Jump to content

Menu

Why do some people think they're photographers? (vent)


mom2scouts
 Share

Recommended Posts

Sorry, but this is a vent because I can't do it anywhere else. I know several people who are professional photographers. One is a Pulitzer Prize winning AP photographer. If you follow sports, news, or politics of any kind, you've seen her amazing work.  One is a University professor who teaches photography. My uncle does all the sports photography for a college and he's really good. Several others do it as a (paying) hobby, but take lots of classes to improve their work. I'm not a photographer, but I have a design background and know about things like composition and lighting.

 

Here's the problem: I have a friend who considers herself a professional photographer. She started a business to sell her services. The problem is that she is a truly horrible photographer. She has no "eye" for photography. Her subjects, lighting, colors, and composition are so bad that sometimes you can't tell the main subject of the photo or are distracted by shadows or lighting. I can get better pictures on my cell phone camera. She has a FB page that would scare away potential clients. She complains that her own family members won't hire her for weddings or senior pictures, but I can't really blame them. She posts her pictures on FB and a private forum and wants us to compliment her pictures. I just can't do it and her work isn't even showing any improvement. Somebody always comments on her "wonderful" pictures. I really want to give her advice, but I guess I should just continue to keep my mouth shut, right?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I vote "mouth shut." I would imagine she doesn't want to hear it no matter how needed. If she's already hanging her shingle as a pro photographer, she has a certain level of confidence in her work - prob not interested in constructive criticism. I think economics will win in this situation. If no one books, she won't make $, and won't be professional for long.

  • Like 16
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Everyone is a photographer these days. Homeschool teens selling photography services abound.

 

We were having yearbook photos taken for co-op (by a mom who is a professional photographer who does good work) and I was helping. An 8th grader said to me "I hate having my picture taken by anyone else. I'm a professional photographer so it drives me nuts when people don't know what they are doing."

  • Like 13
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, keep your mouth shut.  I hear you though.  So many people think photography is just a matter of pointing the camera in the right direction and pushing the button.

 

My daughter has an interest in photography and has a good camera. She has thought about becoming a professional photographer - after taking courses, etc.  She has no illusions that she is good enough to start taking photos for pay.  (She did, though, take a friend's senior photos for fun, which the friend's mother just loves and raved about /end of brag.)  But she has stopped telling people she is interested in photography as a career because of all the stupid comments she gets.  Two I remember:

 

"Who needs professional photographers anymore, now that everyone has a phone?"

 

"Sure, I can see why you'd want to be a photographer - it's so easy!  Just push a button and you're done."

 

Ugh.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would keep my mouth shut.  No one will hire her and she will get the message eventually.

 

My SIL is one of these would-be photographers.  She has a very expensive camera.  This past week the whole family (20 of us) were together and she insisted on her annual "family photo."  We have several copies of 20 people in two rows - one sitting on the couch, one sitting on the floor in front.  All I can see when I look at the pics is the bottoms of peoples shoes and the central focus seems to be the (ugly) artwork above my in-laws sofa.  It is the same thing year after year.

 

And I once belonged to a co-op where every girl over the age of 13 was begging people to pay her for photographer services.  They were charging the same amount as a professional photographer.  It was laughable.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just let her customers decide. Its very common for people to advertise themselves as professionals when they are novices. Landscaping, snow removal, paving, the list goes on...buyer beware.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OP, I think I'd stay quiet re: her work.  She'll get the message soon enough, through other means.

 

Everyone is a photographer these days. Homeschool teens selling photography services abound.

We were having yearbook photos taken for co-op (by a mom who is a professional photographer who does good work) and I was helping. An 8th grader said to me "I hate having my picture taken by anyone else. I'm a professional photographer so it drives me nuts when people don't know what they are doing."

 

I would have laughed.  I think.  :)  That is ... such a kid-thing.  I'd find it irritating, and I think I couldn't help but laugh.

 

Similarly - we met a new homeschool kid recently, also 8th grade, and I was wearing an ammonite necklace.  The kid recognized it and brought up archaeology (no, an ammonite isn't an archaeological piece, but kid didn't know that).  My DS said, "My mom's an archaeologist" (turned SAHM, now, obviously), and the kid said, "I am, too!"  I didn't even know how to respond to that.  It was such a bizarre statement from an 8th grader, and I can only think he was saying he was interested in archaeology.  He's a strange fellow, that one.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My nephew has hung out his shingle with a website. He is 16.  He has been doing photoshoots for friends for several years, just for the experience (building a portfolio), and for whatever they think it is worth. 

