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Personal SARS-COV-2 vaccination experiences


JennyD

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9 hours ago, wathe said:

I had my second Pfizer dose today.  33 days after my first dose - we've had shortages.

I got a weird taste in my mouth about 5 min after both doses, and a bit of a sore arm after the first.  So far, so good after dose 2.

So glad you were finally able to get it!

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9 hours ago, ScoutTN said:

Did the doc give an explanation? 

Her interpretation of what the Dr. Said was that diabetics are being affected with more side effects after Pfizer than Moderna.  

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10 hours ago, kand said:

The Covid vax would have a lot more reason for mandate than the chicken pox one, since the risk to others from Covid is so high. If it turned out vaccination doesn’t decrease transmission at all (so far it appears that it probably does—today’s news is by 56% for the Oxford vax), then requiring vaccines probably doesn’t make sense, but otherwise, it is only fair to teachers and others that people be vaxed. People who don’t want to can choose a different way of schooling if they feel that strongly about it. 

I'm probably going to get flamed for this, but... If you are vaccinated against COVID, then you are protected, even if I am unvaccinated and get COVID, right? The argument I hear from past discussions is that my not being vaccinated is a threat to those who can't be vaccinated due to pre-existing health problems? Can we apply the same criteria to those who can't get vaccinated due to pre-existing conditions that maybe *they* should choose a different way of schooling if they are afraid of getting COVID, rather than saying all children must be vaccinated who are able to be vaccinated? And, sticking my neck WAY out there, while I believe that the threat to children who get COVID is real, I don't believe it is as prevalent as the news and social media is indicating, and we may be having similar issues with the vaccine with inflammation, etc.

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1 hour ago, Martha in GA said:

I'm probably going to get flamed for this, but... If you are vaccinated against COVID, then you are protected, even if I am unvaccinated and get COVID, right? The argument I hear from past discussions is that my not being vaccinated is a threat to those who can't be vaccinated due to pre-existing health problems? Can we apply the same criteria to those who can't get vaccinated due to pre-existing conditions that maybe *they* should choose a different way of schooling if they are afraid of getting COVID, rather than saying all children must be vaccinated who are able to be vaccinated? And, sticking my neck WAY out there, while I believe that the threat to children who get COVID is real, I don't believe it is as prevalent as the news and social media is indicating, and we may be having similar issues with the vaccine with inflammation, etc.

The risks to unvaccinated children are not evenly spread across the population. While children are less at risk of severe complications, those children most likely to have them look like mine. The vaccines appear most likely to prevent severe complications, not infection or transmission or further mutation. All children are entitled to a free and appropriate public education, even those who may not be able to take the vaccine and/or are medically fragile. Federal education law doesn’t operate on ‘majority rules’ principles.

Edited by Sneezyone
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1 hour ago, Martha in GA said:

And, sticking my neck WAY out there, while I believe that the threat to children who get COVID is real, I don't believe it is as prevalent as the news and social media is indicating, and we may be having similar issues with the vaccine with inflammation, etc.

I've been following the COVID news and I don't think we have a good sense of what the risks to children with the virus is. Children seem very unlikely to die and not all that unlikely to be hospitalized, and the fact that there were weird sequelae like the inflammatory syndrome makes me nervous. 

A virus has many more ways to damage your body than a vaccine, which is why I'd be surprised if there were as many possible sequelae with the vaccine. However, I do wish we had more longterm data. I really do. 

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Our state legislature, never an entity to rise to an occasion, is currently very very concerned about theoretical vaccine mandates. 

In the meantime, my county -- the most populous in the state -- has a daily vaccine standby list for leftover doses.  To sign up, you must commit to being able to get to one specific clinic within 30 minutes.  About 11,000 people a day sign up and they give away between 0 and 4 doses.

