Jump to content

Menu

Part time job after not working 15 years...ideas?


Tess in the Burbs
 Share

Recommended Posts

The short story is Dh is going to be making a job change soon, and it's most likely going to be slightly less money, but enough that with our rent having just gone up for the next year, I will need to work part time to make up the difference.  However, the more I think about this, the less opportunities I can think to do. 

 

I last worked 15 years ago.  I have kept track of volunteer work.  I'm working on putting a resume together.  

 

I'm overweight, so I don't think fast food or any standing 8 hours job is going to work.  I have been in PT all spring for my shoulders(can't lift above my head w/o pain and knee pain).  My pain isn't better and most likely related to an autoimmune issue.  Knowing this, I can't see doing a standing job unless it were 4 hours and less.  

 

I don't mind office work, but everything seems to be 30+ hours, nothing 15-20.  I work on a Mac at home, and since Windows 10 came out I can't even find any Office products on the windows computer in our house !!  I used to be fairly competent in those things, but would need to ramp up.  

 

We have 1 car.  Don't see that changing with a loss in income.  I have shopping down the hill from me(1 mile) that ideally I could walk to work.  I was holding off on the grocery stores b/c I don't want to do the union stuff.  There is a pet store.  Two pizza places.  Yogurt place.  Sandwich shop.  Coffee shop(not wanting this one).  A few banks.  Some vet offices.  Gas station and local plant place(closed in winter, so out).  

 

If I rode the bus 15 min I can get to a lot more.  But it only adds in retail options.  

 

Seriously, who is going to hire a middle aged woman who hasn't worked in 15 years?  Where do I even begin to look?  We don't co-op, so teaching a class isn't an option for now.  I would have to join a co-op this year and hope to find a class they don't already have to teach the following year.  I am also open to teaching science in my home next year, but I need something for now.  This fall.  ASAP.  

 

I did look at the tech school.  Some programs are not taking new students.  Some are over a year, so again, not helpful now.  

 

give me your ideas?  suggestions?   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Usually when a woman has been out of the workforce I suggest working in a hotel because most hotels will start you out at something easy and low paid, but quickly move up your pay when you do good work. I usually suggest banquets or night audit because there is always room for those when it's busy. You didn't mention being close to a hotel, and you did say you don't have the physical capability of standing 8 hours or carrying a tray over your head in a crowded room, so that is probably not for you. Many night audit people can sit on a stool and don't have to stand all night though...

 

Maybe something freelance at home is better for you. Fall is coming and the companies who let you take orders from home will be hiring and that sounds like the easiest thing for you right now.

 

Also, you are a home school mom so you might think about beta reading for self published authors. Many of them pay beta readers a small amount per book. If you are really a grammar ace you might even considered editing for self published people and just working for yourself. I don't think they make a lot, but when you do all your work online and don't buy a second car, or pay extra gas or buy nice clothes just to wear to work, work at home becomes more equitable.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know you mentioned no grocery stores, but do you have an aldi nearby? Ours has stools for the cashiers to sit on and that makes it much easier. I don't know if they are union or not.  Dd works part time at a grocery store that's union but it's not an issue at all. 

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Of the places you mentioned within walking distance, the pet store, yogurt shop, and banks would probably have the least physically strenuous jobs. I'd apply at all of those and see what happens. Instead of thinking about the qualities you don't have (haven't worked in 15 years, etc), think about what you do have. You are motivated, mature, and don't need full time-- that may be exactly what a business is looking for.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

  I am also open to teaching science in my home next year, but I need something for now.  This fall.  ASAP.  

 

    

 

If you can deal with younger students, I bet you could fill some classes for fall very easily. It doesn't have to be an all semester thing - you can do varying sessions from 2 to 8 weeks, depending on topic. 

 

Science classes are actually what was most popular for me when I did classes: chemistry experiments, magnets, hands-on physics. Arts and crafts tend to do well also. Basically all of the messy stuff that requires prep, that people don't want to do at home, lol. 

