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Personal SARS-COV-2 vaccination experiences


JennyD

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13 minutes ago, popmom said:

Dd got her first shot early this morning. I just checked in with her. She said her arm feels horrible. It’s swollen, very sore, and she can barely move it. 

I wonder what causes the different reactions? Does she know which one she got? Moderna/Pfizer?

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10 minutes ago, RootAnn said:

I wonder what causes the different reactions? Does she know which one she got? Moderna/Pfizer?

It might very well be a "different people react differently" kind of thing. Same goes for most vaccines, really, although this one does seem to have a relatively high rate of unpleasant (if not dangerous) side effects. 

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9 minutes ago, RootAnn said:

I wonder what causes the different reactions? Does she know which one she got? Moderna/Pfizer?

She is wondering the same thing because her boyfriend (military) just got his a couple of days ago and he had nothing. She got the Moderna. She’s going to ask her bf to find out which one he got.

To update...I just got off the phone with her. I don’t think she has much actual swelling—She reports the orange under the skin feeling. And she’s just keeping that arm tucked into her chest because it hurts so much to move it. I told her to take ibuprofen. Oh—another interesting thing—she said she bled like crazy. That the nurse kept telling her “don’t look at it!” lol 

 

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Just had my 2nd Pfizer vaccine. So far a sore arm only, but again only as sore as a flu shot, and the thing that’s weird is, unlike a flu shot the soreness seems to come and go a bit. Feel fine otherwise I think, although have had a slight headache which may be related or maybe not. I did have a further delayed reaction to the first one after about 4 days so wondering if that will happen again.

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9 minutes ago, Not_a_Number said:

It might very well be a "different people react differently" kind of thing. Same goes for most vaccines, really, although this one does seem to have a relatively high rate of unpleasant (if not dangerous) side effects. 

My mom got the pneumonia vaccine recently and it was terrible—worse than the typhoid shot. She did really swell up, turned red, and it spread up over her shoulder. She also slept for about 24 hours the day after. She ended up going to the dr to make sure she didn’t have cellulitis. It was not infection. He said it was the worst reaction to that shot he’d ever seen. Just bad luck. So yeah it’s varies from person to person with all kinds of vaccines. 

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4 minutes ago, Not_a_Number said:

What reaction did you have? 

I’m curious, too. My dd said other students she talked to reported feeling very cold a few days after. I’m not sure if she meant chills or what. 

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14 minutes ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

I can't say for sure about the Covid vaccine, of course, but dh was told to move the arm that got the shot as much as he could.  It makes the pain go away sooner.  I've been told that about other vaccines and have always made sure to move my arm in circles etc. 

You’re right—I have heard this, too. Thank you. I will text my daughter.

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FWIW, I got the flu shot earlier at a pharmacy, and the pharmacist accidentally injected it into my shoulder joint instead of the muscle. I remember thinking he was kind of high on my arm, but whatever. My arm was sore, and then just got progressively more sore for about a week. It hurt to move my arm. I saw my doc who said give it about six weeks to go away, and it did take that long, though some have permanent damage. I figured it out by googling, and you know things aren't good when all the first links are to medical malpractice lawyers, lol. Anyway, I'm fine now (though might not have good flu immunity) and plan to avoid pharmacists for injections if I can from here on out. I would advise anyone whose arm pain lasts more than a couple of days to look into it. It's more common when you are an older woman with little muscle on the upper arm, and also more common if the injector is standing over you while you are sitting.

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3 hours ago, Not_a_Number said:

Well, that certainly does support my hypothesis, lol. She didn't warm up yet! 

It could also be that the shot hadn't warmed up yet.  I have to give myself a weekly injection and it is so much more painful if the shot is cold.  I was told to let it warm up for at least an hour, but in my experience it needs to warm up longer than that.  I usually let it warm up for 24 hours (which is safe for my medicine according to manufacturer guidelines).  