 

He relies heavily on his automated features on his camera and doesn't seem very interested learning the fundamentals and experimenting with the range of what various functions of a camera will do and how to work them to achieve various effects. 

 

Dh is very creative and is a good amateur photographer, and by way of encouraging nephew's passion, decided that we were going to have a photography contest on our vacation together.  (Stakes were not high, it was more of a friendly competition in which we all enjoyed being part of the experience.)   It turned out to be a really good experience, and it normalized thinking and planning shots, in a way he had not really experienced before.  (I didn't do too badly with my point and shoot, either.  :-) )

 

While I'd like to be adamant about his learning the basics, I have no doubt that dh's approach was much more beneficial and allowed them to have some good techy conversations.

Edited by Halftime Hope
  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I vote "mouth shut." I would imagine she doesn't want to hear it no matter how needed. If she's already hanging her shingle as a pro photographer, she has a certain level of confidence in her work - prob not interested in constructive criticism. I think economics will win in this situation. If no one books, she won't make $, and won't be professional for long.

Yes to this.  Money talks!

 

I have a couple of friends who are truly gifted at photography.  I think they started off as amateur home photographers and studied to improve their work as they went, but it's obvious that they do indeed have an eye for it.  Some of them do now work as professionals, and their work is truly beautiful.  If I were to pay for professional photography, I'd pay one of them, and when I comment that I love their shots, I'm not just being polite because I really do like their work.  But I think their work speaks for itself, as does your friend's; people will request more of what they like, so I think people will either buy her services or they won't, and she'll hopefully get the message from that.  I wouldn't say anything to your friend though, although I do love the idea of suggesting a class to learn new techniques.

Edited by happypamama
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I suspect it's often a tax write-off.  They want to deduct the camera as a business expense.  Just create a Facebook page and boom, you're in business. You have to try to drum up customers to show you are advertising.  Whatever.  Ignore ignore ignore ignore.

 

Or it's a hobbyist who wants to go into creative work but the bar to entry is so low that competition is fierce. I  once asked in my neighborhood facebook group if anyone was doing minisessions and I got about 14 responses (small town). All women.  Some of the pics they used to advertise were truly bad. # of reviews generally correlated to # of friends.  I read reviews that said things like "Jenny is a fabulous church organist and takes good photos too!"

 

 

OP, I think I'd stay quiet re: her work.  She'll get the message soon enough, through other means.

 

 

I would have laughed.  I think.   :)  That is ... such a kid-thing.  I'd find it irritating, and I think I couldn't help but laugh.

 

Similarly - we met a new homeschool kid recently, also 8th grade, and I was wearing an ammonite necklace.  The kid recognized it and brought up archaeology (no, an ammonite isn't an archaeological piece, but kid didn't know that).  My DS said, "My mom's an archaeologist" (turned SAHM, now, obviously), and the kid said, "I am, too!"  I didn't even know how to respond to that.  It was such a bizarre statement from an 8th grader, and I can only think he was saying he was interested in archaeology.  He's a strange fellow, that one.

 

That's something a little kid would say - maybe that was just a very immature 8th grader?

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Everyone is a photographer these days. Homeschool teens selling photography services abound.

We were having yearbook photos taken for co-op (by a mom who is a professional photographer who does good work) and I was helping. An 8th grader said to me "I hate having my picture taken by anyone else. I'm a professional photographer so it drives me nuts when people don't know what they are doing."

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

 

I can understand a kid saying he wants to be a photographer or that he loves photography, but if he's telling people he's already a "professional photographer," maybe it's time for his parents to have a little chat with him and bring him back to reality, because he sounds ridiculous.

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I suspect it's often a tax write-off.  They want to deduct the camera as a business expense.  Just create a Facebook page and boom, you're in business. You have to try to drum up customers to show you are advertising.  Whatever.  Ignore ignore ignore ignore.

 

Or it's a hobbyist who wants to go into creative work but the bar to entry is so low that competition is fierce. I  once asked in my neighborhood facebook group if anyone was doing minisessions and I got about 14 responses (small town). All women.  Some of the pics they used to advertise were truly bad. # of reviews generally correlated to # of friends.  I read reviews that said things like "Jenny is a fabulous church organist and takes good photos too!"

