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Friend just had a baby and named her.....


Moxie

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I like to see people naming their kids after my great aunt but I was really, really, really hoping that the "Madysyn-Mykenzi-McHaileigh" misspelling craze was over.

 

dd's friend named her new baby boy David. It's a family name, but it still made me smile almost as much as the young lady who posts on this forum about her six year old son, John, and her three year old daughter, Mary. :)

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When I was scanning the new threads I initially thought they'd named her "Hayzel Ugh".  Like maybe a creative misspelling of the tree and the boot?

 

Count me in as another one is who is not a fan of creative spellings.  

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Considering how often my name gets misspelled (and mispronounced), even when I say "normal spelling", I feel bad for kids with the creative spelling because it's just another layer of issues. My name is Eve.

 

I have given two of my kids long names though (traditional, but long), so I will keep my rocks and glass house.

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Not a fan of Kri8tiv spellings. Except maybe if the name has so many variations the kid will have to clarify anyway. I mean, if your name is "Caitlyn," you're gonna be spelling that out no matter how your parents chose to spell it.

 

I have a Collin and he has to spell it (when it matters) simply because the one-L spelling is equally common.

 

ETA: mis-spelling, ironically enough

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I find onomastics to be fascinating.  The fads that come and go...20 years ago it was all about giving girls traditionally boy names (beginning with Mac/Mc, ending with a form of 'son').  Boys tended to end in an 'n' more: Brendon, Jaden, Hayden..

 

Then names devolved as the internet age broke forth, with it becoming popular to choose spellings like it was a personal email address.  Must be original, with no other spelling like it.  'Y' was thrown in willy-nilly, replacing vowels (Mckynzy), names were spelled backward (Nevaeh), children were named after hobbies/parental likes (Dakota, Espn, Apple). Etymology was thrown out the window.

 

Studies were put out showing teachers and employers use names as a first impression, and misspellings give off the impression of being illiterate, but I don't think that will be a study that has lasting effects as the children from the past 20 years grow up.  Royal/old names are back in fashion, simple things like Cora, Grace, Jack - the class divide between names is slowly disappearing again.

 

I do feel sorry for some children (two here have names pronounced like 'colon', which I wish their parents had thought about before they left the hospital), but it'll be interesting to see how they all end up and if their name is a burden.

 

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That doesn't really bother me. I could never get past some of the names I typed up for honor roll. Sh*thead. Pronounced Shu-theed.

We had a girl named this at my oldest's high school. We had to call her down by first initial last name to ask her how to pronounce it for graduation.

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DS has a friend named Isiaih. Because his mother let her daughter fill out the paperwork. Whatever.

 

Okay, but do they at least pronounce it Ize-eye-ay? Or Is-ih-ah-ih? Or however one might phonetically pronounce that?

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Okay, but do they at least pronounce it Ize-eye-ay? Or Is-ih-ah-ih? Or however one might phonetically pronounce that?

They pronounce it Isaiah (Eye-zay-ah), the normal way. We knew them a year before I was corrected while we were texting for a meet up. :D.

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As someone with a misspelled name, I'm sorry to step on toes, but misspelling a name doesn't make it unique. It just makes it misspelled.

 

It's very annoying to have to tell people how to spell it all the time.

 

My oldest has a very uncommon name that people invariably mispronounce. It's spelled correctly and everything and I love it, and she loves it, but if I'd known just how much people would stumble over it, I probably would have chosen something else.

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That doesn't really bother me. I could never get past some of the names I typed up for honor roll. Sh*thead. Pronounced Shu-theed.

This is so sad. I can only imagine the emotional baggage that comes from knowing that's the name chosen for you by your parents.

 

And I am not a fan of creative spellings. Some names come with options, but taking measures to twist up a simple traditional name seems silly to me.

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Hazel wouldn't be my favorite choice, but it is sweet in an old-fashioned way. Hayzel.... not a fan of alternate spellings.

 

My niece named her baby Evelyn. But she spelled it Evalynn.

 

That one actually makes some sense, if she wants a specific pronunciation.

 

I've met Evelyns that pronounce it Eva-lyn, Ev-lyn, and Eve-lyn.