 

Writing is the non-messy class that did the best. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What about babysitting or afterschool type care?

 

I wouldn't mind this, except it feels like other people get sick more often than my family.  DH is a nutcase if anything sneezes...so outside kids and colds...I think he would move out.  He's crazy about not getting sick lol.  

 

I need to think about this one.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Usually when a woman has been out of the workforce I suggest working in a hotel because most hotels will start you out at something easy and low paid, but quickly move up your pay when you do good work. I usually suggest banquets or night audit because there is always room for those when it's busy. You didn't mention being close to a hotel, and you did say you don't have the physical capability of standing 8 hours or carrying a tray over your head in a crowded room, so that is probably not for you. Many night audit people can sit on a stool and don't have to stand all night though...

 

Maybe something freelance at home is better for you. Fall is coming and the companies who let you take orders from home will be hiring and that sounds like the easiest thing for you right now.

 

Also, you are a home school mom so you might think about beta reading for self published authors. Many of them pay beta readers a small amount per book. If you are really a grammar ace you might even considered editing for self published people and just working for yourself. I don't think they make a lot, but when you do all your work online and don't buy a second car, or pay extra gas or buy nice clothes just to wear to work, work at home becomes more equitable.

 

My college aged son is a desk clerk at a hotel and it's been a really good job for him. Fairly regular hours, better than minimum wage pay, and he can study during quieter times. They have high chairs or stools to sit on. 

Edited by Pippen
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

LOL, my dh used to be that way. I can remember a huge freak out he had when oldest dd (then 6) sneezed and I was going to work and how was I going to keep her from getting him sick? He seriously wanted me to call in to work and stay home over a single sneeze, lol. It is really funny to look back at, but it wasn't funny then. I was like, "OMG! I'm married to a moron who thinks a sneeze is going to turn into the Black Plague! I hate my life!"

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know if there are any schools nearby, but I work for the county office of education and we are always needing aides. It is usually part-time. Also, substitute aides are in high demand and if they wanted it had very steady work. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Y might have some spots open. 

 

I know the pet store had a sign out that they were hiring a couple of weeks ago - they were looking for a manager.  I don't know if that has been filled or not.

 

The library has some openings from time to time.

 

Starbucks.

 

There is a new pet hospital next to QFC.  They might have some openings.  (I know your kids have allergies but I don't know if you do or not.)

 

Teriyaki Town II had a sign out saying that they were hiring. 

 

I'll let you know if I see any "now hiring" signs out

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

LOL, my dh used to be that way. I can remember a huge freak out he had when oldest dd (then 6) sneezed and I was going to work and how was I going to keep her from getting him sick? He seriously wanted me to call in to work and stay home over a single sneeze, lol. It is really funny to look back at, but it wasn't funny then. I was like, "OMG! I'm married to a moron who thinks a sneeze is going to turn into the Black Plague! I hate my life!"

YES!!!  It's hard not to roll my eyes when he's like this.  

 

I don't know if there are any schools nearby, but I work for the county office of education and we are always needing aides. It is usually part-time. Also, substitute aides are in high demand and if they wanted it had very steady work. 

I hadn't thought about the schools, thanks, will look into this option

 

The Y might have some spots open. 

 

I know the pet store had a sign out that they were hiring a couple of weeks ago - they were looking for a manager.  I don't know if that has been filled or not.

 

The library has some openings from time to time.

 

Starbucks.

 

There is a new pet hospital next to QFC.  They might have some openings.  (I know your kids have allergies but I don't know if you do or not.)

 

Teriyaki Town II had a sign out saying that they were hiring. 

