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The Girls' Mom

The 2017 Acceptance Thread

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Creekland (((hugs)))

 

While the colleges are trying to bring in first generation college goers, medical schools are bending backward to only accept the privileged. Good to know. 😤

 

Actually, both first gen college goers and kids of doctors are those being accepted to med school.  Having a good backstory is also a hook.  My son has neither.

 

He just told us the results of talking with his Pre-Med adviser...

 

I need to retract what I said about their fixing their timetable about getting commission letters out.  They have NOT changed to doing those early like most other schools do.   :cursing:   Kids from other schools will again be getting interview acceptances before kids from UR can even submit secondaries.

 

Otherwise, he learned that he was the TOP applicant recommended for this year - received their top score category.

 

BUT he also learned that his main major, Brain & Cognitive SCIENCE is not recognized as a science for med school recommendation letters, so he had only submitted one "real" science prof recommendation letter instead of two (along with all the other sources providing letters).  That might have made the difference in getting looked at, since his app is one of hundreds or thousands when received by a school.  When he asked them why they didn't tell him this before - like last year when they looked at his app(!!!) he was told that was something he should have been aware of himself.   :banghead:

 

No folks, this is all new to my kid and YOU are his pre-med advisers.  It's YOUR job to advise and point out errors BEFORE application.  (GRR!)

 

So to all guidance counselors out there with kids thinking of heading pre-med - be aware of how good/bad the med school advising is at any future college choice.  URoc failed my guy IMO.

 

Incidentally, he also told us he met with one of the doctors he's shadowed (who wrote a recommendation letter) and asked him for another (should he reapply for next year - something he's debating).  That doc was stunned.  It at least makes me think our reactions aren't due to "special snowflake" syndrome.

 

And no, my guy will NOT consider Caribbean schools (sigh).  When I pressed him for "why" he told me it's because he's seen students from there (UR) who don't do so well get eagerly accepted in the Caribbean - they accept essentially anyone - and he doesn't want to feel part of that after he's done so much.  I guess I can respect that.

 

Current considerations on his part are reapplying for next year, Americorps (one year commitment, so could be done with reapplication), Teach for America (two year commitment, so not compatible with reapplying), heading for a PhD (not compatible), or "something else."  In general, he admitted to being really bummed at the moment.  I can sympathize.

 

On a good note, he also found out he was voted Vice Pres for a new Tango Club they got started recently... Someone out there loves him!  I just wish it could fill the otherwise deep void he's feeling. (sigh)

 

Off to do something useful here now.  I've been lounging pretty much all day and I've a table that needs to be cleared off for starters... tons of mail built up on it due to my absence... some of it could be important I suppose.

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thank you Creekland. I think your karma will come back to your DS in a big way, it's just not yet clear how.

Edited by madteaparty

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The world is definitely losing out on a good doctor in this case.  Just from folks who know him his schedule would have been full - regardless of what specialty he ended up in.  He's that dedicated to getting things right and he has terrific people skills.

 

I keep mentioning St Kitts, Grenada, St Maarten and our willingness to adjust our island of preference.  Time will tell what he decides for Plan C.  He has time to mull it over for a bit and figure out what he wants to be when he grows up.  He's thought he's known since he was 8, so we can give him a few weeks or months to pick a new path.  I know he's applying to Americorps, so if that comes through, that may be it.

 

 

I don't know which schools he applied to this year, but if he is willing to reapply next year he may want to look at DO schools such as LECOM and PCOM in the US instead of St. Kitts, etc.  The acceptance rate is a little better than for MD schools, and he wouldn't the issues with residencies that he would with St. Kitts, etc.

 

MCAT scores really matter. But showing personal interest can also tip the scale- calling, writing extra letters, sending extra letters of recommendation, etc.  Also, if he can work in a hospital doing anything this next year and try to connect with a doctor and get a letter from them that could help. 

 

Not everyone in med school has a doctor in the family-- someone has to the first one!

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MCAT scores really matter. But showing personal interest can also tip the scale- calling, writing extra letters, sending extra letters of recommendation, etc.  Also, if he can work in a hospital doing anything this next year and try to connect with a doctor and get a letter from them that could help. 

 

Not everyone in med school has a doctor in the family-- someone has to the first one!

 

His MCAT score is one of the Top 4% of everyone taking the MCAT including having a perfect score on the section including his major and just being one question off on at least one other - perhaps two, my memory is a little fuzzy.

 

He's worked in the hospital there at UR (volunteering or shadowing) since his sophomore year and worked in a lab there freshman summer.  He's got quite a few MDs who are professional friends now - at least three wrote letters of recommendation for him.  Then he had the medical mission trip to Africa and volunteering for hospice, etc.

 

He's not really lacking anything TBH - except now we learn about the science designation of his major not being recognized by med schools (sigh).  And then the late timing of getting everything together probably didn't help.

 

But I really don't want to derail this thread any longer.  I just want others considering college choices (now that they have acceptances) to be aware of some of these nuts and bolts IF considering a pre-med path and living in a state without a designated "state resident" med school.

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Actually, both first gen college goers and kids of doctors are those being accepted to med school.  Having a good backstory is also a hook.  My son has neither.

 

He just told us the results of talking with his Pre-Med adviser...

 

I need to retract what I said about their fixing their timetable about getting commission letters out.  They have NOT changed to doing those early like most other schools do.   :cursing:   Kids from other schools will again be getting interview acceptances before kids from UR can even submit secondaries.

