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This is a spin-off of the post about the mom who feels intellectually unstimulated and depressed at home. Not saying that homeschooling is the RIGHT choice for HER and her family. Just saying that for those of us who do desire intellectual and other non-homeschooling stimulation, here's the place to post ideas.

 

Here are my thoughts. I too crave a lot of intellectual stimulation. My kids are young yet, but older is finally getting into material that challenges me, and I adore it. I am learning Latin, more history than I care to admit I never knew :tongue_smilie:..I will be creating my own timeline next year alongside his, I am relearning Spanish, I am learning mythology...science is a TRIP...anyway, you get my point. School is becoming more stimulating for ME, not just him, and I am happy there.

 

Outside of homeschooling, what ideas do you have to keep yourself engaged, stimulated and happy? Ideas:

 

1. a hobby: I love knitting and put it aside a few months ago, but will likely resume at some point. Find a hobby and learn about it!

2. A physical challenge: at various points in my life I have trained for marathons, half marathons, bike races...set a goal and try to reach it.

3. Learn a new language-there are so many resources out there.

4. Relearn history, focusing on areas of interest. Create a small, usable unit study, filled with great questions, resources, projects and internet links.

5. Start a homeschool group, maybe even one just for classical homeschoolers! Set up a website, make flyers, contact librarians.

6. Join a book club.

7. START a book club!

8. Learn to cook a new type of cuisine. Indian food, anyone? :D

9. Take an online class. So many good, cheap and free ones available now. Great Courses are good too!

10. Write a novel.

11. Organize a girls' night out for margaritas with some friends, even if they don't know each other.

12. Design a course for your homeschool, one that you just can't find and wish existed. Share it with other HS moms on the web, for free or for a price. You can do it!

13. Work part-time. Even if you don't make a ton of money. Breaking even is okay if it helps you feel sane. I work 10 hours a week and the kids go to afterschool--I was hesitant to do it, but it has worked out well and provides me with a kid-break and adult stimulation.

Edited by Halcyon
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I have three young children, and I know when I feel like I'm falling apart emotionally that is a sign that my self-care is not so great.

 

I have been considering volunteering at a local therapeutic riding center. That somewhat relates to what I did professionally pre-kids enough that it would stretch my knowledge base, but without the commitment of a full job. It would be useful if I returned to the workplace as well.

 

I definitely enjoy learning along with my children. When we get bits and pieces of interesting content, I find it fun. My eldest is only in 2nd grade, so the interesting parts only come in small chunks right now. I look forward to learning with them as time goes on.

 

I've been getting back to reading more frequently.

 

I like your list a lot :)

 

I can relate to many of the feelings expressed in the related thread. This season of life has been very challenging for me.

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This is a spin-off of the post about the mom who feels intellectually unstimulated and depressed at home. Not saying that homeschooling is the RIGHT choice for HER and her family. Just saying that for those of us who do desire intellectual and other non-homeschooling stimulation, here's the place to post ideas.

 

Here are my thoughts. I too crave a lot of intellectual stimulation. My kids are young yet, but older is finally getting into material that challenges me, and I adore it. I am learning Latin, more history than I care to admit I never knew :tongue_smilie:..I will be creating my own timeline next year alongside his, I am relearning Spanish, I am learning mythology...science is a TRIP...anyway, you get my point. School is becoming more stimulating for ME, not just him, and I am happy there.

 

Outside of homeschooling, what ideas do you have to keep yourself engaged, stimulated and happy? Ideas:

 

1. a hobby: I love knitting and put it aside a few months ago, but will likely resume at some point. Find a hobby and learn about it!

2. A physical challenge: at various points in my life I have trained for marathons, half marathons, bike races...set a goal and try to reach it.

3. Learn a new language-there are so many resources out there.

4. Relearn history, focusing on areas of interest. Create a small, usable unit study, filled with great questions, resources, projects and internet links.

5. Start a homeschool group, maybe even one just for classical homeschoolers! Set up a website, make flyers, contact librarians.

6. Join a book club.

7. START a book club!

8. Learn to cook a new type of cuisine. Indian food, anyone? :D

9. Take an online class. So many good, cheap and free ones available now. Great Courses are good too!

10. Write a novel.

11. Organize a girls' night out for margaritas with some friends, even if they don't know each other.

12. Design a course for your homeschool, one that you just can't find and wish existed. Share it with other HS moms on the web, for free or for a price. You can do it!

