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Friend just had a baby and named her.....

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My great grandmother had a somewhat unique old fashioned name. She was 97 when she was hospitalized with a woman who had the same name, and was also 97. My family was extra vigilant checking with the nurses about which "Gertrude" they wanted

I had a great grandmother named Gertrude,too.

 

Born in 1903.

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I have a kiddo named Ivy. Three letters (!!) and we still get asked to spell it.

"I-v?" "I-v-e-y?"

 

I truly wasn't expecting this name issue.

 

I have a friend whose mother named her Ivey. (with an E) When she got to about high school she stopped using the "E" and wrote her name Ivy forever after. I'm not sure if she legalized the spelling when she changed her name after marrying or if she still has an "e" in her legal name. But she hates it.

Edited by theelfqueen

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Trust me, Lisa ( or Leesa, Lesa, Lise) still gets misspelled.

 

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk

Or if you're me, Leisa.

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I didn't realize he was married to an Evelyn. I've always heard the male name pronounced Eve-lynn but women I've known with that name are all Eh-vuh-lynn. 

 

Not quite the same as the Waughs, but I once taught with a married couple named Denis and Denise. Ds 19 is Dennis but with two N's. I know the proper spelling is with one N but to me it leaves the possibility of being teased because it can look as if it's pronounced like the man's organ except with a D. (Also he's named after my dad who spelled it with two N's).

 

Bob Hope's real name was Leslie. John Wayne's real name was Marion.

Here there are more than a few couples named Denis and Denise, but in French, Denis is pronounced like Den-nee (long e sound). So it's easy to tell which is which. I know two couples named Jean and Jeanne. Those are closer in sound, but if you have a French ear, it's easy to hear the difference. The hard ones are the Michel and Michelle couples. There is no difference in the pronunciation, so if you're calling on the phone, you just hope you can identify the voice. One Michel/Michelle couple I know both have very similar voices, and every time I call there, I feel like I'm in a Seinfeld episode.

 

Edited by Audrey
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I've never known a female Shawn, but went to school with a girl named Shawna. I've known males with the different spellings - Sean (my preference) Shaun, and Shawn.

There's Shawn Colvin, the singer/songwriter.

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There's Shawn Colvin, the singer/songwriter.

And Shawn Cassidy the actor/singer.... But now I'm showing my age...

 

Sent from my SM-T530NU using Tapatalk

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Chris and Lori. Her name is Christina but she goes by Chris. His name is Lori. The article about them wedding (which had other reasons to be unusual) got them mixed up.

 

Sent from my SM-T530NU using Tapatalk

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My college friends Dawn and Don married each other :)

 

I know in some dialects those are pronounced differently, but the way they pronounce them is identical.

Edited by maize

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My bug bear is that because of the mispelling trend nobody trusts how to spell any name. I have kids named Anna and James and I seriously want to kick people when they continually ask if James is spelt with a z or if Anna has a h on the end. My youngest is named Isaac and I was expecting some trouble with that for obvious reasons but everyone seems to know how to spell that correctly without even asking 🤔

Edited by sewingmama
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This is so sad. I can only imagine the emotional baggage that comes from knowing that's the name chosen for you by your parents.

 

 

Not necessarily if its a cultural name. I used to think Fatima was such a bad name...until I learned it was pronounced Fah-teem-ah and not Fat-i-ma which I originally thought...I think it's quite pretty sounding now.

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There used to be a site devoted to this whole topic - Baby's Named A Bad, Bad Thing. It's gone away now, but they explored every urban legend name thoroughly (including the Jello twins, Sh*thead, Cannabis and his sister Sativa). All thoroughly debunked. Unless there is hard evidence to the contrary they'll just have to go down as the myths handed from generation to generation. :) Goodness knows there are enough really bad names out there. I went to school with a Burley D*ck, Jr - it wasn't enough for there to be one in the family , I guess. And unfortunately that can be easily verified due to his prison stint.

That site is still there..I visited just last week 😉

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And Shawn Cassidy the actor/singer.... But now I'm showing my age...