Obviously at some point we will have to confront the issue of vaccine hesitancy, but I really think public health would be best served by vaccinating the population that does want the vaccine as quickly as possible, then see who/what/where the folks are who have been more skeptical and figure out how best to target those populations.  I have to think that the group of people who 'don't want to get the vaccine first' is a lot larger than the group of people who 'don't want the vaccine at all,"  so presumably hesitancy will decline over time, assuming the vaccines on the market continue to appear to be safe.

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2 hours ago, Martha in GA said:

I'm probably going to get flamed for this, but... If you are vaccinated against COVID, then you are protected, even if I am unvaccinated and get COVID, right? The argument I hear from past discussions is that my not being vaccinated is a threat to those who can't be vaccinated due to pre-existing health problems? Can we apply the same criteria to those who can't get vaccinated due to pre-existing conditions that maybe *they* should choose a different way of schooling if they are afraid of getting COVID, rather than saying all children must be vaccinated who are able to be vaccinated? And, sticking my neck WAY out there, while I believe that the threat to children who get COVID is real, I don't believe it is as prevalent as the news and social media is indicating, and we may be having similar issues with the vaccine with inflammation, etc.

I don’t really understand why people are arguing that the risk to children is small and therefore we should do xy and z. I think we can all agree that the risk to the actual children is pretty small. Why can’t people move on to the real risk of spreading infection among kids, which is who they will spread it to - the chain of infection. It is stunning to me how some people choose to ignore this completely.

Now I’m not arguing for schools to be closed or anything like that, I don’t know what the right answer is, but for goodness sake, those that are concerned are not arguing there is a huge risk for children, but rather the people they come in contact with. That is why some countries have shut schools again. It drives me somewhat bonkers hearing people advocate for things on the grounds that the risk to children is low. We know that. Argue about whether they are going to put vulnerable people at risk or not. That’s what we need to know. For the record I have seen people get really sick, and some die after exposure to Covid via their kids and grandkids. That’s why I would like to see the real issue discussed.

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1 hour ago, JennyD said:

Our state legislature, never an entity to rise to an occasion, is currently very very concerned about theoretical vaccine mandates. 

In the meantime, my county -- the most populous in the state -- has a daily vaccine standby list for leftover doses.  To sign up, you must commit to being able to get to one specific clinic within 30 minutes.  About 11,000 people a day sign up and they give away between 0 and 4 doses.

Obviously at some point we will have to confront the issue of vaccine hesitancy, but I really think public health would be best served by vaccinating the population that does want the vaccine as quickly as possible, then see who/what/where the folks are who have been more skeptical and figure out how best to target those populations.  I have to think that the group of people who 'don't want to get the vaccine first' is a lot larger than the group of people who 'don't want the vaccine at all,"  so presumably hesitancy will decline over time, assuming the vaccines on the market continue to appear to be safe.

Agreed. As time goes on some on the "hesitancy" list will grow less hesitant and some will never be comfortable. Let's not borrow trouble now though.

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1 hour ago, TCB said:

I don’t really understand why people are arguing that the risk to children is small and therefore we should do xy and z. I think we can all agree that the risk to the actual children is pretty small. Why can’t people move on to the real risk of spreading infection among kids, which is who they will spread it to - the chain of infection. It is stunning to me how some people choose to ignore this completely.

My argument was in response to mandatory vaccinations for school-aged children. If there is availability of vaccines for children to be vaccinated, then I am assuming that any adult who would like to be vaccinated will have had that opportunity as well.

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7 hours ago, Martha in GA said:

My argument was in response to mandatory vaccinations for school-aged children. If there is availability of vaccines for children to be vaccinated, then I am assuming that any adult who would like to be vaccinated will have had that opportunity as well.

Children already have mandatory vaccination requirements for school in most states. Why make a big deal about this vax when the principle is already in effect and not likely to change anytime soon? 

