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Would you get a dog if all the family members weren't on board with the idea? Updated at end with picture!


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One thing jumped out at me from the post- you said only those of you onboard with getting a dog would do any dog care. That won’t work. Every adult in the house must be willing to let the dog in or out or pick up after it at times. 
When one of them comes home and no one else is home, the dog will still need to be let out to potty and then back in, for example. Or if they are the ones home at feeding time- not wait until you get there, etc

If you live in the house and are capable- you help with the dog.

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3 hours ago, Hilltopmom said:

One thing jumped out at me from the post- you said only those of you onboard with getting a dog would do any dog care. That won’t work. Every adult in the house must be willing to let the dog in or out or pick up after it at times. 
When one of them comes home and no one else is home, the dog will still need to be let out to potty and then back in, for example. Or if they are the ones home at feeding time- not wait until you get there, etc

If you live in the house and are capable- you help with the dog.

 

My family has had situations where certain members who were not into dogs did no dog care.  

It basically takes one reliable older child and one back up parent (for care beyond child capacity or if child is away, plus vet trips, chauffeur to dog training etc,) and a set up that works for that. Especially if the main child is homeschooling the schedule is figured out for keeping dog needs in mind it should not require other adult or almost adult children to do feeding or letting in or out. 

 

 

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4 hours ago, Hilltopmom said:

One thing jumped out at me from the post- you said only those of you onboard with getting a dog would do any dog care. That won’t work. Every adult in the house must be willing to let the dog in or out or pick up after it at times. 
When one of them comes home and no one else is home, the dog will still need to be let out to potty and then back in, for example. Or if they are the ones home at feeding time- not wait until you get there, etc

If you live in the house and are capable- you help with the dog.

I can see in a household with fewer people that might be an issue but with our household, I can honestly say that I can't remember a single time in the last year where at least one of the 5 pro-dog people wasn't home and the no-dog people were.  The older boys are the only people who are leaving the house these days and between work and school we simply don't see them much.  DH is working from home permanently as long as he is at his current job and when I go out, I almost never take more than 1 kid so really, the chance of the no-dog people needing to help out is pretty much nil.

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11 hours ago, Tanaqui said:

Looking at some of these comments, I have to say, a few of you have some very odd ideas about the appropriate way to treat beloved family members.

From my point of view, they're all beloved family members, those who want the dog and those who don't. From a very limited viewpoint, I don't see anything so extreme as to completely disregard the wishes of those who do want it. OP is thinking about it carefully, as she should. 

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59 minutes ago, katilac said:

From my point of view, they're all beloved family members, those who want the dog and those who don't. From a very limited viewpoint, I don't see anything so extreme as to completely disregard the wishes of those who do want it. OP is thinking about it carefully, as she should. 

Sure, and I'm not saying that about people simply because they disagree with me. It's people who seem to think that it is THEIR house and not their children's house - when those kids are minors! - that are getting my sideeye.

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37 minutes ago, Tanaqui said:

Sure, and I'm not saying that about people simply because they disagree with me. It's people who seem to think that it is THEIR house and not their children's house - when those kids are minors! - that are getting my sideeye.

In my case the no-dog minor is less than 6 month from being adult all other minor children are about 200% on board with getting dog. So if I waited another 6 months and then made this decision where the only no-dog were adult children would you view it differently (this is an honest geniune questions, absolutely no snark involved)?  Because I really truly want this to be the best decision possible for our family but when it's so divided at some point I will have to make a decision about whose voice matter more because either decision will leave someone less than happy.  

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6 hours ago, Tanaqui said:

Sure, and I'm not saying that about people simply because they disagree with me. It's people who seem to think that it is THEIR house and not their children's house - when those kids are minors! - that are getting my sideeye.

Huh. I didn't think of it this way at all. I mean, if I'm painting my kitchen, I don't ask the kids to vote on the color. I pick it. They can pick a kitchen color when they have their own house. I would ask though if painting their bedroom. But even there I might reserve veto power. If non dog liking kid doesn't want dog in their bedroom, that's fine. Same idea. 