 

LOVE, LOVE your post!

 

I'm re-learning--or in some cases learning for the first time--right along with the kids. Latin, History, you name it, I want to know about it.

 

I'm particularly partial to your #10. Writing a novel is hard work. This is where my heart is.

 

#12 looks really cool! But I'm not sure what course I would write....

 

I'm not political minded, but if I were, this would be the season to get out and be involved, start a group, have discussions, etc. Not even sure why it crossed my mind!

 

Also, joining local organizations like Soroptomists, etc--find some way to get involved in the community.

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1. This year I started taking ballet. Never took a class in my life. It takes some serious physical and mental focus while incorporating beautiful music, physics and anatomy, and French.

 

2. I started teaching RCIA classes at my parish so I would finally undertake all the deeper theological reading I keep putting off.

 

3. A few years ago I began a ministry at our parish that serves poor women. Each year it grows and gives me a chance to use m organization/project managing skills while always reminding me how good I have it.

 

4. I try to go out with my husband and his co-workers regularly. I used to work in the same field so it helps me stay connected. It is so refreshing to get to talk shop with a bunch of adults after dealing with temper tantrums and diapers and phonics meltdowns all day.

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as my girls have gotten older, I found myself volunteering where their interests are.

 

Girl scouts is a biggie for us. I am leader for thier multi-age troop. but then I also volunteer at the adult level. I take care of all the cookie paperwork for all the troops in my town. I give the training to the troop cookie moms and answer all their questions. I collect paperwork, and check it. It really satisfies my box-checking/ paper-organizing issues.:leaving:

 

I was also trained to be a camp trainer for adults. That did not go so well. I figured if I was going camping for the weekend, I would rather do it with my kids/family than women who didn't really want to be there.:thumbdown:

 

robin in nj

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LOVE, LOVE your post!

 

I'm re-learning--or in some cases learning for the first time--right along with the kids. Latin, History, you name it, I want to know about it.

 

I'm particularly partial to your #10. Writing a novel is hard work. This is where my heart is.

 

#12 looks really cool! But I'm not sure what course I would write....

 

I'm not political minded, but if I were, this would be the season to get out and be involved, start a group, have discussions, etc. Not even sure why it crossed my mind!

 

Also, joining local organizations like Soroptomists, etc--find some way to get involved in the community.

 

 

Awesome! I bet there are a TON of things you could write a course on--what do you know about that you may think other people wouldn't care about, or isn't "typical" homeschool stuff? Off the top of my head, I could (or would love to learn enough to) write a homeschool course about alternative medicine (I'm an acupuncturist), great female scientists in history, great female politicians in history, Advocates for Peace throughout History (focusing on people like Gandhi, King, etc and whether their efforts were effective, etc), Starting a Small Business, writing from a classical perspective (using old vintage texts-hey! I'm doing this now LOL)....I could go on!

 

What do you love reading about? Or wish you knew more about?

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Dd asked me the other day what my favorite book is. I told her Les Miserables. She asked about the title and I told her it was originally written in French, but I had only read the English translation. She said, "You know, Mom, learning isn't just for kids. You could still learn French and read your book."

 

I think I might just do that :D

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Here are my thoughts. I too crave a lot of intellectual stimulation. My kids are young yet, but older is finally getting into material that challenges me, and I adore it. I am learning Latin, more history than I care to admit I never knew :tongue_smilie:..I will be creating my own timeline next year alongside his, I am relearning Spanish, I am learning mythology...science is a TRIP...anyway, you get my point. School is becoming more stimulating for ME, not just him, and I am happy there.

 

I love this post! I've done pretty much everything on your list except start a book club! After being part of a book club, I've vowed never again. I read light novels for fun, but I don't like treating them as if they were great literature.

 

1. Learn about quantum physics: This is my off and on project for the past ten years. I've read all the Brian Greene books plus a couple biographies about quantum physicists. I'm taking a break, but I'm gearing up to work on Stephen Hawkings' books. When people ask what you're reading, just casually mention, "Oh, quantum physics." I am no closer to understanding the field than I was ten years ago. I have a notebook for my scribbles and most of the lines have a question mark next to the note to show where I'm confused.