 

Sent from my SM-T530NU using Tapatalk

It is actually Shaun Cassidy. 😃

 

Where I live, people spell boys Shawn. We personally used it for a middle name for one of ours and spelled it Sean. Can't help it. I am Irish.

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 Oh, and one of my closest friends has a brother named Claire. She said that many a fight happened over his name.  

I've never met a man with the i in Claire - Clare is a family name going back generations. My dd (I only have girls) has Clare as her middle name, and we chose to continue the male spelling.

 

 

 

Not quite the same as the Waughs, but I once taught with a married couple named Denis and Denise. Ds 19 is Dennis but with two N's. I know the proper spelling is with one N but to me it leaves the possibility of being teased because it can look as if it's pronounced like the man's organ except with a D. (Also he's named after my dad who spelled it with two N's).

 

 

My mom's cousin is Denis. He married a Denise.

 

THIS is when it really annoys me. Don't get mad when people spell your kid's name "wrong" by spelling it right. I've seen this upclose and personal with family members and friends. They get all indignant and say, "The coach spelled EmmaLeigh's name wrong on her trophy!" Well, duh! What are they supposed to be? The Oracle?

 

If you want to be different, knock yourself out, but be patient about all the corrections you will have to make forever and ever. We wanted our first child to have a rarer name, so we intentionally chose something uncommon: Kyla. However, this name is often confused with its much more popular similar names for that generation of kids - all those Kayla, Kylie, Kayley girls. So I spell. And remind. And clarify. And now she does. He name is not spelled in an unusual way, but just by being a name that wasn't in the top 100, people mistake it for other names.

 

 

ETA: punctuation screw-up

My oldest dd has a fairly unusual name - Jaycie. One time at Awanas she received 2 awards and a certificate. Her name was spelled 4 different ways (3 different awards and the card that the announcer read). None of them were correct (Jaycee, Jacey, Jaycey and something I don't remember). She's learned just to roll with it, and she answers to the more common rhyming names as well (Tracey, Stacey). 

 

I have a friend whose mother named her Ivey. (with an E) When she got to about high school she stopped using the "E" and wrote her name Ivy forever after. I'm not sure if she legalized the spelling when she changed her name after marrying or if she still has an "e" in her legal name. But she hates it.

My grandmother was Erma - she changed it to Irma (she didn't have an official birth certificate so she just changed it). Why? She hated writing cursive capital E's. She then married a man whose last name started with an E. 

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My parents knew a couple with the names Carol and Carole. I'm sure it was super fun for my dad to go out with them and my mom because her name was also Carole :)

 

Another funny name story. My uncle's wives were both named Pat. His last girlfriend was also a Pat. 

 

Kelly

Edited by SquirrellyMama

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Not necessarily if its a cultural name. I used to think Fatima was such a bad name...until I learned it was pronounced Fah-teem-ah and not Fat-i-ma which I originally thought...I think it's quite pretty sounding now.

 

We know a Fatima & it is pronounced Fah -ti - mah...with the accent on the first syllable.  It's funny how pronunciations can differ!  

Edited by clementine

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But naming one's daughter an extremely masculine-dominant name, masculine since Biblical times, does seem to me a really bad idea.

 

 

some of us deliberately name kids something that shortens to name which is widely used both as male or female name so they can choose to use a gender non disclosing name.  I don't see why such a thing should confuse people so much. 

 

 

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Not necessarily if its a cultural name. I used to think Fatima was such a bad name...until I learned it was pronounced Fah-teem-ah and not Fat-i-ma which I originally thought...I think it's quite pretty sounding now.

Fatima has difference pronounciations.  Some are closer to the Portugese (& the Catholic saint) and some are Arabic.  The only thing it definitely isn't is "Fat I'm Ah"   

 

http://www.pronouncenames.com/pronounce/fatima

 

Edited by hornblower
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Or if you're me, Leisa.

