Jump to content

Menu

Alternatives to pain management during childbirth?


Recommended Posts

I've had two births and am currently pg with my 3rd. My first was an epidural baby and I had no problems. My 2nd came too fast and she was natural and I was not prepared for that. With this one, I really don't want an epidural, but I really don't want all natural either. I will do it if there's no time, obviously, but I'm wondering if there are other options. Local right before delivery, etc.? I don't have an appt. for another two weeks, so I can't ask my dr. right away. I'm not patient when I need to know something. :) Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My first two births were induced and medicated. (epidurals) I have lasting back pain from those epidurals. My third was born in our backyard in a pool (blow-up pool), delivered by my husband. I used Hypnobirthing. I highly recommend it. Once I remembered that transition is the only really painful part, I knew I could do it. :001_smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Running late, but will put in a quick plug for the Bradley method. Worked so very well for me. I had looooong labors and big (for me) babies, and this helped me manage the pain well enough to get through unmedicated, and without tearing with my biggest baby. Loved the Bradley method.

 

We also used water for our births- didn't have a tub at the time, so the Dude and I were in the shower during transition. Helped tremendously. If you can get a tub, all the better. If we had had one, I would have been in it most of the labors, I am sure.

Edited by Needleroozer
added info.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Running late, but will put in a quick plug for the Bradley method. Worked so very well for me. I had looooong labors and big (for me) babies, and this helped me manage the pain well enough to get through unmedicated, and without tearing with my biggest baby. Loved the Bradley method.

 

We went thr Bradley method classes, so...I guess that's what we used?

 

Really, all it takes for me is imagining the needles that are the alternatives to natural birth, & voila! I choose needle-free every time. ;) (Because I"m a big chicken. Just clarifying. There's nothing inherently wrong w/ needles, other than their sharp end, that I know of.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There really aren't any "end-stage" options, medically speaking.

 

I'll second the Bradley method. My first was an epidural, my second was iv drugs (can't remember the name, but they were awful, lol), and my 3rd and 4th were natural, based on reading up on Bradley. I never took the classes, and I can't say I followed ALL of the tips, but it was an enormous help. I honestly loved my last two births, and I'd do it over and over again... as long as I could skip the 9 (10) months of pregnancy. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Really, all it takes for me is imagining the needles that are the alternatives to natural birth, & voila! I choose needle-free every time. ;) (Because I"m a big chicken. Just clarifying. There's nothing inherently wrong w/ needles, other than their sharp end, that I know of.)

 

That's what did it for me too. I was determined to not have an epidural and once I set my mind to it, I managed. Planning the same for this one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Really, all it takes for me is imagining the needles that are the alternatives to natural birth, & voila! I choose needle-free every time. ;) (Because I"m a big chicken. Just clarifying. There's nothing inherently wrong w/ needles, other than their sharp end, that I know of.)

 

 

:iagree::iagree:

This is why I had mine at home- terrified of hospitals and such, as well as needles (though I had to deal with them some, as I had to self-administer B-12 shots throughout both pregnancies)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I second (or is that 4th) the Bradley Method as well as water. The problem with a local before the birth is that it can cause the tissues to swell and can worsen tearing. Birthing in the water really eliminated the "ring of fire" sensation of crowning.

 

I taught Bradley for 12 years, only recently hanging up the pelvis. After my first birth - 12 hours of labor before the epidural and then a horrendous recovery from side effects of the epidural, I vowed my next birth to be different. I took Bradley, but was terribly skeptical. I learned to be confident in my body and learned to fill my bag with tools to help me through labor. I felt prepared instead of afraid. That labor was mostly pain-free. I did freak a little during crowning. With my last, I used the tub and found it WONDERFUL!

 

If you cannot get a Bradley class in (or even if you do), I strongly recommend an experienced doula. Many of my couples found that it made a huge difference.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just to clarify--I'm not in the camp of saying that childbirth was pain-free, fun, or something I'd like to do more than necessary. I do not like childbirth. It hurts. A lot.

