Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

The Girls' Mom

The 2017 Acceptance Thread

Recommended Posts

The postgraduate diploma? I did that! Great program, very exciting!

Yes, that's the one. He's been reading course descriptions over the phone to me and it's neat to hear how excited he is.
  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it normal that I'm sitting here with tears in my eyes for moms and kids I've never even met?

 

Congrats to all!

 

:party:

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it normal that I'm sitting here with tears in my eyes for moms and kids I've never even met?

 

Congrats to all!

 

:party:

 

Me too-just thrilled for everyone!  Congratulations all-can hardly wait to see the rest roll in over the next few months!

 

ETA-(No idea why the SaveSave keeps showing up-it won't let me delete it-but it means nothing-never typed it myself.)

SaveSave

 

 

SaveSave

Edited by JumpedIntoTheDeepEndFirst
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am so excited to finally be able to post!  Ds just got accepted to his first choice with an awesome scholarship - Allegheny College.  He also got accepted with $ to Hope College, Calvin College, and Pacific Lutheran University.  It's been a good day.  We're still waiting on four more, but I think his decision has been made  :001_smile:

  • Like 33

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am so excited to finally be able to post!  Ds just got accepted to his first choice with an awesome scholarship - Allegheny College.  He also got accepted with $ to Hope College, Calvin College, and Pacific Lutheran University.  It's been a good day.  We're still waiting on four more, but I think his decision has been made  :001_smile:

 

Congrats to your ds! Allegheny is on my dd's list (which is admittedly pretty long still!)

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am so excited to finally be able to post!  Ds just got accepted to his first choice with an awesome scholarship - Allegheny College.  He also got accepted with $ to Hope College, Calvin College, and Pacific Lutheran University.  It's been a good day.  We're still waiting on four more, but I think his decision has been made  :001_smile:

 

So happy for your ds, jjeepa!!!!  Allegheny has a beautiful campus. :)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congrats to your ds! Allegheny is on my dd's list (which is admittedly pretty long still!)

 

Thank you!  

 

So happy for your ds, jjeepa!!!!  Allegheny has a beautiful campus. :)

 

 

Thank you!  Yes it does!  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DS was accepted to University of Virginia today.  

 

I guess he had a pretty good application package.  Several schools are saying yes that I thought were pretty long shots.  

 

Still waiting on word on the Navy ROTC scholarship.  That would be a key part not only of paying for these nice schools, but of meeting his goal of becoming a naval officer.

  • Like 36

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DS was accepted to University of Virginia today.  

 

Do you realize how difficult it was for a Va Tech alumni to add a like to a UVA acceptance???   :lol:  :lol:  :lol:

 

The things I do for fellow Boardies...  :coolgleamA:

  • Like 15

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you realize how difficult it was for a Va Tech alumni to add a like to a UVA acceptance??? :lol: :lol: :lol:

 

The things I do for fellow Boardies... :coolgleamA:

Ditto. :). So happy for you! What does your VPI son think?
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congrats to everyone. Always fund to read these posts.

 

 

Since we're also doing grad school acceptances, I'll add mine.

 

My ds, who graduated last year with a BS in chemistry, has been accepted to a graduate program at the London School of Economics to study finance and accounting.

Was this always his desired plan for after graduation? I think I read on a different thread that your son had been studying/travelling abroad. My college kid loved studying abroad last year so much that she looked into going back for grad school after graduating this spring.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ditto. :). So happy for you! What does your VPI son think?

Creekland's DS didn't go to VT. Creek and her dh are alumni.

 

My niece loved it. My DD is there now and starting to get in the groove. It's a big place for an introvert like DD.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you realize how difficult it was for a Va Tech alumni to add a like to a UVA acceptance??? :lol: :lol: :lol:

 

The things I do for fellow Boardies... :coolgleamA:

Your sacrifice has been noted.

 

It might get interesting to have UVA and VA TECH at the same dinner table.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you realize how difficult it was for a Va Tech alumni to add a like to a UVA acceptance???   :lol:  :lol:  :lol:

 

The things I do for fellow Boardies...  :coolgleamA:

 

Did you have to drink some wine afterward?  :cheers2:

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Creekland's DS didn't go to VT. Creek and her dh are alumni.

 

My niece loved it. My DD is there now and starting to get in the groove. It's a big place for an introvert like DD.