 

I'll let you know if I see any "now hiring" signs out

 

 I wondered about the Y.  I figured a current member might be their first choice.  And someone in better shape lol.   I hadn't thought about Teriyaki Town...I would seriously die working there.  I can't eat teriyaki and the smell of yumminess would drive me to death!  DH would love that.  Bring home dinner dear!  I hadn't considered that shopping area...need to go by there and see what is hiring, thanks!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Check with your county employment office as you might qualify for free training programs as a "displaced homemaker". I used to think that only divorcees qualified as "displaced homemakers" but married women may still qualify if the primary breadwinner is unemployed or had to take a lower-paying job after a layoff/disability/etc. Some of the training options in my area were for fairly good-paying jobs like paralegal.

 

My DH wound up finding a new position fairly quickly so I didn't end up doing any training program but it was good to see that the option was there if I had needed it.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know if there are any schools nearby, but I work for the county office of education and we are always needing aides. It is usually part-time. Also, substitute aides are in high demand and if they wanted it had very steady work. 

 

I was going to suggest this as well. Subs at my district join a hotline that calls them each day with the needs and you can say yes or no to an automated system (need a bachelor's degree in anything to sub for middle or high school). There is also a need for subs for paras too. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

YES!!!  It's hard not to roll my eyes when he's like this.  

 

I hadn't thought about the schools, thanks, will look into this option

 

 

 I wondered about the Y.  I figured a current member might be their first choice.  And someone in better shape lol.   I hadn't thought about Teriyaki Town...I would seriously die working there.  I can't eat teriyaki and the smell of yumminess would drive me to death!  DH would love that.  Bring home dinner dear!  I hadn't considered that shopping area...need to go by there and see what is hiring, thanks!

 

I was just looking at the job openings at our local Y.  They offer membership as a benefit so don't seem to be looking for current members.  I know the people working the front desk, babysitting or the preschool classes aren't always in great shape.   (I'm definitely not and I was considering applying)

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Check your local Craigslist for merchandisers.  I work for TNG and they are always looking for good workers.  I know there are other merchandising companies as well.  I like that I can work during my scheduled days during the times that I want and it's independent work.  I stock books at a major grocery store and magazines at a couple of CVS.  I currently work about 10 hours a week, but during the holidays it's more.  You could always work for 2 merchandising companies if you needed more hours. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1. Check with the Y. If you can do admin or work open (5am-9am) or close at reception that might be great. Then as an employee you get to work out when you arent working if you want and may get s discounts for family members. I worked at the Y years ago my ds did TKD and personal training and my dd did year round swimming.

 

2. Grocery. Being in the union might be good. Often that means health insurance. You might be able to cover your family's insurance in a part time position cheaper tgN your dh's full time rates. Additionally, if you can cover health ins that might give your dh some flexibility in his work.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What about working from home? Something computer or writing related -- computer research, editing, writing newsletter content for big companies with websites...

 

How about tutoring? You can set your own hours, and not physically demanding. And you have LOADS of experience, with multiple grades and multiple subjects. :)

 

Pick-up/delivery for a dental lab (deliver dental impressions to the lab from dental offices, and then deliver completed appliances back to the dental offices -- my retirement-age uncle is doing this, and splits the part-time job with another retiree).

 

Grocery shopping, light house-cleaning, pulling weeds, sitting and visiting, and other odd jobs for an elderly person still living at home who has a harder time getting things done.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Check with your county employment office as you might qualify for free training programs as a "displaced homemaker". I used to think that only divorcees qualified as "displaced homemakers" but married women may still qualify if the primary breadwinner is unemployed or had to take a lower-paying job after a layoff/disability/etc. Some of the training options in my area were for fairly good-paying jobs like paralegal.

 

My DH wound up finding a new position fairly quickly so I didn't end up doing any training program but it was good to see that the option was there if I had needed it.

 

I just read about this recently.  So glad they have something like this! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1. Check with the Y. If you can do admin or work open (5am-9am) or close at reception that might be great. Then as an employee you get to work out when you arent working if you want and may get s discounts for family members. I worked at the Y years ago my ds did TKD and personal training and my dd did year round swimming.

 

2. Grocery. Being in the union might be good. Often that means health insurance. You might be able to cover your family's insurance in a part time position cheaper tgN your dh's full time rates. Additionally, if you can cover health ins that might give your dh some flexibility in his work.

