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DawnM

Math Majors

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What are your math-y kids majoring in and going into?

 

We have some ideas, but would like more.

 

Middle son is quite good in math and science (although doesn't want patient care as blood and guts make him queasy).

 

He had thought he liked editing, and does, but is thinking of something more in math.

 

Something with good job prospects would be fantastic!

 

HELP!

 

Thanks.

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My mathy brother is finishing up a PhD in statistics and has plenty of excellent job prospects. He did a concurrent BS in Math and MS in Statistics before entering the PhD program.

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Economics, finance

Statistics, data science

Astronomy (lots of math, zero blood!)

Engineering - lots of subfields here

Computer science - doesn't require a ton of math, but logical thinking skills required overlap with math

(Computer graphics is a very matty subfield)

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Quite a few people working in Engineering, especially Software Engineering, have a B.S. degree in Math.  I still receive emails about temporary contract positions.   I once shared a room with about 6 other people and probably several of them had a B.S. in Math. 

 

Below position requires a current SECRET clearance: **Final Secret Clearance to start (mandatory)**   This is Computer Security related.

Degree in Computer Science, Systems Engineering, or Software Engineering is preferred. Related degrees will be considered.

Education / Experience:
Bachelor's degree and typically 2 or more years' experience in an engineering classification or a Master's degree with experience in an engineering classification. Required: Bachelor or Master degree from an accredited course of study, in engineering, com

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My oldest is a chemE. My current college student (math and physics double major) will be applying to physics grad programs in the fall. He loves math, but he loves physics more. He had zero interest in competition math after his first physics course. It was physics all the way from that point on.

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Well, I got my BS in mathematics, then promptly went into aircraft maintenance in the USAF.  Then became a SAHM mom.

 

So I'm no help. (LOL)

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Ds is getting his BS in math with a minor in physics and possibly a computer science minor as well. He's not settled on career yet.

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My dd started out just CompSci, but added a math minor, and now has decided she wants to double major CompSci/Math (and still planning a minor in Robotics).

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Math.  She plans to get a Ph.D. and do, ummm, math.  Math research is not at all what I would have envisioned (if I had bothered to envision such a thing); it is quite collaborative and social.  It does require a pretty intense devotion to math, though.

 

I know many math majors who are actuaries.  That seems like a solid way to earn a living.

 

I keep running into industrial engineers lately as well.  Not that I've actually run into this guy or that this is remotely relevant, but I just read that Georgia Tech's field goal kicker has had a big week, being both drafted by the Carolina Panthers and graduating in IE.

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Just wanted to add that my planned Math-major dd has been trying to convince her fairly math-phobic twin to also major (or minor) in math.  That dd just took Stats and is thrilled that it should be her last math class ever.  But she has also fallen in love with Logic (through Philosophy - she's currently taking Symbolic Logic and wants to do Modal Logic next).  So her twin thinks if she's good at logic, she should give math another try - she did just score highest in her class in Stats... but I think that's a non-starter. ;)

 

My youngest (16) is really good at math, but doesn't have any interest in majoring in it.  She's thinking of going into Business, probably Marketing, but isn't closing the door on Finance yet.  Enough time to decide that later.

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Oldest: Double major in math & cs. Works as a software engineer.

2nd oldest: Double major in math & biochem. 3rd year PhD candidate in computational quantum chemistry.

3rd oldest: Double majoring in math & cs. Finishing his freshman undergrad year & interning this summer in software engineering.

Probably more math majors to come...

:)

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Thanks guys.

He says he wants nothing to do with finance.  DH is an accountant, that may be why.  Who knows.

 

But the other fields may interest him.  He is looking at various kinds of engineering, and then we need to find some other fields as well.

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He can come work for me!!!

 

I manage a team of 14 data analysts. We build predictive and reactive data models for our company. Having taken a computer class or two wouldn't hurt, but frankly the computer part is the easiest thing for me to teach a new hire. What I can't teach is a feel for numbers and curiousity as to why the numbers look the way they do. I am always on the hunt for math majors when hiring.

 

Data analytics is a growing field and excellent career opportunities.

