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major dental problems-can anything be done?


SparklyUnicorn
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Looking for any BTDT or ANYTHING really.  I had some major dental work in the past year.  I initially went there and basically said please pull all my teeth out and give me fake ones.  And I was not joking.  They wouldn't do it insisting they could save my teeth.  Well several thousand dollars later I am starting to feel like they were wrong.  Clearly the state of my teeth is going very quickly downhill.  I'm sure it is because of the GERD and all the meds I have taken for it.  But I can't do anything about that part (I'm working on that, but it could be another year before I could do something major like surgery).  So what to do?  I can see teeth nearly sticking out of my gums because they have thinned so drastically.  They gave me some sort of fluoride prescription stuff and it made my teeth very brittle and pieces starting chipping off (so I stopped).  Needless to say I'm pretty freaking frustrated and wish they had listened to me.  The same exact thing happened to my mother.  They insisted she fix stuff.  She spent every damn dime she had to do that and then ended up with dentures because none of it worked.  Now they claimed my situation is not the same because my mother had poor health and tons of meds.  Well my health is not poor, but I do take meds that are very very harsh on teeth and then there is the GERD (which my mother also had).

 

I literally have no money to spend on it at the moment or I'll have to go and get a loan (which ok I'll do, but this cannot be a waste of money to save crap teeth).

 

I'm sick of the damn lecturing from the hygienist about teeth brushing.  If anything I had to pull back on how much I was brushing and flossing them because it was hurting!  I was probably doing it too often.  I am very meticulous about brushing, flossing, water flosser, and use various types of toothpastes.  I use products to help with dry mouth.  I almost never eat any sugar (minus whatever is in stuff like broccoli).  My teeth literally ache.  My gums hurt.  It's just a mess and no matter what I do it does not seem to help. 

 

Really I don't even know where to start.  I should probably make an appointment, but I'd like to know what the options ahead of time are.  If any. 

 

And let me tell you this is difficult to even talk about.  I think people assume bad teeth...you must just not brush your teeth correctly.  *sigh*  When I look on-line it says stuff like don't use antacids.  OH GAWD PLEASE.  Frustrating. 

 

 

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How much sugar can there be in broccoli?

 

I have no idea what a solution is for you, but I just wanted to say that sucks and I'm sorry about it. :(  My dad had bad acid reflux his whole life too, unmedicated (other than tums and baking soda) until he was in his 50s, and I don't think he had more than about 5 teeth by the time he was 60.  It was not bad teeth hygiene on his part either - it's just that constant acid presence is not good for teeth, and neither are most of the remedies for the acid.  

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How much sugar can there be in broccoli?

 

I have no idea what a solution is for you, but I just wanted to say that sucks and I'm sorry about it. :(  My dad had bad acid reflux his whole life too, unmedicated (other than tums and baking soda) until he was in his 50s, and I don't think he had more than about 5 teeth by the time he was 60.  It was not bad teeth hygiene on his part either - it's just that constant acid presence is not good for teeth, and neither are most of the remedies for the acid.  

 

hah yeah on the broccoli...I'm just saying I don't eat candy or anything like that where it might be super bad for teeth...it's really nothing I can control in any way.

 

And that is just it.  Ya know.  They say do X, Y, Z.  Well I have done that and then some.  They even told me we don't expect people to actually never eat candy.  I ACTUALLY never eat candy.  LOL  Have not in many many years. 

 

Maybe they philosophically object to the idea of giving up and not trying something, but hello...my wallet...my sanity...my time...the fact I know given family history this will not work (my dad is also in the same boat although he does not have GERD). 

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I'm so sorry all the sh*t seems to be hitting the fan for you this year, health-wise.  

 

My dad had terrible teeth due to terrible nutrition and poor hygiene.  I believe they capped them all a couple years ago and he's been really satisfied with that.  I think capping teeth is really expensive though.  

 

My husband had less severe enamel thinning due to reflux, but it was enough to cause quite a bit of sensitivity and pain.  Sealing was enough for him to have relief.  He also brushes with a strong fluoride and wears a mouthguard at night due to teeth grinding.  The sealing was pretty cheap.

 

 

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Sparkly I have a suggestion for you. You need to find the nearest Dental School. Years ago, I had a friend/neighbor who taught in a Dental School. He recommended a former student to me and I then switched to that Dentist and used him until I moved from TX to Colombia. Years ago, my (late) Mother went to the U.S.C. Dental School and she had a lot of work done there. It is a PITA. It takes more visits.  The students take longer. BUT they are supervised and the end result will probably be close to perfect.  It will cost less.  If you are anywhere near a Dental School, contact them immediately and ask for an Evaluation appointment.

