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Losing more weight when *not* exercising??


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I've had this conundrum before, and it's happening again now. This past summer I did the Couch to 5K program to try to lose weight. I would like to lose 50 pounds total, which is no small amount! I went from being quite sedentary to jogging 3-4 times per week, and walking several times as well. I got up to jogging 25 minutes straight, over 2 miles. I did this for 9 weeks, and did not lose one single pound; in fact, I gained a couple. I didn't notice any real change in how my clothes fit either. :confused: I got frustrated and gave it up in Sept. After stopping, and not changing the way I ate, I lost 2-3 pounds, which may have been the muscle that I built up while jogging. This past week I started roughly following WW points, only took a couple 15 minute walks; ate a Big Mac and fries one day, had pizza last night....I just weighed myself and I lost five pounds?!

 

I remember in the past when I have done WW, that I seemed to do better on weeks when I didn't exercise, too. It sort of takes away your drive to exercise, when you see more results without it! Has anyone else experienced this???

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When you find out, let me know, ok? :glare:

 

I have the same exact problem.

 

I lost 55 pounds this year. I did it by RADICALLY changing the way I eat. Cut out sweets, stopped drinking pop, more fresh fruits and veggies, less carbs.

 

Then, after about 8 months (Around the end of August or so), I started brisk walking. I walk around the neighborhood while the little boys ride their bikes. We got up to 3-4 miles a day.

 

I stopped losing weight.

 

No idea why. At first, I thought it was because I was gaining muscle. But I never got back to losing at the pace from before I started exercising.

 

In my past experience, for *me, I lose a lot more weight by watching what I eat carefully (which includes tracking my calories to around 1400-1500 a day at my current weight, as well as eating small portions 4-5 times a day) than if I exercise as well. I am a lot more active now that I lost so much weight, but I don't do 'intentional' exercise, iykwim.

 

Also, unlike I've always read, my body loses weight very quickly if I eat very few calories. For example, if I eat around 1000 calories a day, I lose a lot of weight. I don't seem to go into 'starvation mode' and keep all the food on as fat, which is what I always read will happen if a woman eats less than 1200-1400 calories a day. Don't know why, it's just the way my body works. Not that I regularly eat less than 1000 calories a day; I like food too much for that. :D My point is, I guess, just that everyone's body is different, and we don't all always follow all the 'rules'.

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Did you catch that Gary Taubes video that Snickerdoodle linked in another thread? In it, among many other fascinating things, he talks about how when we increase our exercise, our appetites naturally increase to adjust. Conversely, when we reduce our caloric intake, our bodies naturally reduce their energy output to adjust. Even before watching that video I had read about some studies that showed that exercise for weight loss was basically a failure. It's not something you hear much about though, because it flies in the face of "conventional wisdom". The video is long, but definitely worth watching! He describes (in general layman's terms) the biochemistry of how weight gain and loss occurs, and it's very valuable information.

 

http://webcast.berkeley.edu/event_details.php?webcastid=21216

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I'm not positive that this holds true for everyone, but I gain weight when I exercise because I'm shedding fat but putting on muscle. Fat weighs less. To me, the more important thing is if my body is changing - firming up, slimming down, etc. I gained a little too much weight this summer:glare:, so I did lose a couple pounds when I started exercising last month, but I've held steady since then. It doesn't bother me though, because I can see in the fit of my clothes that I am slimming down.

 

HTH

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I'm not positive that this holds true for everyone, but I gain weight when I exercise because I'm shedding fat but putting on muscle. Fat weighs less. To me, the more important thing is if my body is changing - firming up, slimming down, etc. I gained a little too much weight this summer:glare:, so I did lose a couple pounds when I started exercising last month, but I've held steady since then. It doesn't bother me though, because I can see in the fit of my clothes that I am slimming down.

 

HTH

 

If you don't have that much weight to lose, looking better and feeling better by replacing fat with muscle is probably a good goal. But when you are 50 pounds overweight, actually clinically obese, losing weight is important, kwim?

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It's important to vary the intensity of the exercise. One needs to "pour it on" for a brief period, and then drop back, and then pour it on, and then drop back.

 

This is called "interval" training. Walking at a steady pace is good for a person (very good) but it doesn't "re-set" the metabolism the way that doing intervals while walking does. Same with running.