 

I suspect, though, that the Bradley method may have contributed to making me a) more confident, although I cried as labor began w/ a hard bang w/ #1, telling dh I wasn't sure this was really it (my water had broken & hard contractions started at the same time, out of the complete blue), b) have shorter labors, ranging from 19min for #2 to 8hrs (most of that w/out any pain or contractions, though--2hrs for the nitty gritty, 26 from the time my water broke, 8 for the time the dc were w/ my saint of a neighbor), & c) have some kind of information to help myself know when/how to push, what stage I'm in & how much longer to go, etc.

 

HTH

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another 3 time Bradley success story here...though mine were hospital births and not in the water. Sounds like you're not sold on doing it natural again, but I have to say having the time to actually prepare for the natural birth instead of having it thrust upon you in the heat of the moment could make all the difference. If you're interested at all check out Natural Chidbirth the Bradley Way. It is immensely useful.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Natural-Childbirth-Bradley-Way-Revised/dp/0452276594/

 

Good luck either way!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Water does it for me. My first 5 labors lasted from 7 hours at the shortest to 26 at the longest. For some reason, I did showers but never got in the tub. With my last two, I got in the tub as soon as I started to feel wiggly like I couldn't deal with it one minute longer. #6 was born in 3.5 hours start to finish with maybe 1.5 hours of water labor. #7 only took about an hour and a half all together and I was in the water for about 30 minutes. Wasn't pain free, but much more manageable and quicker.

 

Barb

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Having done the childbirth thing repeatedly and in different ways I can tell you that there is no way to have a child painlessly without drugs. Sitting in water during labor did not help. (Although it has helped some friends tremendously.) Standing up did not help. Lying down did not help. Breathing exercises are a joke. The nurse my first time around (27 years ago) actually told me they promote Bradley and the other method (forget the name -- it's breathing thing) because it keeps the mom occupied.

 

To have a child without severe pain you need to be 1) incredibly lucky like my cousin who has never felt a labor pain, or 2) get drugs, lots and often.

 

You should speak with your doctor or midwife. They will give you all your options, and may even have something new I never heard of. I haven't done it in over 10 years. ;)

 

My 4th baby was my only med-free one and we used a birthing tub. I knew some Bradley techniques, but can't say that's really what I used. Having a *wonderful* midwife beside me helped as much as anything.

 

Same here. My last one was at home. Just being home with no strangers milling around, safe in my own environment and with only hand-picked attendants made all the difference in the world. It was still excruciatingly painful, but I was in control and I dealt with it. If I'd known then what I know I would have never, ever gone to a hospital to deliver my first.

Edited by tdeveson
Link to comment
Share on other sites

One word: Hypnobabies. I know 3 women IRL who have had pain-free births using Hypnobabies. I used it too, but ended up with a planned c/s (DS was going to be a VBAC, but I went to 42w2d...and we were SURE of dates) so I never got to put it to the test, so to speak.

 

Oh yeah. HypnoBabies forever!!!!!!! :lol: Another IRL mom who I lent my HypnoBabies too also had a pain-free natural birth.

 

Well, I had under 20 min of pain. And that was going from 7cm to baby born in under 20 min, so I understandably lost my focus :tongue_smilie:and that was IT. I mean, I could tell it was just as intense as with dd1 (where I had an epi and thought I was going to die from pain, LOL) but I could totally handle it this time, and make my brain think it didn't hurt. And being in the water helped a lot, too (which they made me get out of for that last 20 minutes :glare:--next time I'm birthing at home and staying in the water).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was determined to not have an epidural and once I set my mind to it, I managed. Planning the same for this one.

 

Same here. It helped a great deal that my husband was supportive. I had a moment of weakness with #2 and #3, and if he hadn't supported me, I would have ended up having something because the nurses were sure pushing the pain meds and epidural. I'm planning the same for this next baby.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Same here. It helped a great deal that my husband was supportive. I had a moment of weakness with #2 and #3, and if he hadn't supported me, I would have ended up having something because the nurses were sure pushing the pain meds and epidural. I'm planning the same for this next baby.

