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Marie Kondo Series on Netflix??

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5 hours ago, displace said:

A slob comes clean can be more manageable.

Thanks! I've read her website. The truth is that I like to read about decluttering instead of actually decluttering.

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I've been trying to figure out this phenomenon as I can't imagine having enough stuff to fill a whole hour of TV with the sorting and disposing of it.  So I looked at some before and afters on google and I still don't quite get it, I think.  Is it really that hard for people to get rid of things they don't use or don't like?  Why do they keep them if they don't use them or like having them?  I am not a minimalist AT ALL, although DH totally is, and I still can't understand it.  If you don't like something that you have, you give it away.  If you do like something you have, you don't give it away.  At the end of every season you go through the kids' clothes to see what has holes and what has been grown out of or just not worn and dispose of that.

Maybe we just move too much to accumulate enough stuff.  Also, 7 kids are hard on things.  We read the covers off of books and wear holes in our bedding.

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1 hour ago, StellaM said:

 

from that article:

" Some of the best moments in Tidying Up are when, whilst sorting through the mess, her clients find long lost mementos with true value, like small photos, old letters or especially important books. "

now maybe I understand why the whole thing mystified me.  We go through every single item we own at least once a year and usually more often than that. I don't have long lost mementos. 

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1 hour ago, moonflower said:

 

 

from that article:

" Some of the best moments in Tidying Up are when, whilst sorting through the mess, her clients find long lost mementos with true value, like small photos, old letters or especially important books. "

now maybe I understand why the whole thing mystified me.  We go through every single item we own at least once a year and usually more often than that. I don't have long lost mementos. 

 

This. I watched one episode and couldn't figure out the appeal. I agree that moving regularly forces you to make tough choices about what's important to you. It makes the whole concept seem like...DUH?  Every time we move, we start with a blank space and have to decide what to bring in and what needs to stay out.

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7 hours ago, Storygirl said:

Thanks! I've read her website. The truth is that I like to read about decluttering instead of actually decluttering.

 

Interesting, this is also how I feel about homeschooling... 🤔  🤣

 

2 hours ago, moonflower said:

I've been trying to figure out this phenomenon as I can't imagine having enough stuff to fill a whole hour of TV with the sorting and disposing of it.  So I looked at some before and afters on google and I still don't quite get it, I think.  Is it really that hard for people to get rid of things they don't use or don't like?  Why do they keep them if they don't use them or like having them?  I am not a minimalist AT ALL, although DH totally is, and I still can't understand it.  If you don't like something that you have, you give it away.  If you do like something you have, you don't give it away.  At the end of every season you go through the kids' clothes to see what has holes and what has been grown out of or just not worn and dispose of that.

Maybe we just move too much to accumulate enough stuff.  Also, 7 kids are hard on things.  We read the covers off of books and wear holes in our bedding.

One of the things I've found interesting is how emotionally attached people are to "stuff".  Like I just watched the guy with the 160 pairs of sneakers he bought as collector's items.  What the heck???  He managed to narrow it down to 45 pairs at the end.  And I'm still like, WHAT THE HECK???  

I have no issues throwing out stuff.  In fact, I have to be careful because sometimes I think if I keep throwing away my kids crafts, I'll regret it someday.  So I'm trying to remember to save at least a few items each year.  But it's hard because I'm not a naturally sentimental person.  I'm much more attached to my digital photo blog, and thankfully, that does not take up space.  

2 hours ago, moonflower said:

 

from that article:

" Some of the best moments in Tidying Up are when, whilst sorting through the mess, her clients find long lost mementos with true value, like small photos, old letters or especially important books. "

now maybe I understand why the whole thing mystified me.  We go through every single item we own at least once a year and usually more often than that. I don't have long lost mementos. 

 

 

We are 6 people in a 1100sqft apartment.  Stuff has to earn its place here, and continuously, or it goes.  I'm not saying we have zero clutter, but I am in a near constant declutter mode, or else things quickly become unlivable.  So I also am able to stay on top of things.  I do wonder, as the nest empties, if we will begin to accumulate more clutter simply because we will be able to.  Luckily I have 15 years before that risk is a possibility.  LOL  I do think clutter may be related to people living in homes that are unnecessarily large- either because it's a McMansion, or because children have moved out or not yet been born.  I just cannot even imagine having an entire room/s devoted to clothes, shoes, boxes, etc.  The luxury of having an entire empty room!!!  I have already planned out my office/workout room for when I get the kid infestation out of the house!  😄

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On 1/3/2019 at 3:15 PM, StellaM said:

Watched eps 1-3. 

Wow. I can't believe people have so much stuff! No wonder they are overwhelmed.

I haven't Kon Mari-ed my home for a couple of years; I am itching to get going now. Won't take me long, as we just don't have lots of stuff. 

