Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

Lanny

Article: LASIK eye surgery needs to stop (ex FDA adviser)

Recommended Posts

Although I am very, very nearsighted, I’ve always taken my glasses off to read and most of the time when I am at home and whenever I’m sitting at work. With my glasses off, I still have perfect close up vision, even though most people I know are using cheaters by my age. I actually don’t mind things not being perfectly clear all of the time. Sometimes I even like it, as for example, I don’t have to always see what needs cleaning. My son said the same thing when he first got glasses in high school. It took him a long time to consistently start wearing them because he said it was overwhelming to suddenly have everything in perfect focus all of the time.

My husband, on the other hand, was one of those people who put his glasses on first thing in the morning and took them off last thing at night. But even though I can’t really read even the top line of an eye chart, his vision was always much worse than mine before surgery.

Edited by Frances

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a newbie here, but I just had to chime in. I got LASIK and it was life-changing! I didnt realize a person could see individual leaves on trees until after I had LASIK. Glasses and contacts couldnt correct my vision enough or correctly. And I didnt get glasses until I was six - that was when I found out that I was supposed to be able to see people's facial features., including my own (in a mirror). Makes sense why I am terrible with facial recognition now. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, vonfirmath said:

 

My dad grew up VERY poor and he remembers wondering why his friends enjoyed playing baseball. Baseball to him was having a ball fall out of the sky to smack you in the face. There was no way to see it coming to catch, etc.  HE didn't realize the teacher was writing things on the board related to the teaching but thought he had to listen and take notes to figure out what he needed to learn. He finally got checked out and got glasses and discovered a whole new world. Including that the teacher was actually writjng notes/working problems on the board!

I remember copying the person next to me when they copied things off the board as I couldn't see the board. I then felt guilty because in my head copying someone's paper meant cheating. But I had to do it. I have no idea why I didn't tell someone I couldn't see the board - that never occurred to me. 

And as an aside, I'm also terrible at facial recognition - I do wonder after reading the others saying this if it is because of not seeing them well as a child!

And yeah, had no idea you could see the leaves on trees before glasses - I thought they all looked like a painting a kid did - one green blob. Or blades of grass!

My eyes changed so quickly that I often wasn't wearing proper prescription, and several times had issues with them being ground wrong or fit wrong so that everything looked hilly, etc. None of that helped my coordination when it came to sports. Possibly why I hated softball. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Arctic Mama said:

Okay that’s true the higher prescriptions are more expensive in the truly custom range.  But eh, my bifocals were about $550 last time and that was with insurance, so it’s all relative 😆

Hubby’s cheap solution is wearing his glasses with non-script goggles or safety glasses over them - that’s worked well for soccer and wood working and home remodel and such.  In higher impact sports I don’t think it would be safe to not get actual prescription goggles, but swimming hasn’t even given either of us issues. 
 

Either way, he isn’t a candidate for lasik at all and I’m afraid of it, so cute glasses it is!

These do go up to -8.  Also, in the water you generally do not need the exact same prescription as out of the water.  If eyes are different, buy two pairs as the lenses pop in and out.  Much cheaper than optometrist goggles when you are basically just trying to see the wall or the scoreboard at a swim meet.

https://www.swimoutlet.com/p/tyr-corrective-optical-goggles-3465/

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/15/2019 at 7:09 PM, Teaching3bears said:

What is PKR?  How is it different from lasik?  Can it help for someone who has very bad nearsightedness as well as farsightedness and retina problems that are causing bluriness?  I can no longer see street signs with glasses and I am having trouble with reading when there’s no sun.  I already have dry eyes and do not want that to get worse nor do I want to risk any blindness or double vision.

 

On 11/17/2019 at 11:21 AM, Lanny said:

Several years ago, I was surprised to see (in an online ad for the Texas Tech University Eye Clinic) that they were still doing PRK, in addition to LASIK.  My impression is that PRK is more invasive? There is an Implant with PRK? 

It's my understanding that PRK came before Lasik. Instead of making a flap and lifting it up, they burn off the top bit of the cornea with acid. It takes longer to recover from, and your eyesight isn't instantly better like Lasik (because you have to wait for your cornea to grow back). But after it's done, you don't have a flap, which is nice. 

My regular eye doctor is amazing and wonderful, and he recommended the guy who did my surgery, and told me that if I was his sister, that's the guy he'd recommend. The surgeon told me I wasn't a good candidate for Lasik because I have really large pupils, but I could do PRK. He did one eye at a time (because during recovery, you can't see well out of the eye that's been done). 

On 11/17/2019 at 9:50 PM, Arctic Mama said:

My brother’s first comment after glasses was “I didn’t realize you could actually see pine needles on the trees!” 😆

When I was a kid we lived in Salt Lake City, on the bench of the mountains. After I'd got a new prescription once, I was amazed that the mountains had trees on them - I thought they just had blurry edges!

On 11/17/2019 at 11:09 PM, Frances said:

Although I am very, very nearsighted, I’ve always taken my glasses off to read and most of the time when I am at home and whenever I’m sitting at work. With my glasses off, I still have perfect close up vision, even though most people I know are using cheaters by my age.

My eyes were so bad before surgery that I couldn't read without my glasses or contacts on. The book would have to be basically touching my nose for me to read the words, and then my eyes would cross because it was so close. 

When I was doing the prep work for my surgery, everyone (doctors and nurses) made sure to point out that I would most likely need some sort of reading glasses in the not too distant future (I was in my mid-30s), even if I got the surgery. I'm okay with that!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/17/2019 at 8:49 AM, Garga said:

RIght.  I had 20/1200 and used to try to explain to people that by the time my eyes looked at something as far away as my elbow, it was already blurry.  I couldn’t even see my own elbow without blur.  I never, ever, ever did anything ever without glasses.

However, people used to randomly say to me, “You’re so smart,” because of the glasses.  It used to happen all the time.  But no one said it ever again after I got the surgery and stopped wearing glasses. I thought that was interesting from a sociology POV.

 

 

Well, lol, that seals it - no surgery for me. 😉 My vision is terrible and I have astigmatism so contacts don’t quite fully correct, though good enough. I’ve opted not to do the surgery because, shudder, the idea of surgery on my eyes gives me the creeps. But I think it’s an option people have and I don’t know that it should be taken. My sister had it done with a lot of initial pain. My mom had it done but it only rid her of the need to use bifocals. She still needs readers. 

Me? I like these coke bottles I wear around... probably because people assume I’m smart. 😛 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/17/2019 at 11:21 AM, Lanny said:

 

Someone upthread mentioned the possibility of Retina problems?  Anyone who is being watched for Retina problems should go to a Retina specialist.  Never read in a moving vehicle (car, airplane, etc.)

 

I do see a retina specialist.  He never mentioned not reading in a car or anything.  What can that do?

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...