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11 hours ago, TCB said:

I don’t really understand why people are arguing that the risk to children is small and therefore we should do xy and z. I think we can all agree that the risk to the actual children is pretty small. Why can’t people move on to the real risk of spreading infection among kids, which is who they will spread it to - the chain of infection. It is stunning to me how some people choose to ignore this completely.

Now I’m not arguing for schools to be closed or anything like that, I don’t know what the right answer is, but for goodness sake, those that are concerned are not arguing there is a huge risk for children, but rather the people they come in contact with. That is why some countries have shut schools again. It drives me somewhat bonkers hearing people advocate for things on the grounds that the risk to children is low. We know that. Argue about whether they are going to put vulnerable people at risk or not. That’s what we need to know. For the record I have seen people get really sick, and some die after exposure to Covid via their kids and grandkids. That’s why I would like to see the real issue discussed.

I would add that allowing children to spread it will also give the virus more opportunity to mutate. We don't need anymore variants.

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Got my second Moderna yesterday morning and I had a garbage night. Low grade fever, body aches, terrible headache, joint pain...basically everything I knew to expect. I tried to hold off on taking Tylenol but finally had to give in around 2am. Never did fall back asleep. The immune system can be quite unpleasant!

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54 minutes ago, sassenach said:

Got my second Moderna yesterday morning and I had a garbage night. Low grade fever, body aches, terrible headache, joint pain...basically everything I knew to expect. I tried to hold off on taking Tylenol but finally had to give in around 2am. Never did fall back asleep. The immune system can be quite unpleasant!

Yay for dose two, boo on the side effects. 

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I got my 2nd Moderna Tuesday morning.  No effects immediately (maybe a touch of nausea? Though I wasn't sure if that was anxiety driven). Arm got sore as the day wore on.  Starting feeling nauseous and tired about 7p and I went to bed and slept all night long. (A few wakings, but went right back to sleep).  Arm was stiff and sore all day Wednesday -- but mostly only when I raised it above my head or noticed it was there. It's slightly stiff today but much better even than yesterday. ETA: No fever. I checked a few times as I felt "off" temp wise.

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Second dose update:  I had it Tuesday (Pfizer).  Arm soreness peaked at about 6-12 hours post.  Muscle ache (back, thighs, calves) from about 12-18h post.  Nausea for a few hours starting about 12 post.  All completely resolved by 24h.  All enough to be uncomfortable, but not enough to impair function.  I could have worked through it, but was glad that I had the day off.

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I got my second Moderna shot on Monday morning (3 days ago). Day of injection - no biggie - just sore injection site. Day after injection - no biggie (maybe some fatigue) until about 4 PM when I started to get mild chills (Is it cold in here, or am I starting to get a fever? Pretty mild.) Took my temp - 100.6. Took some aspirin. An hour later felt fine except for fatigue. Good nights sleep, woke up on feeling perfectly normal. So, all in all, not too bad. Just bad enough to know my immune system is working. 😉 

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My adult son who lives in a group home got his second Pfizer shot Tuesday, along with the other dudes and some staff from his group home.  He was very nauseated, vomiting repeatedly and had the trots Wednesday, to the point where the house protocol was to take him to ER for evaluation, IV hydration if needed. He was not admitted, but sent home after ER doc confirmed what I suspected - just his way of reacting to the second shot.  He is reportedly fine today.  Of the five other dudes he lives with, one had a headache that was much less today, another had a sore arm.  One staff was queasy but not nearly as bad as Joe.   I'd say, be prepared for anything after second shot!

Edited by JFSinIL
still queen of the typos
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2 hours ago, Amethyst said:

I got my second Moderna shot on Monday morning (3 days ago). Day of injection - no biggie - just sore injection site. Day after injection - no biggie (maybe some fatigue) until about 4 PM when I started to get mild chills (Is it cold in here, or am I starting to get a fever? Pretty mild.) Took my temp - 100.6. Took some aspirin. An hour later felt fine except for fatigue. Good nights sleep, woke up on feeling perfectly normal. So, all in all, not too bad. Just bad enough to know my immune system is working. 😉 

Yes.  I think this is the first time I have ever celebrated feeling sick.  Reveling in my myalgia - proof that it's working!