I LOVE the joy thing. I also love the way, in her book, she suggests you hang clothes. My hangers are open just so I can enjoy looking at my clothes moving from bright to dark, light to heavy. It's art. LOL. 

 

Okay, let’s talk about this clothes hanging thing. I don’t have mine color-coordinated, but I do hang by sleeve length, so all my tank type shirts hang first, then short sleeves, then 3/4, then long and in my long I go from thin to thick. I hang a couple casual dresses, my few pieces of dress clothes and my jacket at the end, mainly because I don’t like long things hanging in between short things.

So tell me, do you do clothing like this, but then sort by color within the type? I’m not super colorful, so most of my stuff is pretty basic (my kids swear I’d only own gray if they never shopped with me), but I’m just curious. I love my clothes to look nice hanging.

FWIW, I mostly keep out of season items in an IKEA storage container on a shelf above my clothes rod, but that logistically works much better in the summer when I can store all the winter items with no fear of cold days. I don’t have that luxury in the winter here in Louisiana, when we could have a random 80 degree day in the midst of a cold front.

I uploaded pics of our closet just for fun. I have all white hangers and storage boxes, and dh has all black hangers and storage boxes. We each have a 3 drawer IKEA chest underneath for folded clothes. There is no dresser in our room.

2CE9706C-3D64-401A-B0E8-016C0DAE2B58.jpeg

1403D704-17F4-4DFF-8894-44FD41BBEE93.jpeg

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43 minutes ago, StaceyinLA said:

 

Okay, let’s talk about this clothes hanging thing. I don’t have mine color-coordinated, but I do hang by sleeve length, so all my tank type shirts hang first, then short sleeves, then 3/4, then long and in my long I go from thin to thick. I hang a couple casual dresses, my few pieces of dress clothes and my jacket at the end, mainly because I don’t like long things hanging in between short things.

So tell me, do you do clothing like this, but then sort by color within the type? I’m not super colorful, so most of my stuff is pretty basic (my kids swear I’d only own gray if they never shopped with me), but I’m just curious. I love my clothes to look nice hanging.

FWIW, I mostly keep out of season items in an IKEA storage container on a shelf above my clothes rod, but that logistically works much better in the summer when I can store all the winter items with no fear of cold days. I don’t have that luxury in the winter here in Louisiana, when we could have a random 80 degree day in the midst of a cold front.

I uploaded pics of our closet just for fun. I have all white hangers and storage boxes, and dh has all black hangers and storage boxes. We each have a 3 drawer IKEA chest underneath for folded clothes. There is no dresser in our room.

2CE9706C-3D64-401A-B0E8-016C0DAE2B58.jpeg

1403D704-17F4-4DFF-8894-44FD41BBEE93.jpeg

 

It will be visually prettier if done by color, but I go by sleeve length then color in my closet too.

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I personally don't like my clothes sorted by colors hanging in my closet.  I prefer to group them by style...Short sleeves, long sleeves, button downs, sweaters.

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4 hours ago, Monica_in_Switzerland said:

One of the things I've found interesting is how emotionally attached people are to "stuff".  Like I just watched the guy with the 160 pairs of sneakers he bought as collector's items.  What the heck???  He managed to narrow it down to 45 pairs at the end.  And I'm still like, WHAT THE HECK???  

I have no issues throwing out stuff.  In fact, I have to be careful because sometimes I think if I keep throwing away my kids crafts, I'll regret it someday.  So I'm trying to remember to save at least a few items each year.  But it's hard because I'm not a naturally sentimental person.  I'm much more attached to my digital photo blog, and thankfully, that does not take up space.  

We are 6 people in a 1100sqft apartment.  Stuff has to earn its place here, and continuously, or it goes.  I'm not saying we have zero clutter, but I am in a near constant declutter mode, or else things quickly become unlivable.  So I also am able to stay on top of things.  I do wonder, as the nest empties, if we will begin to accumulate more clutter simply because we will be able to.  Luckily I have 15 years before that risk is a possibility.  LOL  I do think clutter may be related to people living in homes that are unnecessarily large- either because it's a McMansion, or because children have moved out or not yet been born.  I just cannot even imagine having an entire room/s devoted to clothes, shoes, boxes, etc.  The luxury of having an entire empty room!!!  I have already planned out my office/workout room for when I get the kid infestation out of the house!  😄

3

I think the size of homes grew out of the push for consumerism and "progress". Trying to keep the kid's stuff pared down is an internal battle b/c societal expectations are so skewed here as to what it means to provide for and take care of your children according to other parents and even more so between peers. Once people fill up their homes they build more storage or rent storage sheds, even w/ the size of American homes storage sheds are a huge business. BUT saying all of that I don't think you can necessarily always compare exactly, living in the country and city. In the country we do our own work we have storage for all sorts of things people that live in a city would not need- we do not hire our lawn done, household maintenance, vehicle maintenance etc and lots of people garden (I just have a small one) and have animals, that takes space as well. But certainly regardless of all of that Americans have so much to learn about using space efficiently, every time I go to Ikea I marvel at how well they use the space. Americans have always had so much space so we didn't have to even try, so combine that w/ the push for consumerism and it is a big mess. I think the tiny house movement goes too far but the pendulum needs to find it's place somewhere in between.