 

Glad your niece liked it, and your dd does, too.  My comment was directed toward Sebastian, who has a son there in the Corps of Cadets.  My dh, ds, and I went to VT, too.  :)

 

ETA:  Duh.  Spelling.

Edited by MomsintheGarden
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes!!! They also have a specialized French IB program called the CIFA cohort. She is in the middle of that application right now. So for that, we wait and see. That program is exciting bc their jr yr is spent at a French university in their actual degree program with all classes taught in French alongside their French counterparts.

 

Super, super happy. This was her absolute dream option, but the odds were so slim that she didn't dare hope for it.

 

That is so fabulous!!! Congratulations to you both for such outstanding work and results! :)

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you have to drink some wine afterward?  :cheers2:

 

I would have, but I've been on the road today beating the snow Canada is sending across Lake Ontario...  :glare:

 

Now I'm in my chair trying to be on the computer with a cat sitting between me and the laptop - he insisted on weaseling in here.  Someone missed me and isn't content remaining at my feet like he usually does.  It's considerably tougher typing, but I don't have the heart to make him move.  I'm making flight reservations for my spring break lads, so I have to be careful to click the correct buttons as he nudges my arm!  (Of course I've had to retype some of these words too.)

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congrats to everyone. Always fund to read these posts.

 

 

 

Was this always his desired plan for after graduation? I think I read on a different thread that your son had been studying/travelling abroad. My college kid loved studying abroad last year so much that she looked into going back for grad school after graduating this spring.

No, definitely not. He majored in chemistry and was planning to be a doctor. But you're right that he has been living abroad. Last summer he got a scholarship from the German government to do physical chemistry research at a university there. He enjoyed Germany very much, but he said he felt relatively uneducated surrounded by people that spoke a minimum of two languages fluently. So he decided to stay and do intensive German study.

 

Honestly, if you had told me a few years ago that he would be focusing his major studies and research on physical chemistry, such a mathematically intensive area of chemistry, and then living abroad and pursuing by choice intensive foreign language study, I would have told you the likelihood of that happening was about equal to him being abducted by aliens, based on our homeschooling battles over math and foreign language. So in comparison, his recent decision to apply to LSE rather than medical schools was not so surprising.

 

I hope your dd finds a grad program abroad that she loves!

  • Like 21

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, definitely not. He majored in chemistry and was planning to be a doctor. But you're right that he has been living abroad. Last summer he got a scholarship from the German government to do physical chemistry research at a university there. He enjoyed Germany very much, but he said he felt relatively uneducated surrounded by people that spoke a minimum of two languages fluently. So he decided to stay and do intensive German study.

 

Honestly, if you had told me a few years ago that he would be focusing his major studies and research on physical chemistry, such a mathematically intensive area of chemistry, and then living abroad and pursuing by choice intensive foreign language study, I would have told you the likelihood of that happening was about equal to him being abducted by aliens, based on our homeschooling battles over math and foreign language. So in comparison, his recent decision to apply to LSE rather than medical schools was not so surprising.

 

I hope your dd finds a grad program abroad that she loves!

I love that story. Thank you for sharing!!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Honestly, if you had told me a few years ago that he would be focusing his major studies and research on physical chemistry, such a mathematically intensive area of chemistry, and then living abroad and pursuing by choice intensive foreign language study, I would have told you the likelihood of that happening was about equal to him being abducted by aliens, based on our homeschooling battles over math and foreign language.

:lol:  It's amazing, isn't it?  How they mature.  

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:lol: It's amazing, isn't it? How they mature.

Most definitely! And thankfully, he is now mature enough to freely admit that I was right about both the importance of having a solid math background to keep doors open and the beauty and utility of being able to speak more than one language.

 

Edited to add that he now also has the goal of greatly increasing his Spanish language skills, the language he very reluctantly studied in high school. His chemistry major, due to the high number of required classes, allowed him to skip the foreign language requirement of his honors college.

Edited by Frances
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love these threads but what I love even more is you guys sharing stories about journeys, how impossible you thought something was that your dc eventually achieved and yes, even about cats who claim lap rights. Sigh...love, love, love.

  • Like 12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, definitely not. He majored in chemistry and was planning to be a doctor. But you're right that he has been living abroad. Last summer he got a scholarship from the German government to do physical chemistry research at a university there. He enjoyed Germany very much, but he said he felt relatively uneducated surrounded by people that spoke a minimum of two languages fluently. So he decided to stay and do intensive German study.

