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Why do so many parents get ANGRY when their kids have a snow day???


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I am trying to be sensitive here to work schedules and all, but I am just getting really tired of reading messages from people on facebook who are MAD that their kids are out for a snow day. Most of these moms do not work outside the home and they are just mortified that they have to spend the day with *gasp* their children. One mother even attacked me for homeschooling and said she didn't see how i could stand being with my kids all day, everyday. :001_huh: Um, I gave birth to them and I don't let the ps raise them. I am quite happy to be with them all day, every day. Do they ever drive me crazy? YES Do they ever get on my very last nerve and make me want to run and hide? YES Do I occasionally put them in their rooms and have an hour to two alone? YES

 

Maybe I am just being sensitive, but I just dont' understand that thinking.

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I was that parent when the kids were very young, as in kindergarten. Even though we don't have snow days, I would get mad if one of them was sick and I had to stay home with them. I was a workaholic, didn't like to be home with the kids anymore than necessary and just not a very good mom. But when ds was in first grade ps, things started to change. The things that they were being taught did not sit well with us and my ds was always in trouble for talking too much. I had to change my outlook on being a mom and taking responsibility for their education. It wasn't an overnight change but it did happen. I think that it is all about perspective. Once I changed the way that I perceived my children, I could be the mom that they needed. Now I can't imagine my life any other way but with my kids everday, all day long.

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I wonder what on earth they DO all day long!

 

So do I.

 

It's always just saddens my heart for those families to be honest.

 

I feel the same way. I have one friend in particular who doesn't work and can't even stand the 2 weeks from when her kids are out of school to when summer camp starts or the two weeks they're off for the holidays. She laments about it every year. She just can't WAIT for them to go back to school, so she can resume doing...well, I don't know what.

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I love being with my kids - but snow days irritated me for two reasons:

 

First, when they were little and school was canceled it really WAS a problem to scramble and find care because I had to work even if there was snow. It was a major issue.

 

Second, the whole "snow day" thing is often ridiculous. I can see why you cancel school for three feet of new snow - but half an inch??? In otehr countries, life does not grind to a halt if it snows - people have snow tires on their cars and kids walk and school happens when there is snow... so to me, the whole idea is whimpy. If the bus does not run, then make it the parent's responsibility to get them to school, period.

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Second, the whole "snow day" thing is often ridiculous. I can see why you cancel school for three feet of new snow - but half an inch??? In otehr countries, life does not grind to a halt if it snows - people have snow tires on their cars and kids walk and school happens when there is snow... so to me, the whole idea is whimpy. If the bus does not run, then make it the parent's responsibility to get them to school, period.

Yeah, and it's not just a difference of one country compared to another...even within the US, there's a major difference. I grew up in Michigan, and snow was a normal part of winter. You went to school when it snowed. If we got 2 or 3 feet of snow, we went to school. That's what snow plows are for. Or you drive slowly and carefully if you drive your kids to school. Now I'm in SW Ohio, and people panic if there's 2 inches of snow. My in laws' church cancelled a Christmas party because of snow that had fallen the night before. I was out shopping in the morning, and it was fine. The snowplows were plowing my neighborhood when I got home. I went out later and the roads were completely clear. Yet, they cancelled the party that morning because they were afraid. :confused:

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Second, the whole "snow day" thing is often ridiculous. I can see why you cancel school for three feet of new snow - but half an inch??? In otehr countries, life does not grind to a halt if it snows...

 

IIRC, parts of England and France seemed to have some troubles this winter.

 

Growing up in Montana, I don't think my school had a single snow day, but we were familiar with and had the means to deal with snow. States that don't typically get snow might not have that, so a snow day would be prudent.

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I had a friend who was just like those moms -- she would use any excuse to be away from her kids, and would spare no expense on sleep-away camps and any activity that would keep them out of the house.

 

Now her kids are grown and she can't understand why they never come to visit her. :glare:

 

Cat

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I don't know about your friends or their situations, but the few people I know who sound angry are often frustrated because it happens at the last minute and they have to scramble to find child care. Or they don't have enough sick/personal/vacation time(or none is offered), so they will be taking time off unpaid if their work will let them and facing consequences from that if they can't find a sitter.