 

Other than that, where we lived before in Cali, our next door neighbors daughter was an Orthodontist.  She recommended the Dentist we used for years, until our family income was cut about 60%     Now, I believe that only someone like an Orthodontist, who sees the work of many Dentists, is qualified to recommend a Dentist to someone.

 

I wish  you much good luck with this and hope you are near a Dental school.

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I'm so sorry all the sh*t seems to be hitting the fan for you this year, health-wise.  

 

My dad had terrible teeth due to terrible nutrition and poor hygiene.  I believe they capped them all a couple years ago and he's been really satisfied with that.  I think capping teeth is really expensive though.  

 

My husband had less severe enamel thinning due to reflux, but it was enough to cause quite a bit of sensitivity and pain.  Sealing was enough for him to have relief.  He also brushes with a strong fluoride and wears a mouthguard at night due to teeth grinding.  The sealing was pretty cheap.

 

I wondered if they could do sealants (that seems like a great idea), but they never suggested it to me.  I think they don't work if you have fillings.  Nearly every tooth I have has a filling in it. 

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Oh, I'm sorry, dental issues are terrible! 

 

I'd think - second opinion and maybe a university dental school. Someone that will listen to you and look at you as a whole person rather than just a set of teeth. 

 

Well, my hesitation with that is I assume wait times are LONG and I really want someone highly experienced to be honest. I'm done with crap work.  I used to go to cheap dental chains (Aspen Dental) because they are far more affordable.  I won't even go there anymore because they do a hack job.  I'm willing to borrow the money to get what is needed.  I just don't want it to be a waste of money though.

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I am so so sorry to hear about this. The only thing I'm aware of that might help the gums is a hypobaric chamber. A friend of my moms had esophageal cancer and as part of the (it's a harsh treatment at her stage) treatment they pulled all her teeth before the chemo and radiation began. After treatment she went to a hypobaric chamber a number of times to help the gums regenerate or heal so that she could get implants. If your gums are degrading that quickly something like that *might* help I would think but you're going to have to find a better dentist and I have no idea how much it costs. I don't know anything else about the treatment but maybe it would give you a starting point to look.

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Find someone who is an expert in dealing with advanced periodontal disease (as that's what it sounds like). I second/third/fourth the suggestion of the dental college of possible.

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Find someone who is an expert in dealing with advanced periodontal disease (as that's what it sounds like). I second/third/fourth the suggestion of the dental college of possible.

 

They claim it is not advanced.  I think things have just declined THAT quickly since they evaluated them though.  They wanted to do some deep cleaning thing, but at this point I'm actually afraid to have them fork around.  I feel like my teeth will fall out if they do.  Maybe I'm wrong.

 

Although if my teeth fell out, that WOULD be cheaper than having to pay them to pull them out.  LOL  Ya know...silver lining.

 

Like my two front teeth are basically plastered together with filling in the back.  The front part (my real teeth) are chipping off.  I have sharp edges everywhere.  My teeth are basically disintegrating. 

 

Meanwhile....the gosh darn GI doc is making me wait forever to get help.  I'm just....angry as hell here.  Maybe I can call around to try to get in somewhere else sooner.  I don't know. 

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Well, my hesitation with that is I assume wait times are LONG and I really want someone highly experienced to be honest. I'm done with crap work.  I used to go to cheap dental chains (Aspen Dental) because they are far more affordable.  I won't even go there anymore because they do a hack job.  I'm willing to borrow the money to get what is needed.  I just don't want it to be a waste of money though.

 

IMO you are virtually guaranteed to receive outstanding work in a Dental School, because the Professors are guiding the students and grading their work.   If you are near to a Dental school, that is your best chance at getting the best possible outcome. It will take longer. It will cost less. But the possibility of getting the best outcome is much higher in a Dental School.   That's what my friend would tell you.  I hope he is alive and well. I think they moved and I am not sure where they live now.

 

If you are not near to a Dental School, call them or visit them, explain the issues you have and ask them if they can recommend one or two Dentists who are near to where you live who have expertise in your issues.

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Yes, dental school will take longer, that is for sure.  There can be waits to be seen, and the dentists can be slower, and there is sometimes a wait for the teaching dentist to come in and check work, advise, etc.  But since they are teaching, they are going to do a great job. They're also going to have the latest methods and technology.  

 

It's not like the students are working on their own.  Everything is checked by the supervising dentist. In a complicated case like yours (well it sounds complicated to me), there will be a lot of consultation and supervision.