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It's awkward to me because it makes me feel like the name is hay-ZEL with a strong emphasis on the ending, which the name Hazel - which is a lovely name - doesn't usually have. ETA: Or maybe it's that it looks like it's hay/zel instead of haze/el - I'm sure the phonics people among us will know I've done that wrong, but it feels like where the z is in the syllable break has changed in the name with the new spelling. Before, it's mostly in the first syllable, but the new spelling makes me want to put it firmly in the second, which also changes the syllable emphasis.

 

In the end though, I'm going to try and fall back on my position about creative spellings of names in general. I mostly dislike creative spellings, but I dislike the way people get judgey about them way, way more.

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That one actually makes some sense, if she wants a specific pronunciation.

 

I've met Evelyns that pronounce it Eva-lyn, Ev-lyn, and Eve-lyn.

And Evalynn could be a combined family name, which I rather like. I have a grandmother Eva and a grandfather Lynn so I could see combining those names into Evalynn.

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I know a Hazelle.  Emphasis on the zelle.  And short A.

 

Hay at the beginning....just makes me think someone doesn't know how to spell.   :(

 

Okay, so that's basically what I was wondering - if there should be an emphasis on the second syllable. In other words, the name isn't Hazel at all. I admit I like that spelling better. It looks more natural but gets the same concept across.

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When I was sitting through an awards ceremony at college, there was a young woman named Michael. Not Michaeline or Michelle - Michael. In just that half hour or so, I heard many confused mutterings amongst people sitting near me - "did they say 'Michael'? Is that a mistake?...they just said it again! Is it really a girl named Michael?!"

 

As the wife of a man named Kelly, I can tell you that crossing gender associations is problematic, but I grant MIL leeway because Kelly was once a perfectly acceptable male surname-name. She didn't know Charlie's Angels would make Kelly a female-majority name. But naming one's daughter an extremely masculine-dominant name, masculine since Biblical times, does seem to me a really bad idea.

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When I was sitting through an awards ceremony at college, there was a young woman named Michael. Not Michaeline or Michelle - Michael. In just that half hour or so, I heard many confused mutterings amongst people sitting near me - "did they say 'Michael'? Is that a mistake?...they just said it again! Is it really a girl named Michael?!"

 

As the wife of a man named Kelly, I can tell you that crossing gender associations is problematic, but I grant MIL leeway because Kelly was once a perfectly acceptable male surname-name. She didn't know Charlie's Angels would make Kelly a female-majority name. But naming one's daughter an extremely masculine-dominant name, masculine since Biblical times, does seem to me a really bad idea.

Maybe her parents were fans of The Waltons. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Learned

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When I was sitting through an awards ceremony at college, there was a young woman named Michael. Not Michaeline or Michelle - Michael. In just that half hour or so, I heard many confused mutterings amongst people sitting near me - "did they say 'Michael'? Is that a mistake?...they just said it again! Is it really a girl named Michael?!"

 

As the wife of a man named Kelly, I can tell you that crossing gender associations is problematic, but I grant MIL leeway because Kelly was once a perfectly acceptable male surname-name. She didn't know Charlie's Angels would make Kelly a female-majority name. But naming one's daughter an extremely masculine-dominant name, masculine since Biblical times, does seem to me a really bad idea.

 

I hear you. I actually dated a Kelly once. And I know guys that spell Michael different ways (ea vs ae) but a girl named Michael would really stump me.

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When I was sitting through an awards ceremony at college, there was a young woman named Michael. Not Michaeline or Michelle - Michael. In just that half hour or so, I heard many confused mutterings amongst people sitting near me - "did they say 'Michael'? Is that a mistake?...they just said it again! Is it really a girl named Michael?!"

 

As the wife of a man named Kelly, I can tell you that crossing gender associations is problematic, but I grant MIL leeway because Kelly was once a perfectly acceptable male surname-name. She didn't know Charlie's Angels would make Kelly a female-majority name. But naming one's daughter an extremely masculine-dominant name, masculine since Biblical times, does seem to me a really bad idea.

 

 

QFT.  Says Scarlett whose real name is definitely a boy's name.

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When I was sitting through an awards ceremony at college, there was a young woman named Michael. Not Michaeline or Michelle - Michael. In just that half hour or so, I heard many confused mutterings amongst people sitting near me - "did they say 'Michael'? Is that a mistake?...they just said it again! Is it really a girl named Michael?!"