My house is not a democracy. It is a benevolent monarchy. 

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I am not a dog owner, so this is a real question: can the dog wanting people ensure the dog does not bother the non-dog-wanting folks, i.e. train the dog not to jump at them, slobber on them, chew their stuff?
This is an issue for friends, too. Many dog lovers do not seem to understand that non-dog people do not appreciate dog slobber on their clothes or dogs jumping up at them with their paws. I do not think it is appropriate to subject other people to this behavior, be they strangers or family members. A person has the right not to be in contact with animal saliva.

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1 hour ago, regentrude said:

I am not a dog owner, so this is a real question: can the dog wanting people ensure the dog does not bother the non-dog-wanting folks, i.e. train the dog not to jump at them, slobber on them, chew their stuff?
This is an issue for friends, too. Many dog lovers do not seem to understand that non-dog people do not appreciate dog slobber on their clothes or dogs jumping up at them with their paws. I do not think it is appropriate to subject other people to this behavior, be they strangers or family members. A person has the right not to be in contact with animal saliva.

This is important, and I think is why everyone is suggesting obedience/canine good citizenship classes. Even other people who like dogs will not like your dog when it is behaving badly. DH (and we have always been dog owners, though I am more of a cat person) had a cousin with a terribly behaved dog that they loved. It wasn’t dangerous, just annoying, jumping up on people, barking excessively, etc.  And it made spending time with this cousin so unpleasant that we would cut visits short and avoid going over. They were totally blind to how terrible the dog was, and thought it was funny and cute.

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50 minutes ago, regentrude said:

I am not a dog owner, so this is a real question: can the dog wanting people ensure the dog does not bother the non-dog-wanting folks, i.e. train the dog not to jump at them, slobber on them, chew their stuff?
This is an issue for friends, too. Many dog lovers do not seem to understand that non-dog people do not appreciate dog slobber on their clothes or dogs jumping up at them with their paws. I do not think it is appropriate to subject other people to this behavior, be they strangers or family members. A person has the right not to be in contact with animal saliva.

Dogs can be trained; they can be kept out of certain rooms. They can certainly not be allowed to jump up on people! I have been to peoples' homes where the dog ignored people completely unless a person engaged them by calling them or offering a treat. I wasn't a dog person till I had a dog of my own, so I get it. I hated dogs getting up in my face. (But worse are cats, who always seem to want to brush up against me, which makes me itch.)

So yeah, training is key.  But will always be some people who are clueless about their pets. 

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In my young adult days, I was very selfish without even really realizing it.  After college graduation I lived at home for about six months as I applied to the peace corps. I got a job at a pig farm. My younger brother, a minor, also lived at home. He had a show pig on the (rural) property. Show pigs were one of the major ways we saved for college.

Pig farms have a lot a bio safety rules to prevent a disease wiping out the herd. Someone there found out about my brother’s pig and my employer gave me the choice of moving out immediately, the pig going to a separate property, or losing my job.

I thought that of course the pig should go to another property; there was the option of keeping it at the school ag farm, though it would be much less convenient for my brother.

 My brother didn’t want to do that, though, and my parents wouldn’t make him. I had to move out. It seemed terribly unfair to me, and I had some resentment. 
 

Looking back at it, I do think my parents were right. If a legally adult child with a job has a problem with the living situation, they can change it by getting their own living situation that suits them better. It might not be optimal, but neither is giving them more than their share of “say” in how things are going to be done in the household, over those who actually pay the lion’s share of the bills, and those who have no recourse for setting up their own household(minor children) and are still the responsibility of the parents. Yes, my feelings on that would vary depending on how much the adult children contribute to household expenses, and I realize that moving out is not always an option due to housing costs and various factors.

 For me, at that time, moving out was not a bad or relationship destroying thing, and it did help me get over myself a little I enjoyed my time in that apartment. And realized I’d been needing more independence anyway.

 This is not to prescribe anything for the OP’s situation, just to give a perspective on young adult vs minor children’s wants in the home.

 Also, I agree that my house is a benevolent dictatorship, not a democracy. 🙂 

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I don't think I'd allow the irrational prejudices of my young adult children to determine an important decision for me.