 

Your friends might just be going for dark humor after being momentarily put out by a last minute change in their schedule?

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Second, the whole "snow day" thing is often ridiculous. I can see why you cancel school for three feet of new snow - but half an inch??? In other countries, life does not grind to a halt if it snows - people have snow tires on their cars and kids walk and school happens when there is snow... so to me, the whole idea is wimpy. If the bus does not run, then make it the parent's responsibility to get them to school, period.

 

:iagree:Doesn't it snow in Finland? Norway? Sweden? Denmark? Iceland? Russia? Germany?

 

It snows all the time in Maine and Michigan, right? If they can handle it, why don't the rest of the "snow-potential" states get their acts together?

 

I wonder how many snow days the students get in those snowy countries?

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I have a fb friend (well, IRL, too, but she moved) that is in the depths of despair that there may be a snow day tomorrow. I think it's because it messes up her plans for the day. Very, very sad. BTW, she doesn't work, so it's not a daycare problem.

 

I do know plenty of PS moms that would be thrilled if their kids were home for a snow day, though. :)

Edited by Rhonda in TX
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t snows all the time in Maine and Michigan, right? If they can handle it, why don't the rest of the "snow-potential" states get their acts together?

 

I wonder how many snow days the students get in those snowy countries?

 

I don't know about more northern states, but here in Texas, things really do come to a stop when there is snow/ice. Part of the problem is, well...it's Texas. We get snow once a year maybe. We don't *have* snowplows (as far as I know)! We don't have snow chains or snow tires! The buses can't handle icy roads! So school gets canceled maybe once a year.

 

That being said, we had a *FOOT* of snow last February..and my university *still* held classes the next day. It was just about the only one in the DFW area which did so. :glare: However, the roads weren't that bad that day because the temperature was already starting to go up, ergo no ice.

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:iagree:Doesn't it snow in Finland? Norway? Sweden? Denmark? Iceland? Russia? Germany?

 

It snows all the time in Maine and Michigan, right? If they can handle it, why don't the rest of the "snow-potential" states get their acts together?

 

I wonder how many snow days the students get in those snowy countries?

 

I think the problem is that in many of the "snow-potential" states/areas, it's just not cost-effective enough to constantly keep "at-the-ready" the kind of equipment and manpower required to quickly deal with snow when it's not really an everyday thing. They have the stuff to deal with it and eventually get it taken care of, but it's just too expensive to keep enough equipment/manpower to deal with it quickly enough for life to go on as usual. And in many places, they get enough snow to have some experience driving in it, but probably not enough for most people to really be able to drive safely.

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Maybe because it results in more laundry?

 

No proably cooking more....:D I work outside the home and homeschool. I am astonished as well as how many parents get angry with snow days!! :glare: I would LOVE a snow day esp with my work. (I work for PS but kids are homeschooled) So when we have a snow day I am home and I love to be with my kids!!

 

Holly

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I would suspect it is because it is an unexpected change in their plans. Unexpected changes sometimes upset me.

 

The other thing may be that they feel the schools are constantly taking days off and they are mad that their kids aren't getting an education.

 

Lisa

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When we lived in Maryland, I woke up one day to about 3-4 inches of snow on the ground and went out to the get the paper. Noticed my neighbor had her young son bundled up and they were waiting for the bus.

 

I called out to her, "The schools are closed."

 

She was from upstate New York. She looked at me and shook her head. "In Buffalo, we call this SPRING!"

 

:lol:

 

I don't hear much complaining from my neighbors for schools being closed on account of snow, although I do hear grumbling when either (a) it's supposed to snow, but hasn't yet, and they're already closed, (b) there's barely an inch on the ground, and they're closed, or © they wait until 6:30 or close to 7:00 to announce a closing. I can understand the last one. If I didn't have to get up, let me sleep!

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I think the problem is that in many of the "snow-potential" states/areas, it's just not cost-effective enough to constantly keep "at-the-ready" the kind of equipment and manpower required to quickly deal with snow when it's not really an everyday thing. They have the stuff to deal with it and eventually get it taken care of, but it's just too expensive to keep enough equipment/manpower to deal with it quickly enough for life to go on as usual. And in many places, they get enough snow to have some experience driving in it, but probably not enough for most people to really be able to drive safely.