 

I should have mentioned that. I told my dh before hand, don't let me get an epidural even if I beg for it. And he did really well talking me through the pain.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bradley Method

 

Baby #1 was 72 hours from the time my water broke before labor began until we transferred to the hospital to get an epidural. I had NO problems with pain, just needed to stop my labor so my cervix could rest (it had swelled). She was born 6 hours later after the pitocin to restart my labor sent her heart rate into a steep dive.

 

Baby #2 was born at home after 22 hours of labor. Again, pain wasn't an issue. My doula's daughter (who was helping care for baby #1 and had seen her mother give birth) said I made it look easy.

 

Baby #3 was induced at the hospital. I forgot what I learned from Bradley, laid in bed the whole time, was in horrible pain, and asked for an epidural.

 

Baby #4 was induced at the hospital. I asked for the telemetry unit, which allows them to do continuous monitoring, which I required, while you walk the corridors. I used my Bradley Method training and made it to transition without too much issue despite the pitocin being turned up to 12 (20 is the highest they'll go). Then I went through transition standing at the nurses station. They didn't know what to think of that! :lol: My DH had to tell them I was in transition and that they should go get the doctor since I'd be delivering soon.

 

Yes, the Bradley Method works well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had my last baby in water, and I was surprised at how much I liked it. The baby before that was my first totally natural birth; it was much too fast, almost violent. It did NOT leave me with feelings of euphoria about childbirth. So thankful that water birth felt so much gentler. (Not pain-free, just not violent)

 

The 2 babies before that I received a half dose of stadol. I LOVED that! But I think I am different from most people in that transition and pushing don't bother me so much; the part that gets me is getting from 4-9. A partial dose of stadol was just the trick to help me relax and not get overcome by pain. Speedy deliveries and sleepy nursers have led me to question this option for me at this time. So, I am really really glad that water is so effective for me.

 

I believe there are some timing issues with a drug like stadol: it must be taken a certain length of time before delivery, or something like that. It's been quite a while since I've used it!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh...there are SOOO many options!!! :)

 

- Hire a doula. The research speaks for itself.

 

- Read everything you can get your hands on!! I have a book/website recommendation list I can email you if you like.

 

- Take a class that teaches about natural birth (don't take a hospital class!). There have been some great suggestions here already (i.e. Bradley). See what's in your area, research the different types and decide what's best for you. Most out there that teach natural birth are excellent!

 

- Hydrotherapy. You'll have to ask your dr or doula about this as you may only have the option of the shower. And if you have that, you probably won't be able to be in there long b/c they will want you on the fetal monitor. Most hospitals don't have tubs to labor in, but yours might. And if they do it's very likely you will not be able to birth there.

 

- Be active during labor. Even if you are on the fetal monitor you CAN be active..it doesn't mean you'll be tied to the bed.

 

- Learn about comfort measures. This includes your husband. If/When you hire a doula she can help teach you these things.

 

- Learn about and practice relaxation methods now. Practice very day. Again, this is something a doula can help you with.

 

- Make sure you spend time during your pregnancy surrounding yourself with the positive. The mind-body connection is VERY strong during pregnancy, labor, and birth. Making sure you are prepared mentally/emotionally will be a huge help in achieving a natural birth.

 

- If you want meds but don't want an epidural, many women choose Stadol. You can't have it when you are very close to delivery (it's a narcotic and will cause respiratory distress in the baby). It will not take all of the pain away but may help take the edge off. It only lasts about 45mins-1hr. Beware though, some women don't handle it well and feel very odd.

 

HTH!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All I can say.. is when I stood... he came out:-) Standing is good:-)

 

Yep, I was standing w/ my 1st 3, born in 3hrs, 19 min, 4hrs, weighing in at 8.5lb, 8.5lb, 9.5lb.