 

Now of course they may not be agreeable to pulling your teeth and giving you dentures.  But you can go to a consultation and tell them that's what you want, and if they say they won't do it, and don't have a plan that sounds better to you, you don't have to go back.  

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Yes, dental school will take longer, that is for sure.  There can be waits to be seen, and the dentists can be slower, and there is sometimes a wait for the teaching dentist to come in and check work, advise, etc.  But since they are teaching, they are going to do a great job. They're also going to have the latest methods and technology.  

 

It's not like the students are working on their own.  Everything is checked by the supervising dentist. In a complicated case like yours (well it sounds complicated to me), there will be a lot of consultation and supervision.

 

Now of course they may not be agreeable to pulling your teeth and giving you dentures.  But you can go to a consultation and tell them that's what you want, and if they say they won't do it, and don't have a plan that sounds better to you, you don't have to go back.  

 

Yeah I'm tired of waiting really. 

 

I guess I'll just make an appointment with my usual place and see what they say.  I actually do mostly like them.  I feel comfortable there which for me is HUGE because I avoided dentists for many years. 

 

I guess my question here was more along the lines of can anything reasonable be done to help/save teeth, but is still not a waste of time/money..  KWIM? 

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Yeah I'm tired of waiting really. 

 

I guess I'll just make an appointment with my usual place and see what they say.  I actually do mostly like them.  I feel comfortable there which for me is HUGE because I avoided dentists for many years. 

 

I guess my question here was more along the lines of can anything reasonable be done to help/save teeth, but is still not a waste of time/money..  KWIM? 

 

I get you.  I understand about being tired of waiting around.  

 

But then I wonder about a dentist who specializes in restorative work.   

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I get you.  I understand about being tired of waiting around.  

 

But then I wonder about a dentist who specializes in restorative work.   

 

Ok, but the additional problem is the GERD.  If I go through the trouble of restoring stuff, but cannot fix the cause of the problem in the first place that is a complete waste.  I really think I need to fix the reflux problem before even considering restorative anything. 

Edited by SparklyUnicorn
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Ok, but the additional problem is the GERD.  If I go through the trouble of restoring stuff, but cannot fix the cause of the problem in the first place that is a complete waste.  I really think I need to fix the reflux problem before even considering restorative anything. 

 

Yeah, I see what you mean.  I was thinking that the restorative work might include materials and/or coatings that would prevent further problems.  But it seems like your dentist knew about your GERD and whatever they did still didn't work, right?   I did a quick search and found this from NCBI/NIH

 

The dentist should consider restorative treatment when: (1) the structural integrity of the affected teeth is threatened; (2) the teeth are hypersensitive; (3) there is significant loss of tooth structure, vertical dimension, and/or function; (4) the defect is esthetically unacceptable to the patient; and (5) pulpal exposure is likely to occur.45

Initially, erosive tooth wear is limited to the enamel. At this stage of the erosive process, the teeth are not hypersensitive. Restorations may be inserted because of esthetic needs and/or to prevent further progression. Direct composite coatings should be considered as the treatment of choice, or porcelain veneers in more advanced cases. This seals the enamel and reestablishes the tooth contour and decreases further enamel loss by acid exposure.

In patients with severe tooth surface loss on more than two surfaces per tooth and extended loss of vertical dimension, complex reconstruction with indirect restorations (ceramic crowns, bridges) is often inevitable.46

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Yeah, I see what you mean.  I was thinking that the restorative work might include materials and/or coatings that would prevent further problems.  But it seems like your dentist knew about your GERD and whatever they did still didn't work, right?   I did a quick search and found this from NCBI/NIH

 

The dentist should consider restorative treatment when: (1) the structural integrity of the affected teeth is threatened; (2) the teeth are hypersensitive; (3) there is significant loss of tooth structure, vertical dimension, and/or function; (4) the defect is esthetically unacceptable to the patient; and (5) pulpal exposure is likely to occur.45

Initially, erosive tooth wear is limited to the enamel. At this stage of the erosive process, the teeth are not hypersensitive. Restorations may be inserted because of esthetic needs and/or to prevent further progression. Direct composite coatings should be considered as the treatment of choice, or porcelain veneers in more advanced cases. This seals the enamel and reestablishes the tooth contour and decreases further enamel loss by acid exposure.

In patients with severe tooth surface loss on more than two surfaces per tooth and extended loss of vertical dimension, complex reconstruction with indirect restorations (ceramic crowns, bridges) is often inevitable.46

 

Well, to be fair, when I started going there for treatment, the GERD felt very well controlled to me.  Things have gotten worse for some reason.