 

I'm one of the millions of Lisas born in the 60s and 70s.  I was given the standard spelling.  I still have to spell it for people because we live in a world where I've actually met a Leighsah. 

 

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I'm one of the millions of Lisas born in the 60s and 70s.  I was given the standard spelling.  I still have to spell it for people because we live in a world where I've actually met a Leighsah. 

 

 

I can handle a lot of different spellings for names, but Leighsah is too much.  I think I'd have pronounced that Lay-sah if you hand't connected it to Lisa.

 

ETA: Nevermind, I would have pronounced that correctly. I have seen Leigh used before. Although, I do like the Lay-sah pronounciation.

 

Kelly

Edited by SquirrellyMama
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I had a great grandmother named Gertrude,too.

 

Born in 1903.

 

Doesn't Gertrude sound like it should be a virtue?

 

Prudence, Chastity, Patience, Charity and Gertrude.

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I think we've had variations of this discussion before & I'm pretty sure it's been mentioned how there's an element of prejudice in these conversations. 

this thread running through the commentary that names should be "English" and should be spelled how they've always been spelled.  

The only exception white peeps seem to make is for Gaelic names. Those are allowed to be a stream of letters which bear no connection to standard English phonemic rules and it's still ok.  

 

Anything else is either too foreign or too ghetto or too hippy or too trendy or too stupid... 

Complaints that "I spell it the normal way & still people ask me how to spell it" is such a loaded statement - that there's the one & only way & that there's something wrong about a multicultural world where names are transcribed and spelled and pronounced a multitude of different ways and that it's really just as easy to learn to say & spell Siobhan as it is to say Hyoyeon or Manhtuan....

Why not just get used to asking people how to spell and say their names and stop worrying about whether that's a 'real' name or a made up name or a foreign spelling or a made up spelling? 

Edited by hornblower
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Here's the issue I have regarding 'creative spellings'.  We have a daughter with a traditionally spelled first name.  The first vowel is meant to be pronounced long, like Hay-zel.  More than half of the time that we make a dentist, pediatrian, eye appointment the person on the phone pronounces it with a short vowel like the beginning of the word 'hat' (even though I have never heard of that being an actual name).  

 

So, if a person grew up with a name that was often mispronounced, one way they could alleviate the problem would be a phonetically spelled version of the name.  

 

Thank goodness that when we meet people in person or say their name aloud we don't have to worry about how it is spelled - so hopefully 99% of the time that people have contact with Hay-zel, the spelling won't make a hill of beans of a difference.  

Edited by clementine

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I think we've had variations of this discussion before & I'm pretty sure it's been mentioned how there's an element of prejudice in these conversations. 

 

this thread running through the commentary that names should be "English" and should be spelled how they've always been spelled.  

 

The only exception white peeps seem to make is for Gaelic names. Those are allowed to be a stream of letters which bear no connection to standard English phonemic rules and it's still ok.  

 

Anything else is either too foreign or too ghetto or too hippy or too trendy or too stupid... 

 

Complaints that "I spell it the normal way & still people ask me how to spell it" is such a loaded statement - that there's the one & only way & that there's something wrong about a multicultural world where names are transcribed and spelled and pronounced a multitude of different ways and that it's really just as easy to learn to say & spell Siobhan as it is to say Hyoyeon or Manhtuan....

 

Why not just get used to asking people how to spell and say their names and stop worrying about whether that's a 'real' name or a made up name or a foreign spelling or a made up spelling? 

 

Who has complained about other language spellings, or said they need to be English names?  I haven't seen that at all.  The complaint seems to be pretty consistently that names that do have a standard spelling are changed just for the heck of it.   I think a couple of people may have thought that a particular different language spelling was a random change, but that's just a factual error.

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Here's the issue I have regarding 'creative spellings'.  We have a daughter with a traditionally spelled first name.  The first vowel is meant to be pronounced long, like Hay-zel.  More than half of the time that we make a dentist, pediatrian, eye appointment the person on the phone pronounces it with a short vowel like the beginning of the word 'hat' (even though I have never heard of that being an actual name).  

