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Personal SARS-COV-2 vaccination experiences


JennyD

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1 hour ago, MommytoFour said:

My husband and I both had our first dose (Pfizer) last Friday. Twenty minutes after getting the vaccine, the left side of my face was tingly ... sort of like how it feels when you get numbed at the dentist. It was the entire left side from by eye to my chin. It lasted for an hour, and came back periodically over the next several hours before disappearing altogether.

I didn't have any other side effects (not even a sore arm). My husband had no effects.

I would ask your doctor about your reaction. Could that kind of numbing/paralysis feeling be linked with Guilaine Barre syndrome?  It seems the the shot affected your nervous system.
I’m glad it went away for you.

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Just now, matrips said:

I would ask your doctor about your reaction. Could that kind of numbing/paralysis feeling be linked with Guilaine Barre syndrome?  It seems the the shot affected your nervous system.
I’m glad it went away for you.

I have a friend who got the vaccine the same day as I did, and had the same reaction. I asked the doctor about it and apparently it's not a common reaction, but not that uncommon either. I am hoping it won't be worse for the second dose.

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24 minutes ago, kand said:

I Recall some research showing that taking fever reducers after a vaccine may reduce their efficacy. I wonder if there’s been any more study on that, especially as regards this vaccine.

I’ve had two family members get the vaccine so far. One because he’s a healthcare worker and the other because his friend’s mom is a nurse and she called him in when she had extra shots left in a vial at the end of the day. Both are around 50, and neither had any side effects.

 

Eta: what do you know, there was an article published about this just yesterday: https://www.healthline.com/health-news/should-you-take-pain-relievers-after-covid-19-vaccine#Pain-relievers-and-the-post-vaccine-immune-response

Interestingly the studies say taking them as a preventative before the vaccine can reduce efficacy, but doesn't say anything about taking them for side effects afterwards. Both ds and I are just getting our first dose this week, which apparently isn't bad. Hopefully by the time we get our 2nd shot they'll know more about how/if pain relievers affect it when you take them after. 

Thanks for that link. We won't be taking anything before at least.

 

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My dd has had both doses now.  After the first dose, she had a sore arm and a small "weird" headache that lasted a day.  (Nothing bad though.)  After her second dose, she felt achy all over and shaky, but was still able to go to work.  She had had the vaccine in the evening, and  her symptoms didn't kick in until she woke up the next morning. That lasted all day.  Before bed, she soaked in a hot bath and took some Tylenol and felt so much better.  Then the next day -- today actually, she just has a small lingering headache.  

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I had my first dose this afternoon. As a leftie I always get shots (and blood draws) in my right arm in case it's sore. When the pharmacist came out I pulled up my right sleeve but she said it's processed for the left arm. I think they follow those who get the shot and need to know which arm you get it in. It's a paperwork thing and she sighed and asked if I wanted it in my right arm. I said yes. I was willing to change my appointment as I said in my post last night but that's not an area where I'm flexible unless there's a medical reason. I stood up for my southpaw rights lol.

After I got home I posted on a local website just to let other lefties know to ask in advance if they want it in their right arm. If I had known that it meant more paperwork by asking for my right arm I would have said something up front. I got all kinds of replies from people about which arm they got it in and why. I posted this on the group and am posting it here just to show you guys how we're all being told different things. I think I covered all the things people were told.

Aside from the paperwork issue for my non dominant arm, everything's fine. I'm not feeling any side effects (6 hours since the shot) and my arm is mildly sore.