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On 1/1/2021 at 11:14 AM, Big Buckin' Longhorn said:

I got the Moderna vaccine the morning of Dec 30th at work.  I am a social worker in homeless services at a VA clinic.
The shot was uneventful. No pain or burning. My annual flu shot usually hurts during the initial stick and burns as it’s being administered. No symptoms for the rest of the work day. Developed a pretty relentless headache that night and it continued off and on throughout the next day. I took ibuprofen, which helped, but the second it wore off, the headache was back.  
The next day, Dec 31st, I worked but was extremely fatigued and ended up falling asleep around 8 PM instead of staying awake for NYE, which is very unusual for me. None of this has been debilitating or life altering, just noticeable.
Today is Jan 1st. I feel fine. I think I’m back to normal, but it’s the weekend and I wouldn’t be doing much anyway. I fully plan to get my next dose at 28 days, but will probably take the next day or two off just in case I have a more pronounced reaction. 

Quoting myself to add a new development.

On Sunday , Jan 10th, eleven days after receiving my first vaccine, I developed a big, red, raised hive (?) around the injection site. It’s about 4 inches in diameter and very warm to the touch. On Monday I went to see a nurse in occupational health and she didn’t seem  overly concerned. She drew a circle around it with a sharpie and took a picture of it. Told me to come see her daily. She said I could take Benadryl, but it makes me too sleepy for work. I already take Zyrtec daily because we’re in cedar season. It’s slightly smaller and less intensely red, but still there. 

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7 hours ago, popmom said:

She is wondering the same thing because her boyfriend (military) just got his a couple of days ago and he had nothing. She got the Moderna. She’s going to ask her bf to find out which one he got.

To update...I just got off the phone with her. I don’t think she has much actual swelling—She reports the orange under the skin feeling. And she’s just keeping that arm tucked into her chest because it hurts so much to move it. I told her to take ibuprofen. Oh—another interesting thing—she said she bled like crazy. That the nurse kept telling her “don’t look at it!” lol 

 

IME and that of some family members who’ve had to receive regular injections, having a very firm muscle - like super well toned, or tensed up for some reason - can result in more pain and bleeding. I have no idea how it translates to a covid vaccine but I imagine at least part of what your dd is feeling is due to the injection itself rather than (or in addition to) the contents of the syringe. 

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2 hours ago, Big Buckin' Longhorn said:

Quoting myself to add a new development.

On Sunday , Jan 10th, eleven days after receiving my first vaccine, I developed a big, red, raised hive (?) around the injection site. It’s about 4 inches in diameter and very warm to the touch. On Monday I went to see a nurse in occupational health and she didn’t seem  overly concerned. She drew a circle around it with a sharpie and took a picture of it. Told me to come see her daily. She said I could take Benadryl, but it makes me too sleepy for work. I already take Zyrtec daily because we’re in cedar season. It’s slightly smaller and less intensely red, but still there. 

Did she mention whether she’d seen any one else have a delayed reaction like that? I hope it means you have some super strong antibodies brewing!

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5 hours ago, Seasider too said:

Did she mention whether she’d seen any one else have a delayed reaction like that? I hope it means you have some super strong antibodies brewing!

Oh, thanks for asking me this. I forgot to post that part. 

She said she usually sees the “Big Red” the very next day, but I am not the only one who has had a more delayed reaction. She also said that she has seen it come and go. So you can have a Big Red, it goes away, and a few days later another Big Red pops up. As long as I don’t start running a fever. But my clinic has temperature checks every time we enter the building, even if you just forget something in your car, so I never would have made it to her office with a fever. 
It’s worth mentioning that it’s Wednesday morning and my Big Red seems to be completely gone. So there you go! 

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11 hours ago, livetoread said:

FWIW, I got the flu shot earlier at a pharmacy, and the pharmacist accidentally injected it into my shoulder joint instead of the muscle. I remember thinking he was kind of high on my arm, but whatever. My arm was sore, and then just got progressively more sore for about a week. It hurt to move my arm. I saw my doc who said give it about six weeks to go away, and it did take that long, though some have permanent damage. I figured it out by googling, and you know things aren't good when all the first links are to medical malpractice lawyers, lol. Anyway, I'm fine now (though might not have good flu immunity) and plan to avoid pharmacists for injections if I can from here on out. I would advise anyone whose arm pain lasts more than a couple of days to look into it. It's more common when you are an older woman with little muscle on the upper arm, and also more common if the injector is standing over you while you are sitting.

I wonder if that's what happened to my mil this year.  She got her flu shot and within a week couldn't lift her arm at all. She struggled with it for about a month.   She ended up getting a injection of cortizone (maybe ?) to help with the inflamation  and within a few days was fine again.  I'll have to mention it to her.

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16 hours ago, Not_a_Number said:

What reaction did you have? 

