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For those of you who consider yourself rigorous homeschoolers


4kiddies
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Does aspiring to be rigorous count?:tongue_smilie: I want to be :)

 

These are our attempts at planning for a rigorous 2nd grade for next year:

Bible: BSGFAA yr 2

LA:

FLL 2

WWE 2

(considering WWW 2 and GWG 2 as supplement but not sure)

AAS (finish 3 through ??? 4 or 5 wherever we get)

Sonlight readers 3 (finish, and then move to SL readers 4-5)

ETC (wherever we are 6-8?)

Zaner Bloser 2 (transition print/cursive)

Math:

Math Mammoth (where we end up, somewhere in 2B/3)?

Right Start Games

History:

Biblioplan Middle Ages

Science:

ES: ES&A

Foreign Language:

Mom done Spanish

SSL 1

Extras:

team gymnastics, piano

 

does this look rigorous? Looking forward to see what other do/have done for 2nd! :bigear:

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Math: MEP and CWP, though we're probably moving to Beast Academy in the fall

 

LA: GWG/SWS, moving to MCT and Sequential Spelling; WWE, GDI

 

Science: starting MPH in the fall, much incidental science

 

History: HO/SOTW

 

Everything else is either yet formal, self-study, or incidental

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Right start/ math minutes

SOTW books and CD's

Prima Latina

read-aloud going all of the time- lit/history

handwriting

WWE

 

Lots of crafts/outdoor play

Science DVD's and books- MSB, Bill Nye, Moody

Kumon books-

Mazes and d0t-to-dot- Kumon and Usborne- also Usborne puzzle books-excellent.

 

Memory work- IEW's poetry, CC Cd's, VP history cards, CC history sentences, math facts, etc. (tons of great stuff in Living Memory)

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I have a current 2nd grader, I don't really care about "rigorous", but we take academics seriously and work for excellence. And she enjoys writing, so does a lot more than my son did in 2nd grade.

 

We use Rod and Staff math, because I expect the arithmetic foundation to be rock solid before they move into pre-Algebra and Algebra. I use it a level ahead.

 

For our language arts we use Explode the Code through Book 8 to reinforce spelling; Classical Writing-Primers for copywork, some spelling work, narrations, picture and nature study; WWE--we're about ready for level 2; FLL--almost done with level 2, we may do R&S Grammar 3 after this; and New American Cursive from Memoria Press; she also does oral narrations for our Ambleside readings.

 

For history and literature we're following AmblesideOnline Year 1. The literature is rich and challenging and the content lays a foundation of familiar myths, fairy tales, and historic legends. She also reads some easier books that correspond to the American history period that her older siblings are in.

 

Then she's started Prima Latina.

 

She participates in a children's choir and has started piano lessons. And then does memory work--poems, Psalms, Catechism, and other things I think are important.

 

 

 

For 3rd grade she'll continue with R&S math, Latina Christiana I, AO Year 2, Classical Writing-Aesop.

Edited by Jami
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I'll let others judge our rigourousness... :p

 

DD is a young 2nd grader - just began 2nd a couple of weeks ago (we school jan-dec)

 

LLATL Yellow

Classical Writing Primers

Cursive writing practice

Singapore 2B

Miquon Green

Living Maths

BFSU

Ambleside Online Y2 for history, poetry & literature

Art - learning to draw this year, various resources.

Russian (just starting slowly with games, soon to begin Rosetta Stone)

Violin

Piano

 

That's enough for us! I'm already thinking ahead to next year for 3rd - that's when the rigour should step up I think. We'll hopefully be dropping LLATL for MCT, moving to CW Aesop, we should finish up Miquon this year so next year we'll add Beast Academy.

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How do you know if you're rigorous or not? I tend to think of rigorous as someone who's doing more than I am. But academics are very important here, and I don't think we're slacking in any way.

 

:iagree: I also wonder. I think everyone defines rigorous differently. I tend to stick close to WTM suggestions (in spirit at least) and think WTM would be considered "rigorous". . . not that non WTM people can't be rigorous ;) just a standard for me . . . Oh and another thing, I know all kids work at different levels and you can be implementing a rigorous homeschool environment and working below grade level (rigorous for that child) but for my dd and where we are, rigorous entails at least working somewhat above grade level, (even if only somewhat in certain subjects.) It is striving for excellence in all things, which often just lends itself to that end.