 

Otherwise, he learned that he was the TOP applicant recommended for this year - received their top score category.

 

BUT he also learned that his main major, Brain & Cognitive SCIENCE is not recognized as a science for med school recommendation letters, so he had only submitted one "real" science prof recommendation letter instead of two (along with all the other sources providing letters).  That might have made the difference in getting looked at, since his app is one of hundreds or thousands when received by a school.  When he asked them why they didn't tell him this before - like last year when they looked at his app(!!!) he was told that was something he should have been aware of himself.   :banghead:

 

No folks, this is all new to my kid and YOU are his pre-med advisers.  It's YOUR job to advise and point out errors BEFORE application.  (GRR!)

 

So to all guidance counselors out there with kids thinking of heading pre-med - be aware of how good/bad the med school advising is at any future college choice.  URoc failed my guy IMO.

 

Incidentally, he also told us he met with one of the doctors he's shadowed (who wrote a recommendation letter) and asked him for another (should he reapply for next year - something he's debating).  That doc was stunned.  It at least makes me think our reactions aren't due to "special snowflake" syndrome.

 

And no, my guy will NOT consider Caribbean schools (sigh).  When I pressed him for "why" he told me it's because he's seen students from there (UR) who don't do so well get eagerly accepted in the Caribbean - they accept essentially anyone - and he doesn't want to feel part of that after he's done so much.  I guess I can respect that.

 

Current considerations on his part are reapplying for next year, Americorps (one year commitment, so could be done with reapplication), Teach for America (two year commitment, so not compatible with reapplying), heading for a PhD (not compatible), or "something else."  In general, he admitted to being really bummed at the moment.  I can sympathize.

 

On a good note, he also found out he was voted Vice Pres for a new Tango Club they got started recently... Someone out there loves him!  I just wish it could fill the otherwise deep void he's feeling. (sigh)

 

Off to do something useful here now.  I've been lounging pretty much all day and I've a table that needs to be cleared off for starters... tons of mail built up on it due to my absence... some of it could be important I suppose.

Wow, just wow.  I thought the general wisdom for those planning on med school was to simply study what you love in undergrad (along with the general science pre-reqs).  How was your son supposed to know that his major put him at a disadvantage?

 

U of R has failed him BIG TIME.  I would be absolutely livid.  U or R's response is unbelievable.  They are called "advisors" for a reason.  What is the point of having an advisor if the student is supposed to figure all of this out by himself?  I am stunned.  I can only imagine how you feel.  (hugs)

 

 

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DD is in at UNC Chapel Hill and NC State.  She won't find out about any others until April 1st.  

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Wow, just wow.  I thought the general wisdom for those planning on med school was to simply study what you love in undergrad (along with the general science pre-reqs).  How was your son supposed to know that his major put him at a disadvantage?

 

U of R has failed him BIG TIME.  I would be absolutely livid.  U or R's response is unbelievable.  They are called "advisors" for a reason.  What is the point of having an advisor if the student is supposed to figure all of this out by himself?  I am stunned.  I can only imagine how you feel.  (hugs)

 

 

To clarify, it was not his major choice that was the problem.  It's his choice of profs for letters of recommendation.  He chose those who knew him best - those in his department who he's worked for and taken classes with.  One of those was Bio (his other major), but the others were BCS (his main major).  Brain & Cognitive Science is not considered a "science" major by med schools even if science is in the name at URoc.  He could have EASILY picked another Bio prof (or Chem or Anatomy or whatever - even Physics or Astronomy, etc) - if only he had known.  The lad has had an A- or two along the way, but never anything less.  He's been friends with pretty much every prof he's ever had.  He's kicking himself right now for not having asked someone else, but he just didn't know he should have.  (sigh)

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He's now working on figuring out a Plan C for his life - possibly research (esp since he IS loved there), possibly Americorps and a volunteering life - or we're still trying to get him to consider going to the Caribbean with us - he could do med school there.

 

 

 

 

Oh Creekland  :grouphug:  :grouphug:  :grouphug:

I'm flabbergasted.  No Words.

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DD received her acceptance at UNC Chapel Hill. She was also notified of merit awards at Ohio State: National Buckeye scholarship and Maximus scholarship.

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His MCAT score is one of the Top 4% of everyone taking the MCAT including having a perfect score on the section including his major and just being one question off on at least one other - perhaps two, my memory is a little fuzzy.

 

He's worked in the hospital there at UR (volunteering or shadowing) since his sophomore year and worked in a lab there freshman summer.  He's got quite a few MDs who are professional friends now - at least three wrote letters of recommendation for him.  Then he had the medical mission trip to Africa and volunteering for hospice, etc.

 

He's not really lacking anything TBH - except now we learn about the science designation of his major not being recognized by med schools (sigh).  And then the late timing of getting everything together probably didn't help.

 

But I really don't want to derail this thread any longer.  I just want others considering college choices (now that they have acceptances) to be aware of some of these nuts and bolts IF considering a pre-med path and living in a state without a designated "state resident" med school.

 

:grouphug:  I 'm so sorry for both of you! This is just shocking.

 

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His MCAT score is one of the Top 4% of everyone taking the MCAT including having a perfect score on the section including his major and just being one question off on at least one other - perhaps two, my memory is a little fuzzy.

 

He's worked in the hospital there at UR (volunteering or shadowing) since his sophomore year and worked in a lab there freshman summer. He's got quite a few MDs who are professional friends now - at least three wrote letters of recommendation for him. Then he had the medical mission trip to Africa and volunteering for hospice, etc.