 

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8 hours ago, moonflower said:

I've been trying to figure out this phenomenon as I can't imagine having enough stuff to fill a whole hour of TV with the sorting and disposing of it.  So I looked at some before and afters on google and I still don't quite get it, I think.  Is it really that hard for people to get rid of things they don't use or don't like?  Why do they keep them if they don't use them or like having them?  I am not a minimalist AT ALL, although DH totally is, and I still can't understand it.  If you don't like something that you have, you give it away.  If you do like something you have, you don't give it away.  At the end of every season you go through the kids' clothes to see what has holes and what has been grown out of or just not worn and dispose of that.

Maybe we just move too much to accumulate enough stuff.  Also, 7 kids are hard on things.  We read the covers off of books and wear holes in our bedding.

For me, it's not so much that it's hard to get rid of things (though I do have a few issues related to that). It's the decision making. Going through every paper to make sure it's not something important before I toss it, and even if it is not important, do I want or need to keep it for some other reason? And then where do I put it if I'm going to keep it? It's mentally exhausting and produces anxiety in me. Papers are the worst, but this kind of decision making is hard in all of the categories of items for me.

And we don't go through everything we own every year. I'm guessing you may have a lot less stuff than the average family.

And not only do I have to deal with my own personal items, but I have to oversee the organization for almost everyone else in my family, because they need the help.

It's mentally and physically taxing for me. And I dislike it, so I avoid it, so things pile up, and then it becomes overwhelming. And then I ignore it, except when I am panicking about how I will ever deal with it all.

It sounds to me like you don't face those issues and feelings, but others do.

And I CAN be completely organized. I know how to do it, because I've had to multiple times will living in a home while it is on the market. But it is so hard for me that when I don't HAVE to live in complete orderliness, I let things slack, and then it quickly gets away from me.

Also, when I work on organizing with my kids, they are not amenable and fun like the kids in episode three. They are snarly and horrible. So that's super fun!

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@soror - I agree with everything you mention- if you are USING your things, then you don't have too many things.  It's when people (on the show) start shoveling out their clothes into one pile, discovering clothes they haven't seen in 20 years, clothes that still have the tags on... then it just seems crazy.  

 

I would love to see a six-month follow-up, kind of like Super Nanny used to do.  I wonder how many people were able to break the clutterbug/accumulate/consume habit and maintain systems that work once Marie was gone.  

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Well, my girls Kon-Mari'd their drawers, I did the little guy's, and my oldest is ready to attack his tomorrow.  I think this is the moment where we will also transition into them folding their own laundry.  YES!!!!!!!  

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1 minute ago, Monica_in_Switzerland said:

@soror - I agree with everything you mention- if you are USING your things, then you don't have too many things.  It's when people (on the show) start shoveling out their clothes into one pile, discovering clothes they haven't seen in 20 years, clothes that still have the tags on... then it just seems crazy.  

 

I would love to see a six-month follow-up, kind of like Super Nanny used to do.  I wonder how many people were able to break the clutterbug/accumulate/consume habit and maintain systems that work once Marie was gone.  

LOL, I'd to see a follow-up but then again I like happy endings, I like to think it all goes swimmingly afterwards! BUT really I think for alot of them they still have WAY too much and I don't know how it won't end up at a mess again, just maybe (hopefully) not as bad as it was.

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1 minute ago, soror said:

LOL, I'd to see a follow-up but then again I like happy endings, I like to think it all goes swimmingly afterwards! BUT really I think for alot of them they still have WAY too much and I don't know how it won't end up at a mess again, just maybe (hopefully) not as bad as it was.

 

This is one of my only complaints about the method.  The emphasis is on storing, not paring down or addressing constant accumulation.  Marie is like, "Bring in small boxes!" and not, "Stop buying shoes!" and that's why I get the feeling that ultimately these people may have reset their space temporarily, but long-term, it's not going to stay neat.  Maybe for some of them it will, but...  

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The follow-up idea brings to my mind thoughts I've had when watching home remodeling shows, such as Love It or List It, and Property Brothers.

The final shots of the beautiful home contain none of the owner's personal possessions, which have been carted off and stored during the renovation period. There is just no way that those homes can stay looking like that!

I've often thought, as they show the "before" pictures, that the first thing the owners really needed was to sort and pare down their possessions.