 

Honestly, if you had told me a few years ago that he would be focusing his major studies and research on physical chemistry, such a mathematically intensive area of chemistry, and then living abroad and pursuing by choice intensive foreign language study, I would have told you the likelihood of that happening was about equal to him being abducted by aliens, based on our homeschooling battles over math and foreign language. So in comparison, his recent decision to apply to LSE rather than medical schools was not so surprising.

 

I'm really glad you shared his story.  We've been bummed that middle son only got two interviews (of 20 applications) for MSTP (and none for just med school).  This is with him having a 3.96 GPA, double majors in Brain & Cognitive Science and Bio, double minors in American Sign Language and Psych, a top 96% MCAT score, lab research (including a tough program to get into at Stanford a year ago), positive peer and adult reviews from his RA job for three years and TA jobs for Organic Chem and BCS, shadowing with glowing recommendations from those docs, then his oodles of involvement in clubs - including being president of two of them... we're just blindsided that none of that was enough to get him even to the interview stage for med schools.  (And those two interviews turned out to be a waitlist and rejection, but with waitlist for med school.)

 

He's now working on figuring out a Plan C for his life - possibly research (esp since he IS loved there), possibly Americorps and a volunteering life - or we're still trying to get him to consider going to the Caribbean with us - he could do med school there.

 

Needless to say, I've quit promoting U Rochester as a pre-med school (though they are still terrific as a research school).  The lad was one of only 12 undergrads to get an academic award from UR last year... yet isn't even accepted to their own med school.  It's showed us exactly how little med schools (overall) think of the place if a TOP student at the school needs other hooks (he has none) to get interviews at places.  If he had blown interviews, that would be one thing, but to have his stats and not even GET interviews is really telling.  I wish I had known all of this about 6 years ago... (sigh)

 

But he'll do fine with whatever Plan C turns out to be.  It's just sad for a mama to see his plans (since third grade) dashed after how much he's accomplished in college.  And of course, that's how the world has lost a future doctor - selecting the wrong undergrad school.

 

If I had it to do over again, I'd have suggested he go to an LAC I think - or perhaps Pitt would have been better.

 

Anyway, to circle back around, I'm glad you shared your story as it makes me more positive at looking forward to his Plan C.  He's still a superb young adult with tons of capability and likability (with everyone he's ever worked with).  That hasn't changed just because we picked the wrong school for him to attend.  (sigh)  I just wish we could have a do-over!

  • Like 17

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He's now working on figuring out a Plan C for his life

:grouphug: I have a niece who applied to med school twice.  TBH, she was not nearly as accomplished as your ds.  According to her, if you don't already have doctors in the family, you are not going to get into med school.  :closedeyes: Are there doctors in your family?

 

After working a few years, she returned to school for a 3 year nurse practitioner program.  I think she'll be terrific.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyway, to circle back around, I'm glad you shared your story as it makes me more positive at looking forward to his Plan C.  He's still a superb young adult with tons of capability and likability (with everyone he's ever worked with).  That hasn't changed just because we picked the wrong school for him to attend.  (sigh)  I just wish we could have a do-over!

 

Can't he have a do-over next year? One of GW's ABA therapists did bio-chem at Baylor then worked for a year with ASD kids and then was admitted to UTDallas' med school. I don't know how competitive he was before the work experience or if he applied straight from Baylor but he did get in to one of his top choice schools with that extra hook.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, creekland, I liked your post, but it is really a hug. I can't imagine.

 

I know mom2collegekids on CC is always posting that there is an absolute necessity for strong committees dedicated to writing LOR for med schools. I know nothing at all about med schools, but is it possible that UR doesn't have this strong dedicated med school LOR committee like she describes?

 

I am so sorry for your ds. He sounds like a wonderfully accomplished young man. I am sure he will find a great plan C, though disappointment at needing one sounds very justified. :(

Edited by 8FillTheHeart
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Creekland, I'm sitting here in shock after reading your post. I honestly thought your son would have multiple acceptances. He sounds like an amazing young man, and I'm sure he will find a wonderful plan C. You are all in my thoughts, and I'm sending hugs your way, as I know how it makes a momma's heart hurt when our child is hurting. And I know you are also dealing with your own health issues and your mom's diagnosis. We're here for you.

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:grouphug: :grouphug: :grouphug:

 

(To creekland and others who are experiencing bumps in the road and turns in the path...)