 

 

 

That's something a little kid would say - maybe that was just a very immature 8th grader?

 

I think so.  It sure caught me by surprise, coming from a kid that age.  :)  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think with the equipment available now and the classes out there, you can become a reasonably skilled photographer these days. And that "professional" is all in the title. There's nothing but getting paid that makes you a "professional." And honestly, that includes for teens.

 

But it sounds like this person is woefully in over her head or deluded. I agree that if it comes up in conversation that casually suggesting that she take a class to learn some new equipment or skills or just get some good feedback would be a kind idea. But I certainly wouldn't bring it up.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think with the equipment available now and the classes out there, you can become a reasonably skilled photographer these days. And that "professional" is all in the title. There's nothing but getting paid that makes you a "professional." And honestly, that includes for teens.

 

But it sounds like this person is woefully in over her head or deluded. I agree that if it comes up in conversation that casually suggesting that she take a class to learn some new equipment or skills or just get some good feedback would be a kind idea. But I certainly wouldn't bring it up.

 

It's certainly easy enough to get high quality photos these days without spending a fortune on camera equipment. But one still needs to know the basics of composition, lighting, etc. It sounds like the OP's friend doesn't have that. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wouldn't say anything.  I think a lot of people do claim to be photographers these days because they can edit themselves, it's a cheap business to start up, and it's fun.  But unless they have a real artistic eye, their photography isn't consistently of professional quality.

 

I am surprised, however, at some photographers who aren't very good and who make a go at it, and actually do get hired, simply because they have made it a business!  Maybe this is more true in smaller towns, but I have certainly seen this.

 

On the other hand, every now and then I have seen someone who just takes random pictures on their iPhone, edits them, and then comes up with pictures that are very beautiful, consistently.  Generally, they have a real artistic eye and could probably become professional photographers if they kept at it.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

On the other hand, every now and then I have seen someone who just takes random pictures on their iPhone, edits them, and then comes up with pictures that are very beautiful, consistently.  Generally, they have a real artistic eye and could probably become professional photographers if they kept at it.

 

Ds is like that. He has no real interest in photography other than wanting photos of certain things/people/pets. He seems to have a natural eye for composition. He and I could take a photo of the same thing, living or non-living, and his is so much better than mine.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's certainly easy enough to get high quality photos these days without spending a fortune on camera equipment. But one still needs to know the basics of composition, lighting, etc. It sounds like the OP's friend doesn't have that. 

 

Yeah and it seems like the problem isn't so much that she doesn't have that, she doesn't think she needs that!  She could learn to get better at it. 

 

Guy at my husband's work did our family photos.  We were among many he practiced on.  We got some decent photos for next to no money (we just paid to print them out).  Over time he has gotten better and better at it.  That was with a lot of practice. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also vote mouth shut.  She'll figure it out soon enough.

 

I was a hobbyist turned professional at one point in time.  Most people dip their toes into the business side without realizing the work involved in building a client base and *keeping* it.  I worked hard, learned how to operate my equipment, researched what I wanted to accomplish, and spent time marketing.  Then I decided that for me, the time spent wasn't worth the income.  Also, everyone wants a deal (i.e. give me the digital copies so I can get cheap prints at Walgreens) and I wasn't willing to give my work away on a massive scale.  So I'm a hobbyist again.  Much more satisfying. 

Anyway, if you don't have the talent for it, you'll find out very very quickly that you aren't going to have clients.  Even when you do have talent, it still takes hard work, networking, monetary investment, and just plain luck to get a profitable photography business going. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is a fad right now. The number of people I know who think their homeschool graduate is going to make a business out of photography is kind of shocking. Most of them do not do a good job so the business is not going anywhere.

 

The thing is if a person wants to take good photos, prices have dropped on DSl cameras, and print services abound. Our ds who does not like art but needed a fine arts class opted for photography. I wanted a really good camera anyway, we bought an intro to photography textbook and the Great Courses videos. He did what he needed to do to earn high school credit, but I really took to the camera and began working with it.