 

This is typical. Some places say you have to have a medical reason for choosing which arm, some say it's a paperwork hassle, some are giving it in the dominant arm and some the non dominant arm, some ask you which arm you want, and the health department just uses whichever arm you present depending on if you're on the driver or passenger side. Did we really think there'd be any semblance of consistency? 🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣
Truly, I'm glad I was able to get it. I'm glad others have been able to get it. I hope in the coming days more and more people will get vaccinated and that it won't be long before the general population can get it. But I still have to shake my head at all the different protocols people are seeing. It's just so typical of how this has been run all along.
Edited by Lady Florida.
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8 minutes ago, Lady Florida. said:

I had my first dose this afternoon. As a leftie I always get shots (and blood draws) in my right arm in case it's sore. When the pharmacist came out I pulled up my right sleeve but she said it's processed for the left arm. I think they follow those who get the shot and need to know which arm you get it in. It's a paperwork thing and she sighed and asked if I wanted it in my right arm. I said yes. I was willing to change my appointment as I said in my post last night but that's not an area where I'm flexible unless there's a medical reason. I stood up for my southpaw rights lol.

After I got home I posted on a local website just to let other lefties know to ask in advance if they want it in their right arm. If I had known that it meant more paperwork by asking for my right arm I would have said something up front. I got all kinds of replies from people about which arm they got it in and why. I posted this on the group and am posting it here just to show you guys how we're all being told different things. I think I covered all the things people were told.

Aside from the paperwork issue for my non dominant arm, everything's fine. I'm not feeling any side effects (6 hours since the shot) and my arm is mildly sore.

 

This is typical. Some places say you have to have a medical reason for choosing which arm, some say it's a paperwork hassle, some are giving it in the dominant arm and some the non dominant arm, some ask you which arm you want, and the health department just uses whichever arm you present depending on if you're on the driver or passenger side. Did we really think there'd be any semblance of consistency? 🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣
Truly, I'm glad I was able to get it. I'm glad others have been able to get it. I hope in the coming days more and more people will get vaccinated and that it won't be long before the general population can get it. But I still have to shake my head at all the different protocols people are seeing. It's just so typical of how this has been run all along.

This is good to know as I have 3 southpaws. I would insert an eye roll for the "more" paperwork to change arms....lol

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36 minutes ago, Lady Florida. said:

I had my first dose this afternoon. As a leftie I always get shots (and blood draws) in my right arm in case it's sore. When the pharmacist came out I pulled up my right sleeve but she said it's processed for the left arm. I think they follow those who get the shot and need to know which arm you get it in. It's a paperwork thing and she sighed and asked if I wanted it in my right arm. I said yes. I was willing to change my appointment as I said in my post last night but that's not an area where I'm flexible unless there's a medical reason. I stood up for my southpaw rights lol.

After I got home I posted on a local website just to let other lefties know to ask in advance if they want it in their right arm. If I had known that it meant more paperwork by asking for my right arm I would have said something up front. I got all kinds of replies from people about which arm they got it in and why. I posted this on the group and am posting it here just to show you guys how we're all being told different things. I think I covered all the things people were told.

Aside from the paperwork issue for my non dominant arm, everything's fine. I'm not feeling any side effects (6 hours since the shot) and my arm is mildly sore.

 

This is typical. Some places say you have to have a medical reason for choosing which arm, some say it's a paperwork hassle, some are giving it in the dominant arm and some the non dominant arm, some ask you which arm you want, and the health department just uses whichever arm you present depending on if you're on the driver or passenger side. Did we really think there'd be any semblance of consistency? 🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣
Truly, I'm glad I was able to get it. I'm glad others have been able to get it. I hope in the coming days more and more people will get vaccinated and that it won't be long before the general population can get it. But I still have to shake my head at all the different protocols people are seeing. It's just so typical of how this has been run all along.

I was asked which arm I wanted it in. I wanted it in my right because that's my dominant arm and I wanted to use the arm to work the soreness out. The nurse giving my shot didn't act like there were any problems with putting it in the right arm. 

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My dad got the vaccination and then a week later got diagnosed with Covid and then a week after that he died. I am unsure but I think the vaccination actually makes you weaker to the virus the first few days. I also suspect the outside contractors who brought in the shots also maybe at least one of them was a carrier. But I also got vaccinated as did my one of my sisters and my brother. I never had trouble at all and neither did my sister and my brother said he got nauseated after one of them. Oh yeah my husband also got vaccinated and he’s had no side effects. Despite my dad‘s death, I still intend to vaccinate. I do not feel his vaccination likely led to his death, but I don’t really know when I figure out my age I’m at bigger risk from the Covid than I am from the vaccination. However for young people, I don’t know that the vaccination is worth it as the vaccination might be more of a risk than the Covid. Again, I don’t know. So I don’t think the law should be setting down any rules regarding people having to get shots.