 

One needs to "push it" part of the time to achieve weight loss.

 

Bill

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I'm not positive that this holds true for everyone, but I gain weight when I exercise because I'm shedding fat but putting on muscle. Fat weighs less. To me, the more important thing is if my body is changing - firming up, slimming down, etc. I gained a little too much weight this summer:glare:, so I did lose a couple pounds when I started exercising last month, but I've held steady since then. It doesn't bother me though, because I can see in the fit of my clothes that I am slimming down.

 

HTH

 

:iagree: When you exercise, you put on muscle while losing fat and may even gain weight. I recommend weighing only once per month and measuring waist, arms, thighs, hips once a month.

 

Also, exercise alone is not very effective at dropping the pounds from what I understand. You need healthy diet of about 1500 calories depending on your body size and needs in addition to exercise to lose weight.

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It's important to vary the intensity of the exercise. One needs to "pour it on" for a brief period, and then drop back, and then pour it on, and then drop back.

 

This is called "interval" training. Walking at a steady pace is good for a person (very good) but it doesn't "re-set" the metabolism the way that doing intervals while walking does. Same with running.

 

One needs to "push it" part of the time to achieve weight loss.

 

Bill

 

That probably works for many people, but in my case, I was doing intervals of jogging the whole time, and I was *definitely* pushing myself, and still lost nothing. I wonder if my screwy metabolism is to blame? My body doesn't seem to function the way experts say bodies do.

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It's important to vary the intensity of the exercise. One needs to "pour it on" for a brief period, and then drop back, and then pour it on, and then drop back.

 

This is called "interval" training. Walking at a steady pace is good for a person (very good) but it doesn't "re-set" the metabolism the way that doing intervals while walking does. Same with running.

 

One needs to "push it" part of the time to achieve weight loss.

 

Bill

 

The Couch to 5K is interval by nature. You run, walk, run, walk through the 9 week training period.

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My sister is clinically obese. She's currently under a doctor's care while trying to lose weight. They've told her not to exercise at first. They want her to lose weight first, see the results, and THEN add the exercise. I don't know exactly what the reasoning is. Maybe it's that they know that exercise makes you gain weight at first because of the muscle/fat thing. Or, maybe they don't want her to hurt her joints right now. Either way, this is what they're recommending.

 

:grouphug: I have about 20 pounds I'd like to lose. I run at least an hour 5x/week. Those pesky 20 pounds are still there! And, I eat about 1500 healthy calories/day. I don't get it either. But, I'm not going to stop running! I love it too much.

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Read "French women don't get fat". I am French , have 4 kids and I am only 111 lb (5.4) .

There is no magic in losing weight other than eat less , eat healthier and walk if you are not able to exercise...

Eat lots of fruits and vegetables (without all these extra dipping sauces ) . Do not drink diet soda, this will make you gain even more weight . Water is best. Extra green tea (sweeten with Stevia) .

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That probably works for many people, but in my case, I was doing intervals of jogging the whole time, and I was *definitely* pushing myself, and still lost nothing. I wonder if my screwy metabolism is to blame? My body doesn't seem to function the way experts say bodies do.

 

I'd advise keeping at it. You will be much healthier with exercise than without.

 

Keep you mind on "fitness" rather than weight loss. And really look at the foods you are consuming. Are they fiber-rich fresh foods? Is your diet heavily plant based? Are you adding unhealthful "flavoring" agents or cooking methods (deep-frying?) to otherwise healthful food items? Drinking sugared or artificially sweetened drinks? Really look at your food.

 

And if you are 50 lbs overweight, you might consider walking (briskly) rather than jogging. Running is hard on the body, and really takes expert technique (with the aid of a good running coach) if one doesn't want to get injured, and even then it's hard on joints.

 

My Mom was a age-group "world's best time" Marathon runner (she started at 46) and she would tell you the same thing.

 

But do keep moving. It's vital to your health regardless of the weigh-in numbers.

 

Bill

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Guest janainaz

I have the exact same issue.

 

I have joined gyms in the past and given up after about 3 months of consistent exercise and watching what I eat. When I was in high school, I put on about 10 unwanted pounds my junior year and tried everything to get it off and it just wouldn't. I know yo-yo dieting is bad, but even back then no "yo-yo" diet even worked for me. Ever. Not one of them.