 

I took our middle son's graduation photos, and had a hard time convincing Walmart that they were mine so I could purchase prints. They were just determined the photos were by a professional and would be illegal to print. I ended up bringing the camera and SD card in so they finally agreed.

 

And I am not good like my friend Nichole who is crazy amazing and profoundly creative. She has a professional business and there is a reason people pay top dollar for her work.

 

There are a lot of people out there though who are not honest about their ability. A lot. I think the internet contributes to this because it is so easy to have a website and advertise. Prior to that when one needed to maintain a professional studio, props, back drops, dark room, etc. it was too expensive for hobbyists to set up a business on a whim.

 

OP the bottom line is you say nothing. Real life will teach her soon enough. Same thing in music with the parent that think Johnny is the next Paganini. As a piano teacher I never had to say a thing because when the audition to the college music department did not get offered, the handwriting was on the wall.

Edited by FaithManor
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

She has already complained about her lack of business. I think she believes it's because nobody appreciates her talent. She did get a client this past week. It was a co-worker whose child never got senior pictures done and was getting them a year later. While there were a couple of good shots, they weren't very impressive.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

She has already complained about her lack of business. I think she believes it's because nobody appreciates her talent. She did get a client this past week. It was a co-worker whose child never got senior pictures done and was getting them a year later. While there were a couple of good shots, they weren't very impressive.

 

Sorry, but I just cracked up at that line.  A person in a business like that doesn't get in a snit because no one appreciates their talent. They would be trying to figure out what successful photographers have/do that they don't, not blaming potential customers for not seeing how great they are.  

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For the same reason some people think they are singers and we ended up with 15 seasons of people who CAN'T sing trying out for American Idol. Thousands and thousands of people who can't sing did audition for the show. And for the most part, that happened because they had people in their lives telling them how good they were. Sometimes those people are blowing smoke up their butts, and sometimes those people really do believe that the person has talent.

Everybody needs a Simon Cowell now and then. But OP, in this situation, it doesn't have to be you!

  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Everyone is a photographer these days. Homeschool teens selling photography services abound.

 

We were having yearbook photos taken for co-op (by a mom who is a professional photographer who does good work) and I was helping. An 8th grader said to me "I hate having my picture taken by anyone else. I'm a professional photographer so it drives me nuts when people don't know what they are doing."

Oh.my.lord.

 

I would have had a hard time not telling that kid off.

 

Photography is an art and a skill and I hate that anyone taking snapshots considers themselves "professional".

 

I have also seen that homeschooled teens are especially guilty of this. Ugh.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it's a balance of passion and profession.

 

I've read agonizingly horrible stories, and I've seen ugly art, sometimes people are terrible singers. Yet, I know to be kind and nod. If nobody is forcing me to pay for any of those things, I can be happy for the person enjoying their hobby.

 

My response would be along the lines of "Wow, you have a real passion for photography! Have you thought about classes?" And I would include much encouragement. The world sucks enough without people trying to kill your joy. JMO.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh.my.lord.

 

I would have had a hard time not telling that kid off.

 

Photography is an art and a skill and I hate that anyone taking snapshots considers themselves "professional".

 

I have also seen that homeschooled teens are especially guilty of this. Ugh.

Oh yes...like the local 9th grader who billed herself out as a professional cake decorator who could hardly make a decent cupcake much less frost it!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have one of those in dh's family. He lost his regular job, so he decided he was going to be a photographer. He bought himself a fancy camera and started taking pictures of trees and lakes and stuff. And the pictures are godawful. Half of them were actually blurry because apparently focusing his camera isn't something he's learned yet, the rest are in focus but are the most boring pictures you've ever seen in your life. Naturally he immediately opened a website and started selling the pictures for hundreds of dollars each. Even the blurry ones. :001_rolleyes:

 

And people kept complimenting him on his FB page! I think they felt sorry for him. I tried to tell dh to say something to him, because he was sinking a ton of time and money into this, but dh refused.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The first time I got my youngest's pictures taken, I took some woman I had never met up on an offer for a cheap photo shoot. She said she was a professional photographer who was trying to build up her portfolio. She said she had a studio in her house. I made the appointment and it was the worst. Her "studio" was the smallest bedroom in her house, entirely too tiny for this work. She had none of those flashes that are on stands on the floor, but only the flash on the camera. And not even a big flash with a diffuser thing on it, just the flash the camera came with. And the kit lens that the camera came with.