2. Work through the Well Education Mind: Darn you Don Quixote! This novel is taking forever.

3. Read the top 100 Greatest Novels: I think from Modern Library? This was my project a few years ago and I made it through most of the books. I kept away from James Joyce, though. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man didn't convince me to read Ulysses.

4. Read and understand poetry: my next project. Dh loves poetry and recites it whenever he's prompted. Nothing like an impassioned recitation of "The Emperor of Ice Cream" to make a girl swoon.

5. Work through AoPS Art of Problem Solving I: I like math.

6. Learn an instrument: The kids are taking piano lessons so we have lots of books with exercises and songs. Mostly a good way to waste time.

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I love this post! I've done pretty much everything on your list except start a book club! After being part of a book club, I've vowed never again. I read light novels for fun, but I don't like treating them as if they were great literature.

 

1. Learn about quantum physics: This is my off and on project for the past ten years. I've read all the Brian Greene books plus a couple biographies about quantum physicists. I'm taking a break, but I'm gearing up to work on Stephen Hawkings' books. When people ask what you're reading, just casually mention, "Oh, quantum physics." I am no closer to understanding the field than I was ten years ago. I have a notebook for my scribbles and most of the lines have a question mark next to the note to show where I'm confused.

2. Work through the Well Education Mind: Darn you Don Quixote! This novel is taking forever.

3. Read the top 100 Greatest Novels: I think from Modern Library? This was my project a few years ago and I made it through most of the books. I kept away from James Joyce, though. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man didn't convince me to read Ulysses.

4. Read and understand poetry: my next project. Dh loves poetry and recites it whenever he's prompted. Nothing like an impassioned recitation of "The Emperor of Ice Cream" to make a girl swoon.

5. Work through AoPS Art of Problem Solving I: I like math.

6. Learn an instrument: The kids are taking piano lessons so we have lots of books with exercises and songs. Mostly a good way to waste time.

 

 

:iagree::iagree: I stalled out on Don Quixote too :lol:

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Dd asked me the other day what my favorite book is. I told her Les Miserables. She asked about the title and I told her it was originally written in French, but I had only read the English translation. She said, "You know, Mom, learning isn't just for kids. You could still learn French and read your book."

 

I think I might just do that :D

 

Smart girl :D

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Well - when my kids were little - we're talking under 5 - I didn't have the time or energy to do more than function... No - not intellectually stimulating - but I was too busy and exhausted to notice.

I can't imagine having toddlers and expecting intellectual stimulation. It is a season in life that is so short - try to embrace it! Learn how to make homemade

play-doh, do arts and crafts every day, go to the park - every day, teach them to cook, take them to children's museums...

Now - after they were both 5, that was different :) I read,,,, a lot. I keep up with politics and current events. I learn a new hobby/skill at least once a year: i.e. sewing, quilting, origami, sailing, etc. I volunteer all over the place. Right now I'm the committee chair of a boy scout troop, but I've been a coach, a Cub Master, den leader, a science teacher for a co-op, etc.

I think the key is challenging yourself. It is easy to get stuck in a rut, and ruts are not stimulating in the least!

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It can be a special kind of exhausted loneliness to be in the trenches with very young children. How quickly things change though! As my youngest approaches 6, my life is getting easier in so many ways. I can definitely relate to your excitement about learning richer material along with the kids.

I am reading the rhetoric stage history selections from the WTM while my kids read the grammar and logic stage books. I hated history in school with a purple passion but it is my favorite subject now.

I am seriously considering writing a secular, CM style American history curriculum for grammar and logic stage. I envision something similar to VP cards but in an 8x10 size, with more than just reading selections. There would be scheduled reading (from a spine, read-aloud lit, biographies and readers), as well as weekly maps, timeline dates, important figures, activity suggestions, and selections for poetry, art, and music study. I have a vision but I lack spare time. :D

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Well - when my kids were little - we're talking under 5 - I didn't have the time or energy to do more than function... No - not intellectually stimulating - but I was too busy and exhausted to notice.

I can't imagine having toddlers and expecting intellectual stimulation. It is a season in life that is so short - try to embrace it! Learn how to make homemade play-doh, do arts and crafts every day, go to the park - every day, teach them to cook, take them to children's museums...