 

He's not really lacking anything TBH - except now we learn about the science designation of his major not being recognized by med schools (sigh). And then the late timing of getting everything together probably didn't help.

 

But I really don't want to derail this thread any longer. I just want others considering college choices (now that they have acceptances) to be aware of some of these nuts and bolts IF considering a pre-med path and living in a state without a designated "state resident" med school.

I really hope he doesn't give up on his dream. Get that second science letter and he can have the first submitted application next year! Seriously, timing can mean so much. We have local schools who don't do on-campus interviewing until October, when our national hiring committee starts meeting in August. It just blows my mind. So grateful my school had August interviews back in the day.

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:grouphug:  I 'm so sorry for both of you! This is just shocking.

 

 

Very much so.  It's the equivalent of applying to an undergrad that requires 4 years of English (or any other major subject) with just 3 years and expecting to get considered (sigh).  The two places he got interview requests from both asked him for an additional recommendation letter from another science prof.  He sent it to them.  He'd have done it for all if only he had known.

 

At least now we know a good reason why his app probably wasn't even really looked at (given the competition out there, it likely just got discarded at most places), but it honestly doesn't make me feel any better - esp about URoc's med school advising.  He was supposedly their top student applying and NO ONE caught this until now - and then they tell him he should have checked on that himself (which is true, but the lad is incredibly busy with everything he has going on plus studying and TBH, he trusted their oversight).

 

I'll cross my fingers that he gets in there (or the other place) off the waitlist (esp since that one is MSTP), but I'm still encouraging him to create a Plan C.

 

And as before, anyone considering similar things down the road - now you have one more thing to check on - how good is their medical advising team.  I would look for high med school acceptance rates.  If your student can do their part, at least the school should also be doing theirs.  I knew URoc's was lower than many others, but I falsely assumed that an unhooked student doing well would still do ok.

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D is in at the University of Maryland. She'll need big scholarship money for it to be a feasible option to her other acceptances + scholarships.

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No, definitely not. He majored in chemistry and was planning to be a doctor. But you're right that he has been living abroad. Last summer he got a scholarship from the German government to do physical chemistry research at a university there. He enjoyed Germany very much, but he said he felt relatively uneducated surrounded by people that spoke a minimum of two languages fluently. So he decided to stay and do intensive German study.

 

Honestly, if you had told me a few years ago that he would be focusing his major studies and research on physical chemistry, such a mathematically intensive area of chemistry, and then living abroad and pursuing by choice intensive foreign language study, I would have told you the likelihood of that happening was about equal to him being abducted by aliens, based on our homeschooling battles over math and foreign language. So in comparison, his recent decision to apply to LSE rather than medical schools was not so surprising.

 

I hope your dd finds a grad program abroad that she loves!

 

What a cool story. It is fun to hear how people change interests and the whys behind the changes.

 

My daughter had an opportunity to intern in Zurich after her junior year, but she changed her mind mainly due to the internship conflicting with fall term at her school. She did wonder how she would feel living where did not understand most of the language spoken around her when she wasn't at work, where most things would have been in English. 

 

Instead, she spent spring term studying/interning abroad through her school. That is when she started looking at grad school as a way to justify spending more time abroad as her major doesn't require grad school. She found a program in a specialty she liked. However, she received a job offer from her summer internship that she couldn't turn down. She did delay her start date to spend the summer travelling abroad. Her new job will be far from where we live. but when people ask about that, I say at least it doesn't require a passport. (Seriously, it would have been fine if she had decided to go the foreign grad school route also.)

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I really hope he doesn't give up on his dream. Get that second science letter and he can have the first submitted application next year! Seriously, timing can mean so much. We have local schools who don't do on-campus interviewing until October, when our national hiring committee starts meeting in August. It just blows my mind. So grateful my school had August interviews back in the day.

 

Creekland,

 

I'm so sorry to hear your son's news. While my fingers are crossed that one of his waitlists turns into an acceptance, I agree with Lawyer&Mom that it seems a shame to abandon his lifelong plans when there is a setback. 

 

My kids' college has a high acceptance rate for medical schools, and the students give all the credit to the person in charge of preparing them for applying for admissions, who says the only time to stop applying is when you decide you do not want to be a doctor after all. Your son's story shows the importance of good advising. I would say that is as important as a school's acceptance rate, which will vary from year to year for lots of reasons. 

 

Since your family has lost confidence in the med school advising at your son's school (for good reason), I was wondering if there were private medical school application consultants like there are for undergraduate admissions. I did a random search and found there is such a thing if your son wants an outside opinion on what to do next. In that search, this article caught my eye.  https://www.noodle.com/articles/rebounding-from-medical-school-rejections  It seems like good advice on whether or not to reapply. The article mentions that some med schools will offer feedback on their applications to applicants who did not get into the school . Since your son is a top applicant from the college that accompanies a med school, it seems he would definitely be able to get feedback, directly or indirectly. 

 

P.S. The students who I know in medical school right now do not have doctors in their families, so it is definitely possible.

Edited by *LC
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(((Creekland))) 

 

Having met your son, I am absolutely astounded by your post.  Your Ds is a personable, intelligent young man, and ANY med school would be most fortunate to have him.