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I've been accused of being rigorous, but I didn't think so. :001_smile:

 

We're in 6th now, but for 2nd and 3rd (and I'm pulling up my old Homeschool Tracker Schedule) we used:

 

Singapore Math: text, workbook, extra word problems, intensive workbook

History Odyssey Middle Ages Level 1: All writing, reading, time lines, and note-booking

R.E.A.L Science: Life then Earth with labs

Voyages in English: complete grammar and writing

Latin for Children Primer A: Book, DVD's, workbook, reading

World Geography: self made

Artistic Pursuits Book 1

Music Appreciation: Meet the Composers

A Young Persons Guide to Philosophy

Dave Ramsey's Financial Peace Junior Kit for Kids

Classical Literature reading

 

And I think there were some elective type things that I didn't schedule. At the time she did a lot of volunteer work, took riding and piano lessons, and was involved with 4H so I might have missed some things.

 

It seems busy, but it really was a lot of fun. She remembers it all with fondness. I have to say, though, I understand she was an exception. Most kids don't appreciate so much. My kid thrives on busy and being crammed with information. A bored DD is not such a good thing. I also follow TWTM and those being her Grammar stage years were filled with lots of memorization. She recited memorized poems and literature pieces at a local open mic at least once a month. I highly recommend this. She has no issues with public speaking and got a lot of personal reward for all her hard work.

 

Best of luck to you on your journey. It only gets better. :001_smile:

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I would say that we're very concerned about "rigor", but it comes down to more / different things than "materials". That's not to say that the materials one chooses don't matter -- obviously some things are better than others -- but more important than choosing between various "good" texts and programs is the consistency and engagement of the teacher. Work every day. Look your kids in the eyes. Really develop basic skills.

 

In the grammar years, I want kids working on solid "three Rs" foundations, memorizing poetry (scripture, speeches) that will nourish their souls, and gaining good exposure to history, literature, and science that will excite them for future learning.

 

For the three Rs, I want a solid conceptual understand for arithmetic along with working to make facts automatic. For some kids, these things come at the same time. For other kids, one far outstrips the other. That's okay. Keep working on both. They need to understand. AND they need to have facts quickly retrievable. Different programs work for different families. But work on both and be CONSISTENT. Don't shy away from adequate daily time spent on math.

 

For reading, by 2nd and 3rd grade, I'd expect most kids to be reading fluently. If that hasn't happened yet, time for some intensive phonics. For kids who are reading well, continue reading lots of wonderful children's literature. For kids who need phonics practice, continue to employ lots of wonderful read-alouds and audio books so they don't miss out on building their store of words and language-used-well. I think most of the "literature" materials out there for elementary are pretty worthless. Just read good books (aloud, alone) and sometimes talk about them. Don't feel the need to discuss everything a child reads. But ask what they think about main character and the choices s/he made. Ask what part of a story was most exciting or suspenseful. Don't push it though. Just let them read and *enjoy* stories.

 

For writing and grammar, I think the Peace Hill Press materials are very good. You can use WWE workbooks or the textbook to create your own assignments using your literature, history, and science readings. For 3rd grade grammar, I like Calvert's 5th grade grammar program (you can buy it separately). R&S is okay, though it moves painfully slowly and you can only read about Brother Matthew milking the cows so many times before you go a bit loopy. ;) MCT and Killgallon materials are interesting and creative additions for kids who already have a good grasp of the basics. 2nd grade would be pushing it for either of those, but they might be good to keep in mind for a little later. ... Don't skimp on writing. Some kids can write more than others, but have all kids write *something* every day. Complete sentences. ;) Not just fill-in-the-blanks responses. Every day.

 

I don't think it matters so much *what* you do for history and science at this age. Following the SOTW sequence is a great organizing principle. But it's also okay to read piles of good quality picture book retellings of world myths and legends, chapter book retellings, picture book biographies, etc, etc. Get kids *interested*. Fill their heads with stories. But the exact method and approach? Not so particularly important at this stage. ... And the same with science. Read science books. They can be good textbooks or narratives -- all sorts of things to chose from... Do some experiments. Get kids interested. But it doesn't have to be X or Y or Z. Read. Learn. Look around. Go on field trips. Feel free to take some rabbit trails as kids develop particular interests. You can put all the pieces together in the middle school years.