 

About two years ago I bought an eliptical. I was on it every day for 45 minutes, I did strength training, I ran, I switched up what I was doing, I ate really well (tracked all my food on Spark People) - all of it and not only did I not lose a pound, my clothes were tighter than ever. So frustrating. My size and frame could stand for me to lose 15 pounds, I was totally satisfied if I could just lose 5 (or if my clothes would have just fit a little better). I would have been thrilled. It was not about the scale, but the fit of my clothing. I know muscle weighs more than fat - I get it. But, I really believe I was gaining muscle, but NOT losing fat.

 

Everyone kept telling me to up my calories. I tried that, didn't work. I felt totally defeated. It seems to be rocket-science for me.

 

Last February I decided I needed to start exercising. So, since February, I have been exercising 5 to 6 days a week for an hour a day (sweat-pouring workouts) and I have been eating well and it's the same thing all over again. The scale seems to creep up and my clothes are tighter - a LOT tighter. Totally frustrating.

 

My parents were in town for the last week and so I took a break from exercising every day except one. My clothes are fitting much better and my weight on the scale is down. I've been eating just normal. I don't understand. I need to keep exercising and I need to care more about my health. I want to feel stronger and at some point those pounds have to come off by doing it the right way. I wish I could understand this phenomenon.

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Cardiovascular exercise, such as, jogging, walking, tennis, etc. are not muscle building activities. These activities actually break muscle down. Only strength training will build muscle. This is why strength training is really a great addition to exercise. Your body has memory. If your body has no memory of exercising and you all the sudden start to exercise, your body will basically be in shock. It will hold on to all that is has and then some. It will take a good 8 weeks plus in order for your body to react correctly to it's "new" exercise. It's as thought you are re-wiring your system to work correctly. It takes time to build good habits of exercising and eating well to really make weight loss effective and for your metabolism to get jump started.

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I have the exact same issue.

 

I have joined gyms in the past and given up after about 3 months of consistent exercise and watching what I eat. When I was in high school, I put on about 10 unwanted pounds my junior year and tried everything to get it off and it just wouldn't. I know yo-yo dieting is bad, but even back then no "yo-yo" diet even worked for me. Ever. Not one of them.

 

About two years ago I bought an eliptical. I was on it every day for 45 minutes, I did strength training, I ran, I switched up what I was doing, I ate really well (tracked all my food on Spark People) - all of it and not only did I not lose a pound, my clothes were tighter than ever. So frustrating. My size and frame could stand for me to lose 15 pounds, I was totally satisfied if I could just lose 5 (or if my clothes would have just fit a little better). I would have been thrilled. It was not about the scale, but the fit of my clothing. I know muscle weighs more than fat - I get it. But, I really believe I was gaining muscle, but NOT losing fat.

 

Everyone kept telling me to up my calories. I tried that, didn't work. I felt totally defeated. It seems to be rocket-science for me.

 

Last February I decided I needed to start exercising. So, since February, I have been exercising 5 to 6 days a week for an hour a day (sweat-pouring workouts) and I have been eating well and it's the same thing all over again. The scale seems to creep up and my clothes are tighter - a LOT tighter. Totally frustrating.

 

My parents were in town for the last week and so I took a break from exercising every day except one. My clothes are fitting much better and my weight on the scale is down. I've been eating just normal. I don't understand. I need to keep exercising and I need to care more about my health. I want to feel stronger and at some point those pounds have to come off by doing it the right way. I wish I could understand this phenomenon.

 

You do understand!!! :grouphug: It's frustrating when people tell you that you must be eating something wrong, you must not be exercising correctly, etc.-- when you *know* you are not. I'm so tired of friends IRL trying to encourage me by telling me that I must be 'gaining muscle'-- hello?? I have FIFTY POUNDS to lose, and you're telling me I should be happy to put on a little muscle instead?!

 

Even when I was very strict about WW, I would lose about one pound per week, which was fine. Then I added in exercise, eating exactly the same way, and the scale would stop going down, and start going up, up, up. That is very discouraging. I wonder if my body goes into preservation mode when I exercise heavily, afraid that it's going to lose its precious fat stores?