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16 minutes ago, Not_a_Number said:

Really? Have people died from the vaccine so far? 

Maybe? But the verdict is still out, and it seems the vast majority are doing well with the vaccine, thus far:

https://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/California-health-care-worker-vaccine-death-COVID-15902997.php

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/health/2021/01/06/death-florida-doctor-following-pfizer-covid-19-vaccine-under-investigation-gregory-michael/6574414002/

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44 minutes ago, iamonlyone said:

Yeah, this is one of those things we may never know except statistically... some people will die after getting a vaccine, because it’s a very large group of people. So then you have to compare rates.

Anyway, I’m pretty sure the number of deaths from the vaccine is orders of magnitude less than from COVID, even for young people. At least, I’d be surprised if that were false.

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8 hours ago, Not_a_Number said:

Yeah, this is one of those things we may never know except statistically... some people will die after getting a vaccine, because it’s a very large group of people. So then you have to compare rates.

Anyway, I’m pretty sure the number of deaths from the vaccine is orders of magnitude less than from COVID, even for young people. At least, I’d be surprised if that were false.

We should consider not only deaths, but also any other effects that are worse than the effects of Covid for the given age group.

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53 minutes ago, SKL said:

We should consider not only deaths, but also any other effects that are worse than the effects of Covid for the given age group.

Which other effects? 

If we're talking about fears of some unknown long term-effects because we don't yet have longitudinal data on the vaccine, it is worth noting that there is much more potential for long-term effects to emerge as we collect more longitudinal data on covid infection. More potential because a viral infection has many more possible mechanisms by which to cause lasting harm than does a vaccine that has successfully passed safety standards in trials. Covid infection would never meet the safety standards of a vaccine trial. Even in young people.

While it is not impossible that the vaccine will turn out to have some kind of unexpected detrimental effects on young people, the probability of the SARS-COV-2 virus having more deleterious effects is much, much higher. 

Worrying more about the vaccine than about the virus is neglecting a large risk to focus instead on a very small risk.

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My mom will be eligible for the vaccine when Maine is in the 65+ phase, which is the next one, whenever that starts. I've been tracking the vaccine doses given in Maine, and today we hit a high of 9,000 vaccines given in a day. At that rate, the whole population of the state could be vaccinated by summer! Very exciting. I don't think the state is banking on that, though... the website says that people under 65 with no underlying conditions won't start getting vaccinated till June. Hopefully we can speed that up a bit! Feeling encouraged right now. @MEmama

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2 hours ago, maize said:

Which other effects? 

If we're talking about fears of some unknown long term-effects because we don't yet have longitudinal data on the vaccine, it is worth noting that there is much more potential for long-term effects to emerge as we collect more longitudinal data on covid infection. More potential because a viral infection has many more possible mechanisms by which to cause lasting harm than does a vaccine that has successfully passed safety standards in trials. Covid infection would never meet the safety standards of a vaccine trial. Even in young people.

Yep. In fact, we KNOW of some long-term effects of COVID for young people. Most of the long haulers are pretty young. 

The "personal COVID experiences" thread has stories about people's relatively young friends dying. No one has reported on people they know personally in their 20s and 30s dying, but there were at least 2 or 3 stories of people's actual friends in their 40s and 50s dying. And there were many, many stories about people with lingering side effects in their 30s, 40s, and 50s. 

The data is there if you care to know. 

 

2 hours ago, maize said:

While it is not impossible that the vaccine will turn out to have some kind of unexpected detrimental effects on young people, the probability of the SARS-COV-2 virus having more deleterious effects is much, much higher. 

Worrying more about the vaccine than about the virus is neglecting a large risk to focus instead on a very small risk.