 

Sing songs, read *lots* of poetry, go on field trips, read lots, play with math, cook things from around the world... Make it your goal for kids to enter the logic stage with a strong foundation in arithmetic, an ability to read and understand at a middle school level, an ability to write a paragraph competently, and an interest in the world. And make sure they're used to working daily and taking direction from you. If they don't listen and obey you by this point, you're in trouble. ;)

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I don't think we are rigorous, but we do work as diligently as we can.

 

In Grade Two, my son is working through:

 

AAS -- finished 3 and working through most of 4

FLL2 and will work through some of MCT Island

WWE 2

ETC 5, 6, and 7

Singapore 3 and start on 4 (with IP 3 and 4 and CWP3) -- he loves math!!!!

Abeka Cursive

SOTW 2 with AG

Elemental Science -- Chemistry

Bible -- AWANA and Leading Little Ones

Music -- Kodaly music class and violin lessons

 

We also do a Classical Conversation-type coop that covers some science, geography, math, art, and presentations.

 

It seems like a lot, but he is usually done the 3 R's in 2 to 2.5 hours and then has about 50 minutes of history or science in the afternoon along with his music practicing.

 

He hasn't started French yet, and I am still debating on adding Latin at some point.

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I don't know how "rigorous" I am in 2nd grade :tongue_smilie: but here's what we're going ot use next year

 

Writing: WWE3 (1/4 way through now) and probably 4. It is unlikely he will be ready for WWS at 7 years old.

Math: Either Singapore 3 or MM 3. Haven't decided. CWP alongside with Right Start Games and Speed!

Science: BFSU and living books. Am vaguely considering RSO as older will be studying Life Sciences.

History: SOTW 1 and activity guide

Latin: continue Lively Latin Book 1

Spanish: My hope is we'll be done with GSWS. After that, I am not sure....

Grammar: KISS Grammar Grades 2 (we're partially done now) and Grade 3. Continue reading MCT.

Spelling: likely nothing formal as he spells at a 7th grade level

Music: piano and music theory classes.

Art: weekly art class with Dad and Artist Studies weekly

Geography: World Geography (self-designed using Kingfisher World Encyclopedia, narrations, memory work and map work)

Cursive: not sure what we'll use. May just find stuff online. He has already begun copying his brother so my guess is we won't need a formal curriculum.

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For our family, I take a multum non multa (less is more) approach to rigor. I'd rather my student do 10 challenging Singapore math word problems than 50 problems in one of the easier programs. More isn't always better. Often it's just busywork.

 

Programs I like at the 2nd & 3rd grade level:

 

-Singapore math with IP and CWP

-Michael Clay Thompson's language arts

-WWE and the Bravewriter approach

-All About Spelling for students who need explicit teaching of the spelling rules, Spelling Power for "natural" spellers

-Mr. Q science

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For our family, I take a multum non multa (less is more) approach to rigor. I'd rather my student do 10 challenging Singapore math word problems than 50 problems in one of the easier programs. More isn't always better. Often it's just busywork.

 

 

:iagree:

 

I used Singapore but we switched back to MUS and I'm following 8fillstheheart's sequencing. So that would be MUS Beta for 2nd.

 

Prima Latina

First Language Lessons

The Writing Road to Reading (spelling)

SOTW

McGuffy's Readers (as fast as they can work through them)

Rex Barks

 

lots, and lots of GOOD children's books. (The Wonder Clock, Grimm, Burgess' animal books, books that follow the liturgical year ie: Caedmon's Song, The Man Who Loved Books, Across a Dark and Wild Sea, D'Aulaire's Greek Myths) the kids need to know these stories like the backs of their hands-they need to be a part of them, that when you talk about Caedmon later, they know exactly who you are speaking of, they see the book in their head.

 

by third they should have their feet solidly under themselves, reading wise, so whatever we are reading is what they read.

Edited by justamouse
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I don't think of us as being as rigorous as some folks here but this is what we are using for DS1 who is about to turn 8 and would be in 2nd grade:

 

-Singapore Math 4B with CWP 3&4 and the intensive practice books

-FLL 2 (this is somewhat boring and easy for DS1, but my 5 yo DD does pretty well participating so I like that I can integrate both kids into it a bit). We'll probably move to MCT this coming year.

-WWE2

-SOTW 2 and accompanying books

-regular read alouds (usually a half hr a day or more)

-logic books like Logic Countdown, Thinking Through Analogies, Connections (deductive reasoning puzzles)

-HWOT cursive

-Art appreciation and study but honestly this is only once a week or every 2 weeks. I try to show the kids lots of art that matches up with various time periods in SOTW.