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My MIL got her first vaccine today....no side effects so far. I’m so glad because she’s been so scared of getting Covid and pretty much isolated in her house since March.....it’s a first step of her getting a normal life back in a couple months. 

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Not really a personal experience but I’m going to be helping with a mass vaccination clinic organized by the National Guard next week. I think it might be for 2000+ people, but not sure of all the details yet. So glad so many at risk people in my area will be on their way to being safe!

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I took my mother and stepfather to get their second pfizer doses yesterday at a county board of health place. They were in there over an hour, but they said everything was well organized. They had just sore arms after the first dose, and she says that's all they have this time as well. All my close family (parents, in-laws, grandmother) have now gotten at least one dose, so I'm feeling pretty good about that. Now onto worrying about next round people--my stepmother who's still under 65 but has stage 4 cancer, my husband who's a teacher, etc. etc. 

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I’m not seeing any data that the risk to children of either chicken pox or Covid is high enough to warrant children under 13 yrs old be vaccinated for them at all. And I would and have flat out refused for chicken pox before age 13 and I would for Covid too. 

Adults worried about getting either should be vaccinated. 

What I’m willing to risk for myself and adults is far more likely than what I’m willing to risk doing to children.

Altho at this point it is my understanding that there is not a Covid vaccine for children anyways. 

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4 minutes ago, Murphy101 said:

I’m not seeing any data that the risk to children of either chicken pox or Covid is high enough to warrant children under 13 yrs old be vaccinated for them at all. And I would and have flat out refused for chicken pox before age 13 and I would for Covid too.

Why do you think the risk from the vaccine is higher? We don’t have data that suggests the vaccine is bad for them, either.

 

4 minutes ago, Murphy101 said:

Adults worried about getting either should be vaccinated. 

What I’m willing to risk for myself and adults is far more likely than what I’m willing to risk doing to children.

But you’re willing to let them get COVID. Why do you think it’s more harmless?

 

4 minutes ago, Murphy101 said:

Altho at this point it is my understanding that there is not a Covid vaccine for children anyways. 

It’s likely to be the same vaccines but tweaked. They are testing them now.

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Just now, Not_a_Number said:

Why do you think the risk from the vaccine is higher? We don’t have data that suggests the vaccine is bad for them, either.

Higher than what? Extremely few children have had problems with Covid at all. And even less having long term issues with it. Very few children have medical needs with chicken pox  and most get life long immunity and are less likely to end up with shingles.  So for me, I don’t think those particular  vaccines, safe or not, are necessary.  A year from now, we might know more about Covid that would change my perspective on it.

But you’re willing to let them get COVID. Why do you think it’s more harmless?

Let who get Covid? Children don’t seem to be affect much by Covid.  Adults? I have no issue with adults *choosing* to be vaccinated.  But outside of military or medical workers, I don’t think any employer should be allowed to require a damn thing of employees’ medically.

It’s likely to be the same vaccines but tweaked. They are testing them now.

Okay. Imo we don’t know enough about Covid or the 4 current vaccines to inflict this on still developing children who have none to extremely low risk of danger from Covid.

 

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It may help to know that my perspective on vaccines is not to avoid all illnesses but to avoid devastating illnesses. The common cold sucks but even if there were a vaccine for it, I wouldn’t get it. Partly bc I worry about mutated viruses post vaccine to being worse than the prevaccine form of the virus. 
 

I don’t want my kids to get chicken pox. I remember how miserable I had it. But if they get it, we will have movies and ice cream and copious amounts of itch creams and baths and we’ll get through it.  It’s not the worst thing to ever happen.  Kids in it past puberty? I haul them in for the vax. The majority of medically endangering chicken pox is for people in ir past puberty. So at that point, I think the vax is necessary.

