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Weight Loss surgery - discussion with boundaries............


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I am researching WLS. I'd like to discuss it, but with parameters.

 

 

  1. Please don't suggest any form of "eat less, move more". I do not eat enough foods to support the calories eat/calories out theory based on fat.
  2. My research into diet/lifestyles has lead me to conclude that exercise is important for health, but minimal in terms of weight loss.
  3. A whole foods, healthy, balanced approach such as Weight Watchers is not a match for my body. I have tried it, with total compliance.
  4. I have tried low carb. It worked once profoundly. About a year ago, I tried it for 3+ months and did not lose. I believe I am THAT metabolically resistant.
  5. I don't believe in HCG.

 

 

I've long framed WLS like cosmetic surgery. A person can go there from a mentally unhealthy place, or a mentally healthy place. It can be an act of extreme, needed, self care or an act of self hatred.

 

I have new insurance, BCBS of Texas, and I think I would qualify.

 

With the caveats, I'd like to discuss WLS.

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I haven't done it, so take what I say with a grain of salt. My sister's husband had the lap band, or something like that, and he doesn't comply with the new rules for eating, and therefore has complications and minimal weight loss. And he is a physician. This same sister's best friend did it, too, and she has mostly followed the rules, lost tons of weight, looks and feels great. She still doesn't eat "healthily", in my opinion, but her blood levels are much better than they used to be.

 

I think my issues with weight are partly metabolic. I went to a doctor last year to see why I have such trouble losing weight when I strive to eat healthy and am far from a couch potato. Most of my family is overweight. I think part of my issues are also caused by emotional eating. My cousin had WLS, and lost over 100 lbs. One time, I was complimenting her on how great she looked, and she said, "I'm still the same person I was on the inside. I still feel like a fat person. The surgery didn't change that." It was another way of saying, "Where ever you go, there you are."

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I know two people who've had it. My aunt, many many years ago. I don't remember a lot about her recovery. She lost a lot of weight. Gained a little back over the years, but not a significant amount.

 

A good friend had it a couple of years ago. He's diabetic and was having a terrible time keeping it under control. He had a few rough days immediately after the surgery, but then got along fine. There was a learning curve figuring out what/how much he could eat. He's lost a lot of weight, although I don't know specific numbers. A few months following the surgery he was able to wean off insulin completely. He's still doing fabulously.

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Here is what I know about BCBS (in Montana anyway) and WLS. You have to have a BMI of 40 or above and you have to have other comorbidities like diabetes for example. I think...you have to have 2 other comorbidities or you have to have followed a diet under a doctor's supervision for 6 months to qualify.

 

I am a professional weight loser. I am just very good at finding what I lost! I would love to have the gastric band done but I haven't been under a medical weight loss plan for 6 months. I also don't have diabetes. I have insulin resistance from PCOS.

 

Good luck

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I have an aunt who had it done (gastric bypass). She lost 200lbs. She is not terribly good about the diet (by her own admission) but remains (after a decade or so) in the "slightly overweight" category. Before she couldn't get herself to do many active things, or other fun things like travel, because of her weight. Now she travels, kayaks, bikes, etc. She will never be *skinny* but now her body doesn't hold her back from what she wants to do. She feels the surgery was a huge success.

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I have a friend who had the Lap Band. It was really hard on her. She had trouble even swallowing the smallest morsel of food. Most of her food needed to be put in the blender. She did lose weight, but like she said, mainly because she hated food at that point.

 

She lasted a year with the lap band, and had it removed. She said she has never been happier with it's removal. She has since put some weight back on, but she says her happiness outweighs(no pun intended) being in misery with the lap band.

 

Do your research. Get a Dr. who specializes ONLY in lap band or gastric bypass.

 

Also, keep in mind that many people who have this surgery cannot absorb iron any longer, and many need to have IV Iron.

 

Best wishes on your decision.

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A good friend of mine had WLS this past February. She has lost about 70 pounds so far.

 

In making her decision, she thoroughly researched the different types of surgery and finally settled on the sleeve. Her decision was based on number of post surgery complications as well as long term success rate. I'm sure there were other factors too.

 

Recovery was pretty quick. She was on a total liquid diet for a week to let her stomach heal.