I love watching those shows, but I think they have skewed my mindset about what a nice home to live in looks like. My home never looks like those staged sets, so I always have at least a minor feeling of my efforts being not good enough.

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14 minutes ago, Monica_in_Switzerland said:

 

This is one of my only complaints about the method.  The emphasis is on storing, not paring down or addressing constant accumulation.  Marie is like, "Bring in small boxes!" and not, "Stop buying shoes!" and that's why I get the feeling that ultimately these people may have reset their space temporarily, but long-term, it's not going to stay neat.  Maybe for some of them it will, but...  

True but I think part of that is a cultural thing, she probably thinks that is "enough" to keep people organized but doesn't account for the American view on stuff and consumerism.

3 minutes ago, Storygirl said:

The follow-up idea brings to my mind thoughts I've had when watching home remodeling shows, such as Love It or List It, and Property Brothers.

The final shots of the beautiful home contain none of the owner's personal possessions, which have been carted off and stored during the renovation period. There is just no way that those homes can stay looking like that!

I've often thought, as they show the "before" pictures, that the first thing the owners really needed was to sort and pare down their possessions.

I love watching those shows, but I think they have skewed my mindset about what a nice home to live in looks like. My home never looks like those staged sets, so I always have at least a minor feeling of my efforts being not good enough.

Oh, good point, we're supposed to have all of these things but your not supposed to be able to see them, our homes are supposed to look show worthy.

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I have mixed feelings on those HGTV rooms ready for open house or whatever. They put decorative stuff out I wouldn’t even want because it’s just clutter to me. And karate chopped throw pillows never look natural to me. Lol  

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To me, the most logical way to start doing something is to assemble what I need to do it before I start.

Hence the yarn stash.  And the looms.  And the kitchen appliances.  And the books.  Book collections.  Collections of book collections.  

Also, when you have a curated book collection about something, it’s hard to ‘break up the set’.  Hence the set of children’s living books about California that I still have, despite not having children at this time.  

All this stuff does add up.  I am increasingly willing to let it go, but still get bogged down in preferring to place it rather than thrift store it.

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30 minutes ago, Storygirl said:

The follow-up idea brings to my mind thoughts I've had when watching home remodeling shows, such as Love It or List It, and Property Brothers.

The final shots of the beautiful home contain none of the owner's personal possessions, which have been carted off and stored during the renovation period. There is just no way that those homes can stay looking like that!

I've often thought, as they show the "before" pictures, that the first thing the owners really needed was to sort and pare down their possessions.

I love watching those shows, but I think they have skewed my mindset about what a nice home to live in looks like. My home never looks like those staged sets, so I always have at least a minor feeling of my efforts being not good enough.

 

A home you're selling should look like that, but a home you're living in should absolutely NOT look like that. 

To sell you have to pare down and depersonalize, so a space's purpose is defined, but it feels vaguely spacious (not having end tables will do that, but where do you set down your bottle of water?), impersonal, and aspirational.  As in - when I move into this aesthetically pleasing space I'll magically become a super-organized and clean minimalist.

But when you try to live like that it's annoying, uncomfortable, and impersonal.  It starts to feel as empty as living in a hotel room instead of like a home.  Homey places are usually pleasantly cluttered.

I routinely store 25-30% of our stuff when I list a house for sale, and we typically move every 2-3 years. My "job" is to slowly renovate our homes so they are easy to sell and we hopefully make some money on them.

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I just got through episode 3 this morning, and that one kind of resonated with me.  I don't have as much clothes to deal with as they did, especially after doing a good purge a few weeks ago, but I still went back (to my own stuff) and got rid of half a kitchen trash bag full of more things.

I've been sloppily KonMari folding for a couple of years now. I'm not particular into the whole "spark joy" concept, but I can manage something near a "do I love this" outlook. Today I decided that anything that didn't feel worthy of taking the time to meticulously re-fold could hit the road. It worked for me!

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5 hours ago, Monica_in_Switzerland said:

 

This is one of my only complaints about the method.  The emphasis is on storing, not paring down or addressing constant accumulation.  Marie is like, "Bring in small boxes!" and not, "Stop buying shoes!" and that's why I get the feeling that ultimately these people may have reset their space temporarily, but long-term, it's not going to stay neat.  Maybe for some of them it will, but...  

The method is about tidying up and sparking joy, not about the underlying psychological and spiritual issues that feed a consumerist mindset.  I think that's it's own show that Americans desperately need.  (I don't comment about countries and cultures I've never lived in, so I don't know what's going on in the rest of the industrialized world or other places.)