I think the all or nothing view of vaccinations does more to harm the vaccination trust than help it. I’m not anti-vax just because I’m not automatically for every vaccine for every person.

As an aside, I do not think airlines should be allowed to require vaccinations.  What’s next? Can’t get on the subway or public bus without a vaccine record proof? 

But I have no doubt countries will require it. In fact most do already. Since I want to fly out of the country and Dh and I are high risk - both of us and most of my grown children will likely get the Covid vaccine and I plan to keep my proof so I can have it added to my passport. 

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On 1/30/2021 at 10:03 PM, MissLemon said:

Got my first Moderna shot today. I am tired and my arm is sore, but that is it. 

I feel really, really, really, really lucky I got an appointment. I cried after I got my shot because I was so relieved.

It sounds like Texas is supposed to get about a half a million doses next week. I am hoping I can get an appt for DH and/or his grandpa. The drive to the Alamodome is too much for grandpa, so I hope we can get something local for him asap. 

Are you a health care worker or in a high risk group? Forgive me if I should know this, I have a hard time remembering everyone’s individual circumstances. 

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16 hours ago, TCB said:

Not really a personal experience but I’m going to be helping with a mass vaccination clinic organized by the National Guard next week. I think it might be for 2000+ people, but not sure of all the details yet. So glad so many at risk people in my area will be on their way to being safe!

I am so glad our troops are being utilized this way. I imagine there will be folks that have something to say about it, but I see it as a win-win: efficient vaccination process, more people vaccinated, and the service members probably feeling great about the use of their time and skills. 

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We get second Pfizer shot tonight. I'm doing all my weekend chores today so I can be lazy on the sofa if needed tomorrow. (All 4 of us living here get vaccinated because in Oregon, disabled people and those who live with them or care for them are in group 1A for vaccines.) The only symptom we had after the first shot was sore arms, but I am hearing from some other locals that second shot was worse for them.

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1 hour ago, Murphy101 said:

<snip>Very few children have medical needs with chicken pox  and most get life long immunity and are less likely to end up with shingles.<snip>

I don't think that's true. It's certainly not true for shingles in childhood.  Shingles risk in adulthood in vaccinated individuals remains unknown.   From the CDC (bolding mine):

Herpes Zoster in People Who Received Varicella Vaccine

Although herpes zoster has always been uncommon among children, the rate of herpes zoster in U.S. children has been declining since the routine varicella vaccination program started. Varicella vaccine contains live attenuated VZV, which causes latent infection.

  • Children (healthy and immunocompromised) who have been vaccinated against varicella have lower rates of herpes zoster compared to children who had natural infection with varicella. The reason for this is that vaccinated children are less likely to become infected with wild-type VZV, and the risk of reactivation of vaccine-strain VZV appears lower compared with reactivation of wild-type VZV.
  • The number of older adults who have received varicella vaccine since it was licensed in 1995 is quite small. There is very little information on the risk of herpes zoster in people who got varicella vaccine as adults.

CDC continues to study the epidemiology of herpes zoster among adults and children and to monitor the effects of the U.S. varicella and herpes zoster vaccination programs.


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10 minutes ago, wathe said:

 

  • Children (healthy and immunocompromised) who have been vaccinated against varicella have lower rates of herpes zoster compared to children who had natural infection with varicella. The reason for this is that vaccinated children are less likely to become infected with wild-type VZV, and the risk of reactivation of vaccine-strain VZV appears lower compared with reactivation of wild-type VZV.

This confirms what I was told by my doctor when I asked if I needed the shingles vax since I had had chickenpox as a kid — she said that having had the disease actually made me higher risk and I should definitely get the vax.

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1 minute ago, Corraleno said:

This confirms what I was told by my doctor when I asked if I needed the shingles vax since I had had chickenpox as a kid — she said that having had the disease actually made me higher risk and I should definitely get the vax.