Echoing these hugs. Bumps (speaking from experience) in this path are so hard and one has to keep reminding one's self that this is not always a reflection of a sub par application.

 

Creekland, please consider my like a hug as well. That was what I had intended plus the hope that his Plan C might turn out to be incredibly good.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:grouphug: I have a niece who applied to med school twice.  TBH, she was not nearly as accomplished as your ds.  According to her, if you don't already have doctors in the family, you are not going to get into med school.  :closedeyes: Are there doctors in your family?

 

After working a few years, she returned to school for a 3 year nurse practitioner program.  I think she'll be terrific.

 

This is what he seems to be finding among those he knows who get into med school (from his school).  They don't have to be nearly as accomplished.  They need to have hooks.  One of those is having doctors in the family.  Another is a good backstory.  He has neither.

 

Can't he have a do-over next year? One of GW's ABA therapists did bio-chem at Baylor then worked for a year with ASD kids and then was admitted to UTDallas' med school. I don't know how competitive he was before the work experience or if he applied straight from Baylor but he did get in to one of his top choice schools with that extra hook.

 

He is still 100% contemplating his options.  He presented us with several ideas this past week (after getting that second waitlist rather than an acceptance).  We'll support him with any of them, of course.

 

Wow, creekland, I liked your post, but it is really a hug. I can't imagine.

 

I know mom2collegekids on CC is always posting that there is an absolute necessity for strong committees dedicated to writing LOR for med schools. I know nothing at all about med schools, but is it possible that UR doesn't have this strong dedicated med school LOR committee like she describes?

 

I am so sorry for your ds. He sounds like a wonderfully accomplished young man. I am sure he will find a great plan C, though disappointment at needing one sounds very justified. :(

 

This is the conclusion we've drawn - the school isn't terribly committed to getting its students into med school.  They caused him (and all others who applied) to miss the first round of interviews by not even having their end of the application done in time.  Students from other schools were getting interviews before his application was even complete - on their end.  He tells me they've fixed this for next year, but that sure didn't help.  I don't know if it made the difference, but it's definitely not anything on HIS end.

 

This whole med school application thing has totally soured me on UR - I'll freely admit that.  I was in love with the school before and promoted them a ton.  I've retracted a bit of that promotion (at school and elsewhere).  I've also dropped them from our "plan to donate to" annual list after we finish paying for college.

 

Before I would warn people not to pay attention to med school admittance rates as those can be skewed, but now I realize I should have been aware of them.  I thought top students would be able to make it in from anywhere - that's not necessarily true.  It's probably more true that one needs a hook from those with lower acceptance rates.

 

I'm learning as I go along - at least future students can learn from our experiences.

 

It also doesn't help that our state (PA) doesn't have med schools devoted to accepting students from our state like AL, TX, NC, and many other states.  I suppose we should have thought about that when we chose to move here, but honestly?  That never crossed my mind to think about when the lad was 2...

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, definitely not. He majored in chemistry and was planning to be a doctor. But you're right that he has been living abroad. Last summer he got a scholarship from the German government to do physical chemistry research at a university there. He enjoyed Germany very much, but he said he felt relatively uneducated surrounded by people that spoke a minimum of two languages fluently. So he decided to stay and do intensive German study.

 

Honestly, if you had told me a few years ago that he would be focusing his major studies and research on physical chemistry, such a mathematically intensive area of chemistry, and then living abroad and pursuing by choice intensive foreign language study, I would have told you the likelihood of that happening was about equal to him being abducted by aliens, based on our homeschooling battles over math and foreign language. So in comparison, his recent decision to apply to LSE rather than medical schools was not so surprising.

 

I hope your dd finds a grad program abroad that she loves!

I love this! I was a German major before I studied Accounting and Finance. I'm now a tax attorney. There is a certain kind of logical, structured thinking that connects all these fields. LSE was definitely a pivotal point in my path. I'm forever greatful that they have the postgraduate diploma to allow people to change directions. If your son wants to talk to someone who did the program 15 years ago (gulp!) I'd be glad to chat with him. I think he is going to have a great experience, I definitely did.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the conclusion we've drawn - the school isn't terribly committed to getting its students into med school. They caused him (and all others who applied) to miss the first round of interviews by not even having their end of the application done in time. Students from other schools were getting interviews before his application was even complete - on their end. He tells me they've fixed this for next year, but that sure didn't help. I don't know if it made the difference, but it's definitely not anything on HIS end.