I would love to see a show addressing that, but I'm sure it would not be popular.  Most people would be defensive and offended at a people probing into why someone would accumulate so much stuff that isn't serving them well.  The possible answers are hard to admit: greed, envy, covetousness, pride, mindlessness, anesthesia, distraction, impulsiveness, short shortsightedness, delusion, etc. It hasn't been easy for me to face up to mine. It's high time we answered the tough question: Why does a nation of people living paycheck to paycheck, behind on retirement funds, in unprecedented debt, facing increasing cost of living and education costs, and expecting to live longer than any generation before, insist on buying stuff that doesn't contribute to those things and buys them on such a scale that it's interfering with keeping their households running smoothly and peacefully?

Edited by Homeschool Mom in AZ
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22 hours ago, Monica_in_Switzerland said:

I enjoy the show, even if I find some bits a bit hokey.  

More importantly, MY KIDS enjoy the show and have gone organization crazy!!!  So that's AWESOME!


Try to think of a reasonable monetary value of that.   Like something you would have truly been willing to pay if that result was guaranteed.  My guess is that Netflix just paid for itself for the next year.  
 

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I struggle with clutter, but what I find is that so much of it is related to the kids stuff.  I just can't keep up with the accumulation that happens in their rooms. 

And I can' quite figure out where it is coming from, as we don't buy them a ton of stuff - some is things they ick up or make, but not all by any means.  Bu tthey begin to have a harder and harder time keeping things tidy as it accumulates. And I start to get really overwhelmed by it as I see a bigger and bigger mess, and think I am going to have to take time dealing with that stuff rather than other things I need to do.

Right now I am getting to where I have to go through ds's room, it will take me half a day.  I also would like to rejig our kitchen storage which is no longer working for us, and I need to especially purge Tupperware that has missing parts.  I feel paralysed by the bedroom though as I don't know when I will have time - I find it difficult to set my mind to it when I am not clear in terms of being interrupted.

I'm not a minimalist and don't like that style in my own place anyway, and I am not generally all that sentimental about getting rid of stuff.  But it oppresses me anyway.

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Those of you who were shocked...you weren't *really* shocked, right?  People are all very different with different strengths and abilities.  Different things are intuitive to different people.

 

 

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1 hour ago, shawthorne44 said:


Try to think of a reasonable monetary value of that.   Like something you would have truly been willing to pay if that result was guaranteed.  My guess is that Netflix just paid for itself for the next year.  
 

 

It's ironic, because I canceled Netflix on the 1st, and so it expires on the 13th.  I was trying to reduce mental clutter.  🤣  I am glad we managed to squeak this show in under the wire.  

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2 hours ago, Carol in Cal. said:

To me, the most logical way to start doing something is to assemble what I need to do it before I start.

Hence the yarn stash.  And the looms.  And the kitchen appliances.  And the books.  Book collections.  Collections of book collections.  

Also, when you have a curated book collection about something, it’s hard to ‘break up the set’.  Hence the set of children’s living books about California that I still have, despite not having children at this time.  

All this stuff does add up.  I am increasingly willing to let it go, but still get bogged down in preferring to place it rather than thrift store it.

You just reminded me I need to go through books. We were given several like new books and I feel like I should keep some and donate the rest to a local struggling  school library. Although, they aren’t hardbacks so... 😬 Goodwill? I don’t know. 

maybe someone could help weigh in on these Townsend Press books. There are some I definitely want to keep but I don’t think all. I haven’t even heard of many 😳

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EAAA80E7-FE52-4845-BAF5-08573C743D52.jpeg

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If you or someone else in your family is not going to read them, I say let them all go.

I love books, but I've decided to let most of them live at the library and just come for visits sometimes.

(If you saw my bookshelves, you might not believe that statement, but I've culled them down (mostly) to just the ones I love.)

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7 hours ago, StaceyinLA said:

 

Okay, let’s talk about this clothes hanging thing. I don’t have mine color-coordinated, but I do hang by sleeve length, so all my tank type shirts hang first, then short sleeves, then 3/4, then long and in my long I go from thin to thick. I hang a couple casual dresses, my few pieces of dress clothes and my jacket at the end, mainly because I don’t like long things hanging in between short things.

So tell me, do you do clothing like this, but then sort by color within the type? I’m not super colorful, so most of my stuff is pretty basic (my kids swear I’d only own gray if they never shopped with me), but I’m just curious. I love my clothes to look nice hanging.

FWIW, I mostly keep out of season items in an IKEA storage container on a shelf above my clothes rod, but that logistically works much better in the summer when I can store all the winter items with no fear of cold days. I don’t have that luxury in the winter here in Louisiana, when we could have a random 80 degree day in the midst of a cold front.

I uploaded pics of our closet just for fun. I have all white hangers and storage boxes, and dh has all black hangers and storage boxes. We each have a 3 drawer IKEA chest underneath for folded clothes. There is no dresser in our room.

