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regentrude

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regentrude last won the day on March 14 2019

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  1. Worksheets are tools of active learning. There has been a lot of pedagogy research that active learning is better than consuming a passive lecture where the instructor repeats the textbook content. If they are using worksheets in class, that means they are doing activities and not just listening. If this is a math course, students need to DO math and practice and not just watch an instructor do math. Worksheets are a good tool for that. We don't use the textbook during any of our math and science classes; the textbook is required because the student needs to read it at home to prepare for class. the fact that they don't have to take the book to class doesn't mean it's not needed.
  2. She should just email him. It's the weekend, so he may not see it, and she should plan to go in on Monday in person. But I would definitely email ahead. For the research program, she definitely needs to remind them. 6 months is a long time. It's a nice courtesy to ask that far in advance to give enough time; however, most professors are actually going to wait writing until the reminder 🙂
  3. How far in advance did she request the LORs? Professors are busy and have a lot of different things on their agenda. The student needs to send reminders. A few weeks before the deadline an email with current info attached; a week before the deadline a reminder of the deadline if the student can see the recommender has not yet submitted the letter. "Dear Professor X, thank you for agreeing to write me a letter of recommendation for college applications. The deadline is on March 1. You should have received an email from the college inviting you to my application (or however the process works); please let me know if there has been a complication. Thank you so much for doing this, and have a nice day." Sometimes, there was a complication in the submissions procedure and it has fallen through the cracks; sometimes the prof forgot. If they agreed to write the LOR, they actually intended to do it and will appreciate the reminder. A prof who doesn't want to write the letter will decline the request upfront.
  4. I am not a fan of filling surfaces with decorative items to block out the space. Can you put something you actually use in that space? Basket with library books? Basket with hats&gloves if you say it's the entryway? Basket with keys and mail?
  5. Many of us are still trying. This past week, I gave the 600 students in my courses exams with free response questions and partial credit. Grading is a massive undertaking for the entire instructor team. It's time consuming and requires people. Colleges have been dealing with budget cuts for a long time. Every single year we are asked to cut back. Heck, we don't even have office phones anymore because we don't have anything else to cut. The trend is fewer instructors teach more students. Something has to give. If legislators were to restore tax funding to public colleges, we'd have more faculty. But where a single instructor is the sole teacher for several hundred students, multiple choice and computer graded homework becomes their only option.
  6. My orthotics fit into Clarks. And I have given up on vanity and actually wear Keen trail hiking shoes for work because it's the only shoe I am comfortable in all day long. Anybody who doesn't like it can bite me.
  7. The bolded: this is such a fantastic experience and you need to highlight this in your counselor letter. It is much more valuable than a bunch of standardized tests. As for the senior year course: having on the list of senior year courses a university class or AP course demonstrates the level of his work, even if the grade or exam score won't be available until the end of the year.
  8. You don't need outside validation for science classes just because he wants to study science in college. Are you looking at an extremely selective college or a state school? In most cases, admissions is admissions to the college and not to the major; they won't scrutinize the transcript differently if you want to major in science vs in history. Also, most schools won't look at your course descriptions and just take the course title on the transcript to check the box. If you want outside validation because he is planning to apply to a very selective school, it is sufficient to have a few here and there. SAT2 tests test highschool level; AP tests are - at least in principle - considered college level work. SAT2 tests are easily scheduled through the college board online; AP tests you have to schedule individually through the school, which can be much more difficult. SAT2 tests are required by many selective colleges; they won't accept AP as a substitute. Another way of outside validation are DE classes. That's what we have chosen; we prefer for them to have the experience in a college classroom and have the credit earned cumulatively over the course of a semester as opposed to all of it resting on the performance on a single high stakes exam.
  9. No, why? If the situation gets so dire that there won't be dorm supplies available because of large scale quarantines, surely they will close the dorms.
  10. Interesting idea. Have you tried something like this yourself? I would imagine it to be terribly difficult to immerse myself in my own writing while my homeschooled children are conducting their own writing activity in the next room on their own.
  11. We did it in once in December and then again this January, and that was almost perfect - except for the short days and the ice at the rim; needed crampons for the first portion, especially since it was still dark. 15 degrees at the rim, 30s at the bottom, (high of 48, but we were there at 10am when it was still chilly and in the shade). No mule dust. This time, the round trip took us about 8+ hours; 25 years ago we did it in 6.5 hours. But that's two fit motivated 20somethings, no kids, and we pretty much ran all the way down. But again, for the OP: that's only 16.5 miles and 4.300 ft; the North Rim is higher and the R to R is 6,000 ft down. And you can't do it in winter since the NR is closed and you can't get to the trailhead. You'd have to start at the SR and do RtoRtoR. Ouch.
  12. Quit if it doesn't feed your soul. We never participated in any of that stuff. We rather hike and camp and rock climb with my kids myself. Scouts is not necessary for that.
  13. Does it have to be a specific homeschool activity? My kids did several extracurriculars, and they were all in groups that consisted of public schooled and homeschooled kids. And of course anything for ps kids is in the afternoons! So why seek out an activity limited to homeschoolers? Mine rode horses, sang in choir, did TKD and judo and bjj, none of them in specific homeschool groups.
  14. Yes, that definitely. I found that schoolwork was most effectively done between 8am and noon, and we never participated in events during these hours. At those ages, all schoolwork should be easily accomplished by lunch time, leaving the afternoons free for extracurriculars, errands, unstructured pursuits.
  15. If evening writing does not work because you're tired, identify a time that would work for you and structure your day around it. You need to consciously make it a priority, otherwise it won't get done because you tend to put everybody else's wants before your need. Can you write first thing in the morning when the house is quiet and nobody is up making demands on you or distracting you? Like 5:30 or 6? (It may not be possible; I can journal in the morning, but can't do creative work until later in the day.) Can you schedule a mid-day break for everybody to have quiet time where they have to be in their rooms and listen to audiobooks or color or nap? And write then? And maybe build a routine to go to the gym in the afternoon with the kids? Like, 5pm or so? And do dinner closer to 7?
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