About 5 days after the first dose I suddenly developed cold like symptoms- sneezing, congestion - which seemed to come and go weirdly, and I also felt completely exhausted. Lasted about a day and a half and then completely disappeared.

So far with this second dose my sore arm is completely better after just 2 days and I feel fine. I’ll have to see what happens in a couple of days.

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4 hours ago, JanOH said:

I wonder if that's what happened to my mil this year.  She got her flu shot and within a week couldn't lift her arm at all. She struggled with it for about a month.   She ended up getting a injection of cortizone (maybe ?) to help with the inflamation  and within a few days was fine again.  I'll have to mention it to her.

Sounds like it, especially since the steroid helped. It's called Shoulder Injury Related to Vaccine Administration (SIRVA).

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I got my first shot yesterday! My field is the health care industry and there was a drive-through clinic through my county. I was in line for 3 hours, then they made us wait 10-15 minutes after the shot to be sure we didn't have a reaction before driving away. I did see an ambulance come to tend to someone in the waiting area during my 3 hour wait, but it looked like the person was okay.

I felt a little giddy the rest of the day, my main side effect. Just relief. Maybe a bit hyper as well, but it was also the first day we've seen the sun in about 2 weeks so that might have had something to do with it.

I received the Moderna shot. My arm is quite sore, probably as much as with a tetanus shot. I had trouble sleeping last night but again, that is not inconsistent with my situation lately. Probably not due to the shot. My next shot should be around February 9 they said. But when I asked if it will be a clinic like the one I was at she said she wasn't sure, they haven't scheduled anything for February yet. So IDK, I hope they get on that or I'm not sure how I'll get the 2nd shot. 

 

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, OH_Homeschooler said:

I got my first shot yesterday! My field is the health care industry and there was a drive-through clinic through my county. I was in line for 3 hours, then they made us wait 10-15 minutes after the shot to be sure we didn't have a reaction before driving away. I did see an ambulance come to tend to someone in the waiting area during my 3 hour wait, but it looked like the person was okay.

I felt a little giddy the rest of the day, my main side effect. Just relief. Maybe a bit hyper as well, but it was also the first day we've seen the sun in about 2 weeks so that might have had something to do with it.

I received the Moderna shot. My arm is quite sore, probably as much as with a tetanus shot. I had trouble sleeping last night but again, that is not inconsistent with my situation lately. Probably not due to the shot. My next shot should be around February 9 they said. But when I asked if it will be a clinic like the one I was at she said she wasn't sure, they haven't scheduled anything for February yet. So IDK, I hope they get on that or I'm not sure how I'll get the 2nd shot. 

 

 

 

 

I just got called today to make an appointment for my second shot.

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15 hours ago, Big Buckin' Longhorn said:

Quoting myself to add a new development.

On Sunday , Jan 10th, eleven days after receiving my first vaccine, I developed a big, red, raised hive (?) around the injection site. It’s about 4 inches in diameter and very warm to the touch. On Monday I went to see a nurse in occupational health and she didn’t seem  overly concerned. She drew a circle around it with a sharpie and took a picture of it. Told me to come see her daily. She said I could take Benadryl, but it makes me too sleepy for work. I already take Zyrtec daily because we’re in cedar season. It’s slightly smaller and less intensely red, but still there. 

Could it be cellulitis? My son had that same reaction to the second TDAP and we drew a circle around it and it felt hot to the touch. We watched it move down his arm. It was gone within a day. The nurses all said it could be cellulitis and to come in. It turns out 2nd dose reactions are typically mistaken for cellulitis. 
 

Dh had his 2nd shot of Pfizer  yesterday. His arm progressively became more and more sore through the day. He had a bad headache and muscle aches. He took some Advil and went to bed early.

He woke up last night with severe chills but no fever. His hands and feet were cold to the touch. When he had covid he had problems with temperature regulation. He’s still feeling achy and has a headache but 24 hours later it doesn’t seem as bad. He’s working from home today. His coworkers that also got the 2nd shot at the same time have had varied reactions. They are younger but working through it. 

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1 hour ago, OH_Homeschooler said:

I got my first shot yesterday! My field is the health care industry and there was a drive-through clinic through my county. I was in line for 3 hours, then they made us wait 10-15 minutes after the shot to be sure we didn't have a reaction before driving away. I did see an ambulance come to tend to someone in the waiting area during my 3 hour wait, but it looked like the person was okay.

