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Bootsie

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About Bootsie

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    Hive Mind Level 4 Worker: Builder Bee

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  • Gender
    Female

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  • Biography
    ds--college sophomore; dd--college graduate
  • Location
    Texas
  • Occupation
    college professor

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  1. I wide scarf can be used in the summer to cover bare arms if she goes into an area with AC and is cool. In cooler time periods it can be worn with a black cardigan to add some color and variation.
  2. I would be very interested in knowing what your daughter (or anyone else) thinks would be a fair and uniform policy. I have been teaching at the collegiate level for over 30 years, and IME the problem has become more difficult to manage in recent years. Very little of the issues I experience come from athletics, although some sports require students to miss class more than others (e.g. baseball players miss many classes during the spring semester) I was teaching a compressed summer course that meet five times this summer. Before the class had started I had heard from at least half of the class that they planned to miss at least one of the class meetings. The reasons ranged from going to their destination wedding (and missing 3 classes) to having surgery to traveling for work to family vacation to job interviews to a project for another class... About a third of the class was planning on missing at least 2 classes--40% of the class meetings. Even doctor's excuses have become problematic. I had a student go to the emergency room before the first exam in a class and was discharged without any treatment; second exam comes along, the student goes to the emergency room again. With scanners and copy machines it is easy for students to produce fake/recycled doctors' excuses.
  3. Personally, I found Southwest Airlines the most difficult airline to fly when I had toddlers. The first people to board take all of the aisle seats; then I was trying to climb over them with the kids. At times there wouldn't be seats together for me and my toddler. I found that they catered more to business travelers who were used to traveling short, frequent distances and were not necessarily young children friendly. This would probably differ depending on what the route you are taking is. It sounds as if you have connecting flights. If so, I would spend some time learning about the connecting airport. Some airports have play places for small children, but they may not be available in each terminal.
  4. We have been in a rental for four years with a basic Whirlpool electric dryer and it works fine.
  5. Even if the 3 year old drinks from a regular cup, take a sippy cup or a cup with lid and straw. Ask the flight attendant to put any drinks in that cup. Trying to balance a baby, a toddler, an drinks during turbulence can be impossible. Be sure to have a change of clothing for yourself in your carry on in case a child spills on you. Are you able to "practice" or talk to the 3 year old about what to expect on the flight?
  6. Wow--as a professor, I would never think of having an assignment due before the first class for a regular undergraduate class. I might email my students and say that they need to make sure that they have particular materials for the first day of class because we will be using them the first day. I taught for many years before students had emails and before there were learning management systems to post assignments for the them. If I could teach then without having them do assignments before the class officially starts, surely I can do it now. This is one of the downsides of how much more "organized" we can be with technology. I think it is causing us to be more frantic and pulled into too many directions than we need to be. There have been a few times that I have contacted students about an assignment before we have met. I once had a Monday class in January that would have been the first class that was cancelled because of an ice storm. The next Monday was MLK holiday. So, it was two weeks into the semester before we were going to actually meet--and we would be way behind the other sections with a coordinated lab if the students did not complete the first assignment. But, in that case the semester had really already started. We also routinely give assignments before a compressed graduate class where we meet just a few class meetings that last all day long; in those instances, however, the students are prepared for readings and case assignments that wi be discussed in the class meeting.
  7. I am sorry that your daughter is in this difficult situation. Does she know what the consequences will be if she remains in the class but has more than 2 absences? Would she be removed from the class? Would she have a class participation grade lowered?
  8. IME it is rare for a college student to be a teetotaler. But I also do not know too many adult, non-college students who are teetotalers. I do know many who only drink occasionally. I think the number of teetotalers will vary greatly across schools depending upon the demographics of the student body. I also think that many of the teetotalers will be fairly quiet about it; they choose not to consume alcohol themselves but do not necessarily advertise the fact and are not concerned about others drinking. Some universities will have dorms or organizations for students who chose to abstain from alcohol if a student is looking to be around like-minded students.
  9. I think it has much more to do with the culture of the specific school being a good match for the personality of the student. Most students who are at a large university went to high schools much smaller than the university and are making some of the same adjustments to overall size/scale. And I know of some students who went to a university about 1/2 the size of their high schools.
  10. A package of outdoor fun activities--bubbles, frisbee, water sprinkler a badmitten, croquet, or bocci ball set BBQ or picnic supplies potted plant and gardening tools for the kids
  11. The experience when you visit any campus is extremely random--depending on the people you run into that particular day, the weather, whether it is summer, etc. You should be able to find SMU's student profile online. I am not familiar with the specifics but it is going to be a school that attracts the GQ-type student--especially more than UTD. SMU definitely has its own personality--some people like it and others are very uncomfortable there. Much of your experience may have had to do with it being summer. If there is some particular reason you are interested in SMU (a particular major, for example) I would give it a second chance. If there isn't anything especially intriguing about it, and if the other schools seemed a good fit, I would pass on considering it any more. Many college campuses are "smoke-free" but that do not enforce a total ban on smoking.
  12. I, too, wish we would end the practice of tipping in the US. In fact, if I were an employer in one of these situations, I would push to end the practice. From an incentive structure it creates an odd situation and a conflict of interest. Who is really the employer? In other situations, if the client were paying the worker extra money, it would be considered a bribe.
  13. I have had a couple of family members who were having memory problems that improved once medications were removed or decreased. Another family member kept forgetting things that she was told or saying things that appeared random in the conversation; she was getting a lot of facts confused. We finally realized it was a hearing problem. She was not forgetting things she was told--she was not hearing them. She would say "yes" or seem to be participating in a conversation but she was missing major parts of what was being said.
  14. DD's first job was in a foreign country and started a couple of months after graduation (she could not apply for the work visa until she had her diploma in hand). She lived with us in the interim; we did not charge her rent for those two months; she covered her other expenses through a combination of savings, working some odd jobs, and selling some of her college items, like dorm fridge. Her employer helped her with some of her relocation expenses and loaned her an apartment deposit/first month's rent. If we had a child who had a good job in a location that was going to require substantial relocation costs and deposits, and the child had a solid budget and career plan then we would make a loan to the child and would probably provide some support in the form of a graduation gift. My undergraduate school made small, low-interest loans to graduating seniors to purchase a suit for interviewing, pay to move, etc. That was in the era of double-digit interest rates. I don't know if they still do that or not. I had a friend who graduated in May and was going to begin a job in September. After a lot of calculations she found the cheapest way to live in the interim (with her family was not an option) was to go backpacking across Europe and stay in hostels!
  15. I know of someone who was able to get a person who wanted to scrap some of the materials from an old house who was willing to remove the house for free for the material value while the original owner maintained ownership of the property.
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