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LAmom

The Forum vs In Real Life

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It is interesting to me that I am so influenced by opinions on this forum.  Then in real life, MOST of my friends (in different homeschool circles) have different opinions on things than this forum.  For example, many friends LOVE and ADORE Classical Conversations (where I have read so many negative things on the forum) and even my husband really wants me to do CC with my kids (we have done 1 year).  Also, Saxon is loved and popular IRL, too, where on the boards it gets a lot of negative posts.

 

I know that I need to do what is best for my family and not be so easily influenced--but here I am debating TOG, MFW, CC, etc., while my friends (not on forums) just pick something and go with it and it works.  I am all over the place because I have too many excellent choices!  Over-thinking things?

 

Anyways, just seems weird to me that here CC and Saxon get a bad rap and then IRL those are the 2 things that are loved my so many.  LOL. 

 

Just making an observation.  I may have been better off to not have all these choices!  The days of Abeka and BJU (and Calvert) may have been much easier at times then these hundreds of choices.  

 

 

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For me, many people I know do or have done CC ( or Saxon). The thing is, I don't share my concerns and experience (with CC) with most people in real life because, pretty much, they don't want to hear it. I found that when I would share a negative opinion or personal experience about something a friend wanted to do or had done they only wanted reassurance, they didn't want to hear anything against their choice.

 

On the board, I personally feel people can be honest without having a friend IRL get upset. Also, I found that most homeschoolers in my area do not frequent message boards. They talk to others within our group....that then leads many people doing the same thing. Not sure I have explained this well, but thought I'd try.

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The days of Abeka and BJU (and Calvert) may have been much easier at times then these hundreds of choices.  

 

For sure those days were less expensive days!

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IKWYM, although it seems to me there are as many positive opinions about Saxon as there are negative. :-)

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I have not met any homeschoolers IRL who are pursuing an academic level of education that is even remotely comparable to ours.

Thus none of their opinions on academics and curriculum are in the least relevant to my homeschool.

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I have thought about this, and I think there are "forum people" and "not forum people."

 

You wouldn't hang around a forum if you didn't get something out of it, you know what I mean? So people on forums are specifically wired or accustomed to seeking out, listening to, and offering opinions for whatever reason.

 

My husband sees it on the forums he frequents too. If you're buying a motorcycle helmet, you either want to read 700 opinions about 9 different models, or you don't.

 

I do think that when it starts to be less than enjoyable, it's important to re-evaluate what you are getting out of spending your time this way. Most people I know have taken extended forum breaks at one point or another, myself included.

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Most of the people I know here that homeschool get all of their information at the local homeschool convention and then at their co-op. I don't really have any close friends here that are homeschooling classically so it's really hard to find input on which Latin program is better. 

 

And I've gotten some great advice on here, like doing two math programs that are different styles instead of one and which ones fit in which categories. I'd heard of the creator of CC doing that but never specifics on how to do it or why. 

 

Though I have certainly gone through the ping pong of picking a program and the panic of wondering if you picked the right one and going back to the forums to reassure yourself that you made the right choice  :scared:

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I have thought about this, and I think there are "forum people" and "not forum people."

 

You wouldn't hang around a forum if you didn't get something out of it, you know what I mean? So people on forums are specifically wired or accustomed to seeking out, listening to, and offering opinions for whatever reason.

 

My husband sees it on the forums he frequents too. If you're buying a motorcycle helmet, you either want to read 700 opinions about 9 different models, or you don't.

 

I do think that when it starts to be less than enjoyable, it's important to re-evaluate what you are getting out of spending your time this way. Most people I know have taken extended forum breaks at one point or another, myself included.

 

I agree. The IRL homeschoolers I know who aren't forum users usually stick with what was first recommended to them or are looking for the cheapest thing out there.

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I saw "specifically wired" and thought "specifically weird". 

I think it might be a sign.

 

Actually, I think the forum saves me money and time. I have been directed to a lot of great resources over the years, and by seeing what problems some families have had with certain curriculum choices helps me know how I might be able to tweak a program to overcome a problem with it.

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In many cases CC people are not forum people.