That's my understanding, as well.

And totally anecdotally, on of my ds had chicken pox and then had shingles at age 9.  So it certainly didn't protect him.  Younger dd got the chicken pox from his shingles.  I'm glad they both have life long immunity now, which I do see as a bonus, but I am aware that they are more likely to get shingles and will need that vax at some point.

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2 hours ago, Murphy101 said:

Higher than what? Extremely few children have had problems with Covid at all. And even less having long term issues with it. 

... Children don’t seem to be affect much by Covid

In the US, 26,000 children have been hospitalized with covid, and at least 172 have died. We have no idea what the long-term issues may be.

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10 minutes ago, Corraleno said:

In the US, 26,000 children have been hospitalized with covid, and at least 172 have died. We have no idea what the long-term issues may be.

In contrast, there were an average of 90 chicken pox deaths a year in the US  between 1970 and 1994 (i.e. pre-vaccine), about 60% of them in children (interestingly, the deaths shifted from mostly children to mostly adults during the time period studied). https://academic.oup.com/jid/article/182/2/383/2190935

Putting aside the fact that chicken pox not being very dangerous probably wasn't a lot of comfort to the parents of the dozens of children every year who DID die from it, it appears that COVID is substantially more dangerous to kids, even putting aside long term complications.

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28 minutes ago, Corraleno said:

This confirms what I was told by my doctor when I asked if I needed the shingles vax since I had had chickenpox as a kid — she said that having had the disease actually made me higher risk and I should definitely get the vax.

Yes.  Shingles is literally the reactivation of the chickenpox you had as a kid. 

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3 hours ago, Murphy101 said:

Higher than what? Extremely few children have had problems with Covid at all. And even less having long term issues with it. Very few children have medical needs with chicken pox  and most get life long immunity and are less likely to end up with shingles.  So for me, I don’t think those particular  vaccines, safe or not, are necessary.

Do you think those vaccines are riskier than the associated diseases?

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59 minutes ago, Corraleno said:

In the US, 26,000 children have been hospitalized with covid, and at least 172 have died. We have no idea what the long-term issues may be.

That’s no where near what the CDC is reporting.

https://gis.cdc.gov/grasp/COVIDNet/COVID19_5.html
 

49 minutes ago, kokotg said:

In contrast, there were an average of 90 chicken pox deaths a year in the US  between 1970 and 1994 (i.e. pre-vaccine), about 60% of them in children (interestingly, the deaths shifted from mostly children to mostly adults during the time period studied). https://academic.oup.com/jid/article/182/2/383/2190935

Putting aside the fact that chicken pox not being very dangerous probably wasn't a lot of comfort to the parents of the dozens of children every year who DID die from it, it appears that COVID is substantially more dangerous to kids, even putting aside long term complications.

Dozens is just not a high enough number to suggest millions be mandatory vaccinated. At least wrt chicken pox.  

I think we need more data to know for Covid for under 13-15 yrs old. 
 

30 minutes ago, wathe said:

Yes.  Shingles is literally the reactivation of the chickenpox you had as a kid. 

hmm. I’ll have to ask about that bc that’s not the response I was given last I asked a year ago when I got the chicken pox vaccine for a 13 yr old. 

Just now, Not_a_Number said:

Do you think those vaccines are riskier than the associated diseases?

I think chicken pox for kids under puberty is not risky enough to warrant intervention.

Again, I think we need more info about Covid and the vaccine to decide if any massive scale intervention is needed for young children. It’s entirely possible that a year from now I will think there is.  But based on what we currently know, my answer would be to not get this vaccine for my young children at this time. My teens and older? I likely will encourage them to get it. I know for a fact, 4 of them won’t need my encouragement bc they’ve already said they plan to. 

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5 minutes ago, Murphy101 said:

 

Dozens is just not a high enough number to suggest millions be mandatory vaccinated. At least wrt chicken pox.  

