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Lori D.

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Lori D. last won the day on September 20 2013

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About Lori D.

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    learning, reading, gardening, leisure hiking, film buff, and Rock Band game bassist

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  1. CORE SUBJECTS English: - reading/literature = - writing = IEW's SWI B - grammar = - spelling = Megawords (optional: vocabulary) Math = Teaching Textbooks 7 Social Studies - History = she did 1 term of history and is finishing 1 of geography - Geography = she... is finishing 1 of geography (optional other Social Studies: Econ/Personal Finance = Penny Candy; Gov't/Civics; Philosophy; Archeology; Current Events...) Science = Physics 101 DVD OPTIONAL SUBJECTS - Bible/Religious Studies = Bible reading, Scripture memory work - Typing - Foreign Language - Logic - Fine Arts - "Electives" -- computer, health, PE, "home ec" pursuits, pursue personal interests/hobbies/craft skills... ____________________ From core subjects, I didn't see Reading/Literature -- either a formal lit. study, or just regular reading of good books. For an independent more formal Lit. study, you might check out Lightning Lit. 7, or CLE units). Also, I don't see Grammar (Analytical Grammar, Growing with Grammar, and others are pretty independent). Or, if not needing a full-on grammar instruction program, what about something like Editor-in-Chief or other "proof-editing" practice program? Other things she could do from the optional subjects list that could be very independent: - roots-based Vocabulary workbook - Logic Countdown series or other logic/critical thinking puzzles book - take music or art lessons and then practice daily on her own, or explore art on her own with online video lessons - learn computer coding on her own from one of the many kid-friendly free websites - learn to cook, knit, sew, solder electronics, or other useful hand skills - explore a person interest -- creative writing, robotics, science kits, computer animation, or...? - physical fitness -- daily, do at home along with online yoga or aerobics class; go running or biking for 45 minutes... - watch a 20-30 minute science or history video online, write up a short summary and give it as an oral report - pursue some Current Events studies
  2. Off the top of my head, 3 ideas -- and other people will have other great suggestions: English 9 -- and then break it down/explain in the Course Description?? English: Rhetoric + Literature English: * "The Classical Bard": Literature of Shakespeare * "Rhetoric": Writing & Speech * = course provider: Lukeion Project, advanced classical studies
  3. Lots of people do *just* a full year of Composition for one of the English credits, so that shouldn't be problematic. While colleges are *roughly* looking for 1/2 Lit. and 1/2 Writing, I think they are going to be far happier seeing an abundance of writing courses for the English credits, knowing that means the student will likely come in being a good writer. And if you're doing Integrated Great Books studies, you're going to end up with extra credits of English and Social Studies, beyond the requirement, so you'll have at least 2 full credits of Lit. and 2 full credits of Writing -- which equals out to 1/2 + 1/2. I doubt any college cares that it is carefully divided half & half each and every year of high school. 😉 We were not that rigorous and intense, nor did we outsource to online course providers, nor did we do Rhetoric or a formal integrated Great Books study, so I will have to defer to others who have actually did that and put it on their transcript in that way. JMO, but I think that if you want to go with the different course titles, as long as your group your English courses by subject, it will be clear that those are English credits, just a little different than the standard public school English credits. Or, if it is easier to show the integrated studies by grouping credits by grade year, then I would list the subject ("English", "Social Studies", etc.) in front of each course listed to make sure the college understands that this course fulfills the requisite credit for the subject area. Hoping someone who really has "BTDT" will jump in with their transcript suggestions! Warmest regards, Lori D.
  4. I would vote for a science you may not get to otherwise. 🙂 Prentice Hall Explorer: Earth Science (7 chapters, so do one per week, which gives you 1 week extra if needing more time on one of the chapters -- OR, if the chapters are too long to do 1 per week, then pick 4 chapters and spend 2 weeks per chapter) + TOPS Rocks & Minerals (36 lessons, and most were easy to do 2-4 lessons in 30-45 minutes, so you can pretty much knock out all of it by doing 4-5 lessons per week -- OR, pick and choose lessons to fit your 8 week schedule) ____________________ Prentice Hall Explorer: Astronomy (It looks like it has 4 units, so 2 weeks per unit: Earth/Moon/Sun; Exploring Space; Solar System; Stars/Galaxies/Universe) + 4-H Astronomy Activity Guide (FREE; 36 activities) or TOPS: Planets & Stars (20 activities) ____________________ Forensic Science investigations? ____________________ Or... What about a series of biographies on key scientists/discoveries? Or have them do an in-depth Science Fair project, involving making measurements, collecting data, graphing findings, etc.? Or a unit on Anatomy, if your future Biology text doesn't include that? Or if you don't specifically need to do a *natural science*, use that 8 weeks to study: - Health, Nutrition, and Fitness - Robotics - Rocketry