 

I'm a Saxon fan at least for high school, since the 1990s, and with a gifted kid to boot. My 5th grader started homeschooling with Algebra 1, so I never used the lower level texts with my OWN kids. I'm not sure yet, how low I'm going to start Saxon with LD tutoring students, but I'm tempted to streamline by going lower and lower.

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My IRL homeschooling friends have very different goals than I do. They believe the local conference speakers who give such awesome advice as foreign language in high school is optional and two years of high school math is sufficient. The co-op is my area doesn't do labs for their science classes. Most grads wait to get married if they are female or go to cc or trade school. They probably get "enough" education for their goals, but I am preparing my children for high level university work (or pushing them to their capacity).

 

I am becoming more quiet about what we do IRL. My friends don't want to know that my 8 yo is learning to use a microscope and enjoys culturing stuff. They'd rather hear how he struggles with computation. Better I chat here....

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A lot of the people I know IRL are super-concerned about following the state standards (and now Common Core) and use PS textbooks. Then there is a whole group of "unschoolers" who tend not to use any formal curricula. There are a few "by-the-book" WTMers and AOers. I'm typically the odd one out with the very eclectic set of materials I use.

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That's a great point.

 

What does it mean that I'm a forum person? LOL

I think it says you are very discerning and have great taste, but I might have a personal stake in this lol

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I think it depends on your local homeschool community and your personality. 

I'm genuinely shocked by new and some seasoned homeschoolers who won't do much research or reading about their options before they homeschool. This seems to be a big chunk of the homeschoolers I meet IRL  They poll the homeschoolers they know and like and mimic them instead of reading about all their options, clarifying their goals, developing and articulating their own educational philosophy THEN choosing curriculum based on that. Different people just approach life differently. I'm thorough in everything I do.  I know why I'm doing what I am doing and I know why I'm not doing what I'm not doing.

 

Those who just mimic someone they trust aren't people who want to discuss many of the things discussed on these boards.  So many don't have enough knowledge about Classical Education (in any of its forms) to participate in a discussion about it, so I come here and go to a few select homeschooling friends IRL for that kind of thing. Fortunately, there are just under 10,000 homeschoolers in my county, so I have a wider range of homeschoolers to choose from than most homeschoolers in the world. 

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It seems like everyone locally either does MFW or Sonlight, neither of which appeal to me in the slightest. Meh, do what you will. No need to limit yourself to local opinions. :0)

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I have thought about this, and I think there are "forum people" and "not forum people."

 

You wouldn't hang around a forum if you didn't get something out of it, you know what I mean? So people on forums are specifically wired or accustomed to seeking out, listening to, and offering opinions for whatever reason.

 

My husband sees it on the forums he frequents too. If you're buying a motorcycle helmet, you either want to read 700 opinions about 9 different models, or you don't.

 

I do think that when it starts to be less than enjoyable, it's important to re-evaluate what you are getting out of spending your time this way. Most people I know have taken extended forum breaks at one point or another, myself included.

I agree with this.

 

The anonymity offers an opportunity to be honest. But temper that with the knowledge that "forum people" are not a random sample of the population a board hopes to serve.

 

Stella

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I don't have time to meet and socialize with people in real life about homeschool. Its on my agenda, for sure, but when we started it was kind of sudden and we just kept doing what we are doing.

 

I have noticed that I am sinking a considerable amount of time into this forum (especially the archives of  the Accelerated, Middle School/Logic Stage and High School boards) but its all for preparation for the Fall so I will chalk it up to an 'investment'

 

I'll probably delete my account after the summer though, so that I'm not spending more time than needed on the internet.

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I'm currently using Saxon (Hake) Grammar and Saxon Algebra 1.  I like them both a lot. 

 

See? Janet in WA was a great supporter of Saxon math. All four of her dss went through Saxon (I forget how far, but at least through Advanced Math)...and then she graduated the last one and quit playing here. ::sulks:: So y'all newbies aren't getting her excellent reviews of Saxon.

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I have not met any homeschoolers IRL who are pursuing an academic level of education that is even remotely comparable to ours.

Thus none of their opinions on academics and curriculum are in the least relevant to my homeschool.