 

My slow guy was my first home birth (the other 3 were at the birth center). My bed was not as high off the ground as the bc bed, & I couldn't...I don't know find the right grip & ended up exhausted & crawling in the bed saying I was just going to take a short nap, lol. They said he was only 9.5lb, but gosh that baby felt BIG.

 

(No tearing here, either, except on #1, because I apparently skipped the ch on how to push & wash just anxious to get the whole surprisingly painful ordeal over w/. Mom had told me she was clipping coupons when I was born, & I'd forgotten that she'd had an epidural, so I was not expecting what I got, lol!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One word: Hypnobabies. I know 3 women IRL who have had pain-free births using Hypnobabies.

 

:iagree: I've had pain-free births with Hypnobabies, multiple times. My first baby's birth was very painful (no education or support), so I got IV meds and an epidural. I used hypnosis with my last four births and will never give birth any other way. I loved being alert, aware, and comfortable without the risks or side effects of drugs. :D I felt much more connected and in control. It was awesome!

 

I liked water, massage, movement, my doula, etc., but if I could only have one thing, it would be Hypnobabies. :)

 

You can read over 200 birth stories of moms using hypnosis here:

 

http://pregnancybirthandbabies.com/POSITIVE_birth_stories.htm

Edited by Veritaserum
Link to comment
Share on other sites

And I'd be ready with multiple plans and approaches. Everyone is different.

 

When I truly had exhausted all the natural options that I had at my disposal, I had a shot of nubain/nalbuphine which got me through transition. I realize that's not "natural," but the risks/effects are less than an epidural.

 

FWIW I had an epidural later for tendon surgery, and ended up with a spinal fluid leak and complications. I can understand wanting to avoid epidurals now.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've had three homebirths, and I won't say that it didn't hurt...lol...it did. But knowing transition is the hardest part and that everything in a normal birth is manageable, helps a lot. I think of my first as being the most painful, mostly because every sensation was new. By the third I could say to myself "Oh yeah. But it won't last forever". It hurt less when I wasn't afraid....if that makes sense. Laboring in water also helps tremendously.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I took Bradley classes when I was pregnant with my first baby 15 years ago. I had her in the hospital, and my Bradley teacher was also my doula. I ended up being induced, but understanding the stages of labor kept me from needing an epidural. I did end up with 3 third degree tears because the hospital staff did not listen to what I was telling them about my own body.

 

I had 2 more induced births without pain medicine in the hospital with a doula. I had episiotomies with these because I was told that the excessive scar tissue I have from my first birth, and a later repair from that birth will never stretch.

 

When I was pregnant with Miss Bossy, I really wanted something better for myself and for her. I came to the hive, and asked if it was worth spending the extra $750 out of network fee to have her at Nativiti instead of a hospital. The overwhelming response was that she was worth the extra investment, so I bit the bullet and changed.

 

 

 

It was a much better birth, even though the doula I hired was out of town, so I had someone I hadn't met before. I was a little stressed because I did not realize I was in labor until I was in transition, so the drive there was intense. I had her in the water with out an episiotomy, and only had a little tear that I never felt.

 

This last baby was the best birth so far. I had her at Nativiti, but I got there in time to do most of my active laboring with my midwife and my fantastic doula. They helped give me counter pressure on my back, and push on my hips during contractions to help guide the baby down. I used my visualization techniques to the point where I was dozing between contractions when I was 7 cm dilated.

 

I did have very intense back pain. It turns out that she had her fist by her cheek, and her elbow was in my back. I gave one push in the water, and they could see that the baby was coming out with her hand by her face. They told me to get on my knees, and she just slid out. I did not know that her head had even been delivered yet. I assumed that I was going to have some pretty bad tearing with a one push birth, but I didn't even have a little one.

 

I feel like it was a manageable, good birth. Dh said that he thinks all births are hard and intense and scary. Some things that helped make it bearable to me was very GOOD labor support, water for delivery, and a good understanding of how very short the worst part of labor can be.