 

This is exactly it here. We get snow every year and there are snow plows, but not enough to clear streets quickly. It takes days before a plow gets near us. We live on little country roads with no shoulders that have big hills and lots of curves. Busses can't make the trip when it snows. People don't all have 4-wheel drives or even snow tires. It isn't economical when some winters you don't get snow and others (like last winter) we had several feet spread through the winter. Our next door neighbors are from ND. At first they were shocked by how often school closes for snow here. However, they were also shocked by how terrible the roads are. I think keeping kids and teachers safe is more important than making sure they never miss a day in the winter.

 

As far as why parents hate it, well don't we all hate it when our plans blow up at the last minute? I loved snow days when my kids were in school, but I wasn't working so it didn't put me into scramble mode. We just slept late, ate hot food and played outside all day. There was a lot of laundry though!:lol:

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I have a fb friend (well, IRL, too, but she moved) that is in the depths of despair that there may be a snow day tomorrow. I think it's because it messes up her plans for the day. Very, very sad. BTW, she doesn't work, so it's not a daycare problem.

 

 

I can completely understand being upset if you have to scramble for child-care arrangements at the last minute.

 

But how in the world does it "mess up her plans for the day" when she doesn't work??

 

I never understand what women who don't work but send all their kids to school every do all day.

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I think it's just the routine. I know I get cranky when my routine is disrupted. If schools suddenly started having school on Saturdays' date=' that would probably irritate them too.[/quote']

:iagree:

 

 

I think the problem is that in many of the "snow-potential" states/areas, it's just not cost-effective enough to constantly keep "at-the-ready" the kind of equipment and manpower required to quickly deal with snow when it's not really an everyday thing. They have the stuff to deal with it and eventually get it taken care of, but it's just too expensive to keep enough equipment/manpower to deal with it quickly enough for life to go on as usual. And in many places, they get enough snow to have some experience driving in it, but probably not enough for most people to really be able to drive safely.

:iagree:

I don't hear much complaining from my neighbors for schools being closed on account of snow, although I do hear grumbling when either (a) it's supposed to snow, but hasn't yet, and they're already closed, (b) there's barely an inch on the ground, and they're closed, or © they wait until 6:30 or close to 7:00 to announce a closing. I can understand the last one. If I didn't have to get up, let me sleep!

That used to drive me nuts. Especially those (a) days, when it finally did snow, it flurried... for five minutes. I would get angry, not because the kids were home, but because it seem (imo) that they were teaching the kids to go on lock down at the first thought of snow.

I can completely understand being upset if you have to scramble for child-care arrangements at the last minute.

 

But how in the world does it "mess up her plans for the day" when she doesn't work??

 

I never understand what women who don't work but send all their kids to school every do all day.

I'm sure they're all poolside eating shrimp cocktails and bonbons :glare:

 

Or are we going to start arguing the worth of sah public school moms.

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I used to work in daycare and I can tell you that snow days were hard on a lot of parents because of having to pay for a full day when they hadn't budgeted for it. Especially single moms or dads were affected by it.

 

As far as for SAHMs, my friends who were at home while their kids were in school were irritated because it interfered with their "schedule". :lol:;)

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I do think that the more you are with your children, the more you discover techniques to enjoy the time. As with anything, it's hard if you don't have enough practice. When I first started home educating I used to get overwhelmed by my children's company - I'm an introvert - but over time I learned to delight in them.

 

Laura

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I was that parent when the kids were very young, as in kindergarten. Even though we don't have snow days, I would get mad if one of them was sick and I had to stay home with them. I was a workaholic, didn't like to be home with the kids anymore than necessary and just not a very good mom. But when ds was in first grade ps, things started to change. The things that they were being taught did not sit well with us and my ds was always in trouble for talking too much. I had to change my outlook on being a mom and taking responsibility for their education. It wasn't an overnight change but it did happen. I think that it is all about perspective. Once I changed the way that I perceived my children, I could be the mom that they needed. Now I can't imagine my life any other way but with my kids everday, all day long.