Now - after they were both 5, that was different :)

 

I totally agree with this. It's embarrassing but I am reminded of the feeling I always got when I had a newborn. Of course I was so incredibly exhausted at the end of the day and knew I would be up several times in the middle of the night. I knew the best thing to do was to go to bed with the baby, not try to stay up a few hours later for "me" time. I knew it. And yet, I kept trying to get away with it but was always worse for the wear. When DS5 was born, I had a plan. I was going to surrender to the season. I was going to take care of myself as well as I was taking care of him. When he went to bed, I went to bed. I made my "me" time sleeping time, 100%. :lol: I took a nap every day for his first 6 months (everyone still napped then). I think a parallel can be drawn to the toddler and preschool years as well. As long as I had kids of that age in the house, it was a challenge to move on to an intellectual kind of "me" time. Yep. There are seasons.

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Some people have suggested that I use the time when my children are little to further my own self-education instead of elaborate lesson plans for kindergarten. I don't have time or money to go back to school, but I think I do a decent amount of trying to learn various hobbies.

 

And for some reason, I was inspired to get the Life of Fred books out on Interlibrary Loan. I have the first three high school books. I'm only half way through Beginning Algebra, but WOW! I've never thought of using math that way and it makes so much more sense now. I have finally figured out why you add a negative number to a positive one (for example why 7-(-8) is really 7+8. They never taught us that in school, they just showed us how to draw vertical lines when we saw two negatives next to each other like that). I'm really hoping to get a better understanding of math so I won't be so terrible at it when they reach high school.

 

Of course, next I plan on studying history more in depth. I've tried reading SWB's History of the World, but my eyes glaze over. I need them on audiobook.

 

I've been considering buying WWS and FLL4 so I can learn how to diagram sentences (we NEVER did that in school) and learn all SWB's writing tricks. I'm painfully lacking in writing as well.

 

And then, you know, I ought to cover science. Chemistry is so painful for me. And I didn't even bother taking physics. Science scares me even more than math. So obviously, I've got lots of work to do in all areas. It's a good thing I have so long. Even burning rubber :auto: I'll need to take advantage of the time I have.

Edited by meggie
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I

I am seriously considering writing a secular, CM style American history curriculum for grammar and logic stage. I envision something similar to VP cards but in an 8x10 size, with more than just reading selections. There would be scheduled reading (from a spine, read-aloud lit, biographies and readers), as well as weekly maps, timeline dates, important figures, activity suggestions, and selections for poetry, art, and music study. I have a vision but I lack spare time. :D

 

 

 

Do this!!! Spend just an hour a week on it...it'll come together, I bet. :)

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And then, you know, I ought to cover science. Chemistry is so painful for me. And I didn't even bother taking physics. Science scares me even more than math. So obviously, I've got lots of work to do in all areas. It's a good thing I have so long. Even burning rubber :auto: I'll need to take advantage of the time I have.

 

You can start with K-3 Chemistry and Physics and work your way up! I'm up to upper elementary Chemistry so far.

 

In school, I took all the way through Organic Chemistry, but I'm finding the elementary explanations much clearer!!

 

I'm enjoying RS4K, but there are also other options. You can see the full books online and see if they would work for you.

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Here are my thoughts. I too crave a lot of intellectual stimulation. My kids are young yet, but older is finally getting into material that challenges me, and I adore it. I am learning Latin, more history than I care to admit I never knew :tongue_smilie:..I will be creating my own timeline next year alongside his, I am relearning Spanish, I am learning mythology...science is a TRIP...anyway, you get my point. School is becoming more stimulating for ME, not just him, and I am happy there.

 

Outside of homeschooling, what ideas do you have to keep yourself engaged, stimulated and happy?

 

:iagree:

 

I am also relearning Spanish and enjoying learning Latin. 6 and 9 are great ages!

 

When they were younger, it was a bit more difficult, especially moving frequently and being away from family.

 

My website and having remedial reading students is a great break for me--and, I really enjoy teaching and coming up with strategies to reach my more challenging remedial students.

 

Reading is also a good outlet for me.

 

I have also, unfortunately, had to learn a lot about new foods and new cooking options because of my crazy food allergies. On the bright side, when I re-read "Swiss Family Robinson," 99% of the weird things they found to eat, I thought, "Yes, I've eaten that, and I didn't even know what it was last time I read this book." There was one food he mentioned that I had not yet tried that I immediately researched as a possible new food to add to my rotation diet!!