 

This particular union's health insurance is Group Health.  That is a deal breaker for me but not be for everyone 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Also, you are a home school mom so you might think about beta reading for self published authors. Many of them pay beta readers a small amount per book.

 

I don't mean to thread-steal: but this is really interesting. How do you find work like beta reading?

 

 

Alley

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think a lot of retail places actually like women who are coming back into the workforce.  Almost anyone can train for those jobs and middle aged women are reliable and motivated, and often less socially awkward than young people.

 

But in particular, clothing shops that cater to adult women like employees who fit the demographic of the customers.  My next dor neighbor, who is about 45, gave up working as a substitute teacher to work at Tan Jay, and it is a really good fit for her.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was a mostly SAHM for about 18 years, but I had no trouble finding a part-time job.

 

I left my last full-time job when my daughter was born in 1994. I freelanced part-time for a couple of years after that, but stopped when I got pregnant with my son (who was exhausting even before he was born). 

 

When he was two -- for reasons similar to your own -- I took a part-time retail job, which I kept for about three years.

 

After that, I didn't work for pay again until 10 years later, when I again took a part-time retail job. That time, I lasted only six months. However, even after a decade out, I had no trouble getting hired. I went to a hiring event for a new store opening around the corner from my house and was offered a job the same day.

 

While I was doing the retail thing, I also got hired with Tutor.com. They provide on-demand, homework-help tutoring online. Tutors work from home. The pay is not great, and there aren't always hours available when you might want to work. However, the hours are flexible, in that you can pick and choose from among the hours that are open on the schedule, and earning even a little bit while sitting in my own house with my dog at my feet is nice. That was my primary job for the last year my son was home. He was dual enrolled and didn't need me to do anything other than drive him around and make sure he was fed. So, I travelled with my laptop and scheduled tutoring hours for any time he was in class and I could get on wifi.

 

If you have a degree, you might take a look at Tutor.com. 

 

Meanwhile, I took some free classes online and through my local library to brush up on my Microsoft Office skills. 

 

A year later, when my son was headed off to college, I updated my resume with the "new" computer skills and the year of recent work experience. I left off the most recent retail stint and targeted all of the tutoring/test prep centers in town. I had an interview within days and was offered a part-time job within two weeks of sending out the first resume. I've been there just about two years.

 

So, something like that might be another avenue for you. Again, the pay isn't great, but it's better than you're likely to make working retail. The work isn't physically demanding. The availability of hours can be a bit erratic, depending on the time of year, but I can set my own availability and specify the maximum number of hours I want each week. 

 

I've actually been working on gradually ramping up to working full time. Several months ago, I took a job in the technology training department of my local library, which pays better than either of the other jobs and comes with some small-scale benefits. Although I still work a few hours a week tutoring both online and at the center, my long-term goal is to transition to full time at the library. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Every place you listed sounds like a standing job. I don't think it's so much that they wouldn't want to hire "middle aged woman who hasn't worked in 15 years" but that you wouldn't be able to work on your feet at those jobs. Personally I think the yogurt shop sounds appealing. I probably wouldn't have to memorize too many things... I mean they probably charge based on cup size or weight and then change flavors periodically. I don't know. There might be lifting to refill the machines in the back? But maybe you wouldn't have to do that for medical reasons. If they allowed short shifts it might work.

 

Is there a college campus? Could you work somewhere there? Book store, child day care center, library, etc.? They may surprise you with the shifts because they are used to working around students' schedules so may not expect long shifts. Some jobs may be reserved for students, but some may not be.

 

The substitute teacher idea sounds worth investigating.

 

Would it be realistic to walk to work? What if it rains? What if you are running late?

 

We actually just went through a similar thing. I got a PT job in walking distance, but I am only available a few hours a week and the pay is min. wage so I won't be making much. Would you be okay with that? Because I don't know what the jobs you are looking at would pay. On the bright side, being older than most of my coworkers just means I have more experience. So look at it that way. For some of them it's their first job.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I went back to work at age 36 after being a SAHM for 12 years.  

