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RootAnn

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About RootAnn

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    * Certified Crazy Lady *

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    Fortress Homeschool

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    Mid-Central US
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    Amateur Mom, Pretend Teacher, Professional Engineer

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  1. The math mammoth lady (maybe?) used to have a worksheet generator at homeschoolmath.net It might not have exactly what you are looking for, though. I usually just Google the topic and "practice" or "worksheet".
  2. IMO, there are a few topics in Alg 2 that are also covered in PreCalc. It makes sense to do an introduction in Alg 2, review, and go deeper in PreCalc. (For the record, DD covered trig (as in sohcahtoa) for the first time in Alg 1. She saw it again in geometry, then covered it deeper in Alg 2 (unit circle, graphing of functions) and used it in PreCalc.) As for TT, I've always seen that to be sure you cover Alg 2 content to do pretty much all of TT PreCalc. However, I've never used it myself so I don't know how accurate that is, especially if they have newer editions of Alg 2 than what my IRL friends used many years ago.
  3. With dd#1, she did Latin 30-45 minutes 4 days/week. I wove in Spanish using Getting Started with Spanish (and eventually, Duolingo) 15-30 minutes/day 3 days per week. I tried a light Latin year when I went heavier on the Spanish, but it didn't work. (Latin suffered & recovery was painful for both of us.) In 8th, I went with online teachers for both Latin & Spanish, so 30-45 minutes of each five days per week (plus some cramming on weekends for Spanish if there was a test coming up). Latin was not outsourced again, but she begged to drop it after 9th grade since it was so similar to Spanish and she was confusing them on tests. She added German in 11th & Russian in 12th, so three languages this year. They have to be done daily, even if only 15 minutes of grammar or vocab drill. Another idea is 15 minutes of immersion (watching the news in that language, or a favorite cartoon, or whatever). You can alternate heavy/light with A/B weeks. A week - 45 minutes of Language 1 + 15 min of Language 2 on M/W/F, 45 min of Language 2 + 15 min on Language 1 on T/Th. B week - 45 minutes of Language 2 + 15 min of Language 1 on M/W/F, 45 min of Language 1 + 15 min on Language 2 on T/Th. One thing I've learned is that you can't do it all. In order to fit in another language in a serious way, you are really giving up one 'slot' in your day. DD made decisions to not do certain things in order to fit in more language study. She would have added another language sooner (and possibly a 4th) had I let her drop my minimum requirements for high school. There are definitely trade-offs. I recommend not picking a second foreign language from the same 'family' even though you gain a lot of time with similarities. It is too easy to confuse them. DD added German because it was enough different from Latin/Spanish. She wasn't ready for a different alphabet yet. If you ever decide to go crazy and add a third language, you can do whatever. DD decided she was ready for another alphabet and now she can 'read' the letters just as if they were English (even if she isn't quite sure how to pronounce them or what they mean). Some kids can really start to see patterns in how to learn a language -- and that is a great linguistic skill. Some kids then want to go into Linguistics as a major in college. Others just want to add more languages. Or both. Good luck!
  4. I used to save far more. Now, I just print the grading sheet. I also try to save graded essays. If it was a science class, I'd try to save graded labs. Sometimes there is a syllabus, sometimes there isn't. If there is, I'd save it. Likewise, if the provider sends out an end-of-course grade sheet with comments about my kid, I save that. (Theoretically, I could use those comments in my counselor letter.) Otherwise, I mostly don't save as much as I used to. Colleges asked for none of it. Like another poster indicated, there are a few which want a graded essay, but my DD#1 didn't apply to any of those.
  5. I have one that is similar (with some differences). The most important thing is to not close any doors for her this early on in high school. I'm hoping to give mine a super-senior year where she can try out college classes without as much stress as going full time would cause. (DE is full cost here. I'm not sure how academically ready she will be before her senior year.) She might start out with classes like Nutrition, Weight-Lifting, etc. that play into her interest in becoming a personal trainer. Then, she can ease into the more academic classes she may need. So, we are leaving the plan open, but covering bases (like standardized test prep) no matter what she decides later.