 

So, if a person grew up with a name that was often mispronounced, one way they could alleviate the problem would be a phonetically spelled version of the name.  

 

Thank goodness that when we meet people in person or say their name aloud we don't have to worry about how it is spelled - so hopefully 99% of the time that people have contact with Hay-zel, the spelling won't make a hill of beans of a difference.  

 

So, my reading is that your issue is rooted in the decline of the privilege of having your 'traditional' name not being understood as being pronounced a certain, set way.

 

Many of us have names which we always need to explain how they're pronounced and spelled.  I don't see why it's an issue.  Why should this name be different, kwim? 

 

& now I'm curious about the name & why it is that people would be putting in a short vowel if it's so commonly pronounced with a long. Is there a celebrity or something that pronounces it short? Because where would so many people be getting it?...

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Fatima has difference pronounciations.  Some are closer to the Portugese (& the Catholic saint) and some are Arabic.  The only thing it definitely isn't is "Fat I'm Ah"   

 

http://www.pronouncenames.com/pronounce/fatima

 

Raised Catholic in the 1960s I always heard it pronounced with the accent on the first syllable. Then again, I only knew it as a place name (Fatima, Portugal) not a person's name. In Islamic circles I think is where it's a common given name. I didn't learn that until I was an adult.

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Who has complained about other language spellings, or said they need to be English names?  I haven't seen that at all.  The complaint seems to be pretty consistently that names that do have a standard spelling are changed just for the heck of it.   I think a couple of people may have thought that a particular different language spelling was a random change, but that's just a factual error.

 

it's the 'just for the heck of it' that I object to. 

 

For ex, African American culture uses a lot of invented spelling names. M'onique for ex. 

 

Instead of obsessing over each name and whether they have a cultural right to do it (but this is a white person, can they use an invented spelling? Oh, they're biracial and only appear white?) or whether they're doing it just for the heck of it (so what?), I think it's better to just accept the names. 

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So, my reading is that your issue is rooted in the decline of the privilege of having your 'traditional' name not being understood as being pronounced a certain, set way.

 

Many of us have names which we always need to explain how they're pronounced and spelled.  I don't see why it's an issue.  Why should this name be different, kwim? 

 

& now I'm curious about the name & why it is that people would be putting in a short vowel if it's so commonly pronounced with a long. Is there a celebrity or something that pronounces it short? Because where would so many people be getting it?...

 

I certainly don't consider it a privilege to have our dd's name pronounced correctly - I really don't care & we laugh at it when it happens.  BUT, I can see where other people may want to avoid that problem by spelling their child's name phonetically.  

 

Our dd's name is not a celebrity name and I have no idea why people mispronounce it.  To give another example of what happens with her name, I'll use another example.  It would be like naming your son 'Mason', but having people pronouce it 'Ma (like the sound in MAN) - son'.  Doesn't make sense to me, but it happens.  

 

I never said our dd's name pronunciation caused 'an issue' (I bolded the above) - I think you read into what I wrote.  

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it's the 'just for the heck of it' that I object to. 

 

For ex, African American culture uses a lot of invented spelling names. M'onique for ex. 

 

Instead of obsessing over each name and whether they have a cultural right to do it (but this is a white person, can they use an invented spelling? Oh, they're biracial and only appear white?) or whether they're doing it just for the heck of it (so what?), I think it's better to just accept the names. 

 

Ultimately I don't think its a matter of accepting or not accepting - I doubt anyone would advocate limiting name choices barring extreme examples, if at all.

 

But I think its pretty legitimate to not like a particular trend, or even a cultural practice, be it one that we identify with a particular ethnicity, race, class, or whatever. 

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I never said our dd's name pronunciation caused 'an issue' (I bolded the above) - I think you read into what I wrote.  

 

Sorry if I misunderstood. You started your post with "Here's the issue I have regarding 'creative spellings'."  

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it's the 'just for the heck of it' that I object to. 