 

The few people I know in real life that homeschool, but aren't swim families, all tend to use similar curriculum, which tends to be faith-based. Sometimes the program they are pursuing isn't even as strong as what is offered in our public schools.

 

If I did not have this board to refer to, I would still maintain my earlier belief that homeschooling is for those of faith who are protecting their children from the world, but perhaps not preparing them for it. The academic goals seemed to be medium to low.

 

This board blew my image of homeschooling apart.

 

ETA: I think I should probably clarify this. From my IRL experience with homeschoolers in my area, I was left with the impression that most homeschooling was done for reasons of faith and not academics. Coming to this board, shredded those assumptions. I have interacted with so many members, both of faith and secular, who are working hard to provide the very best education possible for their children. I am in awe of their endeavors and am grateful that they are willing to share their experiences  and advice so willingly.

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I have not met any homeschoolers IRL who are pursuing an academic level of education that is even remotely comparable to ours.

Thus none of their opinions on academics and curriculum are in the least relevant to my homeschool.

 

My response is the same as Regentrude's except that I am friends with a few WTMers IRL that do share the same educational objectives, even if their path there is different from my own.

 

I can't tell you how many groups I have attended over the yrs trying to find others with the high academic standards,    In 20 yrs, I have met fewer than 10. 

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Just like anything else, there is a wide spectrum of homeschooling types.

 

I was a Social Worker before I had kids. It was definitely an education in life and how people are different. Some people just flat out do not know how to access services, evaluate options, think through pros and cons, etc. They are forced into a life choice, and it wouldn't occur to them in a million years that they have options within that choice besides what is right in front of them, or right next to them in terms of having a homeschooling friend whose example could be easily replicated, successful or not. Some people just cannot imagine the options and would be overwhelmed by too many. Gosh, how many of us who actively pursue options and revel in weighing pros and cons and planning are still overwhelmed? And we asked for it! :D

 

Others have the ability to do all this but are simply not inclined. Not all people have a drive to exhaustively research, plan, solicit input, and compare notes. Some are perfectly happy to just use what they know of, what has worked for friends and family, what is easy/convenient/cheap... Not all homeschoolers are resourceful or deep thinkers, and they are certainly not all overthinkers like many here (myself included, LOL) seem to be.

 

I love these boards. But honestly, I think my life would be easier if I had not found them, sometimes in a good way (sometimes I crave more independence of thought and wish I could silence ya'll's voices! :lol: ) and sometimes in a bad way (lost opportunities due to ignorance of options).

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Maybe it depends whether you are a researcher or not. Most of the homeschoolers I know are the natural learning type...

so they aren't really looking for resources that involve formal lessons.

 

Two days ago I had my annual homeschool interview with someone from the education department. She was a school teacher/school principal in her former life. Anyway she was floored at all the resources I had discovered and was using with my kids. She was totally impressed at all the research I must have done to find " such high quality and adaptable resources" and at how well they integrated all the "learning styles". She even wrote down a list of some of my resources to share with other homeschoolers who were having trouble meeting requirements in our state.

 

Well I can tell you that ALL of my resources have been recommended here at one time or the other and it has been very helpful to me to read people's opinions..not just negative vs positive ...but most importantly for me...what has worked well with a child who has special needs. For me it is all about what works in my family...regardless of whether people think it is rigerous or not.

 

My advisor was most impressed that even with all the difficulties I had with my SN child....that I had found learning resources that she was thriving on...rather then using her SN as an excuse as to why she was not doing well. My DD is at/above grade level thanks to being able to try many resources until I found something that works well for her....and that it is all due to to the help of people on this board. Especially to those who reassured me it was ok to switch around if something else is not working.

 

We have quite a few HS with kids with special needs.... and they are floundering and usually just falling back on "natural learning" and saying their child can't learn from the standard type stuff so they will just let them learn via "unschooling" except that it isnt really unschooling...it's a fallback excuse for not taking responsibility.

 

However whenever I try to give advice ( asked for only) once they hear what I am using with DD and that it involves " formal lessons" they usually back away saying " yes well isn't it great how all children are so different". GRRRR lol

 

Basically, they don't want to hear and so I can't imagine them seeking advice on a message board.