First I would ask myself:  how much do *I* want a dog?  Do I want to have something I will need to walk in all kinds of weather, train, and clean up after every day for 10+ years?  Because let's get real.  Even if the kids pitch in, it's still going to be your responsibility.  Dogs are great for emotional and physical health.  Are you in for the investment?

Your older children will get used to the idea, especially if you get a puppy.  Even if the dog doesn't grow on them, they will handle it like any other thing adults don't like about their parents/siblings.  We don't ask our kids' permission to add younger siblings, change jobs, get a new car, etc.  By making choices they don't agree with, we expose them to things that will help them develop into more balanced individuals IMO.

And finally, I think that if your kids really believe that all dogs are dangerous, that is something to be addressed in one way or another.  It could pose a problem in their lives.  Aside from impacting their social opportunities, it could be a sign of a kind of global reasoning that isn't helpful.

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We have cousins with 2 kids one of whomwas terrified of dogs and had been bitten by one, and the other one a child who adored dogs above all else.  

 

(Cut what seemed like too much personal info) 

It did take both a lot of work with the dog training and the therapy help for the older child — but the results as best I understand it were all around excellent.  Excellent for both kids.  One getting dog and one getting over fear 

 

 

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6 hours ago, regentrude said:

I am not a dog owner, so this is a real question: can the dog wanting people ensure the dog does not bother the non-dog-wanting folks, i.e. train the dog not to jump at them, slobber on them, chew their stuff?
 

Absolutely! Now, with a puppy it will take time, it won't be instant, but of course. 

My dogs do NOT jump on people - that is a non negotiable for me. It's dangerous as all heck. I've said that and believed it for years, and now can point to my own dog as an example. Sandy, our rescue goldendoodle/wolf hybrid was surrendered to rescue because at 18 months she jumped on her elderly owner and the poor woman ended up on the hospital with a broken back. We taught Sandy not to jump. She DOES give more kisses than I prefer, but I find them a bit endearing and allow her to kiss me a bit. But when I say "enough" she stops. And my dogs know the word "no" and "leave it" and I can use that for a person as well as an object. 

The only thing the dogs sometimes chew up at this point, no longer puppies, are random pencils. I don't really get that....I guess they think they are fancy store bought sticks? Vs the ones the find outside? But if they kids would stop dropping pencils on the ground, the dogs wouldn't be chewing them up!

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6 hours ago, regentrude said:

I am not a dog owner, so this is a real question: can the dog wanting people ensure the dog does not bother the non-dog-wanting folks, i.e. train the dog not to jump at them, slobber on them, chew their stuff?
This is an issue for friends, too. Many dog lovers do not seem to understand that non-dog people do not appreciate dog slobber on their clothes or dogs jumping up at them with their paws. I do not think it is appropriate to subject other people to this behavior, be they strangers or family members. A person has the right not to be in contact with animal saliva.

This. 
I agree that some dog lovers seem to think of them as equal or above humans. 

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3 minutes ago, Melissa in Australia said:

This. 
I agree that some dog lovers seem to think of them as equal or above humans. 

I totally think this! I'll take dogs over (most) people any day.🙂

My dogs are very well behaved, for the record.

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Oh, I will admit, one of my dogs HAS drooled on a stranger. But...we were in the dog park. She got very upset that she had dog drool on her pants, and I started to apologize...but really - if you go in the dog park I think you accept the risk of dog drool, hair, etc. 

I would not allow him to rub his face on some stranger at my house, or in a store, or what not. But in the dog park? He ran up to be pet, and then leaned on her, and it was hot and some drool got on her. Whatever. It's a filthy, sweaty, dog park!

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13 hours ago, cjzimmer1 said:

In my case the no-dog minor is less than 6 month from being adult all other minor children are about 200% on board with getting dog. So if I waited another 6 months and then made this decision where the only no-dog were adult children would you view it differently (this is an honest geniune questions, absolutely no snark involved)?  Because I really truly want this to be the best decision possible for our family but when it's so divided at some point I will have to make a decision about whose voice matter more because either decision will leave someone less than happy.  