 

Her only real side effect is heartburn when she doesn't eat slowly enough and hot flashes after eating.

 

The hardest part for her is the emotional aspect. She is in therapy to help with that. The change is beginning to be internal as well as external. But it is a real struggle for her.

 

Overall, she has been happy with it and has no regrets.

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I have known two women. First had lap band. She often threw up after eating. It was very difficult for her. She stopped having it tightened and gained most the weight back.

 

Second was my aunt. She had gastric bypass and ended up having digestive problems and gained most of the weight back.

 

I wonder why it is so many gain the weight back. Maybe it's not finding the root of the problem.

 

Have you already had your thyroid checked and a blood workup to check any underlying reason?

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I work in a facility that has an extremely good weight loss surgeon. He does them laparoscopically and removes about 2/3 of the stomach (so not lap bands). I've worked on that floor twice. The pts have to undergo a year of training first: They must be compliant with a diet and exercise program before beginning surgery.

 

The patients do well, with minimal pain. Any immediate complications from this particular surgeon are extremely rare. The patients are active and walking laps the day after surgery.

 

I work with a girl who has had the surgery and she is a yr out. She is able to eat very small amounts only or she will get sick. She is unable to take any type of pills (liqiud meds only). I believe this is true for all patients with this type of surgery because the gut is no longer able to absorb and break down pills. So that could affect treatment of other illnesses in the future. They also have trouble absorbing vitamins and that may affect how you feel for some time afterwards. The girl I work with has a good amount of energy though. She can also not eat any sugar whatsoever. Not sure if this is due to just being compliant with the diet or if it causes dumping syndrome.

 

Also, research shows that people often develop other addictions after weight loss surgery. The statistics are pretty high and it's a risk I'd consider carefully.

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I'm concerned about one thing... The way these surgeries work is *purely* by reducing the amount of food your body can take in. If calories in/calories out doesn't work for you, why would this? It works for other people because it is a truly extreme form of volume reduction (which translates to caloric reduction). It doesn't change the way your body processes nutrients. It doesn't change your metabolism. It just changes the amount of food you can take in. (And in many cases, that can translate to severe nutritional deficiencies on top of the risks of major surgery generally.)

 

I tend to agree that weight loss is far more complex than calories in / calories out, though one *will* lose weight on a forced starvation diet, which is what the first few months after surgery amount to.

 

I know you're not looking for alternatives right now. But I think understanding how the surgery works (and doesn't) is really important when deciding if it's worth trying.

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I know three women that had the gastric surgery. One of them lost a lot of weight, but gained it back and more after two years.

 

Another woman, actually an older cousin of mine, had the gastric surgery and was never the same. She did never felt well after it and actually passed away about three months later. The autopsy did not give us a direct relationship between the operation and her death, but even her physician believed it to be directly related.

 

The third woman had a very successful operation and lifestyle change. She has maintained her post surgery weight and added a good bit of exercise to her life. She even followed up with some cosmetic surgery to deal with skin issues. She is very happy with her choice!

 

It wouldn't surprise me to learn of other people I know that have chosen the lap band surgery and were very successful.

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My MIL had gastric bypass about six years ago. In the first few years she dropped to half her body weight. When FIL's heart problems increased and he was hospitalized, she resumed old habits of eating as a way to manage stress. She gained back half of what she lost and has not been successful in taking it off again despite activity and careful eating. For her it seems the surgery jump started massive weight loss, but that benefit had a limited time frame.

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I have friends who have had great luck with it, and some who have brought a lot of suffering into their lives. I think it depends on the kind you get, though. There are disadvantages, they need vitamin shots, they don't absorb vitamins from their food well...but those are the ones that got the gastric bypass surgery. The ladies I know who got the band have had better health through it.

 

Another problem that a friend had was that if he overate the slightest bit, he would vomit. It just was not fun to deal with, though he's very happy he had it done.

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I have also known people who has good success with it, and people who haven't. The type of surgery definitely impacted the results, but not as much as how they approached it. If they didn't deal with any underlying causes, like emotional eating, underlying health issues, lack of exercise, etc, they just gained the weight back. The ones who did actually deal with all of that, starting with medical issues and going all the way through several months of counseling to establish new habits and deal with any issues, have done great.