 

Here is a picture of my new girl when we put her back in the bath after delivery. You can see how awake and alert she is.

post-222-13535083214714_thumb.jpg

post-222-13535083214714_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree. Education and support are key. Research proves that if you have both, you are less likely to need a C section and less likely to even want drugs.

 

I had both my babies at home with midwives and also was determined to not have drugs. I had an awesome midwife for the first delivery that just kept reassuring me that this sucks, that it DOES hurt, but that it is normal and to trust my body. I ended up giving in, surrendering to the pain (stopped fighting it and welcomed it) and I went away to a "happy place"; I trusted that my body knew what to do, and I seriously "went away", to some altered state of consciousness. I literally breathed the baby out and felt no pain those last few minutes. Not new agey/voodoo anything, just knowing it's normal, and trusting and believing that your body can handle it.

Edited by specialmama
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had both my babies at home with midwives and also was determined to not have drugs. I had an awesome midwife for the first delivery that just kept reassuring me that this sucks, that it DOES hurt, but that it is normal and to trust my body. I ended up giving in to the pain (stopped fighting it and welcomed it) and I went away to a "happy place"; I trusted that my body knew what to do, and I seriously "went away", to some altered state of consciousness. I literally breathed the baby out and felt no pain those last few minutes. Not new agey/voodoo anything, just knowing it's normal, and trusting and believing that your body can handle it.

 

I only wish I was able to do that for my second baby. :glare:

 

Yes, this! Surrendering to the pain will get your through it much better than numbing it or dulling it with drugs, which ALL have risks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I hired a doula this last time, and was determined not to have an induction or an epidural. We managed even to avoid the IV line, as everything happened so quickly. (I was willing to get that as it was hospital policy, but we just didn't manage it as my labor was pretty active once we got to the hospital). It was intense, but very manageable (and short- we were at the hospital for only 30 min and the doula was at our house only an hour before that). I had zero stitches, which was new for me. I recommend a more natural birth to anyone who is willing to try. Too bad I'm not planning any more births, I'd love to try the Hypnobabies everyone is raving about.

 

Since I had no stitches, I was even allowed to drive upon my release from the hospital. Definitely my easiest recovery.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the replies and interest. I'll have to check out Bradley and Hypnobabies since so many of you suggested those two. I may not have a choice about pain management since I have quick L&D's. I can put myself in that moment of "just do it" and woman-up and not fight it. My last one was just so unexpected at how fast she came that I wasn't prepared for all that went on. Someone mentioned that one of their births was so fast that it was almost violent and didn't leave them with that euphoric birth experience and I totally agree, that was my experience. Now that I'm prepared that that could happen again, I really have an edge on knowing what to expect and that will help. I wish I could go to a birthing center, but with my 2nd, my water broke and boom, she was here, no beginning contractions, nothing, just water breaking and the end pretty much. Our drive time is 45 min. to the closest birthing center and my dh could possibly be delivering he/she in the car! If I had progressive labor instead of short, quick labors, it would be more of a possibility. My dh isn't comfortable with a home birth at this time, so a good dr. that many people recommended is the best choice for us. She seems to be a good listener (I've only seen her twice so far), so hopefully we can talk about a plan too. I really am leaning in the natural birth direction because I don't really see that I have a choice nor do I want the possible side effects of a epidural, so I better learn about the best way to work with my body and make it a better experience than the last one. Thanks again for all your wonderful advice and interest!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll give you my experience here. My last baby (6th) was the first that I'd had completely natural. I read for months on relaxation/Bradley/hypnosis/etc. so was fairly prepared (plus, it was my 6th baby, so I knew what to expect).

 

When I went into labor, I progressed very quickly. I woke at 1am with a good contraction and by the time I got to the hospital at 2:30, I was 8cm. It was a very painful ride in the car and wait in the emergency room until I got to my room, but then I layed on my side at an incline and was able to relax a bit. I went through a good 1 1/2 hours of horrible transition, despite the relaxation (my midwife specialized in hypnobirthing and said she'd never seen anything like it - she thought I was asleep half the time.) I was fully dialated for quite a while but the baby had not moved down at all, so I sat straight up and endured 20 minutes of hellish torture wishing someone would just kill me while miss baby moved down. A short time of pushing (not painful, just a rollercoaster of intense work), and then she was out. All 9 1/2 lbs of her.