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Thanks for this post, it is inspiring. I have 4 under 7 and another on the way, so I'm happy to hear that the seasons pass. Even though you know things, it's good to hear from others who are emerging on the other side! I think this might be the last one, so there's light at the end of the tunnel now!

 

And the thing that made me most happy- that I'm not the only one who failed to get through Don Quixote!!

 

For myself, I started riding. I love,love,love it! I was actually quite good at it, but it's on hold at the moment whilst this baby comes along.

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For me, it was getting an Audible subscription 3 years ago. The amount of reading I did was tiny due to my kids' demands at that point in time. The luxury of having a hassle-free service was worth its weight in gold to me. And I didn't even have to hold up a book! :tongue_smilie: The effect of having a bank of credits meant I went out on a limb with a couple of choices, which definitely stimulated some thought.

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Well, I read. A lot. I read a majority of non-fiction and literature that keeps my brain engaged. Of course, I read a lot about home school and curricula. :)

 

I keep up to date on current political events.

 

I watch more documentaries/education shows than any other type of TV. Okay, I do indulge in Cary Grant, Katherine Hepburn, and Audrey Hepburn movies. ;)

 

As you posted, I'm learning so much by teaching my kids.

 

I also taught myself to crochet although I'm not currently doing it. I seem to be ADD when it comes to stuff like that. I learn how, do a few projects, and then move on. :tongue_smilie:

 

I volunteer and am active hosting meetings each month. Although my volunteer work has taken a back seat in the past couple years.

 

I know more about dyslexia, brain structure, and the reading process than "reading specialists" I know irl. Seriously, I was astounded at first when I realized how little they knew. Now I realize it's kind of the same as doctors not being very knowledgeable about breastfeeding. However, doctors do not study breastfeeding specifically whereas a person with a PhD that focuses on reading.....yeah, I'd expect that person to have a clue.

 

I help my dh with his college classes. That has cleaned away many cobwebs in my brain!

 

I also research any medical issues that are relevant to my family. Most people I know just follow a doctor's orders without understanding their medical issue. I am not like that. I have a need to know as much as I can. I've even been known to read actual medical journals/studies. That is exercise for the brain. :lol:

 

Oh, looking at your list.....I've learned to cook in new ways. Can you say everything gluten free? That has been a learning experience. This weekend I'm attempting gf cream puffs.

 

At not to be forgotten, I hang out here on the WTM boards. Stimulating and educational!

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:iagree::iagree: I stalled out on Don Quixote too :lol:

 

We watched the ballet! Ha.

 

Thank you for starting this. I need it. :grouphug:

 

What about those of us who already have a college degree or the final degree in their field? Also it's not the best time to find a job so I wouldn't even try.

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Audiobooks are great for squeezing adult learning into your day. My library has lots of Teaching Company classes and nonfiction audio, so I try to coordinate with what the kids are studying in school. Now that they're older, the books on tape I get for them are also engaging for me. I loved Johnny Tremain and somehow I missed it when I was younger.

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Thanks for this post, it is inspiring. I have 4 under 7 and another on the way, so I'm happy to hear that the seasons pass. Even though you know things, it's good to hear from others who are emerging on the other side! I think this might be the last one, so there's light at the end of the tunnel now!

 

And the thing that made me most happy- that I'm not the only one who failed to get through Don Quixote!!

 

For myself, I started riding. I love,love,love it! I was actually quite good at it, but it's on hold at the moment whilst this baby comes along.

 

 

I love riding too :) I have wanted to resume for years, and I think it's getting closer to the time when it might be possible. So fun :)

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We watched the ballet! Ha.

 

Thank you for starting this. I need it. :grouphug:

 

What about those of us who already have a college degree or the final degree in their field? Also it's not the best time to find a job so I wouldn't even try.

 

 

I have a terminal degree in my field, and I went back to work part-time, just 10 hours a week. It's a nice compromise, and keeps my "hand in the game" so to speak for when and if I choose to return to working more hours. You might be able to find volunteer work a few hours a week in your field? Depends what field it is, of course.

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I have a terminal degree in my field, and I went back to work part-time, just 10 hours a week. It's a nice compromise, and keeps my "hand in the game" so to speak for when and if I choose to return to working more hours. You might be able to find volunteer work a few hours a week in your field? Depends what field it is, of course.

 

At this point in my life, I can't, as my plate is too full, but maybe one day. This is also what makes it so hard for me to do anything I want.