 

You said it has been a couple of years since you had a full workup, right? I would start there.

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I'm concerned about one thing... The way these surgeries work is *purely* by reducing the amount of food your body can take in. If calories in/calories out doesn't work for you, why would this? It works for other people because it is a truly extreme form of volume reduction (which translates to caloric reduction). It doesn't change the way your body processes nutrients. It doesn't change your metabolism. It just changes the amount of food you can take in. (And in many cases, that can translate to severe nutritional deficiencies on top of the risks of major surgery generally.)

 

I tend to agree that weight loss is far more complex than calories in / calories out, though one *will* lose weight on a forced starvation diet, which is what the first few months after surgery amount to.

 

I know you're not looking for alternatives right now. But I think understanding how the surgery works (and doesn't) is really important when deciding if it's worth trying.

 

:iagree:

 

If you're willing to do a very low calorie diet, why not consider something like Medifast or Optifast? (I think those are the names) with doctor supervision. Those are at least monitored so you get adequate protein and some nutritional supplements in the liquid shakes.

 

Since you've had good luck with low carb and you know you're very metabolically resistant, I'd really urge you to go back to that way of eating. No products, no sweeteners, possibly no dairy, keeping calories under 1800 or so to start. The book "The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living" by Drs. Phinney and Volek is very, very helpful to developing a nutritionally well-formulated ketogenic diet. You may need to start with something almost zero carb if you're that insulin resistant.

 

But, as you know, if you go back to eating carbohydrate-dense foods, you will regain. Someone with metabolic syndrome is carbohydrate intolerant the way some people are gluten or lactose intolerant. This is my reality too. I stopped eating low carb after losing 60 lbs and within 6 months had regained 20 lbs. That scared me, huge wake up call. And it's taken another 8 months to re-lose those 20 lbs. It was slower this time, but still doable. I've had to be more strict in some ways, but it's still come off slowly but surely.

 

I hope you can find what works for you. Obesity is very, very hard to live with, IME, but surgery just seems to carry more risks than benefits from what I can tell.

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I think this is within your parameters: Perhaps take another look at your 3/23/09 thread. Not one person suggested WLS--just a thought.

 

I agree with a PP, the surgery is just doing "calories in" for you (forcibly if you end up feeling sick each time you eat).

 

If I were considering WLS I think I would do a 30 day juice fast first and see what that did for me.

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My sil had the surgery. She lost 100 pounds the first year. The second year, she gained about 75 back. However, that first year she was exercising regularly at the gym, and was eating really small amounts of food.

 

The second year, she started eating more food, and stopped exercising. She still eats less than she did before, and weighs less, but she gained most of it back.

 

I also watch the Biggest Loser on Netflix. In Season 7, there is a man who had the surgery and gained back even more weight. They have to take off their shirts for the weigh in, and his stomach looks almost deformed. I guess it's because of the surgery.

 

[*]My research into diet/lifestyles has lead me to conclude that exercise is important for health, but minimal in terms of weight loss.

 

 

That was not true for me. I would not have lost weight/inches without exercise. It was the catalyst for me. Even if I didn't lose the inches, I would still exercise. The endorphins are wonderful at relieving stress.

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:grouphug: Have you tried any other medically supervised methods? I completely understand what you're saying about being "resistant." I've spoken to Drs. who spend their careers researching this very thing. Metabolism is incredibly complicated.

 

I know many people respond well to a combination of Metformin and a low-dose appetite suppressant.

 

My DH just took the kids to the park, or I'd ask him about the different surgeries. I know some are better than others. If you'd like, I'll ask him when he gets home and PM you later.

 

:grouphug:

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:grouphug: Have you tried any other medically supervised methods? I completely understand what you're saying about being "resistant." I've spoken to Drs. who spend their careers researching this very thing. Metabolism is incredibly complicated.

 

I know many people respond well to a combination of Metformin and a low-dose appetite suppressant.

 

My DH just took the kids to the park, or I'd ask him about the different surgeries. I know some are better than others. If you'd like, I'll ask him when he gets home and PM you later.