 

This whole med school application thing has totally soured me on UR - I'll freely admit that. I was in love with the school before and promoted them a ton. I've retracted a bit of that promotion (at school and elsewhere). I've also dropped them from our "plan to donate to" annual list after we finish paying for college.

 

Before I would warn people not to pay attention to med school admittance rates as those can be skewed, but now I realize I should have been aware of them. I thought top students would be able to make it in from anywhere - that's not necessarily true. It's probably more true that one needs a hook from those with lower acceptance rates.

I think that is really stinky for an expensive private university. Seriously. Not having them done on time is pretty inexcusable. I would be livid if I were your ds. (Though, now I am wondering, in general, about UR. Back when our oldest graduated from his small public with his ChemE degree, friends' ds graduated with his from UR. While our ds had numerous interviews and 4 job offers at graduation, their ds didn't have any interviews and it took him over 6 months to get one. This makes 2 pretty stellar kids having some pretty cruddy stuff happen.)

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is what he seems to be finding among those he knows who get into med school (from his school). They don't have to be nearly as accomplished. They need to have hooks. One of those is having doctors in the family. Another is a good backstory. He has neither.

 

It also doesn't help that our state (PA) doesn't have med schools devoted to accepting students from our state like AL, TX, NC, and many other states. I suppose we should have thought about that when we chose to move here, but honestly? That never crossed my mind to think about when the lad was 2...

I had wondered about this. Our state's medical school (we only have one) takes a minimum of 100 in-state students each year. They even have a quota system which requires 25 from each of our four Congressional districts. Makes it much more challenging to get in from the two wealthier, more urban districts than from the two poorer, rural ones. They then take another 50-60 as "open candidates." When my dad applied to medical school in our state back in the 1950's, they actually took two from each county. He was the only one who applied from his rural county!

 

I had no idea there was a preference for those who had doctors in their families. Why is that????

 

Would he consider a D.O. program? Just throwing out an idea. I don't think those have had the cache that an MD had, but my (incredibly limited) understanding is that perception has now changed.

 

I cannot believe that his university was so irresponsible on their side of the admissions process!!! It's shocking. Not only would I not give them any money, I would also give them an ear full as to why I wasn't.

 

I am so very sorry, Creekland. Hugs to you and your ds.

Edited by Hoggirl
  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would he consider a D.O. program? Just throwing out an idea. I don't think those have had the cache that an MD had, but my (incredibly limited) understanding is that perception has now changed.

 

I cannot believe that his university was so irresponsible on their side of the admissions process!!! It's shocking. Not only would I not give them any money, I would also give them an ear full as to why I wasn't.

 

I am so very sorry, Creekland. Hugs to you and your ds.

 

My guess with the doctors in the family is pure ole networking in action.  I had hoped my guy's hours of shadowing (with glowing recommendation letters) and his medical missions trip to Cote D'Ivoire plus his volunteering for Hospice (with good recommendations) would show that he knew what he was getting into (job-wise), but none of that seems to make up for having relatives in the field as their kids can also check those boxes, etc.

 

The thing with UR and their end of the application is that they apparently have always done it that way (their own timetable).  My guess is at one point that was sufficient, but with the way med school is so competitive now... it doesn't help.  I don't know if that's to blame TBH.  I just know it can't have helped.  It is good that they have finally changed - for next year - it just doesn't help my guy (or any others) for this past year.

 

We knew his getting MSTP would be tough - acceptance is tough for that program.  We just thought he was set up well to get into med school somewhere - not everywhere he applied, but surely he was good enough for somewhere.  Apparently not.  Not without hooks or a good pre-med committee anyway.  Then to not even get accepted at UR's med school... (others from his school have been accepted there, but they were either accepted straight from high school with BS/MD or have hooks - at least those he knows IRL).  Granted, UR's med school is one of the higher ranked ones so tougher to get into, but one would still think a TOP student from their OWN undergrad who has shadowed their own doctors with glowing recommendations would be an appealing candidate.  No, no that is not sufficient.  He has no hooks to help him stand out from the pack.

 

He's still on their waitlist for med school (not MSTP), but we're not holding our breath obviously. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My niece noted that most of her med school class had parents who were doctors.

 

She had tried to get in an MD-PhD program but was told since her undergrad research wasn't medical research it didn't count. Basically, they were saying no one attending a school that was not associated with a med school could get in those programs because that would be the way to get in on medical research.