  5. Just my 2 cents worth: I always vote for what is most streamlined and easy to understand from the point of view of the admissions officer. You can always go into more detail in the separate Course Description document. For example: organizing the transcript by subject, or simultaneously by subject and grade year, may make it more clear to see what the student did. Many 0.5 credit courses will look much "busier" compared to combining the two 0.5 credits done the same year into one English credit. Also, just me, but I think lengthy course titles can be cumbersome. And some course titles are difficult to immediately recognize as English credits (like Rhetoric). All that said: I'd experiment with transcript layouts and course titles to see what is most clear and easy to understand at a glance what the student has done. Below are some examples. BEST of luck in wearing your administrator hat! Warmest regards, Lori D. ENGLISH course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . credit . . . grade English 9: Rhetoric I + Ancient World Lit . . . . . . 1.00 . . . . X English 10: Rhetoric II + Medieval World Lit . . . . 1.00 . . . . X English 11: Composition + Early Mod World Lit . .1.00 . . . . X English 12: Composition + Modern World Lit . . . .1.00 . . . . X Elective: Shakespeare Lit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.50 . . . . X Elective: Creative Writing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.50 . . . . X total credits/GPA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.00 . . . X.XXX ENGLISH course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . credit . . . grade. . . year Rhetoric I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.50 . . . . X . . . . 9th Literature of the Ancient World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.50 . . . . X . . . . 9th Rhetoric II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.50 . . . . X . . . .10th Literature of the Medieval World . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.50 . . . . X . . . . 10th Literature of Shakespeare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.50 . . . . X . . . . 10th Composition: Essay Writing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.50 . . . . X . . . . 11th Composition: Research Writing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.50 . . . . X . . . . 11th Literature of the Early Modern World . . . . . . . . . .0.50 . . . . X . . . . 11th Creative Writing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.50 . . . . X . . . . 12th Literature of the Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.50 . . . . X . . . . 12th total credits/GPA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.00 . . . X.XXX ENGLISH. . . . . . . . . . . . . .grade 9 grade 10 grade 11 grade 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . credit / grade credit / grade credit / grade credit / grade English 9: Rhetoric I . . . . . . . . . . .0.5 / X Lit: Ancient World . . . .0.5 / X English 10: Rhetoric II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.5 / X Lit: Medieval World . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.5 / X English 11: Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.5 / X Lit: Early Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.5 / X English 12: Composition II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.5 / X Lit: Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.5 / X English Electives: Lit: Shakespeare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.5 / X Creative Writing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.5 / X total credits/GPA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.00 / X.XXX ENGLISH. . . . . . . . . . . . . .grade 9 grade 10 grade 11 grade 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . credit / grade credit / grade credit / grade credit / grade Rhetoric I . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.5 / X Rhetoric II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.5 / X Composition I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.5 / X Composition II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.5 / X Creative Writing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.5 / X Lit: Ancient World . . . . . 0.5 / X Lit: Medieval World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.5 / X Lit: Early Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.5 / X Lit: Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.5 / X Lit: Shakespeare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.5 / X credits per year . . . . . . . . . 1.00 . . . . . . . . 1.50 . . . . . . . 1.50. . . . . . . 1.00 total credits/GPA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.00 / X.XXX
  6. Lori D.