 

Well, I certainly don't always let everybody have a veto. We're not all going to be happy all the time with family decisions. The sticking point here, for me, is twofold.

First, she was bitten on the face by a dog at a fairly young age. People have talked about how she should be encouraged to get over her fear/dislike of dogs - but if you seriously think that, you should do that with help, not by asking her to sink or swim.

Secondly, you say that you often ignore her complaints for the - valid! - reason that she has opinions on a lot of things that don't concern her. That's fair, but since a new household pet does concern her I'd want to take some special interest in her opinion on this since most of her opinions are disregarded. Rightly or wrongly, that's the situation, and it's not... it's not a great situation to be in. If you're going to say all the time "I'm not listening to this, because it's none of your business", then it's reasonable to listen on those occasions when it IS some of her business.

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Huh. I didn't think of it this way at all. I mean, if I'm painting my kitchen, I don't ask the kids to vote on the color.

I do. They're the ones who're gonna help me paint it, after all. They both cook in that kitchen one day a week for the family. They both are exhorted to do their fair share of chores because "this is everybody's home, and we all have to live here, and we all want it to be nice".

I can't tell them that last one and then turn around and say "It's everybody's home right up until we paint, and then it's MY kitchen, and I want yellow!"

Sure, the adults have the ultimate veto, but my kids are going to have to live their entire lives with other people. That means they need to know how to negotiate and compromise, and that means teaching them.

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12 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

Oh, I will admit, one of my dogs HAS drooled on a stranger. But...we were in the dog park. She got very upset that she had dog drool on her pants, and I started to apologize...but really - if you go in the dog park I think you accept the risk of dog drool, hair, etc. 

I would not allow him to rub his face on some stranger at my house, or in a store, or what not. But in the dog park? He ran up to be pet, and then leaned on her, and it was hot and some drool got on her. Whatever. It's a filthy, sweaty, dog park!

 

Some breeds tend to drool more than others. If drool is a major concern, that should be taken into account during the decisions about type of dog.

Similarly some types of dogs are more apt to bowl over anything in their path and others tend to be more reserved.  I prefer more ebullient big dogs, but it could be that smaller and more reserved dog with tight lips and flews and perhaps very short fur so it doesn’t drool much (and drool if any might be only a few inches from floor due to small dog size) might fit a particular family better than a big exuberant jowly dog. 

 

 

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6 minutes ago, Tanaqui said:

First, she was bitten on the face by a dog at a fairly young age. People have talked about how she should be encouraged to get over her fear/dislike of dogs - but if you seriously think that, you should do that with help, not by asking her to sink or swim.

 

I agree that help is important. 

I think helping the 17yo work through the dog fear problem would be valuable even if the family does not get a dog. 

 

 

Assuming they are getting a dog: There could be a possibility of getting on a breeder list for an upcoming litter of a suitable type dog for family. And while waiting (some waits can be a year) have the child with problem about dogs get some exposure to a trained, safe, therapy dog, some cognitive behavioral therapy (or Other suitable to ptsd, perhaps Emdr) etc, and otherwise begin process of ptsd recovery. 

Meanwhile the pro-dog kid(s) can be learning about training etc even without yet having new dog...

 

 