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My math major son is now a software engineer in Silicon Valley at a household-name software company. He literally works his dream job. (Oddly enough, he never took a programming class in college. Go figure!)

 

The funny thing is that the folks there consider it easy to learn a new language, so when they are selecting people for a project, knowledge of the computer language to be used is a non-factor. What matters is your background -- statistics, analytics, logic, skills with algorithms, etc. It is assumed that any intelligent person can master a language easily and quickly, so it is the other skills that matter.

 

It was his skills with algorithms and with data analytics that caught the recruiter's eye -- he was also an econ major, and he spent his summers in college analyzing LARGE quantities of data looking for this trend or that trend.

Edited by Gwen in VA
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Friend's son is a math and computer science major.  That combo is very in demand right now.  He got a very well paying job immediately after graduation.

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Older DS has considered Cryptography and Computational Neurobiology.

 

I studied Population Dynamics (a subfield of Mathematical Biology), and later worked in the policy division of the Ministry of Health doing all the statistics.  

 

Have you looked at wikipedia? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathematics  Scroll down to computational mathematics.

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There's an NFL player (I think for Baltimore) who is a Math genius. I think he's working on his Ph.D. at Penn.? He  knows that Football will not be possible forever, and he loves Math. He gave a talk to the CIA or DIA or NSA (I can't recall which agency) about some Math thing he is working on.   There are a lot of things one can do with a B.S. or M.S. in Math.  The same with a B.S. or M.S. in Physics.  

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Infomatics.

 

Architecture

 

meteorology

 

epidemiology

 

banker

 

urban planning

 

technical writing

 

Also, a lot of technical jobs and trades need great math skills.

 

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There's an NFL player (I think for Baltimore) who is a Math genius. I think he's working on his Ph.D. at Penn.? He  knows that Football will not be possible forever, and he loves Math. He gave a talk to the CIA or DIA or NSA (I can't recall which agency) about some Math thing he is working on.   There are a lot of things one can do with a B.S. or M.S. in Math.  The same with a B.S. or M.S. in Physics.  

 

A lot of Canadian football players in the CFL seem to become accountants, or sometimes they do both together.

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There's an NFL player (I think for Baltimore) who is a Math genius. I think he's working on his Ph.D. at Penn.? He  knows that Football will not be possible forever, and he loves Math. He gave a talk to the CIA or DIA or NSA (I can't recall which agency) about some Math thing he is working on.   There are a lot of things one can do with a B.S. or M.S. in Math.  The same with a B.S. or M.S. in Physics.  

He got his bachelor's and master's degrees from Penn State, and he's currently doing his PhD at MIT during the football off-season.  I've seen him at our math seminars.

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Dh majored in math and comp sci. He works in IT, and the degree got him the foot in the door, most would not hire without it, but he had had to add professional qualifications to it.

 

Comp sci security is a fairly big deal right now and if companies have government contracts, they can not hire non citizens for those positions. So if one can get the security clearance, it can be a really great and very interesting job.

 

There are some good careers in statistics. The NSA has very generous grants for math majors who come work for them after graduation, and NASA recommends that anyone coming to work for them, regardless of what type of research or engineering pick up a math minor or double major with it.

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My dd is a Statistics major. She fell in love with the subject when she took AP Stat in high school. She doesn't yet know what she wants to do with the degree though.

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My math-y, math-loving dd went from wanting to major in engineering, to math (before enrolling in college), to Athletic Training, and now wants to switch to Psychology. 😳 So I'm really of no help whatsoever. 😜

 

She plans to be a Physical Therapist eventually, so her undergrad degree choice doesn't really matter in her case... she's just putting in the hours at this point.

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We have started talking and will do more this summer.  I will be talking to him about all the options listed on this thread.

 

One thing he seemed to perk up about was becoming a data analyst, which looks like it would need an IT or Statistics major, or a combination of the two?  And maybe an MA.   But one step at a time.

 

 

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I got a BS degree in math with a minor in business. I wish that I had pursued a degree that was an actual career. Having a degree in math is fine, but I left college not knowing what kind of job I wanted. I worked in finance for several years before having kids and staying home. I'm facing re-entering the job market in my 50s. If I had become an accountant, actuary, or engineer, it would be much easier. 