    what is your 12 year old reading for fun?

    Books with humor for tween girls: Half Magic, Magic By the Lake, Knight's Castle, Time Garden, 7-Day Magic (Eager) Five Children and It; The Phoenix and the Carpet (Nesbit) -- the Victorian-age books that the above series was an homage to Book of Dragons (Nesbit) -- Victorian humorous short stories about dragons The Reluctant Dragon (Grahame) The Rescuers; Miss Bianca; The Turret; Miss Bianca in the Salt Mines; Miss Bianca in the Orient (Sharp) By the Great Horn Spoon (Fleischman) In the Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson (Lord)The Best Christmas Pageant Ever (Robinson) Fake Mustache (Angleberger) The 13 Clocks (Thurber) The Light Princess (MacDonald) Books with Girl Protagonists classics Anne of Green Gables (Montgomery) A Little Princess (Burnett) misadventures Two Are Better Than One (Brink) Baby Island (Brink) The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate adventure The Wolves of Willoughby Chase (Aiken) Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH (O'Brien) Ronia the Robber's Daughter (Lindgren) Island of the Blue Dolphins (O'Dell) Daughter of the Mountains (Raskin) fantasy/sci-fi A Wrinkle in Time (L'Engle) Tuck Everlasting (Babbit) Enchantress from the Stars (Engdahl) tall tale Pippi Longstocking series (Lindgren) mystery/detective From the Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler (Konigsberg) Roman mystery series (Lawrence) realistic The School Story (Clements) Because of Winn Dixie (DiCamillo) Circus Sequins (Friermood) real people / fictionalized biographyNaya Nuki: The Blackfoot Girl Who Ran (Thomasa)Behind Rebel Lines (Reit) historical fiction The Midwife's Apprentice (Cushman) I Rode a Horse of Milk White Jade (Wilson) The Birchbark House (Erdrich)Calico Bush (Field)Thee Hannah! (de Angeli)I am Regina (Keehn)Strawberry Girl (Lenski)The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle (Avi)
  7. That's odd -- I specifically linked her books at Amazon in my thread above... ??? (It is that group of 4 titles from the Christian Biographies for Young Readers series.) ETA... ah-ha-ha-ha! Not so odd when I click on my links and discover the author's name is Simonetta, NOT Samantha! My bad! (:D
  8. So glad our experiences can encourage or help! Sounds like you have a good plan for getting 4 math credits completed, and some options of how to do it, in case you need to take more time with the Algebra. 🙂 A friend had passed on her Abeka Consumer Math to us, so we just went with free, lol. It was pretty dated (from the late 1980s, I'd guess) as far as the prices of items in the examples, and of course did not have all of the current electronic financial kinds of options in there that students should be aware of. (Electronic transfer of funds, automatic payments, accessing your account to check balances and activity, etc.) Bob Jones has a slightly more recent version (1990s?) that covers very similar scope and sequence. I don't know if either publisher has updated their programs... I've heard the MUS Stewardship program is a similar sort of program, but no personal experience. And if wanting secular, check out the AGS Consumer Math or the Walch Power Basics Consumer Math. I'm copy-pasting this list with links from a previous post: Consumer Math programs (all are 1-year / 1-credit) - Abeka's Consumer Math (Christian) - AGS Consumer Math (Wieser Education -- Pearson published a revised version) (secular) - Alpha Omega Consumer Math (Christian) - Bob Jones Consumer Math (Christian) - Math-U-See Stewardship (Christian) - Walch Publishing: Consumer Math (Power Basics series) (secular) FREE Consumer Math supplemental resources - Math & You (Ron Larson) (secular) -- 1 semester; free text with consumer math topics mixed with other topics - Money Instructor: Spending Money and Consumer Math (lessons) (secular) - Math Central, U Regina CA: grade 10 Consumer Math (projects, problems, etc.) (secular) - Summit High School, Mr. Fisher: Consumer Math & Personal Finance (4 downloadable workbooks) (secular) - IOHS: Weebly: Consumer Math (131-page workbook of consumer math -- exercise sets only) (secular) - Beatrice Schools: Consumer Math (printable worksheets) (secular)
  9. My vote is to homeschool, as I think you'll do a SUPER job, your DSs want to, and it will give them more opportunity to develop their strengths and interests... But, I don't get a vote 😉 -- so, wishing you the BEST of luck as you all discuss and decide together with DSs! Warmest regards, Lori D.
  10. Lori D.

    VP literature guides or do something else?