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I'm in an area where you have a mix of religious folks, using, mostly, straight ahead curriculum choices from one provider and doing a weekly co-op and joining a local HS group for social reasons, and unschoolers who do a lot of cool things and join a HS group or co-op for social reasons, and then there's me...homeschooling because I have an out of the box kid who thrives on academics and structure.

 

Locally, I just don't have people who "get it". Here, I belong.

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Most of the homeschoolers I've met think anything resembling a school book is bad. Most seem to have not heard of several books discussed here. I once met a woman who never heard of TWTM!!

 

So...just goes to show ya...people are different!

 

It does make it difficult to sift through all the opinions.

 

I'll go you one better...

 

After being on this board I just assumed that every homeschooler was as in love with books and the library as I am.

 

One time I was joking about how I had taken a suitcase to the library to collect my books on hold thinking everyone would " get it " and this one homeschooler stares at me blankly and says " wow you must all be book lovers in your family" and I kind of stopped and said " Well I'm sure its an experience most homeschoolers have" and she looks me up and down and says " I can't remember the last time we visited the library...we aren't big readers". I know this woman isn't unschooling and that she uses faith based curriculum of some sort.

 

I just could not get my mind around a homeschooler who doesn't like books and whose librarian doesn't know them by name and comment every time that we go in that our family is responsible for their incredible borrowing statistics LOL.

 

Maybe I am in the minority though...my homeschool advisor saw my two crates of library books sitting on the floor and was visibly shocked at how much we borrow LOL

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I'm in an area where you have a mix of religious folks, using, mostly, straight ahead curriculum choices from one provider and doing a weekly co-op and joining a local HS group for social reasons, and unschoolers who do a lot of cool things and join a HS group or co-op for social reasons, and then there's me...homeschooling because I have an out of the box kid who thrives on academics and structure.

 

Locally, I just don't have people who "get it". Here, I belong.

 

Yes, this pretty much sums it up.

Without the forum, homeschooling would be a very lonely endeavor for us. I have home(un)schooling friends for socializing, but can never talk to anybody IRL about academics and curriculum. Nobody IRL "gets" my kids.

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Without really knowing how many homeschoolers you are in contact with locally, I can't really say this definitively; however, I think the pool of people on these forums is probably much greater. When a question is asked, or a statement is made, about anything, the people who have a real interest one way or the other are the ones who respond. So, sometimes it appears that things are skewed one direction or the other. Read enough forums and enough responses, and it evens out quite a bit.

 

I really could not live happily without the community here. Certainly, I could not be as effective as a teacher. I have come to depend on the insight and opinions offered by many, many experienced people.

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I do think it would be easier if I just had my 1999 copy of TWTM, CM's writings, and time.  Instead of looking for the perfect materials for the perfect year, I would be studying and writing the perfect materials for the perfect year.

 

 

 Then again, there are days when I come here and find commiseration and laughter...not to mention someone to obsess over math or writing or etc...and you all help me decide to do this thing one.more.day.  Without that, I might sell these kiddos to that Big Yellow Bus.

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I once had a conversation with some homeschool friends and one said, "It just feels like no homeschoolers are even thinking about math."  I was like,  :huh:

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It's interesting how my IRL friends, now spread around the US, at least 5-6 of them (!!) are just completely in love with CC. Nothing against CC, but one friend just jumped in w / her 4yo and is planning on using it through high school! I'm like, wow, I'm not able to figure out a plan like that (....thanks to this forum, lol), I can't imagine how someone could just pick one thing and never switch. They love that they are just told here use that or this and don't question it. Where I'm like, but what if I want other language in high school besides Latin, what about algebra in 8th not 9th, and the science isn't what I planned. Anyways, this forum is so helpful in many ways. Maybe it does make things harder for me because I'm given so many options. But, I feel well-informed to what is available and why it has or why not it has worked for people, etc. But, my decision making (especially for history) had been really challenging these last few months. I just want to find something and stick with it!