 

So, the reason for my story - all women experience different levels of labor pain depending on how their nerves/bones/etc are layed out. Relaxation techniques can help immensely, but you won't necessarily have that lovely, peaceful birth (unless you're in hypnosis.) I've seen women singing lovely songs during labor and others who say it's painful but manageable, and then others like me who find it sheer torture. I don't know where you fall on the scale (I generally have a very high tolerence for pain and good relaxation control) but you can rest assured that even if hard labor is very painful, it is just pain. It will go away.

 

I much preferred the "agony" of natural childbirth to the needles, wires, and machines of an epidural and all the things that go along with it. I probably also would have been more comfortable earlier on if I'd had the baby at home. Dh wasn't comfortable with that, though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree. Education and support are key. Research proves that if you have both, you are less likely to need a C section and less likely to even want drugs.

 

I had both my babies at home with midwives and also was determined to not have drugs. I had an awesome midwife for the first delivery that just kept reassuring me that this sucks, that it DOES hurt, but that it is normal and to trust my body. I ended up giving in, surrendering to the pain (stopped fighting it and welcomed it) and I went away to a "happy place"; I trusted that my body knew what to do, and I seriously "went away", to some altered state of consciousness. I literally breathed the baby out and felt no pain those last few minutes. Not new agey/voodoo anything, just knowing it's normal, and trusting and believing that your body can handle it.

 

I wish more women would realize this.

 

Our bodies will produce painkillers FOR us if we will just ALLOW them to!

 

I am a complete advocate of the book "A good birth, a safe birth".

 

My son was in my back, arm across chest, and my cervix was scarred shut at 2 cm. I got one shot of stadol at 2cm, my midwife ripped my cervix open during a contraction (yep, with her fingers), and off we went.

 

It was, and still is the happiest, most magical day of my life. The one time I started to complain that it was too hard, my midwife smacked me on the leg and told me to get ahold of myself - I was going to be a mother and I needed to "man up".

 

Wisest advice I've ever gotten.

 

Eight or so hours of pushing to a perfect baby. No rips. Out Christmas shopping 4 days later.

 

 

a

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

FWIW I had an epidural later for tendon surgery, and ended up with a spinal fluid leak and complications. I can understand wanting to avoid epidurals now.

 

Before I had our first child in 2001, the Doctor/Midwife REQUIRED me to watch a video about epidurals. OMG. That's what did it for me. After viewing that video my husband and I both decided I would NEVER get an epidural.

 

Now, I don't remember a thing about what I heard or saw in that video except that I never want to have an epidural.

 

As for giving in to the pain, I guess you could say that's what I did. I only found contractions to be painful, not the actual birth. With every contraction I told myself "this is only temporary. This will be over in a minute" and I made it through, taking each contraction one at a time. I won't say they didn't hurt, but they didn't hurt as much as prior to getting my emotions and mental state under control.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another plug for Bradley here (and I never took a class, just borrowed an old Bradley book from my local library).

 

My last three were completely unmedicated, Bradley births. I had them in a traditional hospital (birth centers too far away, plus insurance wouldn't cover them). Since I was low-risk I was able to go IV-free with all three of these babies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I loved Hypnobabies. Loved it!!! I used it for my third and had NO pain until he got stuck (shoulder dystocia) and I lost my focus. But, it didn't work for my fourth child. I don't know why. I couldn't focus during her labor. And, hers was at home. Weird.

 

Anyway, am I the only one who does NOT like water??? I found that by walking around, I was much more in control than if I was in a tub, lying down. I felt trapped - like I couldn't move. Whereas when I was walking around, I could rock to the contractions and do what needed to be done at that particular time.