 

The cable company needed part-time customer service reps.  I got 6 weeks of paid training and worked evenings and weekends from 6pm-10pm.  Dh got home from his job at 5:30pm so it was perfect - and a 10-minute drive from home.

 

I put together a resume using online examples - stressing my awesome organizational, multi-tasking, and computer skills I attained by running a home and raising 3 kids :p.   It worked.  And 10 years later, I'm still there.  I just went full-time last fall.  We get all cable channels, the fastest internet, and home phone completely free, too.  It's still really fun and the money is fantastic.

 

You never know.  This might be exactly what you're looking for.

Edited by AngelaNYC
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know how much you're hoping to make, but I clean an office locally twice a week.  The pay is low (I'm at $11.50/hour after two raises) BUT the perk is great - I work alone and can listen to all the podcasts I want while cleaning.  It's something I always want to have time for at home and never do... I look forward to my weekly therapy of podcasts and great music, lol.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been thinking about this thread and the many similar ones there have been here lately, and it occurs to me that the whole going-back-to-work-after-staying-home-with-kids thing has some commonalities with getting into college.

 

Specifically, I think a lot of us tend to conflate the horror stories we read and see in the media about the difficulties of getting back onto a professional track/getting into a selective college with the possibilities of getting "a" job or getting into "a" college.

 

Honestly, I suspect there is an enormous difference in the experience of an attorney who is on the partner track pre-kids and then tries to hop back into a position with a six-figure salary 15 years later and one who, like me, might have a degree and some experience before doing the SAHM thing but then be willing to more or less start over when she returns. I'm sure it's really hard to do the first, but I think the second is very manageable if you are flexible and willing to spend some time rebuilding.

 

I mean, I've been in my own rebuilding phase for about three years, and I'm still not even close to making the salary I made when I left my last full-time position, even if you don't adjust for inflation. I'm hopeful that I might get there within another five or six years, but there's no denying I lost a ton of ground, financially and career-wise, by staying home. Nonetheless, I haven't had any serious trouble getting and staying employed from the time I decided I was ready to do so.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you think one of the jobs where you'd be on your feet for a while might be realistic, start walking and moving now.  Just 4-6 weeks of regular walking can make a big difference in your endurance and your core strength without thinking too hard about it. 

 

I really think child care isn't a bad idea.  Yes, you'll get exposed to more garbage.  But if you take a job outside the house especially if it's in retail, waitress, etc., you WILL be exposed to more illness.  At least with a child in your own home, you can control the hand washing/hygiene aspect of it. 

Edited by WoolySocks
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know a ton of moms heading back to work in our area, looking for part time entry level work, and being out of the workforce for many years was really not a big deal at all.

 

The thing that has really changed is that you will need a resume to submit with online applications, even if it is an entry-level job at Taco Time. Frequently, the interface wants a resume and it won't finish the app without one. My DS17 made a pretty empty resume for that purpose, and he got calls despite the lack of substance. So, there is a place to start. Good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tess, can you tutor? I would look into private tutoring and have the kids come to you or meet at the library.

 

Other things I just thought of -- caterers always need extra help, and if you're in a populated area, party/event planners. For the right person they might agree to provide transportation.

 

If you're good with words, technical writing can be done from home.

Edited by Vida Winter
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Breaking into tutoring where I live is next to impossible if you don't have a teaching degree.

 

I would suggest you tell everyone you are looking to get back to work.  Your hairdresser, the checkout person at a store, the librarian, friends. Leads come from unlikely places.

 

I have started dog sitting and babysitting.  Our town has a facebook babysitter group.  Anyone looking for someone posts there or you can post your availability.  I have picked up 2 hours in the middle of the day to watch a baby while mom takes the older kid to a class.  With school starting people will start looking for someone to get their child ready and drop them at school or pick up from school.  I like the drop off because you are done by 8:30 and your day is your own.  Sometimes people are looking for someone to drive a senior to the store/doctors appointments.