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Well the last 2 days have been busy.  A local humane society got a load of dogs in over the weekend and they had a couple of the most adorable little puppies.  My dog lover absolutely melted.  They had a meet and greet on Tuesday.  So we decided to check them out.  Gave me a good chance to assess how DS7 would also behave.  We also saw another litter at another rescue and I had DD17 look at their picture and see which one she thought was cutest.  She actually picked one even though she didn't want a dog. They also request volunteers for dog walking.  So we went 2 hours early (so we could do 2 slots).  Even then we were 2nd on the list to "see" the puppies (due to covid, all visitations are outside and then you can complete an application if you want.  They will accept up to 5-6 applications for an animal and then pick one to actually get the dog).  So we got to walk 3 different dogs.  All of which were much larger than I'd want but still nice for my younger kids to play with (plus the weather was absolutely gorgeous so we called it a field trip day).  So we wait to see the 2 puppies and they tell us (there was at least 15 groups waiting to see the puppies), that they had another small dog arrive just this morning and if anyone was interested in that one, they could bring him out later.  Puppies were of course adorable so we filled out the app even though I didn't expect we'd get chosen.  We saw the new dog who just came in.  He was perfect.  When visiting the group next to us, the dog keep trying to leave their group and see DS7, dog just stood beautiful by us and let all my kids pet/play with him and when they moved him on to the next group,  he kept trying to come back to us.  So we put him on our app too because he literally checked every single box for us.  And then we waited for the phone call if we were chosen or not for any of the 3.  DD17 wasn't there but when we came home and told her about it, she was like but what about (dog name she had picked).  I said if we didn't get one of these 3 I would look into apply for that dog but that group had a lot more hoops to jump through to even be considered.  She was like oh, ok.  and Not once felt the need to say "I don't want a dog".  I sense a softening. I also had a a discussion with DS20 last night.  Laid exactly what I was thinking, (dog crated at night, gate to keep dog out of the lower level etc).  He was like oh well if I can go downstairs at night and night have to deal with the dog that might be ok.  So I really think despite all their bluster this will be ok.  DS20 ahs been in a phase where he tries to assert his authority but we have to keep reminding him that while he is an adult, that doesn't mean he has authority over his parents and get to tell us what to do in our home (that he pays nothing to live in).  DD17 has pretty much mimicked/idolized this brother for the last couple of years so much of what she complains about is simply parroting this DS. And both of them are already less hostile to the idea than they were.  

And then we got the phone call this afternoon, that we were not selected for any of the 3 dogs.  Middle Daughter is so sad but I assured her we would keep looking.

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You've received lots of food for thought on this topic so I didn't feel the need to add to it.  But after your update, I wanted to share our experience. 

My daughter always wanted a dog (one of her first words was "doggie") and when she was 9, we thought that was a good time.  She was the youngest and I felt like I was finally in a position to be able take on that additional responsibility.  So, one year, the Easter bunny put a video on dog training and a book for kids on dogs in her basket.  Our plan was to get one later in the spring.  Well, my oldest, 16 at the time, was very upset.  He told us he didn't want a dog and he didn't see us as a dog family.  He didn't want to live with one.  I was shocked.  This kid is an animal lover ... he had a voracious need to learn about all creatures.  But the difference was he never saw them as pets, but as wild animals who could be unpredictable.  He didn't imagine an emotional attachment to an animal.  I looked back and remembered a time (about 5 years prior) when he and a sibling were racing home and a neighbor's Jack Russel terrier got out and chased them to our porch and "terrorized them".  This dog was really barky and obnoxious, but never actually tried to hurt them. (JRs are not my favorite breed.  Don't shoot me.) 

After this, we put the plans on hold and worked with ds on his aversion to dogs.  We watched sappy movies about beloved dogs. We went to meet and greets at dog shelters.  My daughter was in love, but ds wasn't moved.  So, when dd turned 10, she and I started volunteering at a shelter so she could get her dog fix.  A year later, an appeal went out to the volunteers for a foster home for an 18 mo labradoodle who was surrendered from a breeder ... someone who was trying to get in on the doodle mania but for whatever reason, decided not to continue.  I thought that this would be the only opportunity for us to get a dog with less shedding, so I jumped on the chance to foster.  (Many of you here gave me great advice as we dealt with the trials and tribulations of new dog owners having a giant puppy in our home.)  After 2 weeks, we had to make a decision on whether to adopt him.  The vote in the family was 4-1, my oldest being the only dissenter.  His reasoning was still the same ... he just didn't want to have a dog.  He was due to go away to college in a year so I basically told him to suck it up for his sister for a year.  And he agreed, provided that the dog wouldn't be allowed upstairs so he could get away if he needed to. Done!

