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mom2scouts

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About mom2scouts

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  1. Thank you so much! My son did physics today and he said the videos helped him understand the lesson so much better.
  2. We also have a Scout who had his parents write a check and then he did a project that took two days. His project was done in two months from start to finish. This is the kind of stuff that makes me want to give my son more credit somehow. They can both say they are Eagle Scouts, but what they did to earn that isn't even close.
  3. I'm writing course descriptions. I know it seems like a lot of work for something you may end up not needing, but I'd rather have them and not need them than need them and not have them. I've also heard of people who send them even when they aren't required or call and ask admissions if they can send them to paint a better picture of their student and homeschool.
  4. I gave up Christmas cards one year when I was grieving and depressed and needed to cut back to only the basics to survive Christmas. Last year I got one Christmas card and that was from my mom. I do sort of miss the tradition. As others have said, sending a yearly letter was like a record of our family life. I've always liked getting Christmas letters telling about what's going on in the life of far off (or even geographically close) friends or photo cards so I can see how people have changed or grown. I dislike getting a card that's just signed. I know it's still a sign that someone was thinking of me, but it's always a bit of a disappointment when there isn't something more personal from the sender.
  5. Students in our local high school *do* get credit for extracurriculars. Things like band, choir, dance, or sports go on their transcripts as graded courses in fine arts, music, or PE and are listed on the extracurricular activities resume too. When my oldest was in public high school, he had a job at the school fixing the lighting and sound equipment from the auditorium and he was in a vocational ed. program in electronics. He spent almost the entire year in class working on things for his job. He got a vocational certificate, an A in electronics on his transcript, and he was getting paid for the work and nobody thought there was a thing wrong with that because he was learning the skills. I should also note that he was not going into the trades, but went to a top 50 university. If I didn't use it as a transcript item, how would I show how far above and beyond he went on his project? Apparently, the average Eagle project takes about 150 hours and he's doing more than five times that. I would like to show that somewhere.
  6. I'm not sure how to help you with the Common App, but since the AP Bio is probably listed as in progress, you can probably just show it as a withdrawal. It's probably more common on transcripts than you think and a W is better than poor grades. As for being overwhelmed, I would drop any other writing you're doing for English and use the essay for that right now. Since it's short term, you could probably put off all other English assignments until it's done.
  7. I didn't get an eye exam for one of my kids until he was in about third grade. When he got his new glasses, they were "Coke bottle thick". The eye doctor was in a plaza that had a HUGE sign out front and my son said, "Wow! I can read that sign now!" I felt so bad that I didn't realize the poor kid couldn't see across the room. When I had an infant, toddler, tween, and two teens, I was always running things through my head trying to remember where everyone was and when they needed to be picked up and dropped off. I did forget one child once and he waited a half hour before I remembered him.
  8. I'm cross posting this here because I know there's several very active Scout parents who hang out on this board. I'd like your thoughts. My son has been diligently working on his Eagle project for two years this week. During that time, five Scouts from our troop have finished their Eagle. The projects have been things like building bat houses and putting them up, building a few benches and installing them somewhere, making feral cat shelters, building a bridge over a small ravine, or making dog beds for the shelter. These projects all take a few days of actual construction and most of them are funded by the recipient. My son decided to do a project directly related to his major interest and career goals. The non-profit group gave him a list of projects they needed done and he picked one. As a non-profit, they said they felt it was important that the person doing the project had the responsibility of funding the project. He spent months and months raising money and getting donations of both money and materials worth about $1800. He worked to earn more money for the project. He learned some basic CAD so he could design the project and determine all the supplies needed. He then spent lots of time preparing things in advance for the actual work days and finding people to help. He met with the non-profit several times about some changes. The project has a few tricky things and even the recipient has started saying things like, "This is a new one for us! We've never had an Eagle project this complicated." His Sea Scout leader told him, "I can't believe this project! It you decide to do Quartermaster, I'm going to give you a really easy project and not let you do anything like this!" His project already has almost *800* hours of work and he's not quite finished. He needs maybe one or two more work days. Here's my question: Would you give him credit on his transcript for something like Project Management? This was suggested to me by an Eagle Scout and a homeschooling parent in our troop. I'm usually of the opinion that homeschoolers shouldn't double dip to add more to the transcript, but this project goes so far beyond what most kids are doing for Eagle projects I feel that he should get more credit for it. Thoughts?