 

crowns and bridges...ugh so so expensive...

 

Well...hmm....  So I think really what I need to do is see IF I can get the GERD situation under control then see what the options are. 

 

I was under the impression seals could not be done on fillings. 

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My dad has bad teeth and he takes great care of his mouth, it's bad genetics. My daughter seems to have inherited his teeth. Her brand new molar was disintegrating as it came in and as soon as it came all the way in she had to get it filled. I imagine it is the first of many dental issues she will face.

 

Has anyone recommended using a waterpic instead of brushing and flossing? My dad swears by it and it has helped his gums. I don't think he never brushes his teeth, but has cut back and uses the pic instead.

 

As far as sealants, I asked about that for myself and they will only do them on virgin teeth. I wish I had known that 10 years ago before I started getting cavities.

 

Good luck! I've never had dental issues until the past year and now it seems like I constantly have something wrong and the fix bothers me more than the original problem.

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I'd find another dentist who will pull them and do dentures.

This. Because this is exactly what I had done about 5 years ago. I'm fairly young for dentures (I think) since I'm in my 40s.

Here's what happened: I broke a molar while at a conference out of town. Didn't really have a regular dentist at the time, so I made 

an appointment with AspenDental (I know, YMMV). Once the exam was done, the dentist said, "With teeth (as bad as) like yours, I recommend

pulling them and getting dentures." I knew my teeth were bad and the quote for dentures they gave me was reasonable, so I agreed.

And I don't regret it for a minute. I now refer to my dentures as my Hollywood teeth because it is the BEST my teeth and smile have looked in YEARS.

 

I'll be praying for you that you find a knowledgeable dentis who is truly more concerned about your health than lining his/her pocket!

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My dad has bad teeth and he takes great care of his mouth, it's bad genetics. My daughter seems to have inherited his teeth. Her brand new molar was disintegrating as it came in and as soon as it came all the way in she had to get it filled. I imagine it is the first of many dental issues she will face.

 

Has anyone recommended using a waterpic instead of brushing and flossing? My dad swears by it and it has helped his gums. I don't think he never brushes his teeth, but has cut back and uses the pic instead.

 

As far as sealants, I asked about that for myself and they will only do them on virgin teeth. I wish I had known that 10 years ago before I started getting cavities.

 

Good luck! I've never had dental issues until the past year and now it seems like I constantly have something wrong and the fix bothers me more than the original problem.

 

I do use a waterpic.  It's very helpful especially in the areas where I have a lot of crowding.

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This. Because this is exactly what I had done about 5 years ago. I'm fairly young for dentures (I think) since I'm in my 40s.

Here's what happened: I broke a molar while at a conference out of town. Didn't really have a regular dentist at the time, so I made 

an appointment with AspenDental (I know, YMMV). Once the exam was done, the dentist said, "With teeth (as bad as) like yours, I recommend

pulling them and getting dentures." I knew my teeth were bad and the quote for dentures they gave me was reasonable, so I agreed.

And I don't regret it for a minute. I now refer to my dentures as my Hollywood teeth because it is the BEST my teeth and smile have looked in YEARS.

 

I'll be praying for you that you find a knowledgeable dentis who is truly more concerned about your health than lining his/her pocket!

 

Yeah I'm heavily leaning towards this.  Because hello $600ish dollars per tooth for something like a crown?  Not to mention all the other stuff.  No way.  I'd have to rob a bank.  LOL 

 

I'm in my 40s too.  But on top of that my teeth are so crazy and crooked they have never looked nice.  They are embarrassing.  The thought of something that looks less stupid sounds great too.

 

 

Edited by SparklyUnicorn
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@Sparkly   To add another worry, to the huge load you have about these issues.  Your Dental problems may be causing Cardiac problems that you are unaware of at this time. My understanding is that frequently, when someone has a Cardiac issue, the Cardiologist will tell them to go to get their Dental problems fixed.

 

I strongly encourage you to call the nearest Dental School. They are probably between semesters. If you can speak with the Secretary to the right person, or the right person, s/he  can hopefully give you some guidance.  If I lived where you do and I had those problems, that is what I would do.  You really need to be in a place like a Dental School where they have teachers with different kinds of expertise, to evaluate your problems and figure out the best possible treatment plan for you.

 

ASK IF THEY WERE IN YOUR SHOES, WHAT THEY WOULD DO!

 

Going to another dentist, specialist or otherwise, is hit and miss, unless someone eminently qualified has recommended him/her to you.

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Okay, three comments come to mind.