2CE9706C-3D64-401A-B0E8-016C0DAE2B58.jpeg

1403D704-17F4-4DFF-8894-44FD41BBEE93.jpeg

 

Within each category I go light to dark - so dresses, for example, all hang together, but they go from pink through red to navy and then black. 

Skirts are on a second hanger and go white through greens, reds, navy.

T-shirts and blouses are folded in a drawer, and I don't worry about colors there, because I can't see them other than to get them out. 

I put pants at the end of the skirts, light to dark, because folded over a hanger, they are roughly the same length as the skirts. 

I store off season clothes out of sight - in vacuum sealed bags in a cupboard. 

Looking at your picture there...I'd do white, light blue, royal blue, grey, black.

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Well I am not that organized for sure!  We don't own any stuff I don't want to own, and I don't have piles of hidden treasures or mismatched tupperware or unused clothes, but I also don't fold or hang anything.  It's all just a jumble.  I don't have enough stuff for that to be a problem, I think.  

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6 hours ago, Monica_in_Switzerland said:

 

This is one of my only complaints about the method.  The emphasis is on storing, not paring down or addressing constant accumulation.  Marie is like, "Bring in small boxes!" and not, "Stop buying shoes!" and that's why I get the feeling that ultimately these people may have reset their space temporarily, but long-term, it's not going to stay neat.  Maybe for some of them it will, but...  

 

It absolutely has had lasting effects for me.  I mean, I never had that much stuff as they do in the show! but since doing Kon Mari, my space has been permanently reset. 

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1 hour ago, prairiewindmomma said:

The only book I'd keep of those is Rebecca Rupp's Home Learning Year by Year.

That was my absolute favorite homeschooling book (sorry, SWB lol). My copy was well worn by the time I passed it on. 

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Only the ones with the TP logo are on the chopping block. Thank you, I feel much better about letting them go now. Ds said he might want a Tarzan book (one I was thinking of keeping) but it’s true that we could just check stuff out. 

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I organize by color (I'm a quilter, I can't help it) and within each color I go from left to right: sleeveless, short sleeve, 3/4 sleeve, long sleeve, heavy fabric long sleeve.  Dresses are in their own section. I hang everything with tops on the top rack and pants, skirts, and dresses on the low rack. Snowgear is in my amiore that used to hold a tv.  My FIL put a closet rod in it for me.  Now if a doorway to Narnia opens, we're prepared.

My sentimental items are in my cedar chest.  I have one folded stack per person: self, husband, oldest, middle, youngest. When the lid doesn't close it's time to cull things until it does.

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It's so peaceful having things organised! I like that folding makes me slow down. 

I did find my ability to have an uncluttered house improved dramatically once the kids were old enough to no longer play with toys.  It makes a huge difference, especially in small spaces. 

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On 1/6/2019 at 6:56 PM, Carol in Cal. said:

What I learned from MOTH—Some people use index cards to schedule their cleaning.  I will never ever been one of those people.  The idea of that is horrifying to me.  No judgement though.

This was the Sidetracked Home Executives method. Would it help to think of it as a flexible to-do list where you only ever have to record “dust door frame” once then you never ever have to write or type it again. It’s very helpful for people who get distracted by screens and need to stay out of the matrix to remain focused. 

On 1/7/2019 at 4:36 PM, PrincessMommy said:

I'm half-way into the first episode.  I don't like it.  She is too cutsie, and I'm sorry - it seems to waste a lot of time "thanking" every piece - and "being nice to it" (don't just throw it on the floor!).  I'm thinking that we Americans are already too touchy-feely.  Do we really need her too?    I just seems too gimmicky for my taste.   There's really nothing revolutionary about it... I just need to get off my butt and do it! 

I tried to read the book last year and couldn't finish it.  

I'm looking for Susan Powder of the cleaning world.  Seriously, she could make bundle being the anti-KonMarie.   Grab her and  Mr.T and let's get to work people.!  

I think the thanking thing might help people who hoard for emotional reasons. If you’re like me and ended up with too much stuff just because you procrastinated purging, it’s easy to part with things once you actually DO it. 

On 1/10/2019 at 11:46 AM, Storygirl said:

It would be nice for my kids to be able to see all of their shirts in their drawers like that. But I will never never never be able to get them to fold them that way. I can't even get them to do a simplified laundry fold, though we've been working on laundry habits for years (**teens with ADHD problem**). And I am not doing their laundry for them; it is rightfully their job.

BUT now I'm thinking of having them roll their t-shirts. It may be easier for them than folding. And easier to see individual shirts in the drawer when they are rolled, instead of folded and stacked. Not sure when we will have time to switch it over, because it would be a big project to sort and roll everything. And big projects tend to spawn drama in my kids, sadly.