 

Her degree was in biochemistry. She had a 3.8 GPA. Her mcats were very high. She got in to one school -- what was then the new medical school associated with VT. It was not her first choice, but she made it serve her well.

 

She's in her third year of residency now. She would agree with the assessment that having a parent who is a doctor is a huge boost.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

She got in to one school -- what was then the new medical school associated with VT. 

 

At least it's associated with a terrific undergrad school.  ;)   :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm so sorry, Creekland. That has got to be incredibly frustrating.

 

My DD wants to be a scientist, which means all kinds of opportunities to get "weeded out" along the way. Finding a good undergrad, getting into grad school school, post-docs, professor, tenure. Not to mention things like research grants getting sequestered or frozen. Right now, I'm just going along with it: I figure at this point every skill she's learning could be reapplied to something else if she changes her mind. But facing the reality that she could just fall aside despite her dreams and hard work at any step along the way is hard. I'm not even sure how to counsel her. If you could do it over again would you push having fall-back plans sooner?

 

Do you think he'll apply for med school again next year? I hope he finds an amazing plan B. I'm so sorry.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I had it to do all over again, I'd have looked far more seriously at med school acceptance rates FROM the undergrad school - this knowing the student would have to do his end of the bargain and get the good grades, MCAT, and recommendation letters.  It seriously didn't occur to me that a student could have all that and not get interviews.  I knew they could blow interviews (nerves, low acceptance rates, whatever).  Right now I suspect that schools with a higher acceptance rate have better reputations (or networking) with med school admissions giving their students an edge.

 

UR is a research school.  My guy (and his peers) have had no problems getting involved and moving on to impressive research opportunities.  He has two presentations coming up this spring for that.  My guess is med schools aren't as impressed with research schools (or at least his research school) - no clue why they'd think less of it, but something has to be the cause.  

 

One of my guy's options now is to head for his PhD instead.  When he was at Stanford, those he worked with there encouraged him in that direction and he seriously thought about it, but opted to try med school (and MSTP) instead.  He just has to decide which path he wants now.  Volunteering appeals to him too as he's always had a heart fixing the real world and making it more like an ideal world we'd want.

 

So for future students, I'm sticking to my motto of "see what students have done from school X recently."  Networking and good connections mean a TON - I think that's what helped him get in at Stanford for that research position a year ago.  I thought that wasn't true for med schools.  I thought only high stats/grades and ECs mattered.  I was wrong.

 

Part of why I mention it here is so others can learn from it.

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Creekland, I don't know if it interests him at all, but when my niece applied to med school, she was really young. (She graduated from high school at 15.) JHU's told her to get her master's in public health and reapply the next yr. She got her masters but did not apply to med school. She has been working for their public health division doing research since then. No idea if it is even a good approach or not, just the one they suggested to her.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(((Creekland and ds)))   :grouphug:  :grouphug:  :grouphug:   So frustrating.  But I agree that Plan C will be awesome.   :hurray:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Creekland, I don't know if it interests him at all, but when my niece applied to med school, she was really young. (She graduated from high school at 15.) JHU's told her to get her master's in public health and reapply the next yr. She got her masters but did not apply to med school. She has been working for their public health division doing research since then. No idea if it is even a good approach or not, just the one they suggested to her.

 

I don't know if that would appeal or not.  My guy isn't young.  He's super intelligent, but we opted to not graduate him early, so he was 18 at high school graduation, then he's already taken a Gap Year by doing Take 5 (at UR) this year, which, of course, is another thing he was accepted into by UR helping prove his worth to others, but still not good enough for their own med school again demonstrating how much their med school approves of their own undergrad institution.  (sigh)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Creekland - I am so upset for your DS especially when I consider the quality of doctors in our area. We have the worst medical care and many people wonder how in the world these people made it through medical school.

 

I played tennis with a fellow the other night; this guy and his wife are both doctors and we've played tennis together on and off for about 10 years. His DS went to our highly ranked state flagship for undergrad/pre-med, had good MCAT scores, and was not accepted to any med school either. He took a year off and re-applied. He is now happily studying at St. Kitts. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Creekland - I am so upset for your DS especially when I consider the quality of doctors in our area. We have the worst medical care and many people wonder how in the world these people made it through medical school.

 

I played tennis with a fellow the other night; this guy and his wife are both doctors and we've played tennis together on and off for about 10 years. His DS went to our highly ranked state flagship for undergrad/pre-med, had good MCAT scores, and was not accepted to any med school either. He took a year off and re-applied. He is now happily studying at St. Kitts. 