 

Owning a DSLR doesn't make you a photographer! 

 

That wasn't the worst part. She had the cringiest logo that looked like it hobbled drunkenly out of the 90s and they were printed huge on every picture. Honestly, I wasn't sure if my child or her ugly logo was the focal point. She did the WORST photo editing I've ever seen. Colored vignettes and colorful words (my daughter's name and birthday) across the pictures. She commented that at least they were better than what we could get at Walmart. Um no, she made Walmart look like they deserved a Pulitzer.

 

When I went home from the shoot, I sat down on the bed and cried, I knew they were horrible. By the time she mailed my DVD, I just had to laugh. By that point, I had already had my photo shoot with another photographer and seen some of the lovely pictures the second photographer took so I was in a better mood. I just kept thinking, why? Why does this woman hate me and my child? But no, everyone she took pictures of got the same treatment. Not surprisingly, her business hasn't exactly taken off.

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it's a balance of passion and profession.

 

I've read agonizingly horrible stories, and I've seen ugly art, sometimes people are terrible singers. Yet, I know to be kind and nod. If nobody is forcing me to pay for any of those things, I can be happy for the person enjoying their hobby.

 

My response would be along the lines of "Wow, you have a real passion for photography! Have you thought about classes?" And I would include much encouragement. The world sucks enough without people trying to kill your joy. JMO.

 

I like this approach. 

But there is no way on earth I'd encourage any kid to think of it as a career, though. Except as a side project or if they are independently wealthy. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like this approach.

But there is no way on earth I'd encourage any kid to think of it as a career, though. Except as a side project or if they are independently wealthy.

I agree. I have also watched some things go horribly south and people lose their life savings. 🙠But being harsh usually only makes them defensive. I have actually gently said that certain ideas were not sound investments.

 

Most people who are not good won't make much money, and will either get better or quit.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have one of those in dh's family. He lost his regular job, so he decided he was going to be a photographer. He bought himself a fancy camera and started taking pictures of trees and lakes and stuff. And the pictures are godawful. Half of them were actually blurry because apparently focusing his camera isn't something he's learned yet, the rest are in focus but are the most boring pictures you've ever seen in your life. Naturally he immediately opened a website and started selling the pictures for hundreds of dollars each. Even the blurry ones. :001_rolleyes:

 

And people kept complimenting him on his FB page! I think they felt sorry for him. I tried to tell dh to say something to him, because he was sinking a ton of time and money into this, but dh refused.

 

Maybe they're related! :lol: My friend has a blurry picture of a dandelion in a field of grass on the FB page. The cover photo is looking down on pumpkin with blurry stones in the right background and a blurry flower in the left foreground. :mellow:

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it's not going to hurt her physically or the people around her, which it isn't, then say nothing.  

 

I tell my friends to wear bicycle helmets when I see them riding without them. They don't like me mentioning it, but I know that it could save their noggin if they listened. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My brother's wedding photographer was pretty terrible and he's a popular local photographer. I think they only hired him because he was a family friend. I would have shot his wedding myself but I know how hard weddings are to do well and it's not my area so I chose not to. In hindsight I think I'd have done a better job. The guy tried some terrible image manipulation to cover issues. It was awful.

 

I truly think most people don't know what good photography really looks like. Unless you take a deep interest in the field or similar areas like art and design the flaws might not be something you even think or care about. Unfortunately I think some of these oblivious people are themselves photographers and they'll never be good.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would think that anyone who has sold photos for money is a professional photographer. Am I wrong?

 

I had a suitor in high school who was very good at taking pictures. Before we graduated, he was working for a major newspaper. He took a few college classes but not in photography and never got a degree. He still works for the paper. He wins awards and speaks at confrences, and is known worldwide for his work.

 

On the other hand, my sister started buying old plastic cameras from thrift stores and carrying them around taking pictures of everything she thought was interesting and then developing the prints in a dark room.

 

Within a year, she was having art openings and prints were all $100+

 

Now she teaches photography at an art school in her area.

 

So based on what I've seen, I just assumed some people have the eye and some don't.