  6. Re: LToW DD#3 took an online class that taught LTOW1 and built in IEW stylistic techniques (because the teacher used to teach IEW, I guess). DD disliked the LTOW stuff, the IEW stylistic stuff (that we've never done before), and pretty much all the "dumb" stuff she had to do. She liked the teacher & fellow students, but I will agree that the pacing is slow and the results are not awesome. I wouldn't choose this class again. The pre-LTOW class (that is no longer offered by that provider) was fine. I'd take that & move onto something more beneficial. But, honestly, good writing classes are hard to find because each kid needs something different. Re: Elegant Essay I tried teaching this to DD#1 a long time ago. I agree with what you wrote that I quoted above. It absolutely didn't work for my kid or me. Horribly written, IMO. I also didn't like that it was written for a classroom, so I had to adjust for just one student and I. More power to those who can make it work. I hated it with a passion.
  7. The high school board has had this thread for awhile, but as many of us are wrapping up our school year, I thought it would be interesting to share hits & misses. I'll likely add more later, but here are some of mine. Hit: SOTW3 - Once again, history using Story of the World is a hit at our house. I had my ds#1 & ds#2 doing it this year. Some would say ds#1 is too old to use SOTW3 without significant additions/modifications, but it was 'just right'. Both boys consider history one of their favorite subjects. This is ds#1's second time through the cycle & ds#2's first time. Spell to Write & Read - I've lost track of how many years I've used SWR for spelling. I know when I've tried other things (Megawords, Spelling through Dictation), I regret it and always come back to SWR. We don't make nearly the progress the guide tells us we should make and my kids miss a lot of words on each list the first two times through, but usually by the 3rd or 4th year on that list, they've gotten the words down. It is not the easiest program to use. It certainly isn't "fun" as written, but I've learned how to add to it or modify it for each kid. This year, my ds#2 said spelling was fun and one of his favorite subjects. That's crazy talk in my house. The boys have many more years of spelling to go (and I'm glad my DDs are done with SWR because three levels at once is more than I have time for), but I know the kids can come out decent spellers by the end. Miss: Beowulf's Grammar - The boys enjoyed going through grammar with this fun program, but it seemed all over the place in terms of level (sometimes too easy, sometimes too hard). It also didn't have enough spiral reinforcement for my kids who need a LOT of constant review. I was going through some of the weekly review sheets (again) since we are near the end of our school year and they have pretty much completely forgotten the early material, have a grasp of a bit of the middle material, and still remember half of the latest material. Whenever I use a non-spiral program, I feel like a failure at the end of the year because my kids retain nothing. So, it'll be back to a spiral grammar program that isn't as 'fun' (or as cheap) next year.
  8. Maybe yours. And lots of others on here. But I have human children & while I sure hope none ever show up to class drunk, they are not perfect and not all of them are superstars academically (but that doesn't stop me from loving & being proud of them). I also know a couple of families that struggle with getting the academics done (whether because of LDs, health problems, or mental health challenges). I know a few public schoolers whose kids have struggled getting enough of an education to subsist in the US workforce. So, OP, I believe it.
  9. I have a son who is a lefty in baseball (absolutely not forced as we are not sporty people - it is the side he is better with) but right-handed for writing/eating. I have witnessed where the coaches force their sons to bat left even though they are right-handed. Janeway, it will eventually become clear. Just help with proper grip. My sister was likely supposed to be left-handed but my mom forced her to use her right hand. My sister feels upset about this even as an adult.
  10. And to answer the question in the header, Yes, this is one possible helicopter parent activity.
  11. Just saw an article saying 'high quality lavender oil is just as effective for generalized anxiety as some of the usually prescribed stuff like Lorazapam.(another source, another one) Anyone try this & have words of wisdom for or against? Links of specific products? This is for a family member.
  12. Has she already taken Java or Python? FundaFunda has a one semester Python class. They run it in the summer, but I think it is different in the summer??
  13. My DD is doing something kind of like what you are describing but will have graduated already, so I am not including it anywhere. If she would have done it prior to senior year, I would have included it as an extra curricular activity. If he continues with Spanish senior year (which I assume he will?), I would make sure his teacher/tutor adjusts for his higher proficiency level in the fall. I hope he has a great time!
  14. My mother makes a huge deal out of everything. (Apparently, it is very important for your grown children to call their mother on Easter because Easter is all about HER & not God.) So, my family knows I am the opposite. My birthday, Mothers Day, Valentine's Day, etc - No big deal here. I don't expect anything (except perhaps that someone will remind me to call my mom). I'm sorry you were disappointed.
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