 

Our oldest Ds received bad advising, or rather a lack of good advising, at VT, and it left us feeling betrayed.  He is doing very well in his career, but it left us with a bad taste in our mouth for the school.  If any of our children went there we would be more hands-on with helping them.  The UR med app advising is ten times worse.  I can't even imagine. 

 

I hope your son does not let go of his dream because of this roadblock.  He will make an EXCELLENT doctor.

 

 

Edited by MomsintheGarden
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Creekland, I can only echo what other posters have already said. Based on what you have written about your son, I am stunned. I really know nothing about med school admissions, so all I have to offer are hugs. And another echo: you are very generous to share your family's story.

 

My son is a senior getting a BA in psych, and he hopes to enter a MS clinical mental health counseling program. Advising from the school? Utterly useless. I am trying to be the guidance counselor, but am ill-equipped for the job. I really did not foresee myself in this position at this point but such is life. Sigh I hope to be posting an acceptance in this thread at some point, but who knows. Maybe yes, maybe no.

 

ETA: Congrats to thoes who recently posted acceptances. I did not just glance over those posts :) As I am well-aquainted with the acceptance rates at both NC and MD schools, a special shout-out to y'all.

Edited by Penguin
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Can he submit some more LOR's for his wait list school?

 

He is keeping both waitlist schools up on his accomplishments and additional shadowing/volunteer hours and letting them know he is super interested in attending should he get the chance.  Both waitlist schools had asked for (and received) the additional LORs already.

 

But getting a chance will require someone who is already accepted opting to go elsewhere - esp for MSTP.

 

My kids' college has a high acceptance rate for medical schools, and the students give all the credit to the person in charge of preparing them for applying for admissions, who says the only time to stop applying is when you decide you do not want to be a doctor after all. Your son's story shows the importance of good advising. I would say that is as important as a school's acceptance rate, which will vary from year to year for lots of reasons. 

 

Since your family has lost confidence in the med school advising at your son's school (for good reason), I was wondering if there were private medical school application consultants like there are for undergraduate admissions. I did a random search and found there is such a thing if your son wants an outside opinion on what to do next. In that search, this article caught my eye.  https://www.noodle.com/articles/rebounding-from-medical-school-rejections  It seems like good advice on whether or not to reapply. The article mentions that some med schools will offer feedback on their applications to applicants who did not get into the school . Since your son is a top applicant from the college that accompanies a med school, it seems he would definitely be able to get feedback, directly or indirectly. 

 

P.S. The students who I know in medical school right now do not have doctors in their families, so it is definitely possible.

 

Good advising is absolutely important (sigh).  URoc will only give applicants two committee letters.  Obviously he used one this year.  He can only apply one other time.  If he doesn't make it in then, he's sunk (aside from Caribbean options I would think).

 

There definitely are far better schools to choose if one is going pre-med IME.

 

He will be looking for feedback.  I sent him the article you linked (and suggested checking with an outside consultant).  He's already emailed me back thanking me and telling me it was useful - so I'm passing that thanks on to you!

 

(((Creekland))) 

 

Having met your son, I am absolutely astounded by your post.  Your Ds is a personable, intelligent young man, and ANY med school would be most fortunate to have him.

 

Our oldest Ds received bad advising, or rather a lack of good advising, at VT, and it left us feeling betrayed.  He is doing very well in his career, but it left us with a bad taste in our mouth for the school.  If any of our children went there we would be more hands-on with helping them.  The UR med app advising is ten times worse.  I can't even imagine. 

 

I hope your son does not let go of his dream because of this roadblock.  He will make an EXCELLENT doctor.

 

Sorry to hear about VT... esp VT.   :sad:

 

Time will tell what my guy decides for his future.  He's planning on talking with the doctors he's shadowed and asking some of the med schools if they'll provide feedback, so he hasn't given up yet.  He just has a ton going through his mind (understandably).

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Our oldest Ds received bad advising, or rather a lack of good advising, at VT, and it left us feeling betrayed. 

 

 

 

Good advising is absolutely important (sigh).  URoc will only give applicants two committee letters.  Obviously he used one this year.  He can only apply one other time.  If he doesn't make it in then, he's sunk (aside from Caribbean options I would think).

 

 

 

 

 

For those of us with DC just starting college, any advice?  How can you know if their undergraduate choice has good advising?  I know it makes a huge difference and that is why I am concerned about where DD goes to school for undergrad.  I know sometimes kids in small, intimate liberal arts schools have a better chance at graduate programs because the schools knows them so well and can highlight them, etc.  ..... agh, this whole process makes me so nervous.

 

For example, she is hoping to get into Chapel Hill's honors program.  If DD does, will that help her on the advising end?  Such a large school makes me nervous when kids aren't plugged into a smaller unit (CH isn't her first choice but it is a solid safety financially, etc).  

Edited by Attolia

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For those of us with DC just starting college, any advice?  How can you know if their undergraduate choice has good advising?  I know it makes a huge difference and that is why I am concerned about where DD goes to school for undergrad.  I know sometimes kids in small, intimate liberal arts schools have a better chance at graduate programs because the schools knows them so well and can highlight them, etc.  ..... agh, this whole process makes me so nervous.

 

For example, she is hoping to get into Chapel Hill's honors program.  If DD does, will that help her on the advising end?  Such a large school makes me nervous when kids aren't plugged into a smaller unit (CH isn't her first choice but it is a solid safety financially, etc).  

 

Thanks for posting this, as I was wondering the same thing as well.