 

I just started contemplating what is my beef if sooooo many friends, even my husband, are gung-ho CC and I'm like....uh, but the forum people say... Maybe I should just ignore you all. ;). Haha

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I *love* the hundreds of choices. :) So do a few bookstores from which I buy things y'all have recommended, I'm sure.

And it's nice to have such a large pool of people to ask questions, some of which might not go over well IRL (where the sample size is small and people may feel more pressure to agree with one another). People of the Forum are candid.

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People who know what AOPS is and those who dream of SWB visiting are COOL (not too many IRL folks around here do).

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This post is very timely. I was just lamenting how weary I am of being the odd man out. It has become clear to me over the last six months that I am truly walking a different path than almost everyone I know in real life (save one, and we're trying to figure this out together). It gets difficult at time to be the odd man out, especially when others make it clear the value they have placed on you.

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We've been around a lot of homeschoolers, mainly secular but a few faith-based. This sounds awful, but generally the local homeschoolers have much lower educational standards than us. This past year my kids took a couple of classes at a public school enrichment program for homeschoolers, mainly because my eldest is planning to start college early and he wanted a classroom algebra course. Our advisor, who spends all day every day working with homeschoolers, was floored at our schedule and curriculum materials. His math and Chinese teachers have both told me he is their only student this year to keep up with the work and manage his time well. Generally, I think people that take the time to research and chat on a forum are trying to give better academics, where as those who don't are homeschooling for completely different reasons. The locals I have met generally give their kids workbooks from Costco or follow a faith-based program from start to end (sometimes doing the bare minimum, sometimes doing well). Most aren't interested in a rigorous education, just the bare minimum so the kids can get into the local CC if they want.

 

There's probably a huge group of secular, academics-focused homeschoolers in my area I'd fit in perfectly with.Problem is, like me, they aren't rushing out to every park day and semi-educational field trip "for socialization," so we will probably never meet each other!

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When a person spends that kind of money on a program it is hard to admit it is a mistake.  It is the same thing that happens when a person goes to a free event versus paying for it.  Once you pay for something you are invested in having made a good decision and are much more likely to say that you liked it, and be less critical.  When it is free you will criticize freely because you haven't spent or invested in it and therefor do not have a personal stake in it.  I think the same thing happens in real life.  Not all the time, but enough of the time for me to see a pattern.  In person it is hard to say I made a decision that was a bad one, and not only did I make a bad decision, but I spent a lot of money for it.  It takes a really, really, secure person to admit that.

 

So I don't know whether it is a good, bad, or so-so program, but I wouldn't decide based on what others thought.  

 

But with that said, I decided that Classical Conversations was not something for our family when I repeatedly read that people who had never even been in a cycle were going to tutor a cycle.  Major red flag for me.  When I outsource something I am either paying for expertise, or convenience.  I pay a heck of a lot less for convenience. 

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 I once met a woman who never heard of TWTM!!

 

Never heard of TWTM?! Shock horror!  :ohmy:

 

 

I have thought about this, and I think there are "forum people" and "not forum people."

 

You wouldn't hang around a forum if you didn't get something out of it, you know what I mean? So people on forums are specifically wired or accustomed to seeking out, listening to, and offering opinions for whatever reason.

 

My husband sees it on the forums he frequents too. If you're buying a motorcycle helmet, you either want to read 700 opinions about 9 different models, or you don't.

 

I do think that when it starts to be less than enjoyable, it's important to re-evaluate what you are getting out of spending your time this way. Most people I know have taken extended forum breaks at one point or another, myself included.

My name is Isabel and I'm a Forum Person. I live in a small town where it would be impossible to get the same mix of people with their various opinions and experiences. I used to seek out 'like-minded' people, but as time goes on, I find myself seeing more and more value in listening to people with differing perspectives. I have learned many things on here that I would never have learnt in real life interaction. On the practical side, it's more convenient to jump on here and look for information or support when I have a spare few minutes than it is to find time to actually meet up with people. If I am researching something at midnight, I can't phone somebody (most people don't consider a curriculum choice crisis as an emergency), but there's sure to be people around on the forums. 

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In RL, most Catholic homeschoolers I know criticize me for not using Seton from K through 12th.