 

First, my dad did just what you did - pulled everything and got dentures.  He loves it.  He has struggled with his teeth for years and years and he was DONE.  He is thrilled.  Now, his insurance is awesome and so financially it was better to pull everything and he had the $$ readily available to get really nice, fitted dentures.  They look very real and they are comfortable for him but he cannot eat things he used to that require a lot of chewing.  That is his downside.  You would never know though, by looking, that he has dentures.

 

On the other hand, I seem to have inherited his horrible teeth.  They are fairly pretty to look at but I have gotten 4-5 root canals and a few crowns and I have a few more waiting.  I max my dental insurance coverage (they pay $1500) per year.  Yeah, crowns REALLY are $600 plus not counting the root canal part of it. I truly regret my root canals.  Now that I am researching a lot of health things, root canals are linked to so much.  I have no idea how much of it is true, but I deeply regret getting root canals on my teeth just based on say so and not on actual discomfort.

 

Finally, this is the kooky thing.  So, my DD #2 inherited my teeth.  She's 15 and has had 2 root canals already on her front teeth.  She has incredibly beautiful, straight teeth.  You would have NO idea how  much she struggles with them.  The dentist is boggled. She is blown away in that she treats our entire family, it is obvious she cares for her teeth regularly, and yet she is still getting cavities. Our dentist tells me it is a matter of the type of bacteria living in her mouth and her saliva.   The girl does a wonderful job of caring for her teeth but she has SO many cavities every time.  Most of my kids have great teeth and she is obviously eating all the same things as them.  Sigh.  We did the medicated toothpaste for six months.  It resulted in THIRTEEN new little cavities.  It was (by more than double) WORSE than any other check-up so far.  I am pretty desperate which leads me to the kooky recommendation.  I am trying the Young Living Frankincense toothpaste.  I have a friend who swears some of her family's cavities were fixed by the stuff and she is a LONG shot from a kook.  I figure it's worth a shot.  I have tried clay, salt, and oil pulling in the past and haven't stuck with any of them consistently but this is only a minor tweak in our regular routine.  It cannot possibly get worse I figure.

Edited by BlsdMama
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I can't help you with options, unfortunately, but I will say that if I were you and my dentist wasn't listening to my concerns about pain, cost, etc., I'd be finding another dentist pronto. He or she should be sitting down with you and explaining why what they want to do is better for you overall considering your current health issues... what potential problems each course of treatment carries, including the denture route... what costs would be involved if their preferred treatment doesn't work... etc. You deserve clear answers to all your questions. I'm fortunate in that my dentist does explain things and works with people on timing procedures and giving options because he understands that costs are a real issue for most of us. So that kind of dentist is out there. I hope you feel better soon on all fronts.

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I'm really sorry, that sounds awful!  It sounds like you have done everything right, just like my dh has.  He has always been the one to brush and floss for 15 minutes (it seems like that long, anyway) every single morning and night.  He has had so many teeth problems!  

 

We've learned (mostly my dh) that our general practice dentist, even though he is great, only knows so much about unique problems.  For anything else, we see an expert.  For my dh, it has mostly been with an endodontist, but that probably isn't what you need.  I myself had to have teeth permanently removed following an accident, and ended up seeing a dental implant specialist.  He was excellent.  He presented clear options, both pulling them and and just getting crowns or getting implants, so he really wasn't even pushing the implants.  He would have done either.  In the end I got the implants because they were my top front teeth, and they have been excellent.  (I've had them for over 10 years now.)

 

We also know people who had good luck with our big state university dental school for extensive teeth repair.

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I'd find another dentist who will pull them and do dentures.

 

THIS.

I have finally found a WONDERFUL dentist who does not lecture me about teeth care everytime I go. They seem to realize that not -everything- about teeth is within the person's control. They give me their recommendations, and the reasons why. But I get to decide what is done. And they are even okay with pulling teeth rather than spending a lot of money on root canal, etc. for teeth that probably cannot be saved in the end.  And they are encouraging when they see improvement.

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I suggest the dental school also it keeps the cost down for you.   I have  bad teeth.  My sibillng do not.  My mother has tetrecycline in her last trimester with pneumonia while pregnat with me.  I had all my baby teeth caapped.  The research says it doesn't effect the enamel in the permanent  teeth.  I'm gonna say BS.  I've had a life time of issues. I have kindergarden pciture all silver caps.   Then around age 22 when I had a good job.  I got all my molars crowned.  Its sad being that young with so much dental work.     It could be genetically I got the bad bacteria in my mouth or the invitro  drugs changed my body and teeth so that I didn't get normal enamel.  