 

A good friend's son went to OSU for undergrad and he was very happy with the advising he received with his medical school applications - I know that he did mock interviews with his advisor and had his essays reviewed - so I don't think the a larger school vs a smaller school is necessarily the issue.

 

I will be interested in reading responses as well as I still have one more kiddo to go through this process.

 

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Creekland, thank you for sharing your son's experiences. I am one of the ones you gave glowing reviews of UR to, as my dd has it on her list. I appreciate the advice you have given here and will definitely take it all into consideration as dd continues working on a final list.

 

I know you said your son won't consider Caribbean schools. I have a friend whose son went to SLU undergrad, had very good stats, but also had trouble getting into med school. He ultimately ended up at Ross University in Dominica, I believe, and is now a very successful OB-GYN. I understand his reasons for not wanting to take that path, but if that is his passion it would be a shame to let that stand in his way of becoming a wonderful doctor.

 

I truly hope the best for your son and his future! It seems certain he will be a success at whatever he chooses to do.

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For those of us with DC just starting college, any advice? How can you know if their undergraduate choice has good advising? I know it makes a huge difference and that is why I am concerned about where DD goes to school for undergrad. I know sometimes kids in small, intimate liberal arts schools have a better chance at graduate programs because the schools knows them so well and can highlight them, etc. ..... agh, this whole process makes me so nervous.

 

For example, she is hoping to get into Chapel Hill's honors program. If DD does, will that help her on the advising end? Such a large school makes me nervous when kids aren't plugged into a smaller unit (CH isn't her first choice but it is a solid safety financially, etc).

In terms of med school, there is an extremely vocal poster on CC who constantly reiterates that the biggest need for med school admissions (on top of the obvious need for very high GPA, strong science courses, etc) is a strong committee to help the UG. Anytime any poster states something along the lines of " but x school has a better reputation," she responds by asking " but do they have a better med school committee?" I have only read them and then promptly ignored them bc med school is not the goal of any of my kids, but based on Creekland's ds's experience, her point should probably be underscored. It sounds like the committee is vital to admissions, especially wo a compelling hook.

 

In terms of engineering, we want to know how the school is viewed by industry, not the general population. It doesn't matter to us if the public at large views the school as having a strong engineering program, but whether industry views it as having a strong engineering program. Having strong recruitment for co-op positions means that industry respects their UG program. Knowing how the career placement office works with the university to support co-oping, career fairs, on-campus interviews, etc is also an indication as to how job placement is viewed. For example, I would run away from a school that charges students tuition or other fees during their co-op semesters (other than a single credit hour charge for "co-op" which keeps them considered enrolled full-time). I personally think that is a slimy practice bc the student is not consuming school resources. (I was floored the first time I heard that it was even a thing.) Universities that value student work-experience should do whatever they can to help students take those opportunities.

 

We also meet with depts during their sr yr of high school. We ask pointed questions about where and what their past couple of yrs of grads are doing, what sorts of opportunities exist within the dept for UG research, assistance for internships, etc. Our current college jr felt comfortable with the answers he was given by Bama's dept even though Bama is not highly ranked for physics. He will have an inordinate amt of UG research by the time he graduates as well as multiple grad level physics courses. (He has huge faculty support and mentoring.....big fish scenario.He currently attends the same meeting as the grad and post-docs with his research advisor.) He will be applying to grad school next yr, so we'll see how well it works out. So far, in terms of REU offers, he has been extremely well received as a strong applicant. Hopefully, that will translate to grad school committees as well. Only time will tell.

Edited by 8FillTheHeart
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Creekland, thank you for sharing your son's experiences. I am one of the ones you gave glowing reviews of UR to, as my dd has it on her list. I appreciate the advice you have given here and will definitely take it all into consideration as dd continues working on a final list.

 

I know you said your son won't consider Caribbean schools. I have a friend whose son went to SLU undergrad, had very good stats, but also had trouble getting into med school. He ultimately ended up at Ross University in Dominica, I believe, and is now a very successful OB-GYN. I understand his reasons for not wanting to take that path, but if that is his passion it would be a shame to let that stand in his way of becoming a wonderful doctor.

 

I truly hope the best for your son and his future! It seems certain he will be a success at whatever he chooses to do.

Here's a story that might inspire him. This doctor applied to 72 US medical schools and received zero acceptances, so he went to a foreign one. He's now making a huge difference to patients and doctors in training at one of New York's busiest and most diverse hospitals. Former classmates at medical school say that from the beginning he was a cut above the rest of them.

 

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2013/05/13/every-disease-on-earth

 

Let your son know lots of WTM mommas are rooting for him!

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For those of us with DC just starting college, any advice?  How can you know if their undergraduate choice has good advising?   

 

I've been thinking about this one myself - what did I miss?  How do I share my knowledge in a useful way to the students I teach at school who are choosing among colleges?  I admit, there's no easy answer as EVERY school will tell you they do a good job and EVERY school can point to students who succeed.  It's tough to figure out if students succeeded due to decent advising - or decent hooks - or prior knowledge of what to do themselves.

 

With med school I'm going to boil it down to acceptance rates even if that, itself, can be hurtful to those who don't make the cut at places that have bars (one can't apply unless they have great stats).  Of course, if students have a hook (doctor in the family, first gen, under represented minority of some sort, etc) then I don't think it matters so much, but for kids like my guy with no hooks at all - just great stats, but plain ole WASP from a middle class family - a high acceptance rate likely would have shown us that a school has really good respect from med schools and advising to get there.  A lower acceptance rate (like URoc's) seems to just show that hooked students can get in.