 

The world is definitely losing out on a good doctor in this case.  Just from folks who know him his schedule would have been full - regardless of what specialty he ended up in.  He's that dedicated to getting things right and he has terrific people skills.

 

I keep mentioning St Kitts, Grenada, St Maarten and our willingness to adjust our island of preference.  Time will tell what he decides for Plan C.  He has time to mull it over for a bit and figure out what he wants to be when he grows up.  He's thought he's known since he was 8, so we can give him a few weeks or months to pick a new path.  I know he's applying to Americorps, so if that comes through, that may be it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My college boyfriend did not get in on his first try, but got a Masters in toxicology (I think) and then got into Med School. But, I certainly understand that having to delay would be extremely frustrating. Especially for as strong of a candidate as Creekland's ds already is.

 

I'm going to just toss an idea out - I think there is and always has been somewhat of a divide/friction between the medical community and the academic/research community. I've known MDs who referred to PhD's as "real" doctors. Not ever sure if that was a praise or a snark. Medicine is not science in its purest sense. It just isn't. I think research people can resent the fact that MDs have historically made more money, and I think MDs can resent the fact that they aren't *really* scientists. Just an observation. Perhaps this plays into the bias toward accepting kids of MDs???

 

Creekland, you are generous to share your experience and perspective on how this process has worked and what your observations are. No doubt, it will help someone reading this in the future.

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My college boyfriend did not get in on his first try, but got a Masters in toxicology (I think) and then got into Med School. But, I certainly understand that having to delay would be extremely frustrating. Especially for as strong of a candidate as Creekland's ds already is.

 

I'm going to just toss an idea out - I think there is and always has been somewhat of a divide/friction between the medical community and the academic/research community. I've known MDs who referred to PhD's as "real" doctors. Not ever sure if that was a praise or a snark. Medicine is not science in its purest sense. It just isn't. I think research people can resent the fact that MDs have historically made more money, and I think MDs can resent the fact that they aren't *really* scientists. Just an observation. Perhaps this plays into the bias toward accepting kids of MDs???

 

Creekland, you are generous to share your experience and perspective on how this process has worked and what your observations are. No doubt, it will help someone reading this in the future.

 

I agree.  Creekland, I am so sorry for your son.  Hopefully he will get off of the waitlist at UR Med.  Is there anyway he can talk to the doctors he has worked with to see if they can pull some strings to get him off of the waitlist?  The doctors he has worked with may not even be aware of the situation.

 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to just toss an idea out - I think there is and always has been somewhat of a divide/friction between the medical community and the academic/research community. I've known MDs who referred to PhD's as "real" doctors. Not ever sure if that was a praise or a snark. Medicine is not science in its purest sense. It just isn't. I think research people can resent the fact that MDs have historically made more money, and I think MDs can resent the fact that they aren't *really* scientists. Just an observation. 

 

There may be a bit to this too.  My guy has had several folks on both sides tell him that trying to do both (PhD and MD) hardly ever works - that he needs to pick a side... but then he had some on each side telling him (after working with him) that they rarely (if ever) recommend it, but they think he would be successful at both.

 

There really were a LOT of outside confirmation signs coming in that led him toward his direction.  The problem is... none of those folks are sifting through apps or on the admissions committees to get his app out of the pile of candidates.

 

I agree.  Creekland, I am so sorry for your son.  Hopefully he will get off of the waitlist at UR Med.  Is there anyway he can talk to the doctors he has worked with to see if they can pull some strings to get him off of the waitlist?  The doctors he has worked with may not even be aware of the situation.

 

He is planning on talking with the main doctor he's shadowed, but he's not the type to (ever) ask for favors.  They're just close enough that he'd have shared any result with him.  That doctor has been on vacation lately.  He's not on the admission committee, but had mentioned to my guy that he looked forward to working with him and hoped he would choose UR, though understood if he ended up elsewhere.  I suspect his not getting admitted to even have it as a choice will come as a shock.  It has to all of us TBH.

 

He's also planning on talking with the Pre-Med department at UR and asking, "What happened???"  He has that appt set up already.  I'm curious to hear their take on it all.   :glare:

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Creekland (((hugs)))

 

While the colleges are trying to bring in first generation college goers, medical schools are bending backward to only accept the privileged. Good to know. 😤

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...