 

So I manage to make it to age 46 with just crowns/fillings.  I got my first root canal last years.   The root part has held up but not enought tooth was left to keep the post/crown.  The crown part has broke off twice.  Its not painful just cosmetic 

 

SO this year big money.  I'm getting my first dental inplant.  I would be getting a bridge but lucky my insurance decided to covre 80% of the implant.   

 

I have insurance and stuff now but I have used a dental school and got great service 

 

SO sorry you are dealing with the teeth issues.  I've brushed twice or something 3 times a day, flossed and did everything right.  It just suck.   I've only had one dentist that was a total bitch that started in own me about my dental hygiene.  I told her off  LOL. I've been doing everything right and its just sucks.

 

My current dentist of 10 years has been the greatest.  He actually did work in 3rd world country.  He said it was eye opening to him.  It helps him really evaluate a mouth with no hygiene vs one with some type inherited dental issues.

 

 

 

 

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Sparkly: Call the nearest Dental School, this afternoon. Today is Wednesday. This is the best day of the week to call anywhere.  I would not risk going anywhere but to the Dental School, or to someone they know and are willing to recommend to you.  

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I think we've talked about our BTDT issues....  In your shoes, I would go see a very good periodontist and lay it all out. Some of the things discussed with us besides the super fluoride toothpaste were: invisalign (as a physical barrier, and to fix alignment issues in anticipation of veneers), veneers, implants, and dentures.

 

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Sparkly: Call the nearest Dental School, this afternoon. Today is Wednesday. This is the best day of the week to call anywhere.  I would not risk going anywhere but to the Dental School, or to someone they know and are willing to recommend to you.  

 

I can't find anything nearby.

 

You know whereabouts I am.  Do you know of any?

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:grouphug: :grouphug:

 

My sister and SIL have teeth that are falling apart. It seems to be related to hormones/thyroid stuff for them because that's the common denominator. My SIL is going this summer to get dental implants after years of "fixing" that which seemingly can't be fixed. It's going to be pricey, but so has been the "fix it work", and she's had enough, and is taking a loan to cover whatever insurance won't. My sister is contemplating going to Mexico to have the same thing done after she sees how my SIL's work out. I've seen the emotional/self-esteem toll their teeth have taken on them and it really sucks. I'm sorry you are dealing with the same thing. :grouphug:

Edited by fraidycat
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:grouphug: :grouphug:

 

My sister and SIL have teeth that are falling apart. It seems to be related to hormones/thyroid stuff for them because that's the common denominator. My SIL is going this summer to get dental implants after years of "fixing" that which seemingly can't be fixed. It's going to be pricey, but so has been the "fix it work, and she's had enough, and is taking a loan to cover whatever insurance won't. My sister is contemplating going to Mexico to have the same thing done after she sees how my SIL's work out. I've seen the emotional/self-esteem toll their teeth have taken on them and it really sucks. I'm sorry you are dealing with the same thing. :grouphug:

 

oh yeah hormonal fluctuations could be another possible addition to the situation  for me too....cuz ya know..the GERD isn't enough...LOL

 

I considered going to Mexico.  No joke. 

 

 

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I can't find anything nearby.

 

You know whereabouts I am.  Do you know of any?

 

No.   I searched for my friend a few days ago.  The last thing I found for him was in TN.  I'd visited them in SC and then I think they moved to NC.  I probably haven't communicated with them for about 5 years.   I will try to search for him again.

 

Possibly begin here with the Dental Association web site:

https://www.nysdental.org/education/student-resident/nys-dental-schools

 

If that list is up-to-date, they are all in the NYC area.  Except for one in Buffalo, which I think is a long way from you.   I was in Buffalo once.

 

I'd never heard of the last one in the list, but the ones above that are solid universities.

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No.   I searched for my friend a few days ago.  The last thing I found for him was in TN.  I'd visited them in SC and then I think they moved to NC.  I probably haven't communicated with them for about 5 years.   I will try to search for him again.

 

Possibly begin here with the Dental Association web site:

https://www.nysdental.org/education/student-resident/nys-dental-schools

 

If that list is up-to-date, they are all in the NYC area.  Except for one in Buffalo, which I think is a long way from you.   I was in Buffalo once.

 

I'd never heard of the last one in the list, but the ones above that are solid universities.

 

Yeah Buffalo is about as far as NYC.  WAY too far.  Thanks for looking though!

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i have insurance, but they cover $1500 max.  Does anyone actually have insurance that covers more than that?