I've stolen your line about the vaccine being much more thoroughly tested than the disease, by the way 😉 . It's a really good way to put it. 

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9 minutes ago, Not_a_Number said:

 I've stolen your line about the vaccine being much more thoroughly tested than the disease, by the way 😉 . It's a really good way to put it. 

Except that's completely false when it comes to kids.  The vax has not been tested on kids at all.  The virus has been spread among kids for over a year, and the vast majority have very mild symptoms or none at all.

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4 minutes ago, SKL said:

Except that's completely false when it comes to kids.  The vax has not been tested on kids at all.  The virus has been spread among kids for over a year, and the vast majority have very mild symptoms or none at all.

The vaccine won't be publicly available to kids until it has been tested on kids.

SARS-COV-2 infection has shown enough negative side effects in kids (up to and including death) that it wouldn't pass safety protocols for a vaccine.

Any vaccine that becomes publicly available for kids will have a better safety profile than the virus. If its effects were as bad as those of the virus it wouldn't be approved.

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4 minutes ago, maize said:

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, about 1.3% of known covid infections in children result in hospitalization. No vaccine would ever be approved that put more than one out of every 100 recipients in the hospital.

https://www.aappublications.org/news/2020/12/29/covid-2million-children-122920

Screenshot_20210129-114053.png

I dunno, more than 1% of all the kids I personally know well have been hospitalized as a result of vaccine reactions, unless various parents and siblings are liars.

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17 minutes ago, maize said:

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, about 1.3% of known covid infections in children result in hospitalization. No vaccine would ever be approved that put more than one out of every 100 recipients in the hospital.

https://www.aappublications.org/news/2020/12/29/covid-2million-children-122920

Screenshot_20210129-114053.png

One of the things that gets obscured when we discuss death rates is the rate of serious illness. For example, the percent of people who get hospitalized for each age group is MUCH more evenly distributed than the percent of people who die. 

If I remember correctly, on average, about 3% of people who get COVID get hospitalized. As we can see, the percent of kids who get hospitalized is still not that much lower than that. It's just that younger people are MUCH less likely to die. But we really have no idea what long-term effects of COVID are. Certainly, the long-term effect of COVID that's serious enough to result in hospitalization might be pretty bad. 

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16 minutes ago, SKL said:

I dunno, more than 1% of all the kids I personally know well have been hospitalized as a result of vaccine reactions, unless various parents and siblings are liars.

Interesting. That's not the case for me. 

But also, that's the wrong statistic. You'd have to do the number of people hospitalized per vaccination, not per kid. If a kid gets 10 shots, and 1% of people get hospitalized for each shot, then about 1 in 10 kids or so would get hospitalized at some point. 

Edited by Not_a_Number
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1 minute ago, Not_a_Number said:

Interesting. That's not the case for me. 

But also, that's the wrong statistic. You'd have to do the number of people hospitalized per vaccination, not per kid. If a kid gets 10 shots, and 1% of people get hospitalized for each shot, then about 1 in 10 kids or so would get hospitalized for each shot. 

It depends on why they had a reaction.  If an individual is sensitive to vaxes, that would be true of more than one vax.  That's why people whose kids have had serious reactions are advised not to vaccinate their kids further.

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Point is, we should really stop insisting the vax is safe for groups it hasn't been tested on.

They said thalidomide was safe.

I don't see the need to use anything other than scientific info to advise parents on getting their kids vaxed.  I mean where are all the people who always insist on science over fear?  The fact is that most kids are not in serious danger from Covid, so let's be patient and see how the vax testing goes.

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34 minutes ago, SKL said:

Point is, we should really stop insisting the vax is safe for groups it hasn't been tested on.

They said thalidomide was safe.

I don't see the need to use anything other than scientific info to advise parents on getting their kids vaxed.  I mean where are all the people who always insist on science over fear?  The fact is that most kids are not in serious danger from Covid, so let's be patient and see how the vax testing goes.

.... did anyone suggest we vaccinate kids right now? The point is that no one will recommend it until the trials are run.