-we don't follow a formal science curriculum but DH is a scientist and I have a strong bio and science background, so it is something we discuss almost daily. DS1 has access to snap circuits, we do lots of simple demonstrations and experiments, engage in a lot of nature observation, keep a garden journal, etc.

 

We work from about 9-11:30 or so most days and DS1 kind of unschools the afternoon most of the time.

 

We have not yet started with a language but I'd like to use a Latin curriculum this coming year I think.

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I always feel intimidated by what others are using, but I'll throw out my plans for ds anyway in case someone finds them helpful.

 

Spelling- SWR

Grammar- FLL2

Reading- classics assigned by me and through history program

Writing- WWE2 as well as narrations in history and science, cursive program designed by me

Math- MM2 plus CWP

History- Biblioplan year 3

Geography- Roadtrip USA

Science- Elemental Science Chemistry

 

I haven't decided what to do for art and music. I'm thinking of using Meet the Masters and having ds take piano lessons.

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I would say that we're very concerned about "rigor", but it comes down to more / different things than "materials". That's not to say that the materials one chooses don't matter -- obviously some things are better than others -- but more important than choosing between various "good" texts and programs is the consistency and engagement of the teacher. Work every day. Look your kids in the eyes. Really develop basic skills.

 

In the grammar years, I want kids working on solid "three Rs" foundations, memorizing poetry (scripture, speeches) that will nourish their souls, and gaining good exposure to history, literature, and science that will excite them for future learning.

 

For the three Rs, I want a solid conceptual understand for arithmetic along with working to make facts automatic. For some kids, these things come at the same time. For other kids, one far outstrips the other. That's okay. Keep working on both. They need to understand. AND they need to have facts quickly retrievable. Different programs work for different families. But work on both and be CONSISTENT. Don't shy away from adequate daily time spent on math.

 

For reading, by 2nd and 3rd grade, I'd expect most kids to be reading fluently. If that hasn't happened yet, time for some intensive phonics. For kids who are reading well, continue reading lots of wonderful children's literature. For kids who need phonics practice, continue to employ lots of wonderful read-alouds and audio books so they don't miss out on building their store of words and language-used-well. I think most of the "literature" materials out there for elementary are pretty worthless. Just read good books (aloud, alone) and sometimes talk about them. Don't feel the need to discuss everything a child reads. But ask what they think about main character and the choices s/he made. Ask what part of a story was most exciting or suspenseful. Don't push it though. Just let them read and *enjoy* stories.

 

For writing and grammar, I think the Peace Hill Press materials are very good. You can use WWE workbooks or the textbook to create your own assignments using your literature, history, and science readings. For 3rd grade grammar, I like Calvert's 5th grade grammar program (you can buy it separately). R&S is okay, though it moves painfully slowly and you can only read about Brother Matthew milking the cows so many times before you go a bit loopy. ;) MCT and Killgallon materials are interesting and creative additions for kids who already have a good grasp of the basics. 2nd grade would be pushing it for either of those, but they might be good to keep in mind for a little later. ... Don't skimp on writing. Some kids can write more than others, but have all kids write *something* every day. Complete sentences. ;) Not just fill-in-the-blanks responses. Every day.

 

I don't think it matters so much *what* you do for history and science at this age. Following the SOTW sequence is a great organizing principle. But it's also okay to read piles of good quality picture book retellings of world myths and legends, chapter book retellings, picture book biographies, etc, etc. Get kids *interested*. Fill their heads with stories. But the exact method and approach? Not so particularly important at this stage. ... And the same with science. Read science books. They can be good textbooks or narratives -- all sorts of things to chose from... Do some experiments. Get kids interested. But it doesn't have to be X or Y or Z. Read. Learn. Look around. Go on field trips. Feel free to take some rabbit trails as kids develop particular interests. You can put all the pieces together in the middle school years.

 

Sing songs, read *lots* of poetry, go on field trips, read lots, play with math, cook things from around the world... Make it your goal for kids to enter the logic stage with a strong foundation in arithmetic, an ability to read and understand at a middle school level, an ability to write a paragraph competently, and an interest in the world. And make sure they're used to working daily and taking direction from you. If they don't listen and obey you by this point, you're in trouble. ;)

 

Thank you. I'm saving this in my permanent file. I really appreciate the first paragraph ...