 

For ex, African American culture uses a lot of invented spelling names. M'onique for ex. 

 

Instead of obsessing over each name and whether they have a cultural right to do it (but this is a white person, can they use an invented spelling? Oh, they're biracial and only appear white?) or whether they're doing it just for the heck of it (so what?), I think it's better to just accept the names. 

 

As long as they're not offended when someone reading or writing it mispronounces or misspells it because the person making the mistake isn't telepathic and and can't know mamma and daddy liked to be creative with spelling, which has been addressed up thread.  There are kids and parents who are downright wounded that someone got it wrong which is ridiculous. I've seen multiple occasions where a child was angry and stomping or a mother was breathless with indignation over a mistake.  The introverts in that crowd don't get to complain that the substitute teacher taking attendance has to stop and single them out and say, "Um, is it Keelah or Kyla? When she sees Keighla on the list. (Actual spelling of a kid's name at church. It's Kyla, by the way.)  And they don't get to be annoyed when people have to ask them, "How do you spell your name again?" over and over again.  If they're cool with that, great.  If not, make choices that reduce the odds of that significantly.  

 

Also, don't expect people who speak and read a phonetic language like English to be irritated when they're not excited about treating a kid's name almost photographically like Chinese.  Yes, technically the syllables in Leighsah do follow some phonetic patterns in English, but they aren't being used in a situation that's familiar to the vast majority of native speakers-they're creating their own English styled exceptions because of how it looks.  They should know that going in.  It means odds are very high people will make their best guess based on their own experiences and spell it or pronounce it in a more familiar way.  If it's going to upset them that someone didn't pronounce or spell their precious child's name correctly without having to be told, then they should make other choices. Everyone is free to choose.  They are not free of the consequences (good, bad, neutral, significant or insignificant) of their choices. 

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yeah, the being irritated is a bit offputting. I guess I would hope both sides would not get irritated. 

I keep forgetting I live in such a huge metropolitan and multicultural region. Here are some first names from a recent event: 

Jasmine, Sara, Runa, Iksa, Nicole, Hardeep, Amarjot, Yi, Aldo, Suong, Charlsie, Ji, Midori

The last names are often way 'harder'. Everyone is used to spelling & pronouncing names for everyone & for the most part, most people are ok with figuring it out. I only occasionally hear grumbles from instructors (the "omg this semester's class! I can't say anyone's name!") 

I think maybe it's the transition time that's hard? When everyone has to do it, it's sort of not a big deal anymore. 

I do feel sorry for barristas though because they have to scribble and spell fast writing sideways on a cup .... :D 



 

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it's the 'just for the heck of it' that I object to.

 

For ex, African American culture uses a lot of invented spelling names. M'onique for ex.

 

Instead of obsessing over each name and whether they have a cultural right to do it (but this is a white person, can they use an invented spelling? Oh, they're biracial and only appear white?) or whether they're doing it just for the heck of it (so what?), I think it's better to just accept the names.

Spelling words consistently within a given language is meant to facilitate ease of understanding written text and the same is true for names. This board is prodominantly English speaking, even if that doesn't mean every single person who comes here speaks English as first language. Therefore, to have one's (English-speaking) child have an easier time of being understood in the English-speaking world, it's doing your kid a favor to give them a name and spelling that is readily understood by other English-speaking people. If you want to name your kid Elizabeth but choose to spell it as "Eelissa-Bethe," you can, but you're doing them no favors.

 

It is true that the large majority of people will have to spell out their names or assist pronounciation from time to time, as I said in this thread. I have to spell one kid's name because two Ls or one L are both common spellings. I have to spell the other kids' names because they are confused with similar-sounding names. No big deal - it doesn't anger me. What makes no sense to me, though, is when someone does choose a "difrint" spelling and then they get mad when people misspell or mispronounce it.

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yeah, the being irritated is a bit offputting. I guess I would hope both sides would not get irritated. 