One of the things stressed in the book is that you can’t Konmari someone else’s stuff. I think they have to buy in for it to work. You might have to settle for beautiful order in your own room. You could get them to pare down, but conning another person into Konmari-ing against their will doesn’t sound like fun. 

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In her book she talks about modelling Kon Mari for others in your household she definitely does not suggest you go and apply this method to other people's stuff! Without fail, my ds Kon Mari's his room the day after I do mine - it's some weird symbiotic thing - but dd1 only did hers for the first time last week, after having seen me usw the method over 4 years, and dd2 has never bothered. 

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24 minutes ago, StellaM said:

In her book she talks about modelling Kon Mari for others in your household she definitely does not suggest you go and apply this method to other people's stuff! Without fail, my ds Kon Mari's his room the day after I do mine - it's some weird symbiotic thing - but dd1 only did hers for the first time last week, after having seen me usw the method over 4 years, and dd2 has never bothered. 

 

I love where she says she wishes she could go back and slap herself for purging her families stuff when she was a kid.  

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Re books, this isn't Kondo, but we used to keep our books under control by only keeping books that would get reread (definitely, not 'maybe one day') or were likely to go OOP. Anything you can get from the library or on Kindle or whatever - out. Or the books you cannot live without.

I KM'ed my personal book shelf down to a single shelf - maybe 20 books ? 

It's harder with kids books, or books you need for work. But even then, confining myself to books I will definitely re-use or want to read to hypothetical grandchildren, books that are now OOP and one or two sentimental faves is possible. That's more like a whole bookcase though.

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We don't have many books because moving books is heavy and annoying, but since we've settled here for hopefully years, I'm accumulating them again.  As long as it is a book I bought on purpose, rather than was gifted and kept even if I didn't want it (which I don't do, anyway), I would be happy to keep thousands of books and build up a small library.  My grandmother had a library in her basement when I was a kid and it was pretty awesome.

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I get her point about people having to make their own decisions about their possessions. But the truth is that my kids won't sort and organize if I don't require it. They will never be inspired by seeing me do it. Just not the kind of people that they are (except for the oldest).

The toy purging days are mostly in the past now (all teens, plus we just moved and got rid of most things from the play room).  So now it's mostly moving too-small clothes out of their drawers and closets periodically. They never have to get rid of things that they would rather keep. They just don't want to do it at all.

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12 hours ago, Monica_in_Switzerland said:

 

This is one of my only complaints about the method.  The emphasis is on storing, not paring down or addressing constant accumulation.  Marie is like, "Bring in small boxes!" and not, "Stop buying shoes!" and that's why I get the feeling that ultimately these people may have reset their space temporarily, but long-term, it's not going to stay neat.  Maybe for some of them it will, but...  

I think she expects the whole “spark joy” thing to greatly reduce your belongings. I think that’s why everything comes out into a pile. It’s expected that a LOT of items won’t make it back into the collection. In the book it seemed like the point of the boxes was to not buy boxes, but USE boxes you found/emptied while purging. Maybe to deter people from hitting the Container Store and buying more stuff. 

12 hours ago, heartlikealion said:

I have mixed feelings on those HGTV rooms ready for open house or whatever. They put decorative stuff out I wouldn’t even want because it’s just clutter to me. And karate chopped throw pillows never look natural to me. Lol  

 

What are karate chopped pillows? (I only saw one episode.)

10 hours ago, Bluegoat said:

I struggle with clutter, but what I find is that so much of it is related to the kids stuff.  I just can't keep up with the accumulation that happens in their rooms. 

And I can' quite figure out where it is coming from, as we don't buy them a ton of stuff - some is things they ick up or make, but not all by any means.  Bu tthey begin to have a harder and harder time keeping things tidy as it accumulates. And I start to get really overwhelmed by it as I see a bigger and bigger mess, and think I am going to have to take time dealing with that stuff rather than other things I need to do.

Right now I am getting to where I have to go through ds's room, it will take me half a day.  I also would like to rejig our kitchen storage which is no longer working for us, and I need to especially purge Tupperware that has missing parts.  I feel paralysed by the bedroom though as I don't know when I will have time - I find it difficult to set my mind to it when I am not clear in terms of being interrupted.

I'm not a minimalist and don't like that style in my own place anyway, and I am not generally all that sentimental about getting rid of stuff.  But it oppresses me anyway.

My clutter was the result of gradual accumulation over YEARS, with only sporadic purging. Our home isn’t big, but it’s a bit bigger than we actually need. I was able to stash stuff in the basement and forget about it. This summer, however, I wanted to create a large empty room in the basement, so I got rid of half the stuff down there. It was EASY because my kids are grown and I longer cared about those things. Had I tried to remove that much stuff when they were little it would’ve been a Very Big Deal. 

I call this Procrastineering. 