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Plans for 3rd grade next fall:

 

Singapore 3A/B (required)

finish Saxon 54 (just loves it :confused:)

Life of Fred E, F, G (loves it)

 

Apologia Zoology 1

+Burgess Bird Book

+Fabre's Insect Book

 

online Latin classes

Galore Park Junior English 2

Grammar Island

Practice Island

Pentime Handwriting 4, 5

Typing Instructor for Kids

Weekly reading assignments

 

Galore Park Junior History 1

Strauss - Ancient Egypt, Ancient China

D'Aulaire's Greek Myths

Black Ships Before Troy

Wanderings of Odysseus

online Chronology class

online Geography class

 

gymnastics program

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I saw somewhere that you are expecting baby #5 this month? Since you are asking about 2nd & 3rd grade, I'm assuming your oldest is that age and you have four younger ones. If all this is true, you are in a very similar spot as I was last year. I had baby #5 when my oldest was in 3rd grade.

 

Our definition of rigor has been to hit the 3Rs consistently and well. I pick thorough and efficient programs, and we do them consistently. What's that saying about eating elephants - one bite at a time? The bites don't have to be huge, but they do need to hit the mark and be consistent to get the job done well.

 

My favorite go-to resources for 2nd/3rd grade are RightStart Math, WWE, and Sonlight graded reading lists. We also do daily dictation using the Day-by-Day Dictation books free on Google books. We cover handwriting, spelling, and basic grammar with dictation.

 

Content areas are caught through life and independent reading. Literature reading is covered by inconsistent read alouds at bedtime or audio books. I am not stressing over content areas while my kids are this age AND I have a houseful of littles to manage. Reading the rigor threads and seeing the long lists of what other people are doing is definitely demotivating. But, you know, not many of those other people have 5 kids ages 9 & under. They aren't living my reality.

 

:grouphug: I hope you have an easier time transitioning to a family of 7 than we have had.

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I wouldn't say we're "rigorous" in the early years, but we do school, and I do expect my son to be challenged. I keep output requirements age and development appropriate - he's not writing 5 paragraph essays. :tongue_smilie:

 

For 2nd grade this year:

 

Math: Singapore Standards Edition (HIG, TB, WB, IP, CWP), Primary Grades Challenge Math

 

Science: Just started Apologia Astronomy with notebooking journal

 

History: SOTW2 with AG

 

Grammar: FLL3, and we just added KISS a couple times a week (that is rigorous!)

 

Spelling: R&S Spelling and HTTS, alternating

 

Writing: WWE2

 

Literature: Several good chapter books I picked out at the beginning of the year (just reading)

 

 

Next year for 3rd grade:

 

Math: Singapore as above (may add LoF Fractions) and probably some select topics from Math Mammoth.

 

Science: Probably continue with Apologia books and other topics via library books and science kits

 

History: US History (mama made)

 

Grammar: MCT Island, KISS

 

Writing: WWE3, MCT Island, will try Killgallon (if he's not ready for that, we'll push it to 4th grade)

 

Spelling: HTTS

 

Vocab: MCT Island

 

Poetry: MCT Island

 

Literature: Good books picked out by me, plus MCT's first literature package (3 books)

 

Latin: Getting Started With Latin (just to see if we like doing Latin)

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I don't know how rigorous we are compared to those on here, but here are our plans for next year.

 

Sonlight Core B – Introduction to World History 1

Story of the World Volume 1 with Activity Book

Sonlight Readers Grade 3

Writing With Ease Level 2

Winning With Writing Level 2

First Language Lessons Level 2

Growing With Grammar Level 2

Handwriting Without Tears 2

Explode the Code Books 7 and 8

All About Spelling Level 2

Math-U-See Beta

Math Mammoth 2

Life of Fred: Dogs, Edgewood, and Farming

Sonlight Science B – Animals, Astronomy, Physics

Sonlight Bible B

Song School Latin

Critical Thinking Company Building Thinking Skills Level 1

Critical Thinking Company Mind Benders Book 3

ARTistic Pursuits Grades K-3 Book 2

Pfeiffer House Music 1 and 2

 

And these are our plans for third:

 

Sonlight Core C – Introduction to World History 2

Story of the World Volume 2 with Activity Book

Sonlight Readers Grade 4/5

Writing With Ease Level 3

Winning With Writing Level 3

First Language Lessons Level 3

Growing With Grammar Level 3

Handwriting Without Tears 3

All About Spelling Level 3

Math-U-See Gamma

Math Mammoth 3

Life of Fred: Goldfish and Honey

Sonlight Science C – Geology, Meteor., Mechanics

*supplement dinosaurs

Sonlight Bible C

LATIN (Song School Latin 2 or Getting Started With Latin)