 

I am curious as to how they monitored for reactions in a drive-through clinic.  Did they just have you drive up and then wave you out of the parking lot 10-15 minutes later?  

I don't have to worry about it yet because it looks like it will be a while before I am eligible for a vaccine in my state.  But, I have had a severe allergic reaction to medication before; luckily I was in the hospital with a nurse and DH right there.  The reaction was so sudden and severe I would not have been able to call for help myself.  So, I am watching the allergic reaction guidance closely (and the differences in the NHS and CDC guidance.)

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9 minutes ago, Bootsie said:

I am curious as to how they monitored for reactions in a drive-through clinic.  Did they just have you drive up and then wave you out of the parking lot 10-15 minutes later?  

I don't have to worry about it yet because it looks like it will be a while before I am eligible for a vaccine in my state.  But, I have had a severe allergic reaction to medication before; luckily I was in the hospital with a nurse and DH right there.  The reaction was so sudden and severe I would not have been able to call for help myself.  So, I am watching the allergic reaction guidance closely (and the differences in the NHS and CDC guidance.)

Yes. About 90 minutes into my wait time I received the consent form. It said here that you agreed to wait after the shot. Then when I got the shot, the nurse put a post-it note on my windshield saying what time I could leave. I drove about 50 feet to the exit area and put it in park until it was time to go. The nurse at the exit checked on me and said I was free to leave! 

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My husband got his first Pfizer shot yesterday.  He has a sore arm today but no other real symptoms.  He was very tired last night, but he'd also not gotten a ton of sleep the night before and had had to get up several hours early to get to his vaccination appointment on time, so that may or may not have been related. 

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On 1/12/2021 at 4:04 PM, popmom said:

She is wondering the same thing because her boyfriend (military) just got his a couple of days ago and he had nothing. She got the Moderna. She’s going to ask her bf to find out which one he got.

To update...I just got off the phone with her. I don’t think she has much actual swelling—She reports the orange under the skin feeling. And she’s just keeping that arm tucked into her chest because it hurts so much to move it. I told her to take ibuprofen. Oh—another interesting thing—she said she bled like crazy. That the nurse kept telling her “don’t look at it!” lol 

 

quoting myself to update on my dd. She said today her arm feels much better, but she did have some joint pain--nothing bad--just some stiffness and achiness. 

 

Also, she is now officially quarantined for 2 weeks because one of the students in her cohort tested positive today. 

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Question: Is it possible that young people would have more adverse side effects/reactions because they have a more active (I know there's a better word) immune system? I haven't read the entire thread, and most of the time you can't tell how old someone is in their posts. Just curious if I would be less likely to feel like crap because I'm older--might not have as strong of an immune response?? I'm thinking about the second shot specifically.

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2 hours ago, popmom said:

Question: Is it possible that young people would have more adverse side effects/reactions because they have a more active (I know there's a better word) immune system? I haven't read the entire thread, and most of the time you can't tell how old someone is in their posts. Just curious if I would be less likely to feel like crap because I'm older--might not have as strong of an immune response?? I'm thinking about the second shot specifically.

I’m lurking on a forum for MDs who are discussing vaccine experiences. They are noticing that younger people often have stronger reactions than the elderly. Also, people who had Covid who then got vaccinated, often have the stronger reactions right after the first dose. ETA: a strong response is not bad, either.

After getting vaccinated, I plan to have a clean house, my favorite food and hope to finally finish watching Mad Men unless I wind up sleeping.

Also, Johnson & Johnson should be releasing their results soon and that could end up being a one-and-done. Could be two also. Guess we’ll have to wait and see.

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My state opened appointments for ages 70+ today and I was able to get an appointment for my 86-year-old mom. It’s not until early Feb, but I’m feeling really happy and grateful we got her a slot - they were only putting up slots they could guarantee they would have inventory for. 

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3 hours ago, popmom said:

Question: Is it possible that young people would have more adverse side effects/reactions because they have a more active (I know there's a better word) immune system? I haven't read the entire thread, and most of the time you can't tell how old someone is in their posts. Just curious if I would be less likely to feel like crap because I'm older--might not have as strong of an immune response?? I'm thinking about the second shot specifically.

There was something about this in the data but I think it was the other way round - that the older people had more severe reactions.  Will try to check when I have time.