 

So, I'm going back to WW tonight, and I'm not going to worry about heavy exercise for now. Going for a daily walk will have to suffice. Yes, exercise is important, but with 50 pounds to lose I think I have bigger fish to fry for now, especially when it seems clear to me that exercising does keep me from losing weight. Once I am closer to my goal, I'll step it up. But for now, it's just too frustrating.

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Something to keep in mind is that water weight is a huge factor for women. I'd encourage you to not judge your results on a week-by-week basis, but look at it over the course of a month or even two or three months. You may not be losing weight right away, but if you're eating fewer calories than you need and exercising, your body ultimately will give up the pounds.

 

Also, people in my WW meeting would talk about the "one-week delay"--how if you have a good week, it won't show on the scale until your following weigh-in (same with bad weeks).

 

Your monthly cycle can throw things off quite a bit too.

 

Just keep at it and you'll get there...you didn't gain all your weight overnight, it takes time to lose it, no matter how hard you work at it! I have to tell myself the same thing all the time...it's hard, but it is worth it.

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Cardiovascular exercise, such as, jogging, walking, tennis, etc. are not muscle building activities. These activities actually break muscle down. Only strength training will build muscle. This is why strength training is really a great addition to exercise. Your body has memory. If your body has no memory of exercising and you all the sudden start to exercise, your body will basically be in shock. It will hold on to all that is has and then some. It will take a good 8 weeks plus in order for your body to react correctly to it's "new" exercise. It's as thought you are re-wiring your system to work correctly. It takes time to build good habits of exercising and eating well to really make weight loss effective and for your metabolism to get jump started.

 

:iagree:

Weight training is what made the difference for me. But it does take awhile. As long as I do weight training 3 times a week, along with calorie restriction, my weight continues to drop, slowly but surely. I do have plateaus, but even during those I can see the difference in my body.

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This is an interesting thread. I'm on my own journey to lose 50lbs, but it's going very slowly. I found when on WW a while back drinking water actually made my weightloss stall. I'm not to WW now because it just wasn't working for me.

 

My biggest question is why do people keep saying "Muscle weighs more than fat" It doesn't a pound is a pound no matter what it's made of. A 1lb of fat and a 1lb of muscle weigh the exact same thing 1lb. Now muscle is more dense which means that 1lb of muscle would take up less space than 1lb of fat, is that what people are trying to say.

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Read "French women don't get fat". I am French , have 4 kids and I am only 111 lb (5.4) .

There is no magic in losing weight other than eat less , eat healthier and walk if you are not able to exercise...

Eat lots of fruits and vegetables (without all these extra dipping sauces ) . Do not drink diet soda, this will make you gain even more weight . Water is best. Extra green tea (sweeten with Stevia) .

 

I haven't read this book (though I will add it to my list, which grows faster than I can read! :) ), but I do have a question about the part that I put in bold. I thought that one of the aspects of the so-called French paradox is that French food typically involves very rich, fatty sauces. Now, TO ME this doesn't seem paradoxical at all, because if you're eating plenty of fat, you have energy and feel full and satisfied, and so are less likely to over eat. The "devil" is in the sugar, which the French diet is low in, isn't it? Well, I was just curious if this book (or is it an article) recommends low-fat?

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When I did the WW about 7 years ago, I lost over 30 lbs in 6 mths. I did the points and walked about 1 hour or more a day. I ate foods that were lower in fat or no fat and ate so much. It worked. Now I'm not doing that. After having 2 children after that weight loss, I'm now walking at least 15 minutes to 45 minutes a day and just watching how much I eat. I don't know if I lost weight but my figure is coming back and I look much better. Probably losing inches. ;)

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I run 35-40 miles/week, and I don't lose weight unless I'm very careful about what I eat. Even then, it is way harder than one would think it should be for me. Also, any alcohol in my system seems to promote weight retention.

 

I've been reading a couple of sports nutrition books recently. Some interesting, new theories are out there regarding glycemic load (not just index). One suggests there perhaps is a geometric progression with higher glycemic food. So, if you eat a bigger portion, it isn't a linear relationship to the weight you will retain, but a geometric one! :eek: The advice being to try to think in small portion sizes for higher glycemic food, as it may help you stay on the lower end of the curve... (from Nutrition Periodization for Endurance Athletes by Bob Seebohar).