Critical Thinking Company Building Thinking Skills Level 1

Critical Thinking Company Mind Benders Book 3

ARTistic Pursuits Grades K-3 Book 3

Pfeiffer House Music 3

Typing Instructor Platinum

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Here is what my 3rd grader is doing this year:

 

Math- Singapore 3 with CWP, IP and I just ordered Hands-On Geometry

 

Latin-Latina Christiana I with a notebook for derivatives

 

French-L'Art de Lire along with a French copybook and dictation

 

Gaelic-Spoken World: Irish

 

English-Imitations in Writing (Greek Myths and Medieval Legends), Italics D, copybook, dictation and I just ordered an editing workbook for her

 

Science-Burgess Animal Book and Among the Pond People for this term

 

Bible-Golden Children's Bible with MP guide

 

Geography-she keeps a notebook for Geography From A to Z which she works on independently

 

World History-continued work in Our Island Story, A Child's History of the World and other supplemental books (especially Diane Stanlely books) which we use with the Book Notes I made for them

 

Literature-A Little White Horse (Elizabeth Goudge) and Great Myths of the World (Padraic Colum) with Book Notes and a poetry study of Longfellow +Ivanhoe (Scott) as our challenge book (she choose this)for this term

 

Ancient History- (she asked for this too) Famous Men of Greece with guide and The Story of Mankind with Book Notes

 

Ancient Literature-D'Aulaire's Greek Myths with guide

 

Art-studying Leonardo da Vinci, Rembrandt and Benjamin West (for this term)

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Thanks to posters who took the time, I just got an idea from a previous poster for something I want to begin implementing!

 

Anyway, I have a 2nd grader. She is not my most rigorous student. She is a young 2nd grader (summer bday) and a natural wiggle worm/daydreamer. Currently she is working in:

R&S 2nd grade spelling, phonics, English, math, and handwriting

For reading she is reading daily to us and we are reading daily to her from classics. She reads at her level, which is improving. We do poetry from What Your 2nd Grader Needs to Know.

SOTW4 using mapwork and doing narrations. (The timelining/outlining are for her older sis.)

Science: notebooking about experiments that we do as a family, competed in science fair, and learning through the local science museum, scout outings, etc. We are about to start a unit on simple machines.

Music: beginning piano and R&S worksheets

Drawing with Children for Art and a class at co-op.

 

Next year will be a continuation of the above. Her reading level should be fairly fluent by fall which will help. She will do:

R&S 3rd grade: spelling, English, math, handwriting. If I feel she still needs phonics work, we might start something new here. I will have to see how she does by the end of the year.

SOTW1 w/A.G. and projects and reading lists. This will be a good year for her to do vol. 1 as she will be reading and there are lots of younger books in the lists.

Reading: occasional narrations, poetry from What Your 3rd Grader Needs to Know

Science: life science, notebooking and experimenting

Prima Latina

Continue music study

Art, we will do more from history projects, using the skills we have learned from DWC.

 

So, maybe not above grade level rigorous for my youngest, but like someone else said, we schedule it, we stick to it and we move forward. I expect her to work everyday that we are home and to do her best work.

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but more important than choosing between various "good" texts and programs is the consistency and engagement of the teacher. Work every day. Look your kids in the eyes. Really develop basic skills.

 

:iagree::iagree::iagree:

 

Dd7/2nd grade

 

Read, read, read (Currently she is reading Harry Potter which is a stretch.)

SM 3 (starting 3B this week), (cwp 2), TT5

WWW3, WWE3

GWG 3

RS4K

SOTW (listening only)

Piano & violin lessons plus orchestra

Spelling City

daily Bible workbook

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I'm in the planning stages for second grade next year. Here's what I have so far:

 

Grammar: FLL 3

 

Spelling: AAS 3&4

 

Writing: WWE2

 

Handwriting: HWOT

 

Math: RightStart 3

Singapore CWP

LOF

*(Not sure which LOF book we'll be in, since I plan to continue as a fun thing through the summer. So, we'll just keep rolling with them.)

 

History/Geography: WTM guidelines w/SOTW2 & activity guide.

 

Literature: Books matching the Medieval historical period

 

Science: WTM guidelines for the earth sciences.