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19 hours ago, Big Buckin' Longhorn said:

Oh, thanks for asking me this. I forgot to post that part. 

She said she usually sees the “Big Red” the very next day, but I am not the only one who has had a more delayed reaction. She also said that she has seen it come and go. So you can have a Big Red, it goes away, and a few days later another Big Red pops up. As long as I don’t start running a fever. But my clinic has temperature checks every time we enter the building, even if you just forget something in your car, so I never would have made it to her office with a fever. 
It’s worth mentioning that it’s Wednesday morning and my Big Red seems to be completely gone. So there you go! 

“Several participants reported injection site reactions after Day 7 that were characterized by erythema, induration, and often pruritis. A review of these events showed that the vast majority of the unsolicited TEAEs categorized as local injection or vaccination site reactions in the second week after immunization were a subset of the solicited local AR with a duration beyond Day 7. Consultation with a dermatopathologist suggested that these were most likely dermal hypersensitivity reactions and were unlikely to represent a long term safety concern.”

looks like this was noticed in the trials in some participants.  Glad you shared it because i won’t be panicking if it happens to any of us.

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13 minutes ago, Ausmumof3 said:

There was something about this in the data but I think it was the other way round - that the older people had more severe reactions.  Will try to check when I have time.

Looks like I was wrong - age didn’t make a difference 

“The overall incidence of unsolicited AEs within 28 days after any IP injection regardless of relationship was comparable in younger adults (18 to < 65 years of age) and older adults (≥ 65 years of age) who received mRNA-1273. As noted in the overall population, the incidence of severe AEs was higher in the mRNA-1273 group compared with the placebo group regardless of age. There was no apparent effect of age on the relative incidence of these AEs by vaccine group.”

 

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18 hours ago, Bootsie said:

I am curious as to how they monitored for reactions in a drive-through clinic.  Did they just have you drive up and then wave you out of the parking lot 10-15 minutes later?  

 

 

My parents were vaccinated yesterday in Brevard County, FL. It was a drive through clinic. They had an appointment slot - were told to come between 2 and 4pm. They got there by 2pm and had their shot at 2:09pm! Then they waited in a designated space for 15 minutes, with a nurse walking up and down in that area giving a thumbs up and seeing if you returned it. If you did, that was your way of saying no reaction, feel fine. If you did not, she'd check on you. 

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2 hours ago, DawnM said:

I will be offered the vaccine in the 2nd round of folks.   

my friend's husband just had a very bad reaction to the vaccine, so I am still hesitant.

Our brain tends to prioritize info about people we know, but logically, the way to look at it is are there more people who have a serious health issue after the vaccine, vs after getting Covid itself? Like, the hospitalization rate for Covid in my state is around 3%. There definitely is not anything NEAR a 3% hospitalization rate for the vaccine. But it is hard to be logical about it when you KNOW the person who had the vaccine reaction and not the people hospitalized for Covid. Hugs. 

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32 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

Our brain tends to prioritize info about people we know, but logically, the way to look at it is are there more people who have a serious health issue after the vaccine, vs after getting Covid itself? Like, the hospitalization rate for Covid in my state is around 3%. There definitely is not anything NEAR a 3% hospitalization rate for the vaccine. But it is hard to be logical about it when you KNOW the person who had the vaccine reaction and not the people hospitalized for Covid. Hugs. 

Yes, but also, that analysis needs to be done based on the individual's specific risk profile.  If, say, 0.5% of otherwise healthy people age 20 have a significant reaction to the vax, how does it compare to the % of otherwise healthy 20yos who have a comparable reaction to Covid?  And also, if the vax immunity doesn't last as long as immunity from actually having Covid, then that would play into the math too ... if you need 3 vaxes to get the same immunity as 1 bout of Covid, then you would need to consider the risk of getting the vax 3x, not once.

Another consideration is that publicly reported info on vax risks may not clearly reflect all the real-people situations.  Like with other vaxes the CDC wants everyone to get, even real risks may be buried in the fine print.  And I'm pretty sure that not all reactions are reported, and those that are aren't reported in real time.  So you may personally know 5 people who had a serious reaction to MMR, while your pediatrician laughs at you for wanting to see the insert.

I could understand people without serious Covid risk postponing the decision on the vax.