So, guess who taught this dog to play fetch?  the anti-dog ds.  Guess who taught this dog lots of fun games to keep him from chewing everything in sight? DS.  Guess who started taking dd and the dog to some of the more advanced obedience classes?  DS. (My dog was a rock star at obedience classes, but still struggles with that Lab brain outside of class.)  Even though DS was only home for a few weeks each year due to having an on-campus research position each summer, the dog still preferred him playing fetch than any of the rest of us.  And DS has been in grad school across the country for 2 years, but when he comes home, they more than make up for lost time.  

I'm not saying that your non-dog loving family members will have this dramatic turn around.  But there may be hope.  

mark and bear_LI.jpg

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15 hours ago, cjzimmer1 said:

Well the last 2 days have been busy.  A local humane society got a load of dogs in over the weekend and they had a couple of the most adorable little puppies.  My dog lover absolutely melted.  They had a meet and greet on Tuesday.  So we decided to check them out.  Gave me a good chance to assess how DS7 would also behave.  We also saw another litter at another rescue and I had DD17 look at their picture and see which one she thought was cutest.  She actually picked one even though she didn't want a dog. They also request volunteers for dog walking.  So we went 2 hours early (so we could do 2 slots).  Even then we were 2nd on the list to "see" the puppies (due to covid, all visitations are outside and then you can complete an application if you want.  They will accept up to 5-6 applications for an animal and then pick one to actually get the dog).  So we got to walk 3 different dogs.  All of which were much larger than I'd want but still nice for my younger kids to play with (plus the weather was absolutely gorgeous so we called it a field trip day).  So we wait to see the 2 puppies and they tell us (there was at least 15 groups waiting to see the puppies), that they had another small dog arrive just this morning and if anyone was interested in that one, they could bring him out later.  Puppies were of course adorable so we filled out the app even though I didn't expect we'd get chosen.  We saw the new dog who just came in.  He was perfect.  When visiting the group next to us, the dog keep trying to leave their group and see DS7, dog just stood beautiful by us and let all my kids pet/play with him and when they moved him on to the next group,  he kept trying to come back to us.  So we put him on our app too because he literally checked every single box for us.  And then we waited for the phone call if we were chosen or not for any of the 3.  DD17 wasn't there but when we came home and told her about it, she was like but what about (dog name she had picked).  I said if we didn't get one of these 3 I would look into apply for that dog but that group had a lot more hoops to jump through to even be considered.  She was like oh, ok.  and Not once felt the need to say "I don't want a dog".  I sense a softening. I also had a a discussion with DS20 last night.  Laid exactly what I was thinking, (dog crated at night, gate to keep dog out of the lower level etc). 

 

Dog could also maybe sleep in room of a dog loving family member. Or rotate nights among the dog loving family members. 

Sleep time can be part of bonding. 

 

15 hours ago, cjzimmer1 said:

He was like oh well if I can go downstairs at night and night have to deal with the dog that might be ok.  So I really think despite all their bluster this will be ok.  DS20 ahs been in a phase where he tries to assert his authority but we have to keep reminding him that while he is an adult, that doesn't mean he has authority over his parents and get to tell us what to do in our home (that he pays nothing to live in).  DD17 has pretty much mimicked/idolized this brother for the last couple of years so much of what she complains about is simply parroting this DS. And both of them are already less hostile to the idea than they were.  

And then we got the phone call this afternoon, that we were not selected for any of the 3 dogs.  Middle Daughter is so sad but I assured her we would keep looking.

 

I’m glad the oldest are softening.

 

I’m especially sorry that you weren’t able to get the dog who seemed to choose your family 😢 

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  • 3 weeks later...