 

I keep forgetting I live in such a huge metropolitan and multicultural region. Here are some first names from a recent event: 

 

Jasmine, Sara, Runa, Iksa, Nicole, Hardeep, Amarjot, Yi, Aldo, Suong, Charlsie, Ji, Midori

 

The last names are often way 'harder'. Everyone is used to spelling & pronouncing names for everyone & for the most part, most people are ok with figuring it out. I only occasionally hear grumbles from instructors (the "omg this semester's class! I can't say anyone's name!") 

 

I think maybe it's the transition time that's hard? When everyone has to do it, it's sort of not a big deal anymore. 

 

I do feel sorry for barristas though because they have to scribble and spell fast writing sideways on a cup .... :D 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But aren't all those names perfectly main-stream names somewhere on the world?   I think I've met someone with all but two of those names.   Isn't Midori a liqueur?   I hope that wasn't one of those names based on the conception.   Those conception names are annoying too.   

 

I don't think anyone knowingly expressed annoyance with a real name.  Real as in recognizable as a name of a person somewhere on the world.  

 

I used to have a friend with a misspelled name.  An extremely common name with one spelling.   She finally asked her mom when she was a teen why her name was misspelled.  Her mom said that she'd meant the standard spelling, but she was doped up with drugs from the birth when she filled out the birth certificate paperwork.   

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But aren't all those names perfectly main-stream names somewhere on the world? I think I've met someone with all but two of those names. Isn't Midori a liqueur? I hope that wasn't one of those names based on the conception. Those conception names are annoying too.

 

I don't think anyone knowingly expressed annoyance with a real name. Real as in recognizable as a name of a person somewhere on the world.

 

I used to have a friend with a misspelled name. An extremely common name with one spelling. She finally asked her mom when she was a teen why her name was misspelled. Her mom said that she'd meant the standard spelling, but she was doped up with drugs from the birth when she filled out the birth certificate paperwork.

And this is why my daughter's middle name is Katherine instead of Kathryn.

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Here's the issue I have regarding 'creative spellings'. We have a daughter with a traditionally spelled first name. The first vowel is meant to be pronounced long, like Hay-zel. More than half of the time that we make a dentist, pediatrian, eye appointment the person on the phone pronounces it with a short vowel like the beginning of the word 'hat' (even though I have never heard of that being an actual name).

 

So, if a person grew up with a name that was often mispronounced, one way they could alleviate the problem would be a phonetically spelled version of the name.

 

Thank goodness that when we meet people in person or say their name aloud we don't have to worry about how it is spelled - so hopefully 99% of the time that people have contact with Hay-zel, the spelling won't make a hill of beans of a difference.

My sister almost goes apoplectic when people mis-pronounce her name that is spelled phonetically correct.

 

It's Tanya. Like sunTAN - yeah.

 

Americans almost inevitably call her TAWNya. It pisses her right off. Lol

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But aren't all those names perfectly main-stream names somewhere on the world?   I think I've met someone with all but two of those names.   Isn't Midori a liqueur?   I hope that wasn't one of those names based on the conception.   Those conception names are annoying too.   

 

I don't think anyone knowingly expressed annoyance with a real name.  Real as in recognizable as a name of a person somewhere on the world.  

 

I used to have a friend with a misspelled name.  An extremely common name with one spelling.   She finally asked her mom when she was a teen why her name was misspelled.  Her mom said that she'd meant the standard spelling, but she was doped up with drugs from the birth when she filled out the birth certificate paperwork.   

Midori is a fairly normal Japanese girls name meaning "green".  Most Midoris I know are my age though (mid to late 40s) or older.

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And this is why my daughter's middle name is Katherine instead of Kathryn.

 

Heretic. Everyone knows it should be Catherine. 

 

/jk! 

 

 

:leaving:

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Heretic. Everyone knows it should be Catherine. 

 

/jk! 

 

 

:leaving:

 

LOL. I always understood the rule to be Catherine and Kathleen. That's how you knew a Cathy was Catherine and a Kathy was Kathleen. But then, there's Katharine Hepburn and if IIRC her mother's name was the same. Different spellings might be more common but they're nothing new.