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I have read that weight loss is 80% diet and only 20% exercise. You HAVE to watch what you eat. Unfortunately!

 

When watching biggest loser people think it is all about the exercise, but they aren't just doing what you and I can do at home......they are spending 4-6 HOURS a day in the gym with a personal trainer.

 

I also need about 1,000 calories or so to lose weight and they have to be calculated.....in other words.....eating 1,000 calories in junk food/processed foods would not get the weight off (again, unfortunately!)

 

Let me join you in the frustration department~!!!! Oh, and I am 5' tall on a good day.....that doesn't help at all!

 

Dawn

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My biggest question is why do people keep saying "Muscle weighs more than fat" It doesn't a pound is a pound no matter what it's made of. A 1lb of fat and a 1lb of muscle weigh the exact same thing 1lb. Now muscle is more dense which means that 1lb of muscle would take up less space than 1lb of fat, is that what people are trying to say.

 

They are trying to say that a volume of fat weighs more than the same volume of fat. This means that a very musculer person at 200 pounds is much smaller than a little muscle/lots of fat person who also weighs 200 pounds.

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They are trying to say that a volume of fat weighs more than the same volume of fat. This means that a very musculer person at 200 pounds is much smaller than a little muscle/lots of fat person who also weighs 200 pounds.

 

That's what I was thinking, it just sounds weird when some says it because I think to myself, "how can that be true, a pound is a pound no matter if it's fat, muscle, bone, organs etc."

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Guest janainaz

To the OP, how long have you been exercising (months, weeks?) I'm just curious. It is frustrating when everyone says, "Give it time, it will come off." For me, it's been since last February. I've pulled out all the stops and 9 months aught to be enough time to see some result. I have not given up even through my frustration, but I feel like something is wrong.

 

I also wanted to ask you if you normally were able to lose weight on just diet alone, or if you have a hard time losing even when you eat right. When I was 17, I tried a lot of different diets to lose 10 pounds (which I needed to lose) and nothing worked. So, from that time I was really awful through my 20's. I would not eat all day, but eat at night. I ate good foods, but a 600 calorie meal was not cutting it. I spent my days drinking coffee and smoking when I worked (yes, I know - yuck). I was really horrible to my body and my metabolism all those years. But, it was from frustration that I could never have victory with a small amount of weight loss (10lbs or less). I just did not know what to do. The only time I could shed any weight is if my nerves were all stirred up. The weight would fall off - literally. As soon as my nerves calmed down, I put it all back on. It's like some chemical is missing - maybe adrenaline? I know there is an adrenal gland - not sure what it does, but it does have to do with metabolism.

 

When I joined a gym, I was set up on a workout regimen. I got measured every 6 weeks. I was working so hard and did not lose a single inch or pound, I gained in both areas.

 

Anyway, if you are able to lose weight by dieting (eating healthy), I would do exactly what you plan to. You will be healthier taking off the pounds first and maybe you'll be able to maintain or keep it off by exercising. But, if exercising starts causing you to gain, there really could be a metabolic issue going on! You're not crazy. Go see an endocrinologist and have a full work-up done. There are a lot of things that could be causing a problem and it would be worth checking out. I'm planning on doing that very soon. I'll be 40 in less than three years and I want all my levels tested anyways. I'm not going to be very nice if I start going through menopause and nothing I'm doing is working. I'm terrified of that. I expect to get old, but I really want to feel good and feel in shape. Working out for 9 months and eating well and not losing a single pound or inch is beyond frustrating. It's even more frustrating to put on a pair of jeans that I could zip when I began exercising all those months ago and to not be able to get them zipped. Seriously. I threw them away last week. I could not torture myself anymore.

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This past time I exercised for almost three months. I just could not take continuing to exercise at that level, with no results. I enjoyed running, but not *that* much, especially when I have so much weight to lose.

 

I normally do have a hard time losing any weight at all, and I know that I do have a very sluggish metabolism, but I did lose weight a few years ago on Weight Watchers. It was slow going, much more so than anyone else I knew who did WW, but it did come off, a pound or so a week. But each time I added exercise, I would start gaining again, and eventually I got frustrated and gave the whole thing up-- not having really made the connection at the time that it was starting the exercise that caused the problem. I just saw that I was working really hard at losing weight and failing, so I thought if I can weigh this much, and eat whatever I want and not worry about exercising, or diet and exercise like crazy and weigh the same amount, I'm going to do the former!! :tongue_smilie:

 

It does sound like you could have a metabolic problem. You have worked harder than I have, and still are having no results!! I can imagine how frustrated you must be. I hope you figure out something that will help.

