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shawthorne44

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About shawthorne44

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    More Kilts!

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  1. Soooooo true. DH has to do things things like dig holes that he didn't have to do in the suburbs. Near our previous house the city had a Day Labor Center. It was funded with permit money. During the day you could drive up and tell a city employee what work you wanted, how long it would take, what you were willing to pay and if English-speaking was required. The first person on the list that was a match, got in your car.
  2. Walking to things: One thing that surprised me about the small town life is that I can walk to things. I'd always lived in large suburbs. In the house I had before this, there was one small shopping center with a 7-11, one crappy restaurant and a library 3/4 mile away. I only did the walk when DD was a baby and the real purpose was to take a walk. The library was a bonus at the end. At my childhood house, there was only the junior high within walking distance. Now the two block center of the small town is a 0.5 mile away. It has a drug store, auto parks store, our doc, a den
  3. We moved to the exurbs and love it. I had to be within a reasonable distance to my work. We moved to a small town of 3K people. It had been remote, rural. But, when a closer-to-civilization rural town turned into a large suburban city, our town became an exurb. We live IN town, but we bought a house on an acre. None of our neighbors have that much land. We'd leaned toward unincorporated land, but God meant us to have this. We have 12 chickens and two Diary Goats, and two dairy goat babies. DH had wanted elbow room, i.e. land, and I wanted neighbors. The standard lot outside of
  4. I think the worst is this year. I worry that DD will be crushed, since she loves this aunt. The trouble is my aunt puts much thought into gifts, just not the right thoughts. Child's lefthanded gold clubs bought at an estate sale. Yes, DD is lefthanded. I have not been on a golf course ever in my life although 30 years ago I did go to a driving range about 5 times total. DH went golfing once about 30 years ago, got a hole-in-one and declared that he was done with golfing. We live in the exurbs. Rural exurbs about 40 minutes away from the nearest golf course,
  5. DH is the SAHD while I work FT. He does most of the homeschooling and works on the house (on the second addition now) It is what works for us. I was glad that both my parents worked outside the home, and I am a better person for it. Just because she would have nitpicked me to death. Having her not there forced them to leave a list of what I needed to get done. If it was done, then they had no reason to complain. So, I had to take responsibility to get stuff done before I relaxed. I would have loved to have been homeschooled though. I'm the type of kid that could have gotten
  6. One thing I would keep in forefront of your what-if plans, is that if you won't have DH's income, you will no longer be tied to the HCOL area. You could move anywhere. Anywhere. So, I wouldn't toss out the idea of, for example, a home daycare because your current lease doesn't allow it. It is a lease. States are different, but death usually allows you out of a lease. If you hated the idea of running a home daycare, that is different. You could also start a pod homeschool. With the school shutdowns, they became very popular, and I expect that they'll stay an accepted thing. You accep
  7. Overkill?!? With History. I really don't understand that concept. I have a STEM brain and my History education in school was worthless, and I went to a 'good' school. For example all I needed to know for world history from the 20th century was which country fought with us in one world war and against us in the other. So, I've spent a good part of my non-fiction reading as an adult on history. I think the rigorous history eduation is what first attracted me to WTM. Reading the physical books, that might be overkill. But the audiobooks shouldn't be too bad. The first three bo
  8. That is so helpful! I used to be good at searches back when I had to use the library. That skill apparently completely atrophied.
  9. That is so helpful! I forgot that we need to Texas History and I insist on doing American History. So, she'd probably be 11 or 12 before we start on the Heroes book. She does love love love audiobooks. Before I saw the updates I googled Durant and Homeschooling thinking that someone else might have blogged about it. Nope. Too much clutter from people homeschooling in Durant, OK. On her maturity-level. The words should be fine. Subject matter, I'm not sure. For example, she cried through SOTW slavery. She was appalled at SOTW Incas, or was it the Horrible History Incas
  10. That is so helpful! I forgot that we need to Texas History and I insist on doing American History. So, she'd probably be 11 or 12 before we start on the Heroes book. She does love love love audiobooks. Before I saw the updates I googled Durant and Homeschooling thinking that someone else might have blogged about it. Nope. Too much clutter from people homeschooling in Durant, OK.
  11. On work friends. I've always been leery of work friends when it is your career. When I was a teen it was fine. But, friendships can cause drama at work, particularly female-female friendships.
  12. The Civilization series audiobooks look reasonable for high school. 11 volumes, so figure 3 per year. The first three are 50-something hours, 36.5 hours and 32.5 hours. They are taking forever and a day to download, but then our computer and internet aren't that great. My thought right now is to have DD take history at the local community college and then listen to these as balance and more comprehensive. A brilliant friend of ours took a college course on the entire series. Even he fell behind in the reading. We were reminded of Durant when he offered us his books. I hope someon
  13. It is hard. I think because most adults aren't looking for a friend. Then those that are, aren't a good match for you. The only friends I've made as an adult came from two locations: One, I joined a social club and regularly attended a couple of weekly events. One event was a bargain night at a brewpub and we'd eat and drink beer. Another was a lunch group. People are sort of forced to sit and talk. Particularly in the lunch group I grew to treasure some people that weren't my cup-of-tea just because we'd verbally shared so much of our lives. I haven't been involved in
  14. No, and I don't know anyone who has. I think that fact is at the core of juries awarding outrageous amounts of money in lawsuits. Everyone on the jury doesn't trust the insurance company.
  15. I found this amusing. The manuscript was found in his Granddaughter's garage.
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