 

If I wanted to help one of my kids develop a good eye, I'd suggest a couple of semesters of Art History with a good professor.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the case of a friend, I would say nothing but I also wouldn't like her photos on facebook if they weren't good.  I like people's photos on facebook sometimes because they are good but mostly because they either show me stuff I want to see be it how a cake they made looks or how my friend's kids dressed for Halloween- because these are things I would complement people in person too- or I like that my friends are having a great time type of things. Fortunately, none of those friends take that in any way than that I support them.  I do like my friends' quilts almost always and I know my friends make tasty cakes because I have tasted them.  None of my friends are going into businesses with those hobbies or with photography. My dd is a good photographer but it is strictly a hobby for her- with one entry to a contest that she won- and a thing she enjoys and we enjoy too.  One thing photographers know is that you need a lot of practice and the one great thing about digital photography is that you can now do that to your heart's delight.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would think that anyone who has sold photos for money is a professional photographer. Am I wrong?

 

 

I think that's generally correct, but I've seen some different definitions in photo competitions and professional societies where you have to earn more than a certain percentage of your total income from photography to be considered a professional. Lots of hobby photographers and part timers who earn a bit of money from it wouldn't qualify.

 

I've noticed with portrait photography that relatively low ability photographers seem to have more success than they should maybe because the people who commision them will like feel like they have to buy the shots of their family/kids etc. there's an in built connection. Whereas if you're buying a piece of art or a shot for some other reason then I think it's going to more easily separate out the mediocre work because the pieces have to work in their own.

Edited by lailasmum
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would keep my mouth shut for sure unless your opinion is directly asked for.  People not hiring her and a junky website definitely speaks for itself.

 

I know photographers like this.  I went to a mini session with a group of families once who was the SIL of another homeschooling mom.  Not only did this "photographer" take garbage pictures, she was short and abrupt and rude to us because we were the last mini session of the day.

 

I have a DSLR and would love to take classes and work on my skills.  I occasionally get a few good shots if I take my kids out and shoot 200+ pictures.  I would never in a million years advertise as a professional photographer.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Here's the problem: 

 

No, no, here is not a problem. At least not for you. 

 

Don't worry about it. Your friend can extend her business and artistic efforts in any way she pleases, and all you should do is wish her luck. 

 

Besides, I have seen enough people I considered untalented in various fields succeed to know that you never know. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am an amateur photographer, and I take a lot of classes and have a lot of fun shooting.  I'll pass along what the teachers have pretty uniformly said:

 

1.  You have to have great shots.  To learn how to do this, study Great Art and practice practice practice.  

2.  Being a professional isn't about shooting all the time.  It's about 80% business and 20% shooting.  Of course, the 20% has to be expert.  

 

The resulting recommendation for wannabes has generally sounded like this:  Get a good entry-level DSLR camera (eg. Nikon 3300 or 5300 or the equivalents in other makes), a tripod, and one good prime lens and use it for a year and learn how to get all you can out of that lens and the camera.  Then you can get another lens and maybe a pay-for-it photo-processing piece of software.  

 

If you can't get good shots out of this setup, you can't get good shots out of a more expensive setup.  If you really want to learn what makes for a good shot, find someone who *knows* and hire them to judge your photos for you and give you feedback.

 

And if you are thinking of getting schooling / a degree, get a business degree with a fine arts minor.  Not photography.

 

It's crushing.   I like hobbies that come with a lot of "equipment."  

 

All that to say encourage her as you can, but not with lies.  Maybe if she approaches you with a direct question, you could have a response sort of rehearsed.  "Oh, it is so neat to see how much you love doing this.  I've wondered if you might like to find a sort of "photography contest judge" who could help you sort out what would be your best commercially viable shots.  Some gal on a discussion board mentioned that she found it very helpful to her and gave her all kinds of insights as to what sells and what doesn't."

 

And that would not be a lie.

 

:0)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My Dd is a professional artist- meaning people have purchased her works. Not friends and family- strangers.  My son is a coder. He hasn't sold a game yet, but he has put materials out in the public realm and received reviews. I don't see any reason to dump on a child's dreams and dedication. And if an adult wants to pursue a career in a chosen field, the market will determine whether they succeed or not. Often, it is the person with less talent but more ability to sell that succeeds. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think sometimes it's a time will tell. There are several homeschool kids that I've seen do it and mostly they start doing less over time but one of the has got quite good at it. Either way it's not an easy way to earn money because not only do you have the random times working you have long hours of processing and editing afterwards.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...