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eternalsummer

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eternalsummer last won the day on January 25 2018

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About eternalsummer

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  1. Eternalsummer, are you the poster who has an Etsy business selling lables for handmade items? I want to get lables to put on handmade knitted blankets. 

  2. I generally think lasagna is better the second day anyway. It's messier than a taco bar, though, esp. with kids.
  3. No amount of dieting is ever going to make your body look like the body of someone who can still reproduce. That ship has sailed and it is not coming back into port. It's done. I think what I might try to do in your shoes is exercise more and eat less, sure - lots of good advice everywhere on these forums about how to do those things. Even just requiring your own day to have more physical activity in it - give up your clothes dryer, or volunteer at a physically active volunteering job frequently, or start a garden, or something - that would help a lot. I think the more important thing is to learn not to hate the bodies of middle-aged and old women. They're not young bodies, or fertile bodies, or smooth bodies, or supple bodies. Some are pudgy and some are stringy; very few are smooth and firm. But that doesn't mean they're hate-worthy. A middle aged woman is quite a useful thing: she's got the experience of raising a family, or years in her profession, or both, and she doesn't have to worry about attracting men anymore (I am speaking more generally/subconsciously/evolutionarily than consciously, of course). She's still usually in pretty good health and you can definitely support and augment that health. She's sometimes strong and sometimes squishy (good for cuddling kids or maybe grandbabies). A related conversation I had with dd12 a few days ago: she wants to quit gymnastics. I said, if you're not enjoying it, I'm sure as hell not paying for it - quit! (she's not like a serious gymnast or something). Try ice skating or hiking for a while. She said, but I'll get fat! I said, well, some day you will likely get about as fat as me (I'm 5' 3" 130-140), once you start having kids, and when you get old like Grandma (my mom) you'll probably get skinnyish again in an old lady sort of way (my mom is 70+). Women in our family normally follow more or less this pattern. If you don't exercise at all and just sit around all day playing Minecraft you'll probably feel kind of depressed and weak, because exercise is good for you, but you don't have to be able to do a double backhandspring to keep from getting fat. She was fine with the idea of looking like me when she's in her 30s and like Grandma when she's in her 70s - she thinks we're both beautiful. But childbearing-age beautiful and old-lady beautiful, not teenager-beautiful.
  4. I've always seen other parents' emails through cc's (granted, just two schools, both public - one a charter).
  5. I read it not for the information, exactly (although it is really interesting to read the state of the science in the 50s, and of course some of it is still accurate), but for the poetry. It is beautifully written. I got it for me, but I could see giving it (I have the full edition, the one still in print) to a kid who has already had some geology and/or biology - maybe an early high schooler - with the caveat that some of the science is outdated (and the caution that this implies that some current science is probably wrong, too, or at least incomplete). It was just such a lovely read. As a side note, some of the outdated science in it made me look things up and refresh/re-understand them, which was pretty cool. And some of the parts where she basically says, we observe this phenomenon but we have no idea why it exists, here are some ideas - those were great, because I could go look up the topic on wikipedia and see if those questions have been answered yet (the answer is often yes).
  6. I'm not sure why you took her for a tour when you had no intention of letting her join the school. Going for 9 weeks is not joining the school.
  7. Yes, when we almost moved to Bend, Oregon (we were there for a few weeks), they had a vegan donut shop in town. With like, normal donuts - not hibiscus mint or macadamia matcha or whatever, but just regular old glazed, chocolate iced, etc. vegan donuts. And they were cheap(ish). I gained I think 10 pounds in 3 weeks. Where we are now, the nearest vegan bakery is 2 hours away, just far enough that I only go every few months (but close enough to get a donut fix every few months).
  8. Well if she wants to come home, that's entirely different and I'd pull her tomorrow. If they want to stay, I'd let them finish out the year.
  9. Oh, and for this kind of thing (we have similarly restrictive diets so I do a lot of research when we travel) I like Yelp and I think TripAdvisor - good place to start to weed out local restaurants and find things that can work. I do a lot of food tourism when we travel :) (even if we're just passing through, if it's somewhere with a vegan bakery I'm trying it out).
  10. My sister lives in Astoria (north of Manhattan a ways) and works in Manhattan as a nanny; she eats out at Bareburger pretty regularly. They have GF buns and veggie burgers and for the meat eaters, they have bison or (I think) grass-fed beef. The best thing, imo, about NYC, is the food - I would look for hole in the wall ethnic restaurants if possible and just order something without gluten. Most Asian places won't have a lot of dairy options anyway, if any. But if you have Celiac and cross-contamination is an issue, that is harder to do.
  11. Personally, I am super proud of my throw pillows.
  12. What an obnoxious lady! I would have totally caved like you did (because I hate confrontation), then come back at a different time with a different librarian and paid it (or paid it online).
  13. Yay! Great name, congratulations :)
  14. My kids don't sleep more but the older ones do entertain themselves (and feed themselves, and clean up after themselves, etc.) My downtime and productive time (and on occasion some sleep time) happens while they are awake.
  15. Maybe we just got lucky with lice. We did get them several times - I can't even count, but at least 3 or maybe more. The thing is, the cousin has them pretty much constantly, so whenever they spent the weekend with cousin (we used to live in the same city) or vacation there, now that we live farther away, DD12 would share a bed and hair grooming and etc. with cousin and surprise, we'd get lice. I never went to these things so I couldn't monitor; refusing to visit cousin was definitely not an option. We did wash pillowcases and sheets every day during the lice purge and banished stuffed animals from the bed. We did the heat and the shampoo both with the first infestation because I was so freaked out (and we had so many, because we had no idea that cousin had lice at that point, so spent 2 months treating head itchiness with hypoallergenic shampoos and hot oil treatments and etc.). I don't know that the shampoo did anything; I think the heat did kill the nits that I missed with the comb, but after I read about the life cycle of lice I realized that killing the nits was really unnecessary - as long as you are combing every morning, you catch any newly hatched ones and eventually you've caught all the hatchlings before they can reproduce and lay eggs. The key is, for us, that each child, even children without lice at first, have to be combed every day, because if a hatchling climbs from one kid's hair to another kid's hair and you have ignored kid 2 because he didn't have lice in the first place, you can eradicate lice on original kid completely but the hatchling on kid 2 will grow up and lay eggs and they will hatch and then you have lice again. I have 6 kids; DD12 is old enough to do her own hair now and can also do the little boys' hair; DS9 takes about 5 minutes a day; DD6 takes 10 minutes. When I was doing DD12's hair (long, thick, etc.), it took about half an hour most mornings. So total time less than an hour. A sucky hour, and I still occasionally have a paranoia that I've got lice somehow and I comb everyone just to make sure, but not the worst thing in the world. I read somewhere that ancient Egyptians used to be buried (entombed?) with their lice combs to take to the afterworld. I can say that this is something I definitely understand. I always own a lice comb now, and always will. It is one of the things I will grab during an escape from the Apocalypse. All of that said, if your kids don't want to leave school I do think it would be unnecessarily traumatic to bring them home in the middle of the year unless you have an exceedingly good reason. For me, "they might get lice" is not a good enough reason to make kids that sad.
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