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This thread is distressing and timely all at once :lol: - I'm contracting up the wazoo but do I have ANY baby names picked yet, stupidly spelled or otherwise? NO. Because naming children is stressful, serious business. GAH!

 

I need to find the thread I begged for names on a few months ago and see if any of them are clicking yet. And then I suspect I'm going to have to stare at the person in question for a few days, argue with his or her father, and pick something I don't love and hope it ends up fitting.

 

They will have conventional spellings regardless of what I choose, but I hate not really even feeling like I've got a short list at this point. I probably have another week of contractions before the main event to continue being indecisive, but names. Oy.

Edited by Arctic Mama
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Oh, good, pronunciation woes! An excuse to trot out one of my favorite comedy sketches. :)

 

is it the

ame
? The one you linked is geoblocked & wouldn't play so I had to google around & found this. I'm dying  :lol:
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is it the

ame
? The one you linked is geoblocked & wouldn't play so I had to google around & found this. I'm dying :lol:

Yup. Key & Peele "Substitute Teacher."

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This thread is distressing and timely all at once :lol: - I'm contracting up the wazoo but do I have ANY baby names picked yet, stupidly spelled or otherwise? NO. Because naming children is stressful, serious business. GAH!

 

I need to find the thread I begged for names on a few months ago and see if any of them are clicking yet. And then I suspect I'm going to have to stare at the person in question for a few days, argue with his or her father, and pick something I don't love and hope it ends up fitting.

 

They will have conventional spellings regardless of what I choose, but I hate not really even feeling like I've got a short list at this point. I probably have another week of contractions before the main event to continue being indecisive, but names. Oy.

See? It's always like this! Those of you with children in abundance have no names, while those of us with just a few kids have to depend on having dogs and cats for the next several decades in order to make a dent in all the great names I have saved up! :D

 

P.S. I just got a book out of the library about Rosemary Kennedy, so this is at the top of my would-be girl name list ATM. (Rosemary, not Kennedy.)

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See? It's always like this! Those of you with children in abundance have no names, while those of us with just a few kids have to depend on having dogs and cats for the next several decades in order to make a dent in all the great names I have saved up! :D

 

P.S. I just got a book out of the library about Rosemary Kennedy, so this is at the top of my would-be girl name list ATM. (Rosemary, not Kennedy.)

What's worse is I have lists of names for boys and girls, I've kept a rolling list since childhood. It has at least twenty options on it for each and I've added and culled regularly over the years! Thing is, the names I like still wouldn't 'fit' this person for some reason or another. They're lovely but not quite right, none of them are clicking. Three of my five kids have had names I adored, the rest have been more choosing the best option and getting used to it.

 

But my top few favorites for each sex just aren't the right fit. Wah!

Edited by Arctic Mama
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My sister almost goes apoplectic when people mis-pronounce her name that is spelled phonetically correct.

 

It's Tanya. Like sunTAN - yeah.

 

Americans almost inevitably call her TAWNya. It pisses her right off. Lol

 

I REALLY hope this comparison isn't offensive, but my dog growing up was named Tanya, pronounced like your sister does. I've never heard anyone else pronounce it that way!

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And then I suspect I'm going to have to stare at the person in question for a few days, argue with his or her father, and pick something I don't love and hope it ends up fitting.

 

This is what my sister did with her third. Took them a month to name him and they weren't totally in love with the name. But it's been 18 years now so I guess it fits. :p

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See? It's always like this! Those of you with children in abundance have no names, while those of us with just a few kids have to depend on having dogs and cats for the next several decades in order to make a dent in all the great names I have saved up! :D

 

P.S. I just got a book out of the library about Rosemary Kennedy, so this is at the top of my would-be girl name list ATM. (Rosemary, not Kennedy.)

 

We are naming this baby Rosemary :)

 

But yes, I have a bunch of names, none of which my husband liked, and I told him I'm going to end up getting cats to use the names on. First in line is a kitty I can name Anne. 

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