 

:grouphug:

 

I was also going to ask if you have tried metformin?

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I know two people IRL who have had great success with weight loss surgery. Mind you, it is not an *easy* option like some people think it is. Both these ladies had great adjustments to make as they recovered & had a liquid-only diet for some amount of time (sorry, I don't remember how long.) Also, sometimes they will get sick if they overeat or if they eat too many bad fats. I think that if you're committed to it, and if you've looked at the pros and cons & still feel that WLS is the best option, then discuss it with your doctor.

Edited by freeindeed
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I've also had two friend who had it done. One lost weight initially but then has gained it back (and more). The other friend kept it off for many years but when her life began to spiral out of control she's started gaining weight back. She's not back to her pre-surgery weight, but definitely headed in that direction.

 

The other problem this second friend had is alcoholism as a result of the surgery. She later discovered that there's a high incident of this for those who had WLS. She was shocked because she'd never had a problem before hand - she didn't even like alcohol that much. It was a very scary time for all of us her are friends with her... but now she's in AA and working through that. Just something for you to be aware of.

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I think this is within your parameters: Perhaps take another look at your 3/23/09 thread. Not one person suggested WLS--just a thought.

 

I agree with a PP, the surgery is just doing "calories in" for you (forcibly if you end up feeling sick each time you eat).

 

If I were considering WLS I think I would do a 30 day juice fast first and see what that did for me.

 

My problem, based on my research, with things like juice fasts is the low protein and steady carbohydrates. So lean body mass is not protected and there's still constant insulin. Sure, it's very low calories, but what's truly lost then? And if muscle is lost, how will one keep weight off when resuming a reasonable amount of calories. For very low calorie diets, I'd rather see a protein-sparing fast with mostly protein and enough fish oil to cover essential fatty acids. But those should be doctor-supervised IMO.

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A family member had the surgery about 5 years ago. She lost an extraordinary amount of weight - it was somewhere around 150 lbs. For about two years she ate right and exercised, weight trained, etc. But - she slowly increased her food intake, and stopped weight training. I believe she still does cardio... I'm guessing this stretched her stomach? Not sure on the science there. Regardless - she has so far gained about 75 lbs back. Still 75 lbs lighter than before, but back to being obese.

 

I have very little other experience with the surgery. I have two acquaintances who also tried it. It worked well for about two years, but they couldn't keep up the restrictions. They made themselves ill eating what - to me- looked like pretty normal food. Eventually they gained about 60-75% of their weight back.

 

Not to be confrontational, and you know your body better than any of us - but the only way I maintain my weight is with healthy food, cardio, and a LOT of weight training. I'm not "buff' at all - people probably can't event ell - but if I stop doing weights my weight starts going up no matter how little I eat. I could also never stop exercising. No amount of starving myself would work - and I couldn't eat like that for long. I have never "dieted" and I don't think diets (per se) work for most people. I do not drink any calories (only water and my morning coffee), I do not eat junk. I rarely have a 'treat' and if I do it's a handful of chocolate chips. We do not eat desert here unless it is a birthday or holiday. No white flour, lots of fiber.

 

I think things like Weight Watchers, juice diets, etc., are flawed in that people generally can't keep up any kind of diet like that for long. I eat real food, in healthy quantities, and exercise a lot. The older I've gotten, the harder it has become to stay the same weight.....

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One thing to keep in mind is what you mentioned with not losing on low carb. Did you follow it exactly and not lose or was it just too difficult to stick to? If you are truly that metabolically resistant than you will probably need to stick to a low carb diet in addition to WLS in order to lose and keep it off. You may also be one of the people who lose slowly in spite of the surgery. Some people have this done and the weight just falls off. Others have it done and still have to work their tails off to lose...it just helps level the playing field. Just keep that in mind just in case you are in the latter group so you aren't terribly disappointed.

 

It's also hard for habitual snackers to lose after the surgery. You may not be able to eat big meals but you can graze and snack all you want and rack the calories up very quickly. This is how most people who have had it done end up regaining. So if you are a snacker, break that habit first.

Edited by tjlufkin
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I know one person who has had it done, and she's had a lot of health problems as a result.