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My kids are still pretty young so I'm still at the -always tired, no energy - phase of life but I am starting to do a few things.

 

-I read. A LOT. DH recently put up some new bookcases for me and I brought a lot of my favorite books in from the garage finally.

-I plan to get back into digital scrapping. I used to do regular scrapbooking but I don't have the space to bring out all the supplies, so digital is a good compromise.

-I plan to learn Spanish and possibly Latin along with the kids.

-I recently started a Cloverbud club and planning out the meetings and activities is pretty stimulating.

-I'm hoping to start a good exercise program and stick with it for a change.:tongue_smilie:

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I have definitely been feeling that lack of mental stimulation. My youngest is 4 next week and I do feel like I am getting a little corner of my brain back.

 

I am hoping to start an Astronomy degree later this year, very part time. It's a completely different field from my first degree and I am excited. I will definitely need to relearn and improve my maths and I need to find something to help with that. I loved maths and physics growing up but was only very average at them so it will be a challenge.

 

I want to get back into playing an instrument, hopefully I will do this with the kids over the next year. I did a lot of music as a child and loved it so it will be interesting if I fall back into it. I think I have forgotten so much. I played the violin.

 

I have also been reading a lot more now I am not so tired and can actually concentrate. It has been lovely.

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You can start with K-3 Chemistry and Physics and work your way up! I'm up to upper elementary Chemistry so far.

 

In school, I took all the way through Organic Chemistry, but I'm finding the elementary explanations much clearer!!

 

I'm enjoying RS4K, but there are also other options. You can see the full books online and see if they would work for you.

Do you have links? I'm not sure I'm finding the right things. :bigear:

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I find a lot of intellectual stimulation in homeschooling. That is even more true now as we move into the high school years. I am designing our own Great Books study according to WTM and WEM guidelines. I merge and tweak progym and rhetoric programs. I am (along with one*mom) delving into a much deeper understanding of rhetoric.

 

But I do other things:

 

I read a lot. A LOT. Reading is my LIFE. Theology, apologetics, quality fiction, history, etc.

I still edit my husband's journal and technical papers (I was a technical writer/editor for the Navy in another life.)

I am taking on my church's library, including creating a catalog out of nothing. I am learning about library science. I work on the library one afternoon a week. (The children come with me and bring schoolwork.)

I volunteer a lot with our local rocket club, now clubS.

I am on the board of a homeschool support group and I field a lot of beginner and curriculum questions.

Last year I was involved with a homeschool bookstore.

I tutor high-school students in English and language SAT prep. (I love this!)

We are very involved in our church and Bible study. I also work in the church bookstore ; ).

Edited by WTMCassandra
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I am learning Latin (ahead of ds) and plan to start Greek soon (again, to stay ahead of ds). I also have spent the last year reading epics--I really enjoyed the Illiad and the Odyssey, so I branched out into other traditons' epics. The Norse ones are especially fun, but my favorite is Gilgamesh so far.

 

On a more homely front I am learning how to knit from my own patterns or to write patterns for things I see and want to reproduce. I am also learning to garden, forage and preserve and it has been a lot of fun.

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What's Cloverbud? :bigear:

 

Cloverbuds is 4-H for kids who are too young for 4-H. It's for K through 3rd graders and instead of long-term projects we do activities from all the different areas that 4-H clubs do. The most recent post on my blog is about our most recent meeting. Not many pictures because I won't put other peoples kids on my blog but lots of information.

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This is a spin-off of the post about the mom who feels intellectually unstimulated and depressed at home. Not saying that homeschooling is the RIGHT choice for HER and her family. Just saying that for those of us who do desire intellectual and other non-homeschooling stimulation, here's the place to post ideas.

 

Here are my thoughts. I too crave a lot of intellectual stimulation. My kids are young yet, but older is finally getting into material that challenges me, and I adore it. I am learning Latin, more history than I care to admit I never knew :tongue_smilie:..I will be creating my own timeline next year alongside his, I am relearning Spanish, I am learning mythology...science is a TRIP...anyway, you get my point. School is becoming more stimulating for ME, not just him, and I am happy there.

 

Outside of homeschooling, what ideas do you have to keep yourself engaged, stimulated and happy? Ideas:

 

1. a hobby: I love knitting and put it aside a few months ago, but will likely resume at some point. Find a hobby and learn about it!