 

40 minutes ago, SKL said:

It depends on why they had a reaction.  If an individual is sensitive to vaxes, that would be true of more than one vax.  That's why people whose kids have had serious reactions are advised not to vaccinate their kids further.

Either way, it’s the wrong statistic. If 1% of people getting each vaccine had a bad reaction (I don’t think that’s the case, but assuming), you’d know more than 1% of people with a bad reaction.

I do understand your point, though.

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1 hour ago, SKL said:

I dunno, more than 1% of all the kids I personally know well have been hospitalized as a result of vaccine reactions, unless various parents and siblings are liars.

In this post you make anecdotal claims.

41 minutes ago, SKL said:

Point is, we should really stop insisting the vax is safe for groups it hasn't been tested on.

They said thalidomide was safe.

I don't see the need to use anything other than scientific info to advise parents on getting their kids vaxed.  I mean where are all the people who always insist on science over fear?  The fact is that most kids are not in serious danger from Covid, so let's be patient and see how the vax testing goes.

And in this one say we should only rely on scientific data.

 

Let's go with the scientific data, as we all know anecdote is not a reliable source of medical advice. 

Scientific data for common childhood vaccines report a MUCH lower rate for serious adverse reactions than 1%. For example:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11144371/

With regard to vaccination for SARS-COV-2, I haven't seen anyone recommend parents get their kids vaccinated before the vaccine is tested. That isn't even possible, no-one will administer the vaccine to children in the general public before it is tested.

The vaccine WILL NOT pass testing and be made available to children if it results in severe reactions during trials at anything close to the rate that SARS-COV-2 infection results in severe reactions in children.

We can be confident when the vaccine is made available for children that it has proven less hazardous than covid.

 

 

Edited by maize
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My parents were supposed to get their second dose today, but they made their appointment one day too early by accident and couldn't get it.  They are probably going to be trying again next week.  

My middle sister is the one helping them get their appointments.  It is not very easy here.  Some people get their appointment for their second shot at the same appointment where they have their first shot, but some people don't.  My parents did not so they are back on the Internet trying to find a second shot.

In good news all of the elderly people I know personally have an appointment made at this point 🙂 Yay!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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1 hour ago, maize said:

In this post you make anecdotal claims.

And in this one say we should only rely on scientific data.

 

Let's go with the scientific data, as we all know anecdote is not a reliable source of medical advice. 

Scientific data for common childhood vaccines report a MUCH lower rate for serious adverse reactions than 1%. For example:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11144371/

With regard to vaccination for SARS-COV-2, I haven't seen anyone recommend parents get their kids vaccinated before the vaccine is tested. That isn't even possible, no-one will administer the vaccine to children in the general public before it is tested.

The vaccine WILL NOT pass testing and be made available to children if it results in severe reactions during trials at anything close to the rate that SARS-COV-2 infection results in severe reactions in children.

We can be confident when the vaccine is made available for children that it has proven less hazardous than covid.

1) Anecdotes are not science, but the fact is that many reactions are not reported to the official databases.  So the truth is really somewhere in between.

2) I hope you are right that they won't bring the vax to market (for kids) if it has worse side effects than Covid, but I have my doubts.  The chickenpox vax is not only available, schools require it for entry into KG, even though chickenpox is a mild disease in kids under 10.  The fact that (despite documented side effects) it's forced on kids, for a pretty mild illness, makes me wonder about what policy will be applied to a Covid vax.  I've already seen some headlines suggesting Covid vax mandates for school attendance.  I just don't feel a lot of scientific objectivity on that topic.

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19 minutes ago, SKL said:

I don't see the need to use anything other than scientific info to advise parents on getting their kids vaxed.  I mean where are all the people who always insist on science over fear?  The fact is that most kids are not in serious danger from Covid, so let's be patient and see how the vax testing goes.

A vaccine that resulted in hospitalization for even 1 out of every 1000 children who received it, let alone 1 in 100, would never be approved, so by definition any vaccine that is approved for children will be safer than the disease itself. 