I too know someone who had this done, and she is in the hospital at least once a month with some issue or another. Her most recent hospital stay resulted in an issue that cannot be corrected via surgery. This issue is now life threatening.

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I know two people who have had this done, and their lives have changed. They can became very active, they don't have to be humiliated on airplanes, not fitting into booths at restuarants; basically they can participate in life without always worrying about their size. Both are healthy, and neither has had any significant weight gain. They were good and ready.

 

One still sometimes sees herself as a 'fat person', and at first, had a difficlut time with the attention she was getting. However, both are 'emtionally healthy'. Or as healthy as anyone else. Both saw therapists before and after, and both have WLS 'buddies' who were matched with them before the surgery. There are many people who have had this done, and lots of support 'out there'.

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I know two people IRL who have had great success with weight loss surgery. Mind you, it is not an *easy* option like some people think it is. Both these ladies had great adjustments to make as they recovered & had a liquid-only diet for some amount of time (sorry, I don't remember how long.) Also, sometimes they will get sick if they overeat or if they eat too many bad fats. I think that if you're committed to it, and if you've looked at the pros and cons & still feel that WLS is the best option, then discuss it with your doctor.

 

 

:iagree:It certainly was not easy. But it did make a postive difference in their health, and their outlook on life.

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thescrappyhomeschooler: I haven't done it, so take what I say with a grain of salt. My sister's husband had the lap band, or something like that, and he doesn't comply with the new rules for eating, and therefore has complications and minimal weight loss. And he is a physician. This same sister's best friend did it, too, and she has mostly followed the rules, lost tons of weight, looks and feels great. She still doesn't eat "healthily", in my opinion, but her blood levels are much better than they used to be.

 

 

See, here's the thing. The OP wants to disregard "Eat less, move more" as relevant to this discussion. But it cannot be done. Because if you don't lose the weight by doing this before this major surgery, you MUST do it afterward or 1) the weight loss won't happen anyway, despite major surgery (with risks of its own) and 2) it will just pop back open/stretch back out.

 

So either way, either before or after, you are going to have to eat less and move more.

 

Gee, they didn't even tell me that if you have an unrelated abdominal surgery - appendectomy, in my case- that the small cut they make can burst into a significant hernia if you return to eating regular meals quickly. You must stay on the "five bites of food per meal" kind of plan you are on after surgery anyway for 2 -6 months to ensure that the spot heals, stays closed and this doesn't happen. If you regain even five pounds after you return to eating (which puts pressure on the area that was cut), you can have this problem.

Edited by TranquilMind
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I'm concerned about one thing... The way these surgeries work is *purely* by reducing the amount of food your body can take in. If calories in/calories out doesn't work for you, why would this? It works for other people because it is a truly extreme form of volume reduction (which translates to caloric reduction). It doesn't change the way your body processes nutrients. It doesn't change your metabolism. It just changes the amount of food you can take in. (And in many cases, that can translate to severe nutritional deficiencies on top of the risks of major surgery generally.)

 

I tend to agree that weight loss is far more complex than calories in / calories out, though one *will* lose weight on a forced starvation diet, which is what the first few months after surgery amount to.

 

I know you're not looking for alternatives right now. But I think understanding how the surgery works (and doesn't) is really important when deciding if it's worth trying.

 

Yes, this, emphatically.

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I personally know someone who had a band procedure done. The band grew into organs and migrated partially and he nearly died. Almost a year later now he's in a nursing home trying to get healthy enough to go home. Complications after time are something I'd closely look into- his experience has been terrifying and heartbreaking.

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I had lap band surgery four years ago. My feelings on whether or not it was a good thing are about 50/50. I've lost 60 pounds and I feel so much better.

 

However,.....I throw up a LOT! Many times I create a beautiful, delicious-smelling meal and can't enjoy it. It has taken away something I used to enjoy and replaced it with an eating disorder. My new goal for this month is to eat one entire meal per day. (when I say "entire meal" I don't mean a typical American meal. I mean something like a cup of yogurt and a piece of fruit.....or a sandwhich.) Some days I literally eat a half of a normal serving (like a half sandwhich) all day long.

 

On the other hand,.....at 60 pounds lighter I can run, kayak and I've recently taken up tap dancing, which I LOVE!