 

Different things for different people!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anyway, am I the only one who does NOT like water???

 

I had an epidural for all my land births, so I can't compare it, but I don't think I would do another water birth. I have very fast labors (20 minutes) but very long, painful afterbirth contractions. I was horrified when I realized that they expected me to get up and shower right after. I passed out in the shower twice; I was in enormous pain and would have much preferred to be able to just lie in bed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Two options that I used: gas and air; an injection that just dulls the pain (I've forgotten what it was called). The gas and air I only used during the contractions. It made me a bit light headed, but it did take the edge off. The injection also took the edge off the pain, but I was less in control of the process.

 

Laura

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jennifer ~ No, you are not the only one. But it's important for women to know that it is an option to help manage the pain. If it (or another pain management technique) doesn't work, try something else.

 

Different things for different people!

This. Exactly.

 

But what is essential is that every woman is educated about her options.

 

It's important to know there are options on where to birth.

 

It's important to know that during labor and birth there are options for every aspect. And when choosing an option every woman needs to know the risks and benefits of those, then make a decision based on that knowledge.

 

No birth is exactly the same. Every woman is different.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And before you make any plans, make sure you know what the hospital allows for pain management. I was surprised to discover when I entered that the hospital only allows nubain or epidural as far as drug pain management goes. That's it. So I had no choice but to go natural and use some of the techniques mentioned. I had a bad reaction to an epidural with the first one and that wonderful nubain turns me into a crazy screaming maniac who tried to take out the nurse and dr with the iv pole. So check with labor and delivery to see what they will allow before you get too far along with plans.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the replies and interest. I'll have to check out Bradley and Hypnobabies since so many of you suggested those two. I may not have a choice about pain management since I have quick L&D's....I really am leaning in the natural birth direction because I don't really see that I have a choice nor do I want the possible side effects of a epidural, so I better learn about the best way to work with my body and make it a better experience than the last one. Thanks again for all your wonderful advice and interest!

 

Hypnobabies has specific hypnosis techniques to get you into hypnosis instantly. Mamas with short labors benefit from those in particular. :) I loved Hypnobabies because I could combine it with moving around, water, massage, etc.--whatever I felt like doing at the time. It was wonderful! :D

 

Here's a chart that helps you figure out what type of preparation might best suit your needs (includes Bradley, Hypnobabies, self-study, and other options):

 

http://www.birthnaturally.org/childbirthoptionsguide.pdf

 

I debated between Bradley and hypnosis with my second baby (first natural birth) and chose hypnosis because my comfort was at the top of my list. :o I'm not a fan of pain (I'm a pain wimp), but I also didn't want another epidural. Hypnosis was the perfect solution for me! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hypnobabies has specific hypnosis techniques to get you into hypnosis instantly. Mamas with short labors benefit from those in particular. :) I loved Hypnobabies because I could combine it with moving around, water, massage, etc.--whatever I felt like doing at the time. It was wonderful! :D

 

 

Yup--you just "turn off your lightswitch" or do the finger drop. You practice for several weeks before so that your mind recognizes the signal and drops into hypnosis immediately.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anyway, am I the only one who does NOT like water???

 

Nope, I didn't like the water either; I used it on my fifth birth (of seven). But my reason has more to do with timing -- my last five births have been from 1-2 hours from start to finish. So with the 5th birth, we spent a good chunk of that getting the pool filled up; and we ran out of hot water so the water was on the cold side of tepid. It was also new, being in the water, and since it was just my husband and myself, we didn't have answers to questions like "Is this normal?" or "Does this position work well for water birth?" etc. So instead of relaxing and focusing, I was asking questions. Anyway, all in all I didn't like the water for these reasons and I've had 2 since then just fine without water.