 

I love the mix of opinions I get here. :-)

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Seems like near me everyone is doing A Beka or BJU or Saxon. It all seems boring and drab. I get so excited when someone I know says they use SoTW or AAR. Doesn't bother or influence me, though.

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I think it depends on your local homeschool community and your personality. 

 

I'm genuinely shocked by new and some seasoned homeschoolers who won't do much research or reading about their options before they homeschool. This seems to be a big chunk of the homeschoolers I meet IRL  They poll the homeschoolers they know and like and mimic them instead of reading about all their options, clarifying their goals, developing and articulating their own educational philosophy THEN choosing curriculum based on that. Different people just approach life differently. I'm thorough in everything I do.  I know why I'm doing what I am doing and I know why I'm not doing what I'm not doing.

 

Those who just mimic someone they trust aren't people who want to discuss many of the things discussed on these boards.  So many don't have enough knowledge about Classical Education (in any of its forms) to participate in a discussion about it, so I come here and go to a few select homeschooling friends IRL for that kind of thing. Fortunately, there are just under 10,000 homeschoolers in my county, so I have a wider range of homeschoolers to choose from than most homeschoolers in the world. 

Thank you!  This is why I stopped discussing what I do and how I do it about 7 years ago.  I got very uncomfortable with people thinking if they just bought the same curriculum they would have all the same results.  (Not that our results are something to emulate.)  Then when whatever I was using didn't work, they moved on to buying all of the same things so and so is using.  As you say, there is a whole population of homeschoolers that has no idea why they are homeschooling or what they are aiming for.

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People who know what AOPS is and those who dream of SWB visiting are COOL (not too many IRL folks around here do).

I just have to say, I think it is really weird that I dreamed about SWB visiting my house last night.  I am not usually a groupie for homeschooling big wigs--though I do respect SWB and have heard her speak in person, and even asked her a question.  Now if I dream of another homeschooling great tonight I'm going to start thinking I need a forum break!

 

What's even stranger about being a forum person (bee? whatever) is having my kids ask me who has been saying what on the forums on a particular day.  They also used to ask me what 'bee level' I achieved! 

 

ETA: They want me to keep them posted on developments in the outdoor tv thread this week.

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In RL, most Catholic homeschoolers I know criticize me for not using Seton from K through 12th.

 

 

Yeah...I have been surprised at the depth of people's love for Seton. o_0

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While it's wonderful to hear about so much curriculum, it can be a detriment as well to hear so many options. Especially if you're happy with what you have. I try to just keep everyone's ideas in the back of my mind for when I might need it, but I recently found myself googling three different curriculums mentioned here. I caught myself and made the insanity stop! What we have works. Yes, I may be missing out on another great program, but I already have a different great program. I'm better off not switching constantly.

 

But sometimes new stuff is so tempting! I do at least have a list of new things to look at at the convention to see them in person. Then I can decide whether to still keep them in mind for the future or not.

 

By the way, we love CC and dislike Saxon :)

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I will say, most of the homeschoolers I know IRL aren't so different from me.  Everyone is unique, of course, but I don't know that many people doing box programs and I don't know many CC'ers (they keep to themselves, I think).  Everyone I know loves to read.  While different people have different goals with education and different paces they're aiming for, everyone I know values learning in a deep way.  I would actually say the number one difference between the Hive and real life for me is the fluency with having the vocabulary to talk about educational philosophies, educational methods, specific curricula, and specific schools of thought about education.  This is not to say that my IRL friends don't think about these things, but it starts from a different place in terms of vocabulary usually.

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This has been my experience, as well.  A few week's ago, I was at co-op and someone rolled their eyes at a lesson plan I was constructing (too organized for her apparently), the French tutor, a fellow homeschooler, scorned our Latin language lessons as a waste of time, most homeschoolers at the social co-op we attend don't know what the Great Books are, and no one understands why we are pursuing two sciences (that's where DD interest is).

I have not met any homeschoolers IRL who are pursuing an academic level of education that is even remotely comparable to ours.

Thus none of their opinions on academics and curriculum are in the least relevant to my homeschool.