 

So, it's a crapshoot as to whether or not I think it was a good thing. Either way you have to figure out why you overeat. I ended up going to therapy. It has helped a lot.

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The two I know that have done it have gained half or all the weight back. One is now a shopping addict and the other spiraled out of control into drugs (she was very young when she did it).

 

I think the problem with food addiction is that it is addiction period. Often when a person turns from food then other addictions replace it and they are not healthy either.

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One thing to keep in mind is what you mentioned with not losing on low carb. Did you follow it exactly and not lose or was it just too difficult to stick to? .

 

I was completely compliant with low carb. I have been familiar with low carb for years. I continued to eat that way even without losing because I *feel* better on it.

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Either way you have to figure out why you overeat. I ended up going to therapy. It has helped a lot.

 

Thanks for sharing your BTDT perspective.

 

FWIW, I do not overeat. I know it is very, very hard to look at a person fat enough to consider WLS and not assume they eat too much and move too little.

 

But, in my case, it is true.

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The two I know that have done it have gained half or all the weight back. One is now a shopping addict and the other spiraled out of control into drugs (she was very young when she did it).

 

I think the problem with food addiction is that it is addiction period. Often when a person turns from food then other addictions replace it and they are not healthy either.

 

I am a therapist with a speciality in addiction. :) I do not attach stigma to addiction, or avoid the label when it is clinically appropriate.

 

My problem with weight is not a food addiction. Although, I suppose, a case could be made that the way my body responds to *carbs* is an addiction response.

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I have known 3 close friends who have had it, and my sister. They have all gained 50# to all of the weight back. These people all had gastric bypass. Plus, It seems as if one can never be totally healthy again, with that much intestine gone. My sister is struggling to eat all her protein, and all of the vitamin supplements she must take for the rest of her life.

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Thanks for sharing your BTDT perspective.

 

FWIW, I do not overeat. I know it is very, very hard to look at a person fat enough to consider WLS and not assume they eat too much and move too little.

 

But, in my case, it is true.

 

I believe you. I actually went to an endocrinologist last summer because I weigh much more than I think I should weigh for how I eat and how much I move. My thyroid stuff comes back in the normal range. Blood sugar, blood pressure, cholesterol, etc. all good.

 

However, my feet are always swollen. I look like I have Fred Flintstone feet. The doctor told me my feet were swollen because I'm fat. He was a total a$$, and I left the office crying. He really didn't listen to me. I've been too busy to try to deal with it again, but I know what you're saying. I do occasionally overeat when I'm stressed. I tried going to OA, but that format didn't work out for me. I haven't tried no grains at all, but I do eat gluten free and that hasn't helped with weight loss, although everyone said it would.

 

:grouphug:

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I am researching WLS. I'd like to discuss it, but with parameters.

 

  1. Please don't suggest any form of "eat less, move more". I do not eat enough foods to support the calories eat/calories out theory based on fat.
  2. My research into diet/lifestyles has lead me to conclude that exercise is important for health, but minimal in terms of weight loss.
  3. A whole foods, healthy, balanced approach such as Weight Watchers is not a match for my body. I have tried it, with total compliance.
  4. I have tried low carb. It worked once profoundly. About a year ago, I tried it for 3+ months and did not lose. I believe I am THAT metabolically resistant.
  5. I don't believe in HCG.

I've long framed WLS like cosmetic surgery. A person can go there from a mentally unhealthy place, or a mentally healthy place. It can be an act of extreme, needed, self care or an act of self hatred.

 

I have new insurance, BCBS of Texas, and I think I would qualify.

 

With the caveats, I'd like to discuss WLS.

 

 

Joanne, I have thought of this myself in the past, but could never get past the fear of surgery after a very botched c-section.

 

That aside, my brother had a gastric band done. While he lost weight the first year, he also dealt with complications from the surgery, including a hospital acquired infection that was nasty. I had been afraid for him because of his existing high blood pressure and diabetes, but later learned that he was exactly the kind of candidate for whom these surgeries were made.

 

He is still dealing with the complications, but has not lost any more weight. Part of that is his own inability to stick to the guidelines. There are a million ways to "cheat" the surgery, apparently, and he became so irritable over the lack of food that he sought out as many "cheats" as he could.