    Just me, but I shy away from doing formal studies with books until starting beginning formal lit. studies in 7th/8th grade, and even then, doing it at a gentle intro level, and NOT with *every book*. And the for late middle school/high school would, questions would be for discussion and guided literary analysis -- not comprehension questions of the "Who blew down the first little pig's house?" type. I don't see Reading in your signature as part of DS's school line up. What about reading good books and working with them through Moving Beyond the Page, or, Build Your Own Library? Or just select good books from the VP, Sonlight, and other reading-based curriculum vendor booklists? Or from the 1000 Good Books list? And, you could also include solo required reading a few times a week since DS is a book lover, and you want him reading more. Fill a basket with a variety of good books (check out all the great booklists out there for his age) and let him choose from that, and require that he read for 30 min. 3x/week. At the end of the 30 minutes, have him give you a 1-minute summary of the section of the story (which would allow you to see if he is actually reading, and if he is understanding). Another option is to just schedule 1 book per quarter that the 2 of you read aloud together "buddy reading" style ("you read a page, I read a page"), and enjoy discussing as thoughts come to you. That would also allow you to see for yourself DS's reading level, comprehension, and involvement with the reading. If you really want to do a guide, at the 4th-6th grade level I'd suggest looking at something like Lit Wits, which is more about extension activities to help bring alive the world of the book. And finally, I think VP is *completely* off base calling The Hobbit a grade 4 book. The Lexile reading level places The Hobbit solidly at 7th-8th, and I most frequently see The Hobbit listed in formal literature programs for grades 7-9. If your DS would enjoy reading The Hobbit *for fun* on his own -- then let him go for it! And if it's too much for him right now, then either switch it to a family read-aloud, or let DS set it aside until a later year. (And as a quick side note: the movies are NOTHING like Tolkien's books. The films are largely about surface-level spectacle -- costumes, setting, fighting -- while the books are complex, rich, deep, inspiring.)
  11. Welcome to planning for homeschool high school! (:D Well, unless you live in a state that regulates amount/type of credits required for *homeschoolers* to graduate, then you as the parent / administrator of your homeschool set the requirements for graduation / earning the diploma -- that allows you to set the requirements that best prepare each student for future success! Also, as a homeschooler, you get to decide *how* to accomplish a list of required credits for graduation. That means picking programs that are a good fit for each of your student's unique abilities and needs. 🙂 Just to encourage you: It looks like you are in Ohio? The only graduation requirement I am seeing for homeschoolers is: "PUBLIC/PRIVATE SCHOOL: Ohio requires a state minimum of 20 credit hours in specific academic subjects, plus instruction in economics, financial literacy, and fine arts to receive a diploma. HOMESCHOOL: Parents determine when their student has fulfilled graduation requirements and can issue their own homeschool diploma; students of private/online schools may receive diplomas from those institutions." Even the Ohio public school graduation requirements are not too difficult to mirror at home, if you wanted to: 4.0 credits = English 4.0 credits = Math (OH requires: up through Alg. 2 at least -- if following the Vocational-Technical path, then Alg. 2 not required) 3.0 credits = Science (OH requires: 1 credit each of = Physical Sci., Life Sci., Adv. Sci., unless parents decide otherwise) 3.0 credits = Social Studies (OH requires at least 0.5 credit each = Amer. History and Gov't) 0.5 credit = Health 0.5 credit = PE 5.0 credits = Electives (OH requires at least 1 credit = Fine Arts and 0.5 credit = Econ & Financial Literacy; other OH elective options: Foreign Language, Business, CTE (Career-Technical Education -- i.e., Vocational-Tech), Technology, Agriculture, Family/Consumer Science, or additional credits in English, Math, Science, Fine Arts) 20 credits = total That list of credits is very close to what the typical college requires for admission: 4 credits = English 3-4 credits = Math (up through Alg. 2) 3-4 credits = Science, with labs 3-4 credits = Social Studies (1 credit = Amer. Hist.; some colleges: 1 credit = World Hist/Geog and/or 0.5 credit each = Gov't/Econ) 2-4 credits = Foreign Language (which is one of the OH elective options) 1 credit = Fine Arts 4-8+ credits = Electives (ex: Health, PE, Computer, Logic, Bible, Vo-Tech, more Fine Arts or other subjects; personal interests...) 