 

I feel pretty confident about WW, and I'm going to get started with that this week. I'll take short walks daily, but that's it for right now.

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For those of you doing weight watchers' date=' do you do the weekly meetings or the online version?[/quote']

 

I've tried both and the meetings work much better for me. I don't even think the WW website is that great-- slow, hard to navigate, unfriendly format. And of course the accountability factor is much higher in person. If someone is really serious about losing weight, and can afford it, I'd definitely recommend the meetings.

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I'd double check what you're eating.

 

I tend to eat more (bigger appetite) when exercising which therefore slows/stalls weight loss. I quickly uncovered my issue by keeping a detailed food journal of every.single.bite.of.food that went into my mouth as the day went on. Not guessing at night, but carefully measuring and analyzing what I ate. It was sobering & shocking and took 3-4 weeks of that to get me in the habit of serving correct portions/high quality foods to be equipped to eat-to-lose WHILE exercising. I cannot lose weight just by controlling diet.

 

For me, there is a sweet spot of reduced calorie eating & exercise which will yield results. It took me quite a while to find it, but it was always tweaking the food as the exercise wasn't the issue (Unless you've been doing the same routine for a while and your body has adjusted, in which case cross train or do interval training to shake things up).

 

Eating 1700 quality calories per day PLUS exercising 30minutes (burning 200-300 calories) is my ideal for losing 1-2lbs a week (so, netting 1400-1500 calories per day- NOT MUCH FOOD). I lost 50lbs after my son was born, and had to fight for every single pound.

 

Losing weight is hard. But unless you have a biological issue, there's nothing magical/mystical about it. I hate to say it, but it IS for the majority of people, basic math.

 

If you are eating your target calories & exercising and still not losing weight, you should probably go to a doctor.

 

Laura

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This article in Time magazine says that exercise can actually undermine your weight loss efforts.

 

Like I need more reasons to feel discouraged.

 

 

I foudn this article fascinating and useful, if anyone skipped over it. Its also my experience that exercise doesnt really help me lose weight- only watching what I eat does. Exercise makes you healthier, but I would focus more on the food side of things, and just enjoy a moderate amount of exercise rather than flogging yourself.

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Something to keep in mind is that water weight is a huge factor for women. I'd encourage you to not judge your results on a week-by-week basis, but look at it over the course of a month or even two or three months. You may not be losing weight right away, but if you're eating fewer calories than you need and exercising, your body ultimately will give up the pounds.

 

Also, people in my WW meeting would talk about the "one-week delay"--how if you have a good week, it won't show on the scale until your following weigh-in (same with bad weeks).

 

Your monthly cycle can throw things off quite a bit too.

 

Just keep at it and you'll get there...you didn't gain all your weight overnight, it takes time to lose it, no matter how hard you work at it! I have to tell myself the same thing all the time...it's hard, but it is worth it.

...but that's what they said they did do. The OP started in the summer, and another has been at it since FEB! That's many months of data that they are judging this by.

 

This is a very interesting topic....as I too am doing the whole weight loss thing. :lurk5: (This needs to be a smile face with a plate of carrots!)

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I haven't read this book (though I will add it to my list, which grows faster than I can read! :) ), but I do have a question about the part that I put in bold. I thought that one of the aspects of the so-called French paradox is that French food typically involves very rich, fatty sauces. Now, TO ME this doesn't seem paradoxical at all, because if you're eating plenty of fat, you have energy and feel full and satisfied, and so are less likely to over eat. The "devil" is in the sugar, which the French diet is low in, isn't it? Well, I was just curious if this book (or is it an article) recommends low-fat?

 

 

French do seem to eat fat but they don't .

You know that the sugar transfornms to fat in the body . French don't eat as much sugar and carbs as here . Here you find sugar even in bread!

The water is mostly replaced with coke (or even worse with "diet coke"-you can't trick the brain ) , the vegetables are replaced with "french" fries (which I don't know why are they named that way ) , the fruit is replaced with ice cream !