 

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I have a good mix of friends and homeschooling styles... I know many homeschoolers here use straight A Beka for everything. Their kids graduate and have successful, happy lives. Nothing wrong with that. I've started to hear more and more people say they're using different programs the last couple years, like Math Mammoth, LLATL, etc. I'd say probably 95% of my homeschool support group uses either Saxon or A Beka for math. I rejected Saxon because my son used it in private school, and it was a bad fit for him and me. I was thrilled when I found alternate choices during my research! There are several on my homeschool support group who use a lot of literature and tend toward CM style homeschool. One was a founding member of the group who has graduated some of her kids (so she's a wise veteran), and she has talked before about how much the family reads together. That stuck with me as a newbie homeschooler a few years ago.

 

I think the difference between me and many irl folks is that I'm a researcher. Most people ask a few friends and go with what is popular (A Beka, Saxon, etc.). Again, nothing really wrong with that. The kids live happy adult lives after that education. I'm not worried about those kids. Those curricula are a bad fit for me because I'd get bored and hate teaching, so I don't use them. I'm not looking for school-at-home. The non-researchers usually don't mind having school-at-home, or they like it, or they don't know that it doesn't have to be that way (since they don't research).

 

I tend to over-research. If I'm buying a $10 cleaning tool for my kitchen, I'll research. It's a bit of a sickness. :lol:

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When I lived in Hong Kong, I knew very few home educators and most had very small children.  In China, there were a lot of missionaries, so heavily religious programmes were the norm.  I really relied on these boards.

 

L

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I love this thread!

 

I know many home schoolers IRL, but most of them are box-curriculum families who have no real academic rigor. I think a lot of them would think I was odd and pretty liberal (for a conservative Christian, lol).

 

I love these boards. I don't post a lot, but when I do I love the variety of experiences and responses I get back. I especially like the opinions that are not the same as mine, because I tend to learn the most from them.

 

It is not helpful if everyone agrees with me.

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I appreciate this forum because my homeschooling friends IRL are so different when it comes to curriculum. Getting to discuss/research on this board keeps me from aggravating them. :)

 

We have a wonderful informal "homeschool group." But we have different personalities and styles and different kids. I probably could find some homeschoolers with more similar educational philosophies in the large homeschool community in our area. But I really don't have the time or interest to create a new social group. Besides I have learned how beneficial it is to spend time with people with different perspectives.

 

Also I do believe my friends are doing a good job with their kids, even though they do things differently. They are happy with their boxed curriculum. And they even use different boxes and approach "school" differently. But they really aren't "researchers" so my swirling thoughts regarding curriculum and educational philosophy would overwhelm them.

 

I think the philosophies and approaches on the board a lot as well. I definitely feel like I am different than a lot of posters here. But I still learn a lot from them. :)

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IRL I come across very few true homeschooling parents.  One, homeschools because she, the parent, made her child late to school.  She doesn't really grade and rarely makes the child complete work.  Another spends so much time teaching religion that the child does not know any history.  Some, they choose whatever is independent and easy.  I find very few that provide actual instruction.  That is why most of us here are different.  We do teach our kids in some fashion, or with some purpose and methodology, and we teach them more than just basic academics to get by or be equal in the real world.

 

I want a successful adult.  Most of you do too.  We want our kids to be kids yet mature at an appropriate rate.  

 

The homeschool group dislikes me.  I work.  :lol: Everyone asks me when the kids will be back at school.   :glare: However, when they go back to school and enroll in advanced classes, pass with an A, and take first place in the state science fair ... they don't seem to know what to do with my children. :lol:   My sixth grader at the time was informing the teacher on how her lecture on ancient Egypt was incorrect, as well as explaining the Egyptian mythology relationship to the pharaohs.  Ooops!  Then, you have some who come in from homeschool so far behind!  Most do not take it seriously.  We do.

 

Guess that makes me a bee. I have been here since .... 98/99 I think.  I post in spurts.  It depends on my work load for the year (how many contracts and so forth or if it is onsite or not).

 

I love reading this post.

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I tend to over-research. If I'm buying a $10 cleaning tool for my kitchen, I'll research. It's a bit of a sickness. :lol:

This is me. I frequently have to remind myself to stop researching and just pick something already.

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