  9. My son has been diligently working on his Eagle project for two years this week. During that time, five Scouts from our troop have finished their Eagle. The projects have been things like building bat houses and putting them up, building a few benches and installing them somewhere, making feral cat shelters, building a bridge over a small ravine, or making dog beds for the shelter. These projects all take a few days of actual construction and most of them are funded by the recipient. My son decided to do a project directly related to his major interest and career goals. The non-profit group gave him a list of projects they needed done and he picked one. As a non-profit, they said they felt it was important that the person doing the project had the responsibility of funding the project. He spent months and months raising money and getting donations of both money and materials worth about $1800. He worked to earn more money for the project. He learned some basic CAD so he could design the project and determine all the supplies needed. He then spent lots of time preparing things in advance for the actual work days and finding people to help. He met with the non-profit several times about some changes. The project has a few tricky things and even the recipient has started saying things like, "This is a new one for us! We've never had an Eagle project this complicated." His Sea Scout leader told him, "I can't believe this project! It you decide to do Quartermaster, I'm going to give you a really easy project and not let you do anything like this!" His project already has almost *800* hours of work and he's not quite finished. He needs maybe one or two more work days. Here's my question: Would you give him credit on his transcript for something like Project Management? This was suggested to me by an Eagle Scout and a homeschooling parent in our troop. I'm usually of the opinion that homeschoolers shouldn't double dip to add more to the transcript, but this project goes so far beyond what most kids are doing for Eagle projects I feel that he should get more credit for it. Thoughts?
  10. I really dislike skipping right over Thanksgiving (and now even Halloween) to go right to Christmas. By the time Christmas gets here, I'm already sick of it all. I do understand putting up some of the outdoor lights when the weather is good and getting them ready, but I'd wait to turn them on. I think there's been a long push to get Christmas started early and it's all about money. The longer the season is extended, the more money people will spend. Even the people I know who claim to shop all year or shop early end up picking up a few things here and there because of all the holiday marketing.
  11. In my experience, it's not at all uncommon for small business tradesmen not to take credit cards. It doesn't mean they're shady or do poor work. A 50% deposit does seem high though. Most just want a small deposit.
  12. My son is a junior and taking Physics this year. I'd like to stick with algebra based physics and not conceptual, if possible, because of some of his college goals, but he will probably not be in a heavy math/science major. We are using Apologia 2nd edition and when he saw all the math he just started avoiding the work as much as possible. He can do the math, but he doesn't like math and he needs to do it slowly and carefully to understand it. I'm also at fault for not keeping tabs on the subject and assuming he was moving ahead just fine. I'm not in a position to buy a completely different curriculum, but I'd be willing to buy the Apologia video if it'll help him understand concepts better. Is the video useful? I think I may need to just work through the book with him problem by problem until he understands each concept, not worry about how much he has done at this point, and just get him moving forward. I'm not sure I even know what I'm asking for, but I'll take all the tips I can get to move him through physics.
  13. I do have to agree that rabbits are not easy pets. I adored our bunny, but she required much more care than our cats and died suddenly (which I'm told is common since they are prey animals and very good at hiding illness or injury). They are really fun, smart, and cute, but they're fragile.
  14. Please don't keep a bunny in a hutch with a wire bottom. It's really hard on their feet. I don't know why someone told you it's better for their feet! We used a large dog crate for out indoor bunny with the plastic crate bottom. There was room for a litter box, food, water, toys, and a big box where she liked to sleep and it was easy to clean. Our bunny spent most of the day free ranging around the house and only spent time in her cage when we were away from home or at night. As for litter training, it helps if the bunny is spayed/neutered. Our unspayed female never totally got the litter box idea and I spent a lot of time vacuuming. Do NOT use kitty litter. We used litter made from paper pulp and put hay at one end. In one end, out the other!
  15. We had a marketplace plan this year and it's worthless. If we ever have a big medical expense, the deductible and co-payment will bankrupt us anyway. There's only one local provider. Last week I got a letter in the mail from my insurance company saying that if I keep my current plan, the cost will go up, the deductible will go up, and the co-pay will go up. I''m not sure why we bother.
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