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Crimson Wife

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Crimson Wife last won the day on April 23 2014

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About Crimson Wife

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    Qualified Bee Keeper
  • Birthday January 27

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    http://bendingthetwigs.blogspot.com
  • Biography
    I'm mom to 4 so far
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    San Francisco Bay Area

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    Female
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    San Francisco Bay Area

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  1. On vaccines, I am still in favor of a selective, delayed schedule. What has changed is that whereas when my older kids were toddlers there were only around 65 measles cases/year in the entire US, now there are several hundred. So while child #3 received the MMR at 3 years, baby #4 will receive the MMR no later than 12 months, and quite possibly at 10 months if we wind up taking him to Europe in August as we are considering (DH is going for sure and the baby & I are most likely going too). I have always felt that there were risks to both getting the vaccine and delaying the vaccine. The greater the number of US cases, the greater the risk to my child in delaying a particular vaccine. I really wish that the Federal government would make proof of immunity to measles a requirement for entering or re-entering the US because that would drastically cut back on the number of cases. Every single outbreak in recent years can be traced back to someone getting infected overseas and then bringing it with them. From a civil liberties perspective, it is FAR less problematic IMHO for the Federal government to say that non-immune people can't get or renew their passports until they get vaccinated than it is for the government to link compulsory education and forced vaccination.
  2. My apologies if this was already mentioned but Harvard offers online degrees through its extension school.
  3. Maybe, and a gynecologist can run tests to help determine that. But because there is a possibility the symptoms could be something serious, the OP needs to go see her doctor and not just assume it's normal perimenopause. No reason to panic, OP, but do go see your doctor if you are still having symptoms and no positive pregnancy test in a week.
  4. Test again in a week, and if it's still negative go see your gynecologist.
  5. Like one of the PP, I have different expectations for different children. My oldest two are absolutely capable of earning a bachelor's degree at minimum. Finances are not an obstacle to the CC-and-transfer-to-a-state school route. Possibly by the time my 7th grader is old enough to attend we might be in a position to afford 4 years at a private college. My 3rd has multiple disabilities and while it's too early to know for sure, there is a very real possibility that she won't be able to do a bachelor's or even associate's degree (as opposed to participating in one of the special programs for adults with developmental disabilities). My 4th is an infant and while we hope he will be typically developing, it's far too soon to tell.
  6. I want to say that one of the We Thinkers (formerly Incredible Flexible You) books deals with this concept. It was definitely covered in the social skills group that used We Thinkers as the "spine". How old is the child in question? We Thinkers is useful IMHO throughout elementary even if Michelle Garcia Winner touts it for ages 4-7. But if the child is older than about 10, he/she would likely find it too juvenile.
  7. When your certifying body says not to give a diagnosis prior to a certain age, ethical professionals will follow that guideline. It's like how in states where SLP's don't have the scope of practice to diagnose autism, all they can do ethically is give a diagnosis of "pragmatic language disorder" and refer to a psychologist or physician for autism evaluation. We parents may find it splitting hairs but professionals have to be careful.
  8. Aphasia is a very different condition and the result of brain trauma (stroke, traumatic brain injury, etc.) A young child could suffer from aphasia if there had been some sort of brain trauma but generally it's a diagnostic label given to adults.
  9. From the website of the American Speech Language Hearing Association:
  10. FWIW, an ethical SLP is not supposed to diagnose CAS prior to age 3. Now they can say that they suspect it and start intervention before 3 but it's just not one of those diagnoses that SLP's are supposed to give a young toddler.
  11. Passing Algebra 1 or a 2 year Algebra 1A & 1B should be a requirement for a general ed diploma IMHO. Now I *DO* disagree with the push to require Algebra 2 for graduation.
  12. {{{{hugs}}}} I was dreading the response to our most recent pregnancy so much that I never did a big social media announcement.
  13. Good receptive language and quick at picking up sign language are both very encouraging signs BTW. My SN child has global language-learning disabilities so she never picked up sign (unfortunately she is the one with hearing loss so it would be really useful for her to know it). Her little brother understands more sign at 4 months than she ever did.
  14. My 10 y.o. with multiple disabilities has been in speech therapy since 27 months. She has seen SLP's through EI, the school district, and our private insurance. We've had good and ineffective SLP's in each setting. The absolute worst of the lot was private. I think it's worth trying EI and seeing how it goes. I would also encourage you to look into Hanen materials. "It Takes Two to Talk" is good for all language-delayed children. "More than Words" is good when there is suspected or confirmed autism. One book that I wish I'd had when my DD was little is "Giggle Time" by Susan Aud Sonders.
  15. With a family history of diabetes, I would do a modified Mediterranean. I would limit carbs more than a standard Mediterranean diet does. Even healthy carbs like sweet potatoes, carrots, fruit, beans, whole grains, etc. can mess with blood sugar too much for someone with pre-diabetes.
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