Anyway, it's a moot point here.  It will be months, at least, before anyone in my household is eligible to vax.  And once the weather starts getting warm, the risks of Covid will decrease naturally.

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1 hour ago, ktgrok said:

Our brain tends to prioritize info about people we know, but logically, the way to look at it is are there more people who have a serious health issue after the vaccine, vs after getting Covid itself? Like, the hospitalization rate for Covid in my state is around 3%. There definitely is not anything NEAR a 3% hospitalization rate for the vaccine. But it is hard to be logical about it when you KNOW the person who had the vaccine reaction and not the people hospitalized for Covid. Hugs. 

I think the hard thing is also that you’re choosing to get the vaccine. It feels different than COVID, which just “happens.” 

Of course, it’s actually quite likely to happen! So it’s not actually an unfair comparison. But it feels like it is.

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54 minutes ago, SKL said:

If, say, 0.5% of otherwise healthy people age 20 have a significant reaction to the vax, how does it compare to the % of otherwise healthy 20yos who have a comparable reaction to Covid? 

I know a 20 year old who had COVID. She was really sick for a week. Very few vaccine reactions are of that magnitude. When we say “serious vaccine reaction,” we often mean something a lot less severe than even a mild course of the actual disease. It just feels more alarming. 

 

Quote

And also, if the vax immunity doesn't last as long as immunity from actually having Covid, then that would play into the math too ... if you need 3 vaxes to get the same immunity as 1 bout of Covid, then you would need to consider the risk of getting the vax 3x, not once.

Except we don’t know anything of the sort. So let’s not reason from facts we don’t have.

Edited by Not_a_Number
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5 minutes ago, Not_a_Number said:

I know a 20 year old who had COVID. She was really sick for a week. Very few vaccine reactions are of that magnitude. When we say “serious vaccine reaction,” we often mean something a lot less severe than even a mild course of the actual disease. It just feels more alarming. 

 

Except we don’t know anything of the sort. So let’s not reason from facts we don’t have.

I just read that 83 percent of people who have had COVID are immune for five months.

https://www.cnn.com/2021/01/14/health/covid-immunity-antibodies-intl/index.html

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1 hour ago, Not_a_Number said:

I know a 20 year old who had COVID. She was really sick for a week. Very few vaccine reactions are of that magnitude. When we say “serious vaccine reaction,” we often mean something a lot less severe than even a mild course of the actual disease. It just feels more alarming. 

Except we don’t know anything of the sort. So let’s not reason from facts we don’t have.

I know we don't have enough info to make these analyses right now, but that is the kind of info people want, especially if the risk to them from Covid is very small.

You know a 20 year old who had a bad case of Covid.  That's the same thing as the pp saying she knew someone who had a bad reaction to the vax.  It is no more (or less) valid a consideration.

Serious vax reactions that I personally know of have been much more than a short period of discomfort.  I'm talking about almost dying, being too sick to play for 6 months, a lifetime diagnosis of epilepsy ....  Of these, at least one case was never reported to the CDC.

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I had my first Pfizer dose on 12/21 and my second on 1/11. I had soreness at the injection site that came about 12 hours after I received the vax and lasted about a day. Other than that, I had no side effects. I got the vax at 8am in the morning on both days, went about our usual homeschool day, and drank wine and watched TV/read/doomscrolled in the evening like usual. Easy peasy. 

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8 minutes ago, SeaConquest said:

I had my first Pfizer dose on 12/21 and my second on 1/11. I had soreness at the injection site that came about 12 hours after I received the vax and lasted about a day. Other than that, I had no side effects. I got the vax at 8am in the morning on both days, went about our usual homeschool day, and drank wine and watched TV/read/doomscrolled in the evening like usual. Easy peasy. 

Glad you didn’t have an annoying reaction!! Yay for being vaccinated!!

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As I said to a irl friend lately, ,I would assume that people's decisions about whether to get the COVID vaccine should be done in conjunction with their doctor.  A doctor will know your health history including any vaccine reactions in the past.  A doctor will know your comorbidities.  And a doctor (should*) be objective about the vaccine vs. getting COVID.  My doctor wants me to get the COVID vaccine - and I have had bad vaccine reactions in the past to other vaccines. 

*any doctor who dismisses COVID or perpetuates any conspiracy theories would be dumped by me unceremoniously.  This is different than a doctor who thoughtfully considers my health risks. 

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