The chart below shows all the VAERS reports on reactions in children, ages 0 to 18, that resulted in hospitalization, from 1990 through 2020. The average number of hospitalizations is 535 per year.

I couldn't find an exact number for total vaccines per year for ages 0-18, so I estimated based on the CDC vaccine schedule and population figures for ages 0-18. I also used a vaccination rate of only 75%, which is actually lower than the CDC estimate, and I did not count flu shots.

That works out to an average hospitalization rate of around 1 in 170,000 immunizations in children. In 2019 it was 1 in 220,000. Even if the rate of severe reactions to the covid vaccine was 10 times higher than for the vaccines currently in use, it would still be safer than actually catching the disease.

Screen Shot 2021-01-29 at 11.40.04 AM.png

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26 minutes ago, Corraleno said:

A vaccine that resulted in hospitalization for even 1 out of every 1000 children who received it, let alone 1 in 100, would never be approved, so by definition any vaccine that is approved for children will be safer than the disease itself. 

The chart below shows all the VAERS reports on reactions in children, ages 0 to 18, that resulted in hospitalization, from 1990 through 2020. The average number of hospitalizations is 535 per year.

I couldn't find an exact number for total vaccines per year for ages 0-18, so I estimated based on the CDC vaccine schedule and population figures for ages 0-18. I also used a vaccination rate of only 75%, which is actually lower than the CDC estimate, and I did not count flu shots.

That works out to an average hospitalization rate of around 1 in 170,000 immunizations in children. In 2019 it was 1 in 220,000. Even if the rate of severe reactions to the covid vaccine was 10 times higher than for the vaccines currently in use, it would still be safer than actually catching the disease.

Screen Shot 2021-01-29 at 11.40.04 AM.png

Well this is off topic, but if a kid gets 7 vaxes at once and gets a reaction, is it actually only 1/7 of a reaction because it was 7 vaccines?

Again, I just hope all that nice language above, about them never bringing it to market if it's not less benign in kids than Covid, is correct.  We'll see.

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5 hours ago, Kanin said:

... today we hit a high of 9,000 vaccines given in a day. At that rate, the whole population of the state could be vaccinated by summer! 

I didn't check your math, but did it account for needing two shots?

3 hours ago, maize said:

 

Screenshot_20210129-114053.png

Just a caveat on these statistics:  Since many places wouldn't test kids for Covid for the first half or more of 2020 (and there are some places that still won't), the "known cases" (denominator) is likely much smaller than it would otherwise be. So, the percentage of hospitalized children (vs. infected) is probably lower than 0.5%. But the point you make is still valid.

I understand @SKL's mindset, though. The idea that it will be required that one receive any vaccine in order to fly on an airplane or keep one's job (this has been discussed in theory for a small handful of jobs) is anathema to many people. One is required to receive certain vaccinations to attend schools now and some chafe at that requirement. Adding another to that list--perhaps within the coming year--especially one that is so new, is definitely going to cause unrest in certain crowds (especially homeschooling crowds).

Edited by RootAnn
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4 minutes ago, SKL said:

Well this is off topic, but if a kid gets 7 vaxes at once and gets a reaction, is it actually only 1/7 of a reaction because it was 7 vaccines?

Again, I just hope all that nice language above, about them never bringing it to market if it's not less benign in kids than Covid, is correct.  We'll see.

I’d count a single shot as one instance, for obvious reasons. So one would probably could count it as 7 reactions to be safe. But most kids do get lots of shots in their lives.

We’ll see the data about the kids in the trials, I’m sure. And yes, there’s no way that a 1.3% hospitalization rate vaccine would move past all the phases. It just wouldn’t happen. 

Edited by Not_a_Number
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57 minutes ago, RootAnn said:

The idea that it will be required that one receive any vaccine in order to fly on an airplane or keep one's job (this has been discussed in theory for a small handful of jobs) is anathema to many people.

Yeah, I can see why people don't want this, but I also understand why companies will want it!! They don't want to host an outbreak. It's expensive for them. 

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1 hour ago, RootAnn said:

I didn't check your math, but did it account for needing two shots?