 

Thanks for posting this, as I was wondering the same thing as well.

 

A good friend's son went to OSU for undergrad and he was very happy with the advising he received with his medical school applications - I know that he did mock interviews with his advisor and had his essays reviewed - so I don't think the a larger school vs a smaller school is necessarily the issue.

 

I will be interested in reading responses as well as I still have one more kiddo to go through this process.

 

 

URoc had what seemed to be a decent Pre-med advising group.  My son did mock interviews and went to several information sessions from freshman year on.  They read through and approved of his application - all of it.  He had a strong committee letter giving him their highest recommendation.

 

But someone missed with the source of the LORS - AND/OR - they aren't all that respected as an undergrad by med schools themselves.  It could be the latter.  I don't know.  I just know it's something.

 

A quick look at just the google search page says that their med school acceptance rate is around 69%.  I don't know how many of those go Caribbean (or if that counts).  I know it all seemed good enough for me, but the real world (now that we're experiencing it) seems terribly different.  They don't say how many of those 69% have hooks, or rather, how many of the 39% didn't.  Some schools have 80 - 100% acceptance rate.  I wish we had chosen one of those in hindsight.  My guy would have done well anywhere he went to undergrad.  He'd have missed out on some research opportunities if he'd chosen elsewhere, but there may have been others he'd have enjoyed just as much.

 

I know URoc is off my "recommended list" for kids at school.  I will definitely no longer wear my college T shirt or Sweatshirt there on "casual days" when many teachers advertise favorite schools.  I'll freely admit anger is fueling a bit of that.  I'm human and mama bears don't like to see their cubs hurt - esp when it's not the cub's fault and he's done so much to represent the school (positively) over the past 5 years.  Not getting into their own med school was the final straw.

 

Creekland, thank you for sharing your son's experiences. I am one of the ones you gave glowing reviews of UR to, as my dd has it on her list. I appreciate the advice you have given here and will definitely take it all into consideration as dd continues working on a final list.

 

I know you said your son won't consider Caribbean schools. I have a friend whose son went to SLU undergrad, had very good stats, but also had trouble getting into med school. He ultimately ended up at Ross University in Dominica, I believe, and is now a very successful OB-GYN. I understand his reasons for not wanting to take that path, but if that is his passion it would be a shame to let that stand in his way of becoming a wonderful doctor.

 

I truly hope the best for your son and his future! It seems certain he will be a success at whatever he chooses to do.

 

'Tis his decision.  If it were me, I'd go and not look back.  As I get older I have less and less patience with dumb systems, and what's happening here sure isn't helping.  The US needs doctors.  There are oodles of students who are qualified to be in med school - they've shown their ability in undergrad - but they don't get accepted.  Why isn't there more capacity (including residency spots later)?  Our country opts to spend billions on unnecessary things (won't get into specifics), yet things we all could use... those don't change.  They aren't important. :glare:

 

The Caribbean tends to accept all who apply (and weed out from there)?  Kudos to them!

 

Then too, I wish we'd picked a different state when we moved.  A good part of my guy's problem is not having a state school (or two) dedicated to educating state residents.  Kudos to states who have them.

 

Here's a story that might inspire him. This doctor applied to 72 US medical schools and received zero acceptances, so he went to a foreign one. He's now making a huge difference to patients and doctors in training at one of New York's busiest and most diverse hospitals. Former classmates at medical school say that from the beginning he was a cut above the rest of them.

 

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2013/05/13/every-disease-on-earth

 

Let your son know lots of WTM mommas are rooting for him!

 

Thanks for that story.  I've bookmarked it and will hang on to it until my guy's spring break in March.  That way it won't look like I'm pushing him too much after he gave us his definitive no.  It's nice to know folks can succeed and be so well respected from other places.

 

I have let him know that plenty of people in my circle (IRL and on here) are hoping for him and support him.  He also is gaining a ton of support there from folks who have found out and gone WTH? :svengo:  The person in charge of where he volunteers for Hospice has made an appt to sit down with him so she can write out "exactly what he needs to succeed" rather than just write a "basic" LOR since "basic" sure doesn't seem to work (though she isn't one who wrote one before - he's gathering more sources).

 

Of course, I'm not sure he knows "exactly what he needs," but hopefully he can get outside assistance to help (we've offered to pay for it if he wants one).

 

I have no idea if any of this will be good enough TBH.  The lad has no hooks.  He's competing with many others pretty much like him.

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With all due respect to Creekland ~

If I have missed any acceptance announcements, please let me know or post them on the List View thread. I went through these last couple of pages and I think I caught the acceptances that were posted.

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With all due respect to Creekland ~

If I have missed any acceptance announcements, please let me know or post them on the List View thread. I went through these last couple of pages and I think I caught the acceptances that were posted.

 

As mentioned before, I don't want to derail this thread.  We just got off on the rabbit trail from a post I made thanking another for the good experience her student had changing paths.

 

I definitely LOVE the acceptance thread each year, so carry on as spring comes and more learn of acceptances!  Then good luck (seriously) picking the best school for the student.

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As mentioned before, I don't want to derail this thread.  We just got off on the rabbit trail from a post I made thanking another for the good experience her student had changing paths.

<snip>

Oh, I know. I've been following along. I just want everyone to know that I am still looking through the thread and searching for those acceptance posts. :D

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DD found out today that she has a nice scholarship at UNC Chapel Hill and they've invited her to join their scholars program.  I don't know what this means exactly, but it sounds impressive  :lol:   They said that only around 6% of students are offered scholarships.  