 

As the wife of a man named Kelly, I can tell you that crossing gender associations is problematic, but I grant MIL leeway because Kelly was once a perfectly acceptable male surname-name. She didn't know Charlie's Angels would make Kelly a female-majority name. But naming one's daughter an extremely masculine-dominant name, masculine since Biblical times, does seem to me a really bad idea.

Could the name have been Michal?

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michal

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I had a minor problem with a "Katlyn", who I could remember to spell whenever I wrote the parents but always avoided saying out loud because I honestly didn't know if it was a new way to spell Caitlin or intended to be pronounced "Cat Lynn". They family does like cats, but that just seemed too over the top.

 

Now that she's sixish, she goes by Katie. Problem solved.

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I hear you. I actually dated a Kelly once. And I know guys that spell Michael different ways (ea vs ae) but a girl named Michael would really stump me.

The one perk is that I have been able to call companies and pose as Kelly, which somehow allows me to channel some sort of inner lion that means business. Me-as-Danielle is not good at making headway with errant satellite companies, but me-as-Kelly somehow manages.

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When I was sitting through an awards ceremony at college, there was a young woman named Michael. Not Michaeline or Michelle - Michael. In just that half hour or so, I heard many confused mutterings amongst people sitting near me - "did they say 'Michael'? Is that a mistake?...they just said it again! Is it really a girl named Michael?!"

 

As the wife of a man named Kelly, I can tell you that crossing gender associations is problematic, but I grant MIL leeway because Kelly was once a perfectly acceptable male surname-name. She didn't know Charlie's Angels would make Kelly a female-majority name. But naming one's daughter an extremely masculine-dominant name, masculine since Biblical times, does seem to me a really bad idea.

I know a Michael-Anne. The Anne does make it more feminine of course, but I always thought the Michael was French for some reason. It didn't strike me as wrong for a girl because it fit her so well.

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I know a Michael-Anne. The Anne does make it more feminine of course, but I always thought the Michael was French for some reason. It didn't strike me as wrong for a girl because it fit her so well.

Similarly, I knew a TommiLynn. Now I can't actually remember how the Tommy part was spelled. But she told me her father wanted a boy and declared he was naming his next kid Tommy no matter.

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As someone with a misspelled name, I'm sorry to step on toes, but misspelling a name doesn't make it unique. It just makes it misspelled.

 

It's very annoying to have to tell people how to spell it all the time.

 

My oldest has a very uncommon name that people invariably mispronounce. It's spelled correctly and everything and I love it, and she loves it, but if I'd known just how much people would stumble over it, I probably would have chosen something else.

 

I am always surprised to see people can't even get the simplest of names.  My daughter uses the name "Anna" and even that gets butchered.

 

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There was a girl.in my fifth grade named Michael. And of course the actress Micheal Learned. I don't find that terribly strange.

 

However, I'm also not a fan of creative misspelling. The person has to forever correct the spelling of his name at every venue, probably starting with preschool. I'm named after my mom's twin sister. Her first name has one letter changed from the usual spelling. She had trouble with that her whole life. My mom gave me the name with the widely accepted spelling. I've never seen my first name misspelled anywhere.

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I have a good friend at church who's a woman named Michael. Her parents wanted a boy and were sure that's what they were having, so they didn't come up with a girl name and decided to stick with Michael even when she wasn't a he. She does have a clearly feminine middle name, but she only goes by Michael.

 

The funniest thing is, my kids happen not to know any men named Michael (well, one Mike, but they haven't made that connection). They came to me once very confused when they were reading a book that had a male character named Michael, because in their experience, it's only a feminine name!

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That doesn't really bother me. I could never get past some of the names I typed up for honor roll. Sh*thead. Pronounced Shu-theed.

 

She may change her name as soon as she can legally do so. Unbelievable. Cruel too. If the parents wanted it pronounced the way you indicated, why not select a different spelling. :huh:

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This is so sad. I can only imagine the emotional baggage that comes from knowing that's the name chosen for you by your parents.

 

And I am not a fan of creative spellings. Some names come with options, but taking measures to twist up a simple traditional name seems silly to me.

It is a fairly common name in a different language, with a totally different meaning than the English.

 

Sent from my SM-T530NU using Tapatalk

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