 

My thought for the OP has to do with the "ring of fire." At that point, I really try to focus on the ENTIRE baby -- not on its head and my cervix! I think of its OTHER end, LOL -- just getting that cute little booty into my arms as it were. :tongue_smilie:

 

And, yes, a lot of it for me is what someone else already said -- "this is how it works; this is how it's worked for a loooong time, everything's fine, I can do this, I can handle this for x-minutes [again for me the "hard part" is only 20-40 minutes so your mileage may vary!], etc."

 

How do YOU feel about water? (You may have already answered that, I'll go back is see).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nope, I didn't like the water either; I used it on my fifth birth (of seven). But my reason has more to do with timing -- my last five births have been from 1-2 hours from start to finish. So with the 5th birth, we spent a good chunk of that getting the pool filled up; and we ran out of hot water so the water was on the cold side of tepid. It was also new, being in the water, and since it was just my husband and myself, we didn't have answers to questions like "Is this normal?" or "Does this position work well for water birth?" etc. So instead of relaxing and focusing, I was asking questions. Anyway, all in all I didn't like the water for these reasons and I've had 2 since then just fine without water.

 

My thought for the OP has to do with the "ring of fire." At that point, I really try to focus on the ENTIRE baby -- not on its head and my cervix! I think of its OTHER end, LOL -- just getting that cute little booty into my arms as it were. :tongue_smilie:

 

And, yes, a lot of it for me is what someone else already said -- "this is how it works; this is how it's worked for a loooong time, everything's fine, I can do this, I can handle this for x-minutes [again for me the "hard part" is only 20-40 minutes so your mileage may vary!], etc."

 

How do YOU feel about water? (You may have already answered that, I'll go back is see).

 

I've never had a birth in water and am not opposed to it. If a birthing center was located closer a water birth is what I would have done. I'll have to ask if the hospital has this option. If not, then I guess I won't. My deliveries go quickly, so I'll just think of the end result and get past the hard 30 or so min. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hypnobabies has specific hypnosis techniques to get you into hypnosis instantly. Mamas with short labors benefit from those in particular. :) I loved Hypnobabies because I could combine it with moving around, water, massage, etc.--whatever I felt like doing at the time. It was wonderful! :D

 

Here's a chart that helps you figure out what type of preparation might best suit your needs (includes Bradley, Hypnobabies, self-study, and other options):

 

http://www.birthnaturally.org/childbirthoptionsguide.pdf

 

I debated between Bradley and hypnosis with my second baby (first natural birth) and chose hypnosis because my comfort was at the top of my list. :o I'm not a fan of pain (I'm a pain wimp), but I also didn't want another epidural. Hypnosis was the perfect solution for me! :)

 

Hypnosis was amazing for me. I had a very healing experience after an emotionally wretched previous birth. I can't recommend it highly enough.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've had all four of my babies at home. I fear hospitals far more than I fear pain:tongue_smilie:

 

In short: I had my first after taking Bradley classes, short birthing, VERY intense. Became a Bradley instructor (the classes are very thorough but the relaxation techiniques taught may/may not be great depending on the teacher). Had baby #2, MORE intense birth, told mw I wouldn't be doing that again. Got pregnant w/#3 and was worried. MW suggested hypnosis. I thought "What a crock." Took hypnobirthing - hypnosis was great but the techniques to do it weren't doable imo. So I checked out Hypnobabies. Ahhhhh, yes! This was doable and awesome. Had the best birth ever! Totally painless. Mw didn't even think I was birthing I was so calm. Had baby #4 1.5 yrs. ago, used Hypnobabies again. It was a quick birth. Not totall painless like before but definitely managable. I would not birth w/o Hypnobabies:D

 

I've come to the conclusion that there are many factors (besides the fact that we are all different) that determine our birthing experience. We are all made differently (I will always have back pain for instance, well, except that one time:)) and our babies are different. I now believe that, to have the optimum birthing experience, we should 1) have the most nutritious diet 2) exercise reguarly (I walked 3 miles a day 5 days a week during my 3rd pregnancy 3) learn solid relaxation techniques for the birthing day 4) enjoy the pregnancy and be determined/fearless about the expectations of the birth.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...