*(I'm still working this one out. I know we'll supplement with some lapbooks, and I'm currently pinning away on Pinterest with ideas I find.) We'll stick with living books and science experiments, but I am checking out some curricula that organize those things.

 

Foreign Language: Prima Latina or Hey, Andrew! Teach Me Some Greek *(I'm still figuring this one out...)

 

Logic: Lollipop Logic, Analogies for Beginners, etc.

 

Extracurricular activities: Continue w/ church activites, Ballet, Tap

*Strongly planning to begin studying a musical instrument

*Possibly adding in gymnastics or some sport

 

 

The things I'm still figuring out are art and music appreciation. I want to match these up to what we're studying in history.

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...

So, maybe not above grade level rigorous for my youngest, but like someone else said, we schedule it, we stick to it and we move forward. I expect her to work everyday that we are home and to do her best work.

 

I think it's a real mistake for people to equate "above grade level" to "rigorous". It is ENTIRELY possible for a child to work well above grade level and *not* be doing anything particularly "rigorous". That said, a child might also be work well below *age*-grade level and still be working in a rigorous manner.

 

It really is about what you say towards the end... Consistently doing one's best, expecting more, making progress... For some kids, that means expecting a *lot* more than what most age peers would do. Sometimes it means slowing down and working at a lower level than what one would *like* simply because gaining a thorough understanding of the basics takes longer for a particular child. Rigor comes from really *learning* the material and working at it -- regardless of the "level".

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I have to temper my type A perfectionistic self when it comes to curricula implementation. I try to keep in my mind that I want to avoid my kids being "Jack(s) of all trades and master(s) of none." I TRY, in these early years, to stick to the basics and whatever "side dishes" I throw in are that. If I listed all the curricula from which I draw, my list would look impressive as I'm a curricula junkie and have the funds to indulge in this (ridiculous?!?!at times) past time.

BUt.......all that said, my husband gave me some great advice when I was obsessing over curricula months ago. He said that ANY curriculum can be used to teach THE MOST IMPORTANT thing (to US for OUR children): focused discipline. He keeps me grounded in realizing that my goal is to make our children "PLODDERS" --- ones that stick with something and PLOD at it rather than on and off, 100% or no% folks who are all or nothing in their approaches to most things in life -- their jobs, their relationships, etc. I have to remember that the biggest goal is to teach that self-discipline and curricula are simply a tool in this quest. This is IN NO way to criticize those of us with this lengthier LIST of curricula/plans -- as I find that to keep my oldest (only one in school yet), I have to draw on more than one program. That's not always true in other families and that doesn't mean their kids are sub-par. For example, with ONE resource --- say the book Pilgrim's Progress. You could milk this for all its worth and derive volumes of info (their are VOLUMES of books written on the meanings of this book) or you could have a 10 question Q&A at the end of it. The same two people could have it listed in their curricula list and the one family has milked it thoroughly and the other has simply read it aloud once with one child practicing Tuba in the background and another squaling for an animal cracker. In short...........curricula list aren't always reflective of rigor. For example, if I listed Miquon in my math list along with my Saxon spine, one may think I implement them both equally -- we do Miquon for about 15 mnutes once a week! If I listed my Abacus Math....we do this about 15 minutes once a month. So...........one would have to take MY long list with the proverbial grain of salt.

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I don't know if others would consider us rigorous but I do compared to some local homeschool friends.

 

 

2nd grade

 

Bible- Awana and We follow the listed reading in MOH1 to follow along with history.

Phonics- Phonics Pathways, Reading Pathways, whatever ETC books they are up to and additional readers

Math- Horizons 2 & calculadders (not timed to start)

English- FLL 2

Writing- WWE 2, plus narrations in history, science and literature

Science- CKE Space and Earth Science with a bunch of extra read alouds and videos

History- MOH 2, SOTW 2, Diana Waring cd's What in The World vol 2, Digging Deeper Vol 2, True Tales Vol 2 + a TON of extra lit & historical fiction read alouds

Spelling- AAS

Handwriting- A reason for Handwriting

Spanish- Getting Started with Spanish

 

3rd grade

Bible- Awana, Deeper church history study

Math- TT4, calculadders and other topical workbooks as needed (elapsed time, stuff like that) We also work on counting back change at this time.

English- FLL 3

Writing- WWE 3, plus narrations and dictations in History, Science and Lit

Science- CKE Chemistry, The Elements, and Exploring the World of Chemistry

History- MOH 3 and SOTW 3-- hoping Diana Waring CD's will be ready next 3rd grade go around. Lots of Literature and Historical Fiction plus a bunch of extra added materials to really flesh out the American History topics.