 

In the end, the surgery helped bring down his weight modestly (he lost about 80 pounds that he maintained, which was about 1/3 of what he needed to lose to not be morbidly obese anymore). It cost him a lot in terms of his personal relationships because of the mood/personality changes that occurred. He has repaired a lot of that, but let's just say that he was not himself when he was starving. Financially, he had no issues because his insurance covered it due to his other conditions being such a risk factor for his health overall.

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I've known 2 people who've had the lap band done. Both suffered from complications after the procedure. The one woman had at least 3 months recovering with the complications, and ended up needing something done (I can't remember what it was). The point is, despite their bad experience, they are both happy with the results. It has been over 2 years (coming on 3 for one, 4 for the other) for them and they are doing well.

 

That said, I think the by-pass is a safer and better option from what I have heard. But you have to look at the choices carefully.

 

I'm sure you already know that it involves pre-screening, usually diet compliance, and a commitment to change. You can gain the weight back. Diet is the main issue (post surgery). I would assume you've had your thyroid checked and know there are no other problems causing weight issues. It's important to know what your (medical) issues are before the surgery.

 

The only other thing I want to add to this conversation is that if you have it done, be careful who you tell. For some reason it has a stigma attached to it, and can even be viewed negatively by employers.

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I was completely compliant with low carb. I have been familiar with low carb for years. I continued to eat that way even without losing because I *feel* better on it.

 

That's *definitely* to your advantage for after the surgery. That way of eating plus the surgery could be the ticket for you.

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Thanks for sharing your BTDT perspective.

 

FWIW, I do not overeat. I know it is very, very hard to look at a person fat enough to consider WLS and not assume they eat too much and move too little.

 

But, in my case, it is true.

 

Ok I don't want to be totally annoying but do you exercise? I don't mean like walking 100 miles a day. I hate exercising but I do strength training for muscle tone. It basically saved me. I lost a hundred pounds. I can smell food and gain weight. A combo of eating LCHF and weight lifting totally changed my life.

 

ETA: I just don't know what the surgery will do, if you are already capable of eating very little.

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Thanks for sharing your BTDT perspective.

 

FWIW, I do not overeat. I know it is very, very hard to look at a person fat enough to consider WLS and not assume they eat too much and move too little.

 

But, in my case, it is true.

 

But, this surgery is to help with overeating. If you are not overeating then why would you do it? :confused:

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I believe you. I actually went to an endocrinologist last summer because I weigh much more than I think I should weigh for how I eat and how much I move. My thyroid stuff comes back in the normal range. Blood sugar, blood pressure, cholesterol, etc. all good.

 

However, my feet are always swollen. I look like I have Fred Flintstone feet. The doctor told me my feet were swollen because I'm fat. He was a total a$$, and I left the office crying. He really didn't listen to me. I've been too busy to try to deal with it again, but I know what you're saying. I do occasionally overeat when I'm stressed. I tried going to OA, but that format didn't work out for me. I haven't tried no grains at all, but I do eat gluten free and that hasn't helped with weight loss, although everyone said it would.

 

:grouphug:

 

:grouphug::grouphug:

 

I am right there with you on the first paragraph and part of the second. I have tried no grains, and that didn't work in terms of weight loss, but I did feel better.

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Ok I don't want to be totally annoying but do you exercise? I don't mean like walking 100 miles a day. I hate exercising but I do strength training for muscle tone. It basically saved me. I lost a hundred pounds. I can smell food and gain weight. A combo of eating LCHF and weight lifting totally changed my life.

 

ETA: I just don't know what the surgery will do, if you are already capable of eating very little.

 

I work 3 - yes 3 - jobs.

 

Intentional exercise is not something I can fit in and I don't believe it is a significant factor in weight loss.

 

It's not that I eat "very little" but I don't eat enough to explain my weight if you believe the calories in/calories out or lower fat/whole grains model.

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But, this surgery is to help with overeating. If you are not overeating then why would you do it? :confused:

 

Because it isn't just to change how much you eat, it physiologically changes how you digest. It has the malabsorption but it also changes the hormonal processes involved in digestion.

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