 

Ours is $2500 but I still managed to max it out. I had three front teeth that just decided to up and die! There was no prior dental work on them, no decay, no cracks, no accident/trauma. They just died and created some massive cyst around the root tips and in the bone when they did it.

 

I had to have three root canals and then oral surgery to remove the cyst. It was causing so much pain including in my nose. Argh. I had the cyst removed last thursday. We had to pay for all but $100 of the surgery because we maxed the insurance out at the endodontist. All total we payed $2100 and my insurance paid $2500. A portion of that was IV sedation charges at the endodontist because I have such extreme dental anxiety and 3 root canals in one sitting is way more than I could handle.

 

I'm so sorry that you have so much going on. I hope you can get someone who will give you a real solution. 

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I had a dentist remind me last week that 5 different dentists will have 5 different opinions. Which can be so unhelpful, I know, but maybe still worth it to see what others think. Consultations are generally free.

 

Keep in mind, you're an adult and you are pretty damn sure you know what you want. If somebody cannot articulate to you why your preferred choices are bad ones, maybe they're not as bad as you think.

 

:grouphug:.

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oh yeah hormonal fluctuations could be another possible addition to the situation  for me too....cuz ya know..the GERD isn't enough...LOL

 

I considered going to Mexico.  No joke. 

 

 

We know a number of people who go to Mexico. There are entire border towns set up to deal with cash pay dentistry.  A number of the doctors are US trained.

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One thing I need to tell you Sparkly, it isn't just the GERD. It is the dry mouth that is causing a lot of the problems. I have Sjogren's Syndrome as one of my many diagnoses and all of us with that end up with bad teeth. I had to change dentists in the last few years because of a number of reasons but a big one was the dental hygienist kept yapping about dental hygiene and how since I had so many fillings, I must be very unhygenic. No, I had no cavities at all as a child. I started getting lots all of a sudden as a older teen and that was the Sjogren's starting. What I do want to caution you about is that many of the Sjogren's patients who got dentures had major issues with them due to dryness. They were very uncomfortable and a number I know decided then to go to implants.

 

As to the costs- I haven't had to have any root canals but have had to have a number of crowns. My teeth are not crumbling and what I had thought was a chipped tooth I had turned out to be a filling that fell out and which the new dentist redid for free. Oh another change with the dentists was the last one claimed I needed a lot of fillings but the new one is much more conservative and didn't find those same problems or not to the extent that I needed a filling. Plus as an extra bonus, he has a new office and his lights are not fluorescent but LED.(A big help for not ending up with bad brain fog or a migraine).

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This thread is such a relief to me!!  A relief because I have horrible teeth problems and I despise dentists who make me feel crappy about it.  I do take care of my teeth, but crazy, bizarre things happen in my mouth that just don't happen to anyone else.  It's nice to hear that I'm not the only one.  

 

In the last month I've had two crowns break off, one on each side so that now I can barely eat anything.  It will be great for weight control, until I can go and get them fixed.  It's good to hear from people who have had success with dentures. So tempting!

 

Years ago, I took my kids to a dental school at a very large university.  It was cheap, but very time consuming.  Also, they weren't really all that great at fixing things that were out of the ordinary.

 

As far as the heart issues which were mentioned up-thread......  the concern there would be the bacteria that lives between your teeth can travel to your heart and cause pericarditis.  It can happen, but it's rare and usually treated easily with antibiotics.  Antibiotics used to be regularly prescribed before dental work for patients with heart defects, but research has shown that it's not necessary.  I don't think the op needs to worry about it.

 

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Our dentist tells me it is a matter of the type of bacteria living in her mouth and her saliva.  

 

Has anybody here had any luck using dental probiotics? This comment made me wonder. (I have thought about trying them, but right now convincing evidence for their effectiveness seems lacking.)

 

I have to admit that I have serious trust issues with dentists due to issues in my own mouth and my own difficulty advocating for myself when I don't want to consent to the kind of procedures they suggest...I admire you Sparkly for being proactive and hope you can get your issues resolved to your satisfaction.

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This is a bit OT but I'm getting mad reading about hygienists bitching about poor hygiene when there is a medical issue at play.  Don't they receive training on that sort of thing?   

 

Well, yes, training is received.  Medical issues are a component to oral issues,but personal hygiene is also.  I always consider a patient's medical history and possible undiagnosed medical conditions.  Periodontal issues can be the result of MANY things.  Decay and periodontal issues usually are independent of each other as there are different bacteria at work in each circumstance. 