 

My advice to my kids is get a career, not just a degree.  

 

 

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I got a BS degree in math with a minor in business. I wish that I had pursued a degree that was an actual career. Having a degree in math is fine, but I left college not knowing what kind of job I wanted. I worked in finance for several years before having kids and staying home. I'm facing re-entering the job market in my 50s. If I had become an accountant, actuary, or engineer, it would be much easier. 

 

My advice to my kids is get a career, not just a degree.  

 

I'm not sure about accounting or actuarial science, but it is quite difficult for engineers I know who have been SAHM to get back into careers as well. Knowledge becomes outdated rapidly in this day and age. 

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I got a BS degree in math with a minor in business. I wish that I had pursued a degree that was an actual career. Having a degree in math is fine, but I left college not knowing what kind of job I wanted. I worked in finance for several years before having kids and staying home. I'm facing re-entering the job market in my 50s. If I had become an accountant, actuary, or engineer, it would be much easier. 

 

My advice to my kids is get a career, not just a degree.  

 

Yes, that is what we are looking for, which is why I asked the question.

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I got a BS degree in math with a minor in business. I wish that I had pursued a degree that was an actual career. Having a degree in math is fine, but I left college not knowing what kind of job I wanted. I worked in finance for several years before having kids and staying home. I'm facing re-entering the job market in my 50s. If I had become an accountant, actuary, or engineer, it would be much easier. 

 

My advice to my kids is get a career, not just a degree.  

I don't think any degree gets you a "career" per se -  it gives you a knowledge base - Math and Physics are strong degrees that show future employers that you were willing to work hard for that degree. Tech companies like those degrees as well.

Edited by MarkT

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I don't think any degree gets you a "career" per se -  it gives you a knowledge base - Math and Physics are strong degrees that show future employers that you were willing to work hard for that degree. Tech companies like those degrees as well.

 

Somewhat true.  It certainly doesn't guarantee a job.

 

But some degrees are more specific and some degrees/schools have connections.  DH got an MA in Business Taxation and his school had a 100% success rate in getting their students placed in local firms.  Not sure if that is still true, but it was back in the day.

And my degrees were very specific for the jobs I have had.

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I got a BS degree in math with a minor in business. I wish that I had pursued a degree that was an actual career. Having a degree in math is fine, but I left college not knowing what kind of job I wanted. I worked in finance for several years before having kids and staying home. I'm facing re-entering the job market in my 50s. If I had become an accountant, actuary, or engineer, it would be much easier.

 

My advice to my kids is get a career, not just a degree.

I don't think it's easier to re-enter the work force after any extended absence.

 

That's more about keeping current on skills in field, doing continuing education in field, maintaining a professional network. It really helps if you can continue very part time or contract assignments. Networking and being current in field is much bigger than what you degree was before hiatus.

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My sister found accounting easy to re-enter after staying home for about 10 years.

 

This is her background:

 

1. She is a CPA a master's degree in accounting from a local regional school

2. Had less than 10 years experience as a CPA for businesses; maybe closer to five (I can't remember exactly when she made the switch from working general business to accounting)

3. Had kept up with her annual CPE requirement through online self-paced courses

4. Volunteered as treasurer for her kids' preschool; helped with church accounting

5. Did not do any networking

6. Had been out of workforce for 10 years

 

When her oldest reached kindergarten age, she sent her resume to a placement firm in her area. (Could have been a temp firm as she wanted a part-time job.) They were optimistic and thought they had a good fit. They called back that day/or within a couple of days to ask when she could start with the company. She never even talked to the company that hired her; She was hired sight unseen. She was hired as part-time, because that is what she wanted/could handle.

 

Six years later, she is now full-time, but she sets her own hours and works remotely as needed. Her job has expanded from what she was hired to do. (She may have taken over what her original boss did, but I'm not 100 percent sure.) During this time, her company was bought by another company, and she was offered a promotion to handle accounting for the larger company. She turned down the promotion. Still happy with her job at the local company.

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The world can always use GOOD math and science teachers.  There seem to be far to many weak ones trying to do the job of teaching math to others.

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