In France people eat more vegetables and usually water or wine for a drink.

We like cheese , full of fat and protein which satisfies our appetite for a long time . For dessert we have yogurt or fruit or both. We don't do a diet , don't have a fitness room or equipment but we do like to take long walks. We love dark chocolate. We like to cook from scratch and hate this microwave foods loaded with chemicals.

Also , there are not restaurants type all you can eat ...If we work , we come home for lunch or pack it from home. Fruit and cheese or yogurt is not missing.

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I've lost a lot of weight since Feb doing step aerobics for at least an hour a day, and watching what I eat. I hit a plateau. and felt burned out, so I cut back the intensity. When I cut down the intensity, my weight lost started back. I came to realize that the strenuous exercise does indeed make me eat more than I otherwise would.

 

I really get so many benefits from daily exercise besides weight loss. I move more the rest of the day because my energy is up, my hormones are regulated by it even before losing any weight.. I just have to keep it a little less strenuous and more enjoyable.

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  • 5 months later...

I'm the same way. i've posted about it before. Unfortunately, for me even watching what I eat doesn't work. If I eat what people here would consider a very healthy diet in what they would consider a proper portion, I will gain tons. I simply don't lose weight. If I want to maintain where I am, I need to eat a regular diet including lots of fats and sugars in fairly large portions. Honestly, I've just given it up. I can lose only if starving myself or exercising to an extreme that I just don't have the time for. It just isn't healthy. I do realize that I am actually an extremely healthy person. I am just fat. I've come to the conclusion that the two are not necessarily exclusive. :D

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If you are limiting your calories and exercising and not losing weight, I would have your thyroid levels checked. I had always easily maintained my weight until a couple of years after I had my daughter. After I had her, I easily got back to my prepregnancy weight. Then sometime afterwards, I found I was no longer able to lose weight, even with following a 1200 calorie diet. Then I slowly started gaining weight. I really fought it, but in the end wound up gaining about 10 pounds.

 

I thought it was just a result of getting older and a slower metabolism, but then a couple of years ago, my doctor said my thyroid levels were within normal limits but just shy of being hypothyroid. It turned out I have Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and just starting on a very low dose of thyroid meds has completely turned my life around, including now being able to lose weight and maintain it as I always have in the past.

 

Fortunately for me, my doctor is really with it because I'm sure there are many who would not have treated me with a borderline number.

 

Lisa

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I run 35-40 miles/week, and I don't lose weight unless I'm very careful about what I eat. Even then, it is way harder than one would think it should be for me. Also, any alcohol in my system seems to promote weight retention.

 

I've been reading a couple of sports nutrition books recently. Some interesting, new theories are out there regarding glycemic load (not just index). One suggests there perhaps is a geometric progression with higher glycemic food. So, if you eat a bigger portion, it isn't a linear relationship to the weight you will retain, but a geometric one! :eek: The advice being to try to think in small portion sizes for higher glycemic food, as it may help you stay on the lower end of the curve... (from Nutrition Periodization for Endurance Athletes by Bob Seebohar).

 

I can't say I have any track record to quote here but...I agree. I was reading Fat Flush and realized that her diet was way too low in calories as well as very tedious. However, I was interested it trying it with more calories. I have been following a FF/WW hybrid for a few days now. I eat NO grain and minimal dairy. I have lost 1.5 pounds and 3/4 of an inch from my waist just this first week.

I can't really shout that from the roof tops but what is SO amazing to me is how easy it makes staying with in my points allotment. I just don't get grumpy-hungry, or frantic-hungry...gone also is bored-hungry. KWIM all those types of hungry that undermine you around...say 3 o'clock in the afternoon?

I also work out a little. I walk leisurely every day and have strted this tape.

http://www.amazon.com/Personal-Training-Jackie-Power-Circuit/dp/B002L6HDAQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=dvd&qid=1271507308&sr=1-1

I do this tape about 2x/week.

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My thyroid is FINE:glare: I wish it was that.

 

I had that as well. For 6 weeks I cut out all pop, ate less and better (close to Weight Watchers points) exercised 20-30 minutes a day, 6 days a week---various activities and did not loose AT ALL. It is very discouraging. In addition to the planned exercise, we live on a small hobby farm so I am out doing chores 3 times a day, hauling hay, water, riding horses, etc. I am not just sitting here doing nothing.