Spelling- AAS, if completed then onto Spelling Power

Handwriting- A Reason for Handwriting

Spanish- continuing- what we use depends on where they are.

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Math: Saxon 3, R & S 2, Activities for the AL Abacus (supplement in summer)

Grammar: FLL 3

Composition: WWE 2

HW/CW: NAC 2, PL Copybook

Spelling: AAS 3

Latin: LNST 2 then PL

Greek: MP alphabet book then HA 2

Memory Work: CC, IEW Poetry, Memory Work Notebook Grade 2 section (has catechism and Scripture from CLP, and MP Grade 2 Recitations

Reading: AAR 3 (when it comes out), OPGTR, McGuffey First Reader for oral reading practice

Literature: VP and MP 2nd grade lit and guides

 

For third I would just bump everything up a level except I would do Saxon 3 Intermediate and another year of NAC 2 (there are 2 versions). When we finished OPGTR I would just use word lists from Classical Phonics.

 

stm4him

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I would say that we're very concerned about "rigor", but it comes down to more / different things than "materials". That's not to say that the materials one chooses don't matter -- obviously some things are better than others -- but more important than choosing between various "good" texts and programs is the consistency and engagement of the teacher. Work every day. Look your kids in the eyes. Really develop basic skills.

 

In the grammar years, I want kids working on solid "three Rs" foundations, memorizing poetry (scripture, speeches) that will nourish their souls, and gaining good exposure to history, literature, and science that will excite them for future learning.

 

For the three Rs, I want a solid conceptual understand for arithmetic along with working to make facts automatic. For some kids, these things come at the same time. For other kids, one far outstrips the other. That's okay. Keep working on both. They need to understand. AND they need to have facts quickly retrievable. Different programs work for different families. But work on both and be CONSISTENT. Don't shy away from adequate daily time spent on math.

 

For reading, by 2nd and 3rd grade, I'd expect most kids to be reading fluently. If that hasn't happened yet, time for some intensive phonics. For kids who are reading well, continue reading lots of wonderful children's literature. For kids who need phonics practice, continue to employ lots of wonderful read-alouds and audio books so they don't miss out on building their store of words and language-used-well. I think most of the "literature" materials out there for elementary are pretty worthless. Just read good books (aloud, alone) and sometimes talk about them. Don't feel the need to discuss everything a child reads. But ask what they think about main character and the choices s/he made. Ask what part of a story was most exciting or suspenseful. Don't push it though. Just let them read and *enjoy* stories.

 

For writing and grammar, I think the Peace Hill Press materials are very good. You can use WWE workbooks or the textbook to create your own assignments using your literature, history, and science readings. For 3rd grade grammar, I like Calvert's 5th grade grammar program (you can buy it separately). R&S is okay, though it moves painfully slowly and you can only read about Brother Matthew milking the cows so many times before you go a bit loopy. ;) MCT and Killgallon materials are interesting and creative additions for kids who already have a good grasp of the basics. 2nd grade would be pushing it for either of those, but they might be good to keep in mind for a little later. ... Don't skimp on writing. Some kids can write more than others, but have all kids write *something* every day. Complete sentences. ;) Not just fill-in-the-blanks responses. Every day.

 

I don't think it matters so much *what* you do for history and science at this age. Following the SOTW sequence is a great organizing principle. But it's also okay to read piles of good quality picture book retellings of world myths and legends, chapter book retellings, picture book biographies, etc, etc. Get kids *interested*. Fill their heads with stories. But the exact method and approach? Not so particularly important at this stage. ... And the same with science. Read science books. They can be good textbooks or narratives -- all sorts of things to chose from... Do some experiments. Get kids interested. But it doesn't have to be X or Y or Z. Read. Learn. Look around. Go on field trips. Feel free to take some rabbit trails as kids develop particular interests. You can put all the pieces together in the middle school years.

 

Sing songs, read *lots* of poetry, go on field trips, read lots, play with math, cook things from around the world... Make it your goal for kids to enter the logic stage with a strong foundation in arithmetic, an ability to read and understand at a middle school level, an ability to write a paragraph competently, and an interest in the world. And make sure they're used to working daily and taking direction from you. If they don't listen and obey you by this point, you're in trouble. ;)

 

This is just what I needed to hear Thank You!

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