2. A physical challenge: at various points in my life I have trained for marathons, half marathons, bike races...set a goal and try to reach it.

3. Learn a new language-there are so many resources out there.

4. Relearn history, focusing on areas of interest. Create a small, usable unit study, filled with great questions, resources, projects and internet links.

5. Start a homeschool group, maybe even one just for classical homeschoolers! Set up a website, make flyers, contact librarians.

6. Join a book club.

7. START a book club!

8. Learn to cook a new type of cuisine. Indian food, anyone? :D

9. Take an online class. So many good, cheap and free ones available now. Great Courses are good too!

10. Write a novel.

11. Organize a girls' night out for margaritas with some friends, even if they don't know each other.

12. Design a course for your homeschool, one that you just can't find and wish existed. Share it with other HS moms on the web, for free or for a price. You can do it!

13. Work part-time. Even if you don't make a ton of money. Breaking even is okay if it helps you feel sane. I work 10 hours a week and the kids go to afterschool--I was hesitant to do it, but it has worked out well and provides me with a kid-break and adult stimulation.

 

I just love this post! Very motivating! I think that I will sit down and write my own list. Thanks for sharing! =)

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This is an interesting thread but I am still a bit confused. I don't homeschool 24/7, after all, so I never felt the need to give up my own intellectual pursuits in the first place.........is it that common to become so completely absorbed in parenting or homeschooling that one 'forgets' one's own interests?

 

Why do some people feel a 'need' to take a class or work in an area to stay engaged in their own interests? Or am I just a bit selfish since this hasn't exactly been a problem? :confused:

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This is an interesting thread but I am still a bit confused. I don't homeschool 24/7, after all, so I never felt the need to give up my own intellectual pursuits in the first place.........is it that common to become so completely absorbed in parenting or homeschooling that one 'forgets' one's own interests?

 

Why do some people feel a 'need' to take a class or work in an area to stay engaged in their own interests? Or am I just a bit selfish since this hasn't exactly been a problem? :confused:

 

I don't think it makes you selfish, but I do think you might be a rare bird if you are confused by the thread. :lol: Obviously everyone is different. I had three kids, each a year and a half apart (not to mention having a DH who is gone half the time). I was in the thick of it for a while. I still read, tried new recipes, and occasionally still had time to embroider. I did take on learning about different homeschool philosophies, curricula, etc. as a hobby during that time (and was well-served and intellectually stimulated by that). :D Honestly though, it was a huge adjustment for me to go from no kids to three kids in a three year period (that should have been obvious, I suppose :lol:).

 

Part of the problem for me is that I have always liked a project, to get totally and completely absorbed in something. I find it hard to accomplish anything in small steps. I'm more of a giant-chunks-of-work-at-a-time then oaf-off-until-I-regain-my-energy kind of girl. So, yeah, having kids at all made me feel like Kristina interrupted. For me, five has been the magic age at which they don't need me for long enough periods of time that I can immerse myself in my own intellectual pursuits and hobbies. I need larger pockets of time to work and feel I've accomplished much. Just for the record, I didn't spend the last 9 years of my life drooling on myself, devoid of any and all intellectual stimulation. I wasn't pathetic. :p I was just plain busier and more ragged with the younger kids, so much so that at the end of the day, I just wanted to flop down and rest.

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This is a topic near and dear to my heart. Here are some of what I have been doing:

 

1. Teaching myself Latin.

 

2. Using Rosetta Stone to increase my German fluency since I started teaching the kids German.

 

3. Lots of religious reading which is helping me go deeper into my faith.

 

4. I get a lot out of planning our unit studies. I do some research first and then formulate a plan.

 

5. Reading homeschool books and listening to recordings of lectures.

 

6. What I really need to do is start exercising again!!! This is one thing that has fallen through the cracks lately.

 

7. I love to knit and quilt, but also haven't been doing that lately!

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Great thread!

 

What I do:

 

 

  • work part-time (I have my own business)
  • read a lot (all non-fiction - mainly about autism, brain science, nutrition, psychology, and business)
  • further my education/training (I have an M.B.A. but have gone on to get other certifications, such as completing a nutrition coach training and certification program late last year)
  • stay informed on politics (daily - through a few online news sources and political forums)
  • volunteer (I'm currently volunteering with a local autism non-profit and will be joining their board of directors shortly)

 

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