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I really do believe that either of two things is happening:

 

1. you are gaining muscle (which weighs more) when exercising, and then when you don't, you lose it.

 

2. you are eating too many calories when exercising. Exercising makes you hungry, and you have to be very careful about what you eat in order to lose weight. Even little changes like adding mayo and cheese or a small bag of chips can keep you from losing weight.

 

I hear what you're saying, but I really think if you stuck with something for a year, you'd see real results. I've noticed it takes a while for my metabolism to change. I lost ten pounds last year from riding my bike and very carefully watching what I ate. Then I stopped and gained it all back.

 

I started up again several months ago, and though I saw increased toning, I didn't lose a pound. I have added much more serious total body weight training every other day (alternating the next day with riding my bike), and after two months, I dropped 4.5 pounds in the last two weeks. I actually gained a couple of pounds at the beginning. It was very frustrating.

 

But, I am very careful (for the most part) about what I eat, and I exercise at least 6 days a week (40 min weight training one day, 60 minutes bike ride the next). Truthfully, the bike ride only burns 400 calories, so a bowl of ice cream could erase that effort. If I don't squeeze exercise in that day, I walk at night. Though this is not a big fat burner, it helps the metabolism.

 

PS -- My best weight loss was a year-long journey. Right out of college (after gaining more than the freshman 15), I decided to walk for at least 45 minutes a day and tried to eat healthier. Over two years, I lost 35 pounds -- I was a size 4, 105/110 pounds, and I was very fit. I didn't have to try as hard as I do now.

 

Now, I try harder but can only dream of being that size (LOL) -- With a little more, I can be a constant size 6, I believe, but I think my size 4 days are over. But, my point is, it was a two-year journey and its focus was on getting healthy. I was looking for a lifestyle, not a diet.

Edited by nestof3
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I haven't read this book (though I will add it to my list, which grows faster than I can read! :) ), but I do have a question about the part that I put in bold. I thought that one of the aspects of the so-called French paradox is that French food typically involves very rich, fatty sauces. Now, TO ME this doesn't seem paradoxical at all, because if you're eating plenty of fat, you have energy and feel full and satisfied, and so are less likely to over eat. The "devil" is in the sugar, which the French diet is low in, isn't it? Well, I was just curious if this book (or is it an article) recommends low-fat?

 

 

It is a fantastic book, I recommend it, too. For the rest? No, no low fat. SMALL portions.

 

IE: A group of Americans I know went to Vancouver for the weekend, and one of them was telling me how all of the food was smaller up there-even the McDonald's. When they asked for a restaurant, a local thin woman looked at them (who were all overweight) and told them the "American portion' restaurant was thataway.

 

Serve yourself your normal portion and cut it in half. When I eat like that the weight drops off drastically-and I don't exercise. I walk, and I will be walking much more soon, but I stopped being a gym rat when I realized it was doing nothing other than draining my pocketbook.

Edited by justamouse
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I'm not positive that this holds true for everyone, but I gain weight when I exercise because I'm shedding fat but putting on muscle. Fat weighs less. To me, the more important thing is if my body is changing - firming up, slimming down, etc.

HTH

 

Yes. People put too much emphasis on what they weigh, and not enough on their fat-to-muscle ratio.

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Over *time*, yes, muscle weighs more than fat but how much weight in muscle do you really think you are gaining in a month? Maybe 1-2 pounds. So the "gaining muscle as I lose fat" argument isn't very accurate. You can't build a pound of muscle in a week, but you can definitely LOSE a pound of fat in that week.

 

I think the main reason that people believe they can't lose weight as well when they are exercising as opposed to only watching diet is that exercising makes you hungry and can increase your calorie needs depending on how intensely you are working out. If you aren't counting calories closely, it is VERY easy to eat more than you need compared to when you are not exercising regularly! Ask me how I know. :001_huh: Now, I'm sure the rare person for whatever physiological reason really can't lose weight from exercise combined with healthy eating, but for most people exercising is important to keep muscles from deteriorating (muscle building boosts your metabolism more than just eating good foods!), to keep your bones strong, and for cardio benefits. And I DO believe it helps one stay trim, lose weight. It may be trickier for some to get the right calorie intake as they increase exercise, but it's worth it.

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