 

I could have written this exact post, minus the workaholic bit. I can't even blame my bad attitude on that. I just looked at school as a break. My how things can change in an instant. Fast forward a few years and I can't imagine NOT homeschooling now and of course my friends think I've lost my mind.

 

I witnessed several panicky parents on fb yesterday when they thought school would be cancelled. They were all pleased that there was only an hour delay. Now the 10 day forecast... :tongue_smilie:

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The only person I know who complains about her children being home all day is a friend of mine who is clinically depressed, has been for years, and was not allowed by her controlling ex-husband to seek help. (They have recently divorced.) You wouldn't know by looking at her that she's depressed. She's finally getting help, but I suspect she may be on a long, bumpy road to recovery. Sometimes you just never really know what's going on with people.

 

Anyway, I am one of those moms who sends her children off to school all day. If others really want to know, I spend a good chunk of my day managing my investments. IMHO, it's better to make your money work for you than have to work for your money. ;)

 

The rest of the day is spent cleaning, cooking, and doing other domestic hum-drums. Purging books and waxing bookshelves is my exciting project for this week. Woo hoo!

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IIRC, parts of England and France seemed to have some troubles this winter.

 

 

As Britain doesn't usually get much snow, we don't have many snow ploughs, nor many gritter lorries, not to mention supplies of salt grit. So when snow does come in quantities, everything grinds to a halt. If we are going to have bad winters from now on, then we need more machinery.

 

Laura

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This isn't the samething, but I remember when my daughter got sick and I was mad at her. Why? Because she was going on a field trip (dog sledding) with her school and I volunteered to go with her. I was very excited to go.

 

Instead, she ate something that she had an allergic reaction to which resulted in her being sick for an entire week with a high fever. And yes, I was mad at her. She knew she shouldn't have eaten it! However, I understood that she was still learning how to tell others what she could and couldn't eat and sometimes, she didn't know how to say no to an adult about a birthday cake. Too much temptation.

 

She didn't go on her field trip and I didn't get to go either! In the end, I (reluctunatly) stayed home and played the good mom role. And felt quilty that I would rather have been dog sledding than staying home with a child who caused her on misery! (and this is 6 years later and I still remember that week like it was yesterday!)

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I figure that in our "snows once a year" area, it's not that you're calling a Snow day for safety-but that it's going to melt by noon anyway, so let the kids play while they've got a chance! Most of the time, "snow days" here are for sleet-and it's just plain yucky.

 

Of course, for the last 6 years that I've taught Kindermusik on Saturdays, I've realized that inclement weather here only shows up Friday night or Saturday morning. Must be the communal prayers of all those ps parents!

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As Britain doesn't usually get much snow, we don't have many snow ploughs, nor many gritter lorries, not to mention supplies of salt grit. So when snow does come in quantities, everything grinds to a halt. If we are going to have bad winters from now on, then we need more machinery.

 

 

Yes, indeed. That is the point I was trying to make to regentrude's comment. I imagine the airports may need more de-icing machines, too.

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For working moms, I think it can be frustrating, because in many families it is assumed that the mom is the one who will drop everything and stay home with the kids. (Much like sick days.) I was delighted when I found out that my boss in grad school split snow days and sick days with her husband; they each stayed home a half day.

 

As far as SAH moms go, I'm guessing that for some the annoying part is the disruption to the day's plans, and the forced spontaneity. I don't mind that kind of thing so much, though I'd be bummed if I had to miss a cherished once-a-week yoga class for a snow day. (Especially if it turned out to be one of our typical snow days, with little actual snow!)

 

I think the problem is that in many of the "snow-potential" states/areas, it's just not cost-effective enough to constantly keep "at-the-ready" the kind of equipment and manpower required to quickly deal with snow when it's not really an everyday thing.

Yes, that's true in my area. We're on the coastline, and we often get scant snow when towns 5 miles inland have multi-inch accumulation. It doesn't make much sense to budget a lot of money for snow plowing.

 

The other issue is that the schools know that the bus drivers will refuse to drive, so the schools are forced to announce snow days. They end up doing this the night before, to help parents plan. That means that sometimes they cancel, but we don't actually get more than an inch of accumulation. Also, it sometimes means that they have to cancel the whole day when the snow might not start falling until noon. They can't risk the drivers refusing to take kids home after school, and early release is problematic for logistical reasons.