22-28+ credits = total A very rough "rule of thumb" is that 1.0 credit = 1 hour of work per day, 4-5 days per week, for 36 weeks of the school year. At that rate, to complete 20 credits by the end of high school, you just need to do 5 credits per year (about 4-5 hours or work per day). And only 3 of those 5 credits per year are apt to be tough for average or struggling students (English (the writing), Math, Science). Very likely, your students will complete more like 5.5 - 6.0 credits per year, without it being difficult at all. Ideas: - do the Math at a slower rate and just school year round in that subject - do a lighter 0.5 credit course over the summer as summer school - PE can be hours accumulated of doing normal sports or activities in the afternoon, on weekends, and over the summer - for some electives (like Fine Arts), count lessons/hours your student may already be doing (theater, piano, art, etc.) And there are options for outsourcing courses that you feel unqualified to teach yourself: - pick a program with video lessons - hire a local tutor to oversee the student's work - trade off strengths with another homeschooler (i.e. -- you teach your kids & their kids your strong subject, and they teach your kids & their kids in their strong subject) - join a local homeschool co-op - ask if your school district allows for a student to take 1 class with the public/private school - outsource to an online class/teacher - for vocational-tech courses, try dual enrollment at your local community college re: Algebra 1 in 11th grade As for getting 4 credits of math with a math struggler -- that could look like: 1.0 credit = Consumer Math* 1.0 credit = Geometry 1.0 credit = Algebra 1, part A (1 school year to get through 1/2 of Algebra 1) 1.0 credit = Algebra 1, part B (1 school year to get through remaining 1/2 of Algebra 1) * = (also: things like Integrated Math, Bookkeeping, or Business Math can count towards a required 4 credits of math) For a math struggler, you might look at trying a gentle program: - Walsh Power Basics - Keys to Algebra series (at least as an initial run-through, and then a second program) - Math-U-See re: average/EF-challenged students For my math struggling DS#2, it took 1.5 school years of time to complete each of Algebra 1 and Algebra 2. He also did Geometry and Consumer Math, so he had 4 credits of Math by graduation. (If it had taken longer to get through the Algebras, we would have just doubled up and done Consumer Math in tiny bites spread out over 2 years while still getting through the Algebras.) He also was my writing-challenged student, and that just took running alongside all the way through high school, and into the first year of being at the community college, until he finally clicked in his own time with how to write a decent paragraph/paper. The key is to go for *quality* of writing and learning the writing process and what goes into a paragraph (and then a paper), rather than *quantity* of writing. Even with a struggling student, they start to "get it" the older they are, so that usually by 11th/12th grades, many of those who were strugglers are quickly closing the gap.
  12. I do think siblings tend to compare. But, I also think kids in a classroom compare, lol. Two things that I think help with that: 1. Start doing volunteering -- gets your eyes off of yourself and dwelling about "oh woe is me". Seeing how you can help others can often help you turn it around from "I'm not as good as..." to being able to rejoice in the accomplishments of others without comparing, and realize that you, too, are a person of value/worth and do have things to offer to others/the world. 2. Get her involved in extracurricular activities and let her explore and find out what she's interested in. Then you're focusing on doing what you're interested, rather than focusing on "I'm not good at...", and you naturally get better at things you do a lot.
  13. Yes (here's an article) -- also, the number of athletic scholarships that are also full-tuition are as rare as hen's teeth! The $$ amount of sports scholarships is not as much as one might think.
  14. Lori D.

    Disneyland

    Wow! Making note of THAT tip! That's what we've always done. One person collects all of our tickets, and while the other 3 go do a few rides, the "runner" gallops across the park or across to the other park (we get park hoppers), gets the Fast Passes, and sometimes stops at the locker (or stop to watch a street performance, lol), and then texts while on the way back to find out where the rest of the group is for meeting up, and returns everyone's park ticket and fast pass. You're limited to just one Fast Pass at a time -- except: you can ALSO pick up and be holding your World of Color pass (and you DO want to do that first thing in the morning, as soon as CA Adventure opens, to ensure being able to go) -- and, you can also pick up a Buzz Lightyear ticket and hold that simultaneously with another Fast Pass. It's because the "boats" only hold 3 people, which is a very difficult combo for loading efficiently -- it means a LOT of boats get run through with only 1-2 people, which means more time waiting for boats. That's what we've done, too. Lunch/locker stop can also be a great time for Park hopping. That's when you pull out your Mouse Wait app and check and see which park is more crowded overall, and go to the less crowded Park.
  15. bumping... just so people can add updates, if desired, and to say this thread has been linked on PAGE 1 of the big pinned thread "High School Motherlode #1" on PAGE 1. (:D
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