 

I MUST give oral hygiene instruction an make a notation in the chart to each and every patient.  I do my best not to sound like a machine(because I have done it 10 other times that day) and I don't *think* my patients get angry about it.  If there is a specific area that is being missed, I also mention that. That's my job.  Not just to clean teeth, do xrays, etc, but to give oral hygiene instruction.  It would be unethical for me to not tell you about what I see.  I mean, I would want to know??

 

I understand that some hygienists(and dentists) don't give much thought to medical issues.  I experience this myself.  Two of my kids have had enamel hypoplasia.  I got to experience the shame at the local pediatric office before they found out I was a hygienist.  No, no bottles in bed, no, he's 9 months, he doesn't have a candy habit...So, I get it, and I am sorry anyone has to deal with that.  Of course, I know better.  It was developmental.  And my mom lost all her teeth to periodontal disease.  I suspect she had Lupus.  She's gone now and I am dealing with a looming diagnosis of an inflammatory disorder.  Periodontal disease is an inflammatory response.

 

What can be done to help prevent periodontal disease in a compromised patient? Plaque control.  If scalings(deep cleanings) are needed then they are essential to prolonged plaque control.  Then, 3-4 month cleanings until the issues(medical or hygiene or both) has settled.  A periodontist may needed.  Medications including localized and systemic antibiotics may be necessary.

 

What can be done to help prevent decay?  Plaque control. Diet modification-I don't jump to the "You must be on a candy diet" assumption if you have a high rate of decay.  I advise to limit or eliminate soda of all kind.  No sugared gums.  I rarely care about foods unless you are eating candy bars in bed right before falling asleep. lol  I really feel like sugared drinks are manufactured by the devil. lol  No sticky sugary things like fruit snacks(even organic ones. lol)  

 

OP: Are you a mouth breather?  Do you have dry mouth.  This is super common.  Biotene helps to lubricate the tissues and keep bacteria from sticking like glue to teeth.

 

Also, you said you brush and floss really often?  Actually 2-3 times a day is recommended.  It is not recommended to brush within 30 minutes of eating.  Especially acidic things.  http://www.colgateenamelhealth.com/enamel-101/acid-erosion

 

I suspect you are dealing with acid erosin since your teeth are flaking away.  Really the only defense is fluoride gel.. I understand you think this is causing more damage.  I suspect it is the excessive pressure and often brushing.  Could you try a Q tip instead of the toothbrush?  Apply it to the root surfaces once a day. The pain you feel is likely cold sensitivity.  Teeth don't know how to feel different things.  They react with pain.

 

I'm sorry you are hurting and feeling like this about dentistry.  I hope I've helped even a little. 

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Finally, this is the kooky thing.  So, my DD #2 inherited my teeth.  She's 15 and has had 2 root canals already on her front teeth.  She has incredibly beautiful, straight teeth.  You would have NO idea how  much she struggles with them.  The dentist is boggled. She is blown away in that she treats our entire family, it is obvious she cares for her teeth regularly, and yet she is still getting cavities. Our dentist tells me it is a matter of the type of bacteria living in her mouth and her saliva.   The girl does a wonderful job of caring for her teeth but she has SO many cavities every time.  Most of my kids have great teeth and she is obviously eating all the same things as them.  Sigh.  We did the medicated toothpaste for six months.  It resulted in THIRTEEN new little cavities.  It was (by more than double) WORSE than any other check-up so far.  I am pretty desperate which leads me to the kooky recommendation.  I am trying the Young Living Frankincense toothpaste.  I have a friend who swears some of her family's cavities were fixed by the stuff and she is a LONG shot from a kook.  I figure it's worth a shot.  I have tried clay, salt, and oil pulling in the past and haven't stuck with any of them consistently but this is only a minor tweak in our regular routine.  It cannot possibly get worse I figure.

 

You HAVE to update us and tell us if this works.  

 

My dh and his entire family have the worst teeth.  All of my children seem to have inherited them.  Every visit, so many cavities.  Every visit, same lecture about candy and sweets and regular brushing.  But no real help, no real ideas, because well, what if you do those things already?  No one ever believes that we actually do take care of their teeth.  They just lecture me as if I am neglectful.

 

I hate the dentist since having kids.

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Well since you said anything, I'll just throw this out:

 

Maybe try the Weston Price info about rebuilding your teeth.  There's a group in our area including a dentist who recommends it.  I have no personal experience with it   I have tried oil pulling ( with coconut oil )  that helped with minor gum issues, and it worked well.  

 

On the other hand, my BIL had horrible issues with his teeth and decided to have the remaining ones pulled in his early forties.  He's happy with his choice and his dentures. 

 

Best wishes to you as you find a dentist who is willing to listen and to work with you.  

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