 

My point was that you were comparing chicken pox to covid, but covid appears to be significantly more dangerous. Although my tangential point is that the chicken pox vaccine has saved hundreds of American children's lives, and you haven't answered whether you think the vaccine is more dangerous than chicken pox (i.e. do you believe that dozens of children every year die from the chicken pox vaccine?) and, if not, why wouldn't it be worth saving dozens of children every year? 

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9 minutes ago, Murphy101 said:

That’s no where near what the CDC is reporting.

https://gis.cdc.gov/grasp/COVIDNet/COVID19_5.html

That source says right at the top that it includes data from only 14 states "and represents approximately 10% of the population." If you multiply those figures by 10 you get more than 20,000 hospitalized children.

The American Academy of Pediatrics lists more than 2 million diagnosed cases in children, 1.3% of which have been hospitalized. That's 26,000 children.

https://www.aappublications.org/news/2020/12/29/covid-2million-children-122920

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12 minutes ago, kokotg said:

My point was that you were comparing chicken pox to covid, but covid appears to be significantly more dangerous. Although my tangential point is that the chicken pox vaccine has saved hundreds of American children's lives, and you haven't answered whether you think the vaccine is more dangerous than chicken pox (i.e. do you believe that dozens of children every year die from the chicken pox vaccine?) and, if not, why wouldn't it be worth saving dozens of children every year? 

No I wasn’t comparing chicken pox and Covid. I was saying that for ME at this time, I don’t think the health risk to actual children of these two is high enough to warrant mandatory intervention.  I do not believe I actually compared Covid to chicken pox beyond that this is my current view of both of them.

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2 minutes ago, Murphy101 said:

No I wasn’t comparing chicken pox and Covid. I was saying that for ME at this time, I don’t think the health risk to actual children of these two is high enough to warrant mandatory intervention.  I do not believe I actually compared Covid to chicken pox beyond that this is my current view of both of them.

semantics, but I consider saying that you classify both as not dangerous enough to children to warrant a vaccine a comparison. 

At what point is a disease dangerous enough? it's not dozens of deaths per year, and it's not 170+

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16 minutes ago, Corraleno said:

That source says right at the top that it includes data from only 14 states "and represents approximately 10% of the population." If you multiply those figures by 10 you get more than 20,000 hospitalized children.

The American Academy of Pediatrics lists more than 2 million diagnosed cases in children, 1.3% of which have been hospitalized. That's 26,000 children.

https://www.aappublications.org/news/2020/12/29/covid-2million-children-122920

Okay.  Good to know how you got your numbers. Thanks.   I’d be interested in a breakdown of ages and conditions hospitalized. Legally a 17 year old is a child but most of us would recognize that for medical purposes they are more adult than young child.  That’s still a really small number of people.  And I’m not even saying no one should get it. I’m saying that for me, I’m not seeing a compelling reason socially or personally *at the time* to get the Covid vaccine for my 4 yr old.  And I think other parents should be able to make that decision too. 

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4 minutes ago, kokotg said:

semantics, but I consider saying that you classify both as not dangerous enough to children to warrant a vaccine a comparison. 

At what point is a disease dangerous enough? it's not dozens of deaths per year, and it's not 170+

It’s not semantics to me but okay  

idk.  I’m great with masks. I’m great with social distancing. I’m great with sanitizing more. I’m great with overall good stewardship policies. I’m super happy for the vast majority of vaccines. I’m super happy about antibiotics.  But sadly, humans are immortal no matter what we do. My mom died of the common cold bc cancer treatment left her no immune system. Even if we had a vaccine for the common cold, she’d have likely died of something else.  I suspect that out of the entire population, a small but still regrettable number of people will fall into this category for various underlying health reasons. Again. A year from now I may have a better informed viewed about that.  And if I find the data suggests the risk to young children is high enough to warrant intervention - I’ll happily haul my young kids in for the vaccine. 

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