 

(In our area, the schools cannot simply tell parents to get kids there and back by other means. Two schools are vehicle-only drop off schools, no walking allowed, and the schools cannot assume that every family owns cars.)

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Last minute changes are frustrating for everyone.

 

Mothers who work outside the home must scramble for childcare.

 

Mothers who do not work outside the home must rearrange their schedules. In some cases this means letting down others who were counting on their assistance (volunteer work).

 

My mother dreaded snow days almost as much as sick days. She could not take off work. (Too many days off, meant being fired.) Our school district rarely announced snow days early. We were often at the bus stop when the postmaster would call out the door, "there's a one hour delay, you'd better come inside." We would all crowd into the lobby trying to hear his radio. If the announcement changed to a two hour delay, he'd send us home.

 

Uh, no one was home. We had to go my aunt's and sit quietly. If the delay turned into a snow day, my aunt would send us home with instructions to come back at noon for lunch. My uncle worked nights, he did not want children in the house while he was trying to sleep.

 

On the rare occasions that snow days were announced early, my mother would take us to a friend's house to spend the day.

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Well, I know that too many snow days add on more school days later in the year. It's a real pain honestly...so that could be one of the reasons too.

 

Here they figure a number of snow days into the schedule. If they don't use the snow days, they still have to go the extra days... so if spring comes along and they haven't used the snow days, they will cancel school for very little snow.

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When my kids went to school, I was in school too, for the most part. If they had a snow day that fell on a day when I had classes I couldn't skip, it was stressful. Either my inlaws covered for me, or my husband (who fortunately had some flexibility in this area) would take the morning or afternoon off, whenever my classes happened to be. I was lucky that I had these resources, so if a working mom didn't, I can see it being very stressful. If the snow day happened to fall on a day when I had nothing else going on, then it really wasn't an issue. I enjoyed staying at home and having two less trips to make (to drop them off and pick them up). Lunches and uniforms were already laid out and packed so the evening routine was also already mostly done. When I was in school, things were so chaotic, so any time there were trips I didn't have to make, or something I didn't have to do, it was a relief. :)

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Personally, I don't think all these woman are truly angry. We live in a culture where you are supposed to say these things.

 

I agree. I was at walmart this week and my kids kind of space out and are always in people's way (why is it so hard to pay attention to where you're standing and the people around you??) and so I'm continually telling them to move. I guess I looked a little irritated after the 400th time because a woman said sympathetically, "Soon they'll be back in school." I didn't say anything, such as, "Actually, we're done with school for the day except for some reading." :p Because, yeah, that's just how parents relate to each other. They talk about how happy they are that school is starting and what an inconvenience it is to have their kids around all the time. Not very nice when you think about it, but I think the vast majority of the time, it's meant light-heartedly. Still, it's rather annoying to see SAHMs complain when they have to deal with their kids...

 

I think the problem is that in many of the "snow-potential" states/areas, it's just not cost-effective enough to constantly keep "at-the-ready" the kind of equipment and manpower required to quickly deal with snow when it's not really an everyday thing.

 

This is true. I'm from Texas originally, Houston area. We don't do snow. When my brother went off to college, it was to Michigan. The winter was rather shocking but he got used to how they deal with winter. Then he moved back home and then eventually to SW Missouri, where I live. The first winter he was here, he lived in this apartment building tucked away on some side road. It snowed pretty heavily and a few days later the city had managed to clear on the main roads. But the parking lot and roads leading to his building were still a mess. He asked me when they would finally get around to clearing those and I told him they probably wouldn't. He was outraged (my brother is easily outraged). :) But snow is a few-times-a-year thing for us. We can't be bothered to do too much about it.

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dc and I were out in public (gasp) the first day the local schools were back in session after Christmas break.

 

We overheard two dads discussing how happy they were that school was back in session and how terrible it was to have the kids home for two weeks.

 

One dad even shared his sadness that they didn't take a vacation and therefore were stuck together for two weeks!! :glare:

 

On hearing this, my kids and I were wide-eyed, grateful, and sad for these families.

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