4 hours ago, maize said:

No, I didn't!  Waaaah. 😪  Our state CDC director said yesterday that we're only getting 20,000 doses each week for the next 3 weeks. That'll get us to 40% of people over 70 vaccinated. Progress, but not super fast progress.

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I know three people who got itchy blotches on their arms about 8-10 days after getting the Moderna vaccine. I looked it up because I was wondering how common it is and it's not super common, but becoming more known. Nothing serious, but a weird one more than a week out from the vaccine!

 

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/heal-the-mind-heal-the-body/202101/what-s-the-new-phenomenon-called-covid-vaccine-arm

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Got my first Moderna shot today. I am tired and my arm is sore, but that is it. 

I feel really, really, really, really lucky I got an appointment. I cried after I got my shot because I was so relieved.

It sounds like Texas is supposed to get about a half a million doses next week. I am hoping I can get an appt for DH and/or his grandpa. The drive to the Alamodome is too much for grandpa, so I hope we can get something local for him asap. 

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Ds got his at work today - he works in a long term care facility. He got the Pfizer and the one I got Thursday is Moderna. I had a sore arm from Thursday night (got the shot around noon) until last night and now it's fine. Ds said his arm doesn't hurt. 

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2 hours ago, AmandaVT said:

I know three people who got itchy blotches on their arms about 8-10 days after getting the Moderna vaccine. I looked it up because I was wondering how common it is and it's not super common, but becoming more known. Nothing serious, but a weird one more than a week out from the vaccine!

 

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/heal-the-mind-heal-the-body/202101/what-s-the-new-phenomenon-called-covid-vaccine-arm

Was just coming to post this.  My mom is in about this timeframe and this appeared a day or two ago on her arm.

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On 1/29/2021 at 4:17 PM, SKL said:

 

2) I hope you are right that they won't bring the vax to market (for kids) if it has worse side effects than Covid, but I have my doubts.  The chickenpox vax is not only available, schools require it for entry into KG, even though chickenpox is a mild disease in kids under 10.  The fact that (despite documented side effects) it's forced on kids, for a pretty mild illness, makes me wonder about what policy will be applied to a Covid vax.  I've already seen some headlines suggesting Covid vax mandates for school attendance.  I just don't feel a lot of scientific objectivity on that topic.

A mild illness for most.  A non-trivial proportion get very sick, and some of those die.

Canadian hospitalizations for chickenpox have decreased 10-fold from the pre-varicella-vaccine era to the publicly-funded-varicella vaccine era, from 1500 per year to just over 100 per year.  Hospitalizations and deaths have decreased by similar proportions in the US, "Since 1996, when the varicella vaccination program was implemented, hospitalizations and deaths from varicella have declined in the United States 93% and 94%, respectively."

I started my medical training in the years before the varicella vaccine was licensed here.  I've seen chickenpox-associated necrotizing fasciitis.  I am so glad that I will likely never see another case again.  Nor will I ever likely see a case of chicken-pox encephalitis, or chicken-pox pneumonia.

The societal costs of pre-vaccine varicella were also non-trivial, " The total medical and societal costs of varicella in Canada were estimated in a multicentre study to be $122.4 million yearly or $353.00 per individual case. Eighty-one percent of this amount went toward personal expenses and productivity costs, 9% toward the cost of ambulatory medical care and 10% toward hospital-based medical care".

Not to mention the stress faced by non-immune women who worked with children - congential varicella sysdrome is tragic.  And we just don't see it anymore.

Covid vaccines won't be approved for children until the data show that they are safe.  But, knowing what we do about vaccines, and what we know about covid outcomes for children right now, if I could ethically source doses for my 11 and 13-year-olds right now (which I obviously can't, so moot point) I would get them vaccinated.  Because I think the risk of covid between now and when vaccines are approved for children is greater than the potential risks of the vaccine.

 

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2 hours ago, AmandaVT said:

I know three people who got itchy blotches on their arms about 8-10 days after getting the Moderna vaccine. I looked it up because I was wondering how common it is and it's not super common, but becoming more known. Nothing serious, but a weird one more than a week out from the vaccine!