So this little guy joined our family today. He's a chihuahua/terrier/? mix.  His name is Joey (yes my children have watched the otter way too much).  Oldest 3 have pretty much ignored him which is totally fine.  Although 2 of the 3 have already shared pictures with their friends which I do find a bit comical since they said they don't care about him. But the youngest 3 are are thrilled! He just arrived this morning from a long trip from Texas so he was pretty wiped out.  He slept about 3 hours this afternoon and my youngers were literally sitting outside staring in the carrier, waiting for him to wake up.  

joey.jpg

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  • cjzimmer1 changed the title to Would you get a dog if all the family members weren't on board with the idea? Updated at end with picture!
1 hour ago, cjzimmer1 said:

So this little guy joined our family today. He's a chihuahua/terrier/? mix.  His name is Joey (yes my children have watched the otter way too much).  Oldest 3 have pretty much ignored him which is totally fine.  Although 2 of the 3 have already shared pictures with their friends which I do find a bit comical since they said they don't care about him. But the youngest 3 are are thrilled! He just arrived this morning from a long trip from Texas so he was pretty wiped out.  He slept about 3 hours this afternoon and my youngers were literally sitting outside staring in the carrier, waiting for him to wake up.  

joey.jpg

He is adorable, and I'm so happy you got a pet for your younger children.

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OH MY GOODNESS. He is adorable!!! And he's smiling. The dog of my heart was a black male chi/terrier mix. 

Joey is a great name!

Congratulations!!! 🎈🥳❤️

ETA: How old is he? Or did I miss it?

Edited by MercyA
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40 minutes ago, MercyA said:

OH MY GOODNESS. He is adorable!!! And he's smiling. The dog of my heart was a black male chi/terrier mix. 

Joey is a great name!

Congratulations!!! 🎈🥳❤️

ETA: How old is he? Or did I miss it?

He will be 9 weeks on Tuesday.  He had a health check on Thursday to get his certificate to leave Texas and he weighed 4.7# then.

 

We actually had our heart set on a little girl from his litter but she was adopted before we finished all the steps and this guy was the last one.  But we were the first one to pick ours up today and so we got to see them all.  Turns out the little girl was so much smaller than Joey and has really short legs.  We have a split level house so there is lots of stairs.  I would be surprised if the little girl would ever get tall enough to handle the stairs off the deck to get to the outside.  This guys legs are so much longer and he's built more like the rat terriers I grew up with.  So even though we didn't get the dog we thought we wanted, I think we got the dog that will be much better for our family.  And of course now that he's ours, we are totally in love and it doesn't matter a bit that he wasn't the first choice.

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so cute!

With those little ones, make sure he eats every few hours, to avoid hypoglycemia. Toy breed puppies are like preemie babies - a bit more delicate until they get older. Always a good idea to have some nutrical supplement on hand (sugar/vitamin paste) or in a pinch, Karo syrup. If they get hypoglycemic it drops their appetite, which creates an obvious issue, lol. So if they are not eating due to that just a bit of sugar usually perks them up enough to be willing to eat. 

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1 hour ago, ktgrok said:

so cute!

With those little ones, make sure he eats every few hours, to avoid hypoglycemia. Toy breed puppies are like preemie babies - a bit more delicate until they get older. Always a good idea to have some nutrical supplement on hand (sugar/vitamin paste) or in a pinch, Karo syrup. If they get hypoglycemic it drops their appetite, which creates an obvious issue, lol. So if they are not eating due to that just a bit of sugar usually perks them up enough to be willing to eat. 

Good to know.  I didn't really know how much to expect to feed him and the rescue didn't really give me an guidance other than it was fine to just leave the food in his dish and let him eat whenever/how much he wanted.  I think he ate about 3 tbsp of kibble plus a few treats that my daughter used when working on sitting with him.  I kept thinking he wasn't eating much but didn't know if it's just because that was normal for such a small dog or he was still adjusting from the transport.  He's got plenty of spunk right now but I will definitely keep an eye on him. I've got karo syrup on hand but will look into the other stuff you mentioned.

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8 hours ago, Corraleno said:

We're going to need a LOT more photos, you know...

How's this one?

It's so fun watching him run around the yard in his sweater and coat.  It reminds of those videos of the tiny goats leaping around.  It just snowed last night so I'm hoping to get a video of him bouncing through the snow today.

joey1.jpg

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so cute!

look forward to Joey in snow picture!
 

This would be a great time to work with him and the child with bite history, So that they get to know each other when he is still tiny and with only weak jaws (though probably very sharp puppy teeth).  
 

Dog training for him to learn not to bite people also important. 

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