 

3 days a week I walk a friends dog and play with her for 2 hours.  Most dog walking gigs are not 2 hours of play with my dog. Most of the people I know who make a decent amount at dog walking have multiple clients and charge for a 20-30 minute walk once or twice a day.  

 

I know people who have been making extra cash as Uber or Lyft drivers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just remembered: Something else I did for a few months when I was first starting to work again was general transcription. The effective hourly rate is low, because you're paid by the minute of audio that you transcribe. But it's another job that super easy to get, you can do from home and has very flexible hours. 

 

I worked for this company: www.rev.com.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The short story is Dh is going to be making a job change soon, and it's most likely going to be slightly less money, but enough that with our rent having just gone up for the next year, I will need to work part time to make up the difference.  However, the more I think about this, the less opportunities I can think to do. 

 

I last worked 15 years ago.  I have kept track of volunteer work.  I'm working on putting a resume together.  

 

I'm overweight, so I don't think fast food or any standing 8 hours job is going to work.  I have been in PT all spring for my shoulders(can't lift above my head w/o pain and knee pain).  My pain isn't better and most likely related to an autoimmune issue.  Knowing this, I can't see doing a standing job unless it were 4 hours and less.  

 

I don't mind office work, but everything seems to be 30+ hours, nothing 15-20.  I work on a Mac at home, and since Windows 10 came out I can't even find any Office products on the windows computer in our house !!  I used to be fairly competent in those things, but would need to ramp up.  

 

We have 1 car.  Don't see that changing with a loss in income.  I have shopping down the hill from me(1 mile) that ideally I could walk to work.  I was holding off on the grocery stores b/c I don't want to do the union stuff.  There is a pet store.  Two pizza places.  Yogurt place.  Sandwich shop.  Coffee shop(not wanting this one).  A few banks.  Some vet offices.  Gas station and local plant place(closed in winter, so out).  

 

If I rode the bus 15 min I can get to a lot more.  But it only adds in retail options.  

 

Seriously, who is going to hire a middle aged woman who hasn't worked in 15 years?  Where do I even begin to look?  We don't co-op, so teaching a class isn't an option for now.  I would have to join a co-op this year and hope to find a class they don't already have to teach the following year.  I am also open to teaching science in my home next year, but I need something for now.  This fall.  ASAP.  

 

I did look at the tech school.  Some programs are not taking new students.  Some are over a year, so again, not helpful now.  

 

give me your ideas?  suggestions?   

 

Look for LibreOffice and/or Open Office on your PC. That's what I use. If you don't have either, I'd download LibreOffice.

 

Just a heads up: I did the substitute teacher thing for a few months, and we were specifically trained to stand and/or walk around the classroom while teaching. The first couple of months, I came home exhausted after every assignment.

 

Ahh.

Edited by heartlikealion
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you can deal with younger students, I bet you could fill some classes for fall very easily. It doesn't have to be an all semester thing - you can do varying sessions from 2 to 8 weeks, depending on topic. 

 

Science classes are actually what was most popular for me when I did classes: chemistry experiments, magnets, hands-on physics. Arts and crafts tend to do well also. Basically all of the messy stuff that requires prep, that people don't want to do at home, lol. 

 

Writing is the non-messy class that did the best. 

 

I agree with this. IMO, there's a real market for drop-off classes-in the 4th-8th grade years especially, but in the other years as well. 

 

I also keep hearing about the growing virtual assistant market. Basically, you're working from home as someone's administrative assistant. There are services where you become someone's permanent assistant, and there are services where jobs are farmed out to available assistants piecemeal and you're paid by the job.  I haven't investigated that very deeply, but it exists (I know someone who swears by those kinds of services), so there must be a marketplace for it. 

 

What about looking into sites like this?

 

https://www.upwork.com/o/jobs/browse/?q=assistant

Edited by ILiveInFlipFlops
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...