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We require ours to purge occasionally.  They are children; they are not 100% responsible for their possessions and don't have 100% control over their possessions.  We have to move them and pay to keep a house large enough to hold all of them.  If all 7 of my kids owned as many things as my only-child niece, we'd need a 10 bedroom house.  As they get older they get more control, of course.  I made the mistake with DD13 of allowing people to buy her stuffed animals and even bought some myself when she was little.  She still has pretty much every stuffed animal she was given before age 10 or so.  It is by far the largest quantity of stuff any single member of the family has.  She's not ready to part with them, though, so I haven't pushed it.  It does mean that she has less room for clothes and other possessions.

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3 hours ago, moonflower said:

We require ours to purge occasionally.  They are children; they are not 100% responsible for their possessions and don't have 100% control over their possessions.  We have to move them and pay to keep a house large enough to hold all of them.  If all 7 of my kids owned as many things as my only-child niece, we'd need a 10 bedroom house.  As they get older they get more control, of course.  I made the mistake with DD13 of allowing people to buy her stuffed animals and even bought some myself when she was little.  She still has pretty much every stuffed animal she was given before age 10 or so.  It is by far the largest quantity of stuff any single member of the family has.  She's not ready to part with them, though, so I haven't pushed it.  It does mean that she has less room for clothes and other possessions.

 

Stuffed animals are clearly a tool of the oppressors to keep parents in their place.  They are the one major category that my kids just. can't. pare. down.  I've gotten them to at least keep the majority in our basement storage room, but I never manage to get any donated, because "I still loooooooove that one!"  🙄  

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3 hours ago, KungFuPanda said:

What are karate chopped pillows? (I only saw one episode.)

A couple posters mentioned staged homes (HGTV shows not the Tidying show) and how they don’t actually have the owner’s items out. I then commented on staged homes’ appearances. Many interior designers or realtors? staging the home seem to karate chop throw pillows at the top just before they place them on the furniture. Like a weird way of fluffing them? I don’t know. I think it looks unnatural and stupid. 

https://www.apartmenttherapy.com/whats-your-biggest-design-pet-peeve-172940

Edited by heartlikealion
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22 hours ago, Monica_in_Switzerland said:

 

This is one of my only complaints about the method.  The emphasis is on storing, not paring down or addressing constant accumulation.  Marie is like, "Bring in small boxes!" and not, "Stop buying shoes!" and that's why I get the feeling that ultimately these people may have reset their space temporarily, but long-term, it's not going to stay neat.  Maybe for some of them it will, but...  

I thought the baseball card guy didn't purge enough, but I think that's something that will require him to go through it multiple times to get it down to a manageable level. 

For the shoe guy, I liked that he started actually wearing the shoes and appreciating them, not just shoving them in a closet to have and not enjoy. That shows a different way of looking at things. Again, that's another one that would probably require multiple purges. 

Hopefully, now that they know how to purge and organize, it will be a more regular process. It's really hard the first time after putting it off for so long and having so much stuff. It's not so bad when you have less and less to go through. Going through the same things again a few months later, I've found to have a different mindset toward some things and it's been easier to get rid of. 

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10 hours ago, StellaM said:

In her book she talks about modelling Kon Mari for others in your household she definitely does not suggest you go and apply this method to other people's stuff! Without fail, my ds Kon Mari's his room the day after I do mine - it's some weird symbiotic thing - but dd1 only did hers for the first time last week, after having seen me usw the method over 4 years, and dd2 has never bothered. 

 

So, at what age does this kick in?  Because my kids become sentimental about actual garbage they find outside, and want to keep it in their rooms.  And ds still has a difficult time organising simple tidying.

9 hours ago, StellaM said:

Re books, this isn't Kondo, but we used to keep our books under control by only keeping books that would get reread (definitely, not 'maybe one day') or were likely to go OOP. Anything you can get from the library or on Kindle or whatever - out. Or the books you cannot live without.

I KM'ed my personal book shelf down to a single shelf - maybe 20 books ? 

It's harder with kids books, or books you need for work. But even then, confining myself to books I will definitely re-use or want to read to hypothetical grandchildren, books that are now OOP and one or two sentimental faves is possible. That's more like a whole bookcase though.

 

This is my method too, now.  Anything that will be read/used is in, stuff that won't is out.  I have a few exceptions for significant heirlooms or books with a separate kind of value.  Everything else goes to the church book sale once a year.

I fid it helps to think about the books withering away, unread.

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On 1/11/2019 at 9:23 AM, Katy said:

 

It will be visually prettier if done by color, but I go by sleeve length then color in my closet too.

 

I do it by sleeve length. As far as it being visually pleasing? Well, I believe there’s a reason my closet has a door on it. Some spaces really should remain purely functional, IMO, even if they aren’t pretty (which is a subjective value, anyway).

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