 

 

37 minutes ago, AbcdeDooDah said:

Was just coming to post this.  My mom is in about this timeframe and this appeared a day or two ago on her arm.

I'll keep this in mind if I see a rash on my arm in the next week or so. 

1 hour ago, MissLemon said:

I feel really, really, really, really lucky I got an appointment. I cried after I got my shot because I was so relieved.

 

Same here. I didn't cry after my shot but I feel so lucky to have managed to get an appointment. The system used here in Florida was a wild west free for all. They're finally making some changes but I kept getting up at the crack of dawn and getting online only to see all appointments booked practically as soon as it went live. When I got my appointment I was just about ready to give up. I was shocked to realize I actually got in and maybe I did get a bit teary at that time.

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I got my 2nd Moderna dose Friday morning.  My experience: 

Exhausted. Saturday I slept ALL day. I literally could not stay awake for more than 2 hours. And I wasn’t just laying down, I slept hard all day long.
My arm felt like a balloon - tight, warm, and very sore to the touch. I couldn’t lay on that side or wear sleeves that brushed against the injection site.
I had the same headache as after the first shot, kinda relentless.
BUT I woke up today, Sunday, pretty much like myself. No headache. Very minor arm soreness. I’m doing laundry and regular Sunday chores.

I’m not sure what will happen next, but I am incredibly grateful to be among the very few in Texas who are fully vaccinated. Immensely grateful. 

 

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Oh yeah, I just talked to my MIL about her 1st shot experience. It sounds like she basically didn't have any side effects at all. It's lucky for her, since she's a super anxious person and would have probably freaked out if she had. 

Edited by Not_a_Number
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My mom (90) had the Pfizer yesterday, no side effects except for the sore arm.  I had the Pfizer last week, and I didn't have a reaction except for the sore arm at the time.  

The last few days, however, my blood sugar has been sky high (diabetic) and I had to call in about it.  I was supposed to have been told to "monitor blood sugar carefully in the days following vaccination."  

I wasn't warned about this, but it's coming down now, just being very vigilant and staying hydrated per doctor's advice.

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On 1/31/2021 at 12:03 AM, MissLemon said:

Got my first Moderna shot today. I am tired and my arm is sore, but that is it. 

I feel really, really, really, really lucky I got an appointment. I cried after I got my shot because I was so relieved.

It sounds like Texas is supposed to get about a half a million doses next week. I am hoping I can get an appt for DH and/or his grandpa. The drive to the Alamodome is too much for grandpa, so I hope we can get something local for him asap. 

I cried after my dd (a health care worker) got her first vaccine ~ first one in our family.  (By now, she's already had her second one as well.)  I think my tears were more in awe of the scientists who were able to pull this off in less than a year...  It's truly incredible!  (Of course, I am very relieved too!)

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3 hours ago, readinmom said:

My mom (90) had the Pfizer yesterday, no side effects except for the sore arm.  I had the Pfizer last week, and I didn't have a reaction except for the sore arm at the time.  

The last few days, however, my blood sugar has been sky high (diabetic) and I had to call in about it.  I was supposed to have been told to "monitor blood sugar carefully in the days following vaccination."  

I wasn't warned about this, but it's coming down now, just being very vigilant and staying hydrated per doctor's advice.

My mom is diabetic and her primary care doctor warned her to get the Moderna rather than Pfizer.  Mom didn't have any real control over which one but when she showed up was glad to find out it was Moderna.

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I had my second Pfizer dose today.  33 days after my first dose - we've had shortages.

I got a weird taste in my mouth about 5 min after both doses, and a bit of a sore arm after the first.  So far, so good after dose 2.

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On 2/1/2021 at 3:49 PM, JanOH said:

My mom is diabetic and her primary care doctor warned her to get the Moderna rather than Pfizer.  Mom didn't have any real control over which one but when she showed up was glad to find out it was Moderna.

Did the doc give an explanation? 

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