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Terabith

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About Terabith

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    Roanoke, VA

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  1. Are hot yoga rooms in residences a thing in California?
  2. I just finished getting my elementary license. There was NO instruction in phonics. We were told to encourage guessing, looking at pictures, and context clues. I had a professor in literacy (graduate level) who said, “Most words can’t be sounded out.” She used the example of the sentence, “The kite will fly high.” She said a child could never sound out the word high. I raised my hand and said, “Wouldn’t it be more efficient to teach the child that igh says long I sound?” She was flustered. “But...does it?” The graduate professors don’t know basic phonics. The teachers certainly don’t. I have a dyslexic kid. I don’t have formal OG training but I learned enough to teach her to read well above grade level by age 8. We have the science to know how to teach kids to read but nobody is teaching the teachers let alone the children. It’s criminal. When you have a dyslexic student who doesn’t have phonemic awareness needed to learn phonics, you remediate the phonemic awareness. You don’t need to be able to do all the fancy deletion and changing phonemes. You just need to be solid on blending and segmenting. You work on working memory. That’s why specialized programs like LIPS exist. Most dyslexics won’t need them but some will. Because very few kids are going to have the memory to learn by sight 100,000 words.
  3. Teachers aren’t allowed to teach the way kids learn, even if they know, and most don’t. The district says what you cover every day. It doesn’t matter if the kids aren’t ready for what is on the agenda. It doesn’t matter if they’ve already mastered it.
  4. I student taught in first grade this year. I was appalled at the instruction or lack thereof in reading, handwriting, and math. There was NO handwriting instruction. Very few kids formed letters the correct way. A lot of them held pencils in a fist. But they were demanding huge amounts of completely developmentally inappropriate writing. There was no instruction in reading. We basically just demanded they read. Sometimes books on their level were provided, but most of it was in the basal reader which was the right level for very few kids. They listened to the story read aloud and then choral read it a few times over the week. There was no instruction in phonics. It was utterly ridiculous. We had some kids doing well, but they could have been so much better with a little instruction. And we had many kids who couldn’t read at all but could have been taught with some instruction. A few would have required some one on one, but that certainly isn’t happening. It was so sad to see first graders who pretty much had no hope of catching up because nobody would teach them to read.
  5. CTOPP doesn't have vocabulary. It has phonological processing, some memory, and RAN.
  6. We lived next door to a family where the little girl had TS (and OCD, which I think is often comorbid?). She had difficulty learning to read because her tics made focusing on words difficult. So that might be a contributing factor with you guys, but it sounds like there are significant other issues as well.
  7. New Century Version or NIrV are both around third grade level. Those are the translations with the lowest reading levels.
  8. My dyslexic plans to do ASL, but it's not required for high school graduation here, just college admission. Probably the easiest way to get away the requirement for college is to do community college first and transfer, but I don't know.
  9. Yeah, if she's struggled that much with Barton levels 1-3, I would really question if she has the prerequisite skills for any OG program. Did she pass the Barton screening? She sorta screams like a kid who needs LIPS to me. I'd definitely do the neuropsych, but I'd for sure start with more detailed SLP testing in the meantime.
  10. Dudeling is young enough that I would call Chaddock and ask them what to do. I have a friend who worked there. It’s an amazing place. https://www.chaddock.org/
  11. I have a child who presented somewhat like this, although her working memory is lower and her fluid reasoning higher, but she never took the WPPSI. She has other issues (very high functioning ASD, anxiety) but educationally, it was obvious there were issues by four. She still is basically a puzzle and frankly, the diagnosis that makes most sense is "complex learning disabilities." Memory is definitely her biggest issue. She's 14 now and she's doing fine. Her spelling is pretty terrible, but spellcheck can catch most of her errors. Math is a bit shaky. She's very very smart but may not get a four year college degree; she certainly won't be eligible for the scholarships her sister likely will qualify for. She has read well since about age 8, but she benefitted greatly from Wilson (an Orton Gillingham program for dyslexia). She's making mostly B's in honors classes in public school presently. She has good executive functioning, but her memory is a weird mixture of extremely good for certain things (narratives, facts on high interest topics) and extremely bad for other things (disjointed, decontextualized information she has little interest in - she still isn't solid on when her own birthday is).
  12. I'm not an expert, but I think most eating disorders center on a disordered view of self. This sounds concerning, but eating disorder isn't exactly what it sounds like. OCD sounds like a definite possibility. I would definitely take him to the doctor, and in the meantime, I would keep handing him food. I worried about this possibility in my 15 year old, but her issue is mostly pickiness. She's never eaten in the morning, even as a baby/ toddler. She will drink a big glass of chocolate milk. But she doesn't like any food that is convenient to pack for lunch, and she doesn't like the school lunches, so many days she's not really eating until dinner time. She's an emotional mess, and it's absolutely an issue, and I really haven't figured out a way to address it, but traditional eating disorder therapies wouldn't be appropriate, because her unwillingness to eat is not stemming from self image but from pickiness. (She eats a wide variety of foods, so avoidant/ restrictive isn't really the right term either. She just hates sandwiches/ salads. She likes leftovers, but there's no way to heat them up at school and she doesn't like them cold. So she'll pack some granola bars and some chips, but it's not really FOOD.)
  13. Last time I checked it was all reality shows, but that was a LONG time ago. They haven't shown music videos for over 20 years.
  14. I would call these people. https://jri.org/services/community/strive?fbclid=IwAR3qRsWITwIpdRPOt5bqB2UdxsUxYGATcgTZakrR5jr-4AA5VAvt4sM0uQw There's a "get assistance" button at the top that I would use, and I would tell them everything. Clearly he needs help, but I'm not sure what can be compelled. But if nothing else, these people might talk you through what you can do to keep yourselves and other children safe.
  15. I have a child who presented somewhat like this, although her working memory is lower and her fluid reasoning higher, but she never took the WPPSI. She has other issues (very high functioning ASD, anxiety) but educationally, it was obvious there were issues by four. She still is basically a puzzle and frankly, the diagnosis that makes most sense is "complex learning disabilities." Memory is definitely her biggest issue. She's 14 now and she's doing fine. Her spelling is pretty terrible, but spellcheck can catch most of her errors. Math is a bit shaky. She's very very smart but may not get a four year college degree; she certainly won't be eligible for the scholarships her sister likely will qualify for. She has read well since about age 8, but she benefitted greatly from Wilson (an Orton Gillingham program for dyslexia). She's making mostly B's in honors classes in public school presently. She has good executive functioning, but her memory is a weird mixture of extremely good for certain things (narratives, facts on high interest topics) and extremely bad for other things (disjointed, decontextualized information she has little interest in - she still isn't solid on when her own birthday is).
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