 

ETA:  Just after I posted this, she got her letter of acceptance to Honors Carolina.  

 

ETA2:  Today she got a letter inviting her into their Research Scholars program so she has a lot of thinking to do before she turns all of this down - Three very hard to get into groups have been handed to her.

Edited by Attolia
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DD found out today that she has a nice scholarship at UNC Chapel Hill and they've invited her to join their scholars program.  I don't know what this means exactly, but it sounds impressive  :lol:   They said that only around 6% of students are offered scholarships.  This was already our most affordable school on calculators so yay!!!

 

LOL!  DD found out today she was admitted to Honors Carolina at Chapel Hill and also received merit scholarship. It's not likely she'll attend there, but it was nice to receive it. :)

 

ETA: Also received notice that she was awarded Research Scholar along with Honors Carolina

Edited by Gratia271
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Dd got a further award to Norwich today, which actually makes it the most affordable of all her acceptances! She put Norwich stickers on her computer last night...  :hurray:

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Dd got a further award to Norwich today, which actually makes it the most affordable of all her acceptances! She put Norwich stickers on her computer last night...  :hurray:

 

I know Norwich.  One of my good friends from college dated a guy at Norwich (later married him) and I went there once for a formal dance.  I liked everyone there and had a great time (much more fun than at the West Point dance I went to. . ..)

 

I know that was a long.....................time ago, but I have such great memories of that school, I had to comment. LOL

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Not something I would normally share, but since middle son has been a subject on here, I'm going to share something good that happened to him today and perked him up.  He got nominated for two campus awards (nominated by others - he has no idea who).

 

One is for:

 

the "student who has "made significant contributions to the community and experience of students living in undergraduate residence halls. This student, through their actions, leadership and innovation has promoted community through respect, fairness, and inclusion."

 

and the other is for:

 

"the member of the graduating class who has excelled in "wholesome, unselfish, and helpful influence" among their fellow students."

 

He said it's nice to know he's loved by a couple of someones out there (and actually two different folks nominated him for the first award).

 

It could be good for us (parents) to remember if/when our kids get rejections that there are others who love and appreciate them.  It felt good to hear my guy feeling better again.  Life can knock you down, but you get back up.

 

And honestly?  Reading what these awards are for and knowing a few someones think enough of my guy to nominate him makes a mama's heart very happy since the attributes I most want my son to be noticed and admired for is just like those descriptions, not any particular letters after his name.   :coolgleamA:

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LOL!  DD found out today she was admitted to Honors Carolina at Chapel Hill. It's not likely she'll attend there, but it was nice to receive it. :)

 

 

Yes, DD is in Honors Carolina as well and she also doesn't prefer to go to CH so ... same boat  :lol:

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Not something I would normally share, but since middle son has been a subject on here, I'm going to share something good that happened to him today and perked him up. He got nominated for two campus awards (nominated by others - he has no idea who).

 

One is for:

 

the "student who has "made significant contributions to the community and experience of students living in undergraduate residence halls. This student, through their actions, leadership and innovation has promoted community through respect, fairness, and inclusion."

 

and the other is for:

 

"the member of the graduating class who has excelled in "wholesome, unselfish, and helpful influence" among their fellow students."

 

. :coolgleamA:

That's awesome. Glad your ds is feeling better. He is a great person and will make a wonderful doctor.
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Creekland, I asked my dad, who sat on a medical school admissions committee for ~30 years before he retired, what he thinks. He is quite shocked! He says it is common for people to re-apply and be accepted the following year, and that the view of the committee is usually that the student really wants to be there and they do not hold their previous rejection against them. Some students spend that year improving their portfolios, but he said your DS sounds great as-is. Just an FYI.

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Creekland, FWIW, my best friend was also rejected from medical school when she first applied, way back when.  She went and got an MPH, reapplied, and was accepted to an excellent medical school.  She later got a very competitive residency and now directs a program at a major teaching hospital.  We've been friends forever and she was so demoralized by the rejection at the time, but in the long run it was really just the most minor of blips.  So tell your DS not to give up!

Edited by JennyD
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Creekland, I asked my dad, who sat on a medical school admissions committee for ~30 years before he retired, what he thinks. He is quite shocked! He says it is common for people to re-apply and be accepted the following year, and that the view of the committee is usually that the student really wants to be there and they do not hold their previous rejection against them. Some students spend that year improving their portfolios, but he said your DS sounds great as-is. Just an FYI.

 

Thanks.  I just sent both of these notes on to him this morning.  He was still pretty bummed when we talked with him (about using a private consultant) last night.

 

Creekland, FWIW, my best friend was also rejected from medical school when she first applied, way back when.  She went and got an MPH, reapplied, and was accepted to an excellent medical school.  She later got a very competitive residency and now directs a program at a major teaching hospital.  We've been friends forever and she was so demoralized by the rejection at the time, but in the long run it was really just the most minor of blips.  So tell your DS not to give up!

 

Ditto above comment.

 

On that note, if anyone has had positive experiences with private consultants (as there are many to choose from), can you send me a PM?  He's bummed that he needs to go that route, but he needs something for his application to stand out (and get interviews) since we can't add hooks to it and neither hubby nor I have experience with that sort of thing.  We had assumed his Pre-Med advising would do that, but...

 

Ironically, he called right after finishing an MCAT tutoring session.  He's good enough to tutor (for a firm) for the MCAT, but not good enough for his application to garner interviews.  :glare:

 

Ideal World vs Real World.  In the Real World hooks mean more than accomplishments (in many fields, not just med school applications).  Networking is often the best way to get jobs/acceptances/whatever.  One's accomplishments only carry so far.

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(((Creekland))) many hugs to you and ds.

 

The news here is that honorary dd earned the additional $4000 per year at the Scholar's Summit at Alma. With her financial aid from having been in foster care for high school before we "adopted" her, a federal loan, and her grandparent contributions in addition to her initial half $20,000 scholarship, she can afford to attend.

 

So Alma it is, and she is flying high...well, when she is around. She calls and texts often, and tells us she loves us and I know she does. But she is spending a lot of time with her grandparents which is exactly what she needs and is best for her. However, I have to admit that I am still adjusting. She is doing fine in her online and DE classes to finish her year and doesn't need me. Entirely awesome for her, but with youngest ds only a year and half from leaving home, I am finding the need to seriously contemplate "what I want to be when I grow up" LOL and have defined myself by this parade of bio and couch kids for so long, I am having a hard time making a plan.

 

Anyway, things are going really great for her!

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Ideal World vs Real World.  In the Real World hooks mean more than accomplishments (in many fields, not just med school applications).  Networking is often the best way to get jobs/acceptances/whatever.  One's accomplishments only carry so far.

 

 

Is this because there are just too many qualified people?  Why are hooks so important?  I know my foster brother got a very prestigious scholarship (full ride) because he had the hook of being in foster care, his parent's were druggies and in and out of jail, etc.  He interviews very well and he had a great GPA but his test scores were far less than you would expect for that sort of scholarship.  He doesn't test well.  period.

Edited by Attolia

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Is this because there are just too many qualified people?  Why are hooks so important?  I know my foster brother got a very prestigious scholarship (full ride) because he had the hook of being in foster care, his parent's were druggies and in and out of jail, etc.  He interviews very well and he had a great GPA but his test scores were far less than you would expect for that sort of scholarship.  He doesn't test well.  period.

 

Yes.  In many fields (and for selective colleges or professional schools) there are oodles of qualified people.  One needs to stand out.

 

Why?  We're (all) human.  We want to give deserving people a break and hope they make it.  We want kids of our peers to do well.  I can totally understand why certain decisions get made and suggest many of us would make similar decisions if we were in similar spots.  It's hard to take notice of one person in a stack of many similar people if they don't have something that makes them stand out.

 

Middle son heard back from some med schools (as to why he didn't get interviews) and I put those results on the other thread rather than clutter this one.

 

http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/636122-college-search-considerations-beyond-the-obvious/

 

Be very wary when selecting a college.  URoc is a terrific school, esp for research, but their Pre-Med advising is horrible if one doesn't have hooks (including being a doctor's offspring) or is trying for MSTP.  If I'd have known then what I know now I'd have never turned over my guidance counselor role to those I thought were professionals.  I'd have studied to learn things - just as I did to be his college counselor - or we'd have paid for a real professional (as we are doing now) to get honest, real, advice.  What my guy was told was just plain wrong on a critical couple of pieces of info.  He went to the seminars (since freshman year).  He listened to what they said.  He made personal appts too and listened there.  Unfortunately, what he was told was incorrect - even last week's info.

 

Such is life.  We'll pick up and move on.  While he's really frustrated at what happened, he still loves his school and feels he got a great education.  I figured I'd best put that in there... it's one part of the organization that is the issue, not the overall place.

 

So the take away for all is to beware and don't be too trusting when something important is at stake.

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Ds received another acceptance - this one from Duquesne University with a very nice scholarship.  We're still waiting to hear from 3 more.

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DS has been accepted to the University of Denver (Chancellor Scholarship) and Earlham College (Presidential Honors Scholarship). He has also been accepted to the honors college at both Valparaiso University and the University of Oklahoma. 

 

DD has been accepted to the University of Redlands which is a small university here in California known for having a good music program. And she had her audition this weekend at IU's Jacobs School of Music. We are hoping to hear from them by April 1st on whether she got in or not. 

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DD found out today that she has a nice scholarship at UNC Chapel Hill and they've invited her to join their scholars program.  I don't know what this means exactly, but it sounds impressive  :lol:   They said that only around 6% of students are offered scholarships.  

 

ETA:  Just after I posted this, she got her letter of acceptance to Honors Carolina.  

 

ETA2:  Today she got a letter inviting her into their Research Scholars program so she has a lot of thinking to do before she turns all of this down - Three very hard to get into groups have been handed to her.

 

OMG.  My daughter got her letter of acceptance to Honors and to the Research Scholars program too in the mail while we were gone!  She was really surprised that she was awarded both along with some merit scholarship.

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My oldest was homeschooled K-9 and then went to private school for 10 - 12.  

 

He has been accepted to Cedarville University and to Centre College (both with partial scholarships).  We are still waiting to hear from one more - probably mid February.  

 

DS received his final acceptance from University of the South/ Sewanee with partial scholarship.  (Wish I could wave a magic wand for the completion of spring semester - he's ready to be done!)

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Ds received another acceptance - this one from Duquesne University with a very nice scholarship. We're still waiting to hear from 3 more.

Congrats! My Dd strongly considered Duquesne if for no other reason than free Penguins tickets!

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