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Matryoshka

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Matryoshka last won the day on May 22

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About Matryoshka

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  1. Just search for the title you want in German. Many seem to come from a store called Momox, which I think ships from Germany, but if you order from Amazon US they still only charge $3.99 shipping. For example, here's Pippi Langstrumpf on Amazon US. Free audiobook with US Audible, new hardcover is $11.16 + $3.99 shipping, but there's a used version for $4.49 plus $3.99 shipping. Here's Emil und die Detektive, which is available in all kinds of formats - in this case for some reason a new version (8.33 + Free shipping!) is cheaper than a used one (??) And they even have a lot of Janosch - here's one. When my kids were young, I couldn't find anything in German on Amazon US, but now I can find almost anything I look for... I just typed in "Grammatik" - and apparently there's a whole host of German grammar books in German as well. Ooo - and you can get the Kunterbunt Fibel there too - that's what my kids' Saturday School used for 1st grade. ETA: Just reread you were also looking for yourself, not just the kids. Same thing. I read a lot of books in German. I sometimes have a hard time finding German authors who aren't too depressing or take themselves way too seriously, but I have found some - I'll also read Scandinavian books translated into German. I tend to read print books, but Amazon US now has a wide selection of German books on audio and kindle as well.
  2. You're making me feel old because when my kids were young we didn't have streaming services and things like that weren't available on YouTube or from Amazon.de yet. We had a great Saturday School with a huge lending library of print, audio, and video, so I mostly got stuff there... for summer work, I did get them workbooks off of Amazon.de. I've noticed lately that US Amazon has been getting a lot more German books and other resources, so check there too... I'm mostly buying for myself these days, and I can find most stuff on the US site in good used condition. Also kindle books and audio. But I'm not as sure about kids' books and workbooks.
  3. Yeah, that's what I've been thinking. Dd was planning on going back even if classes were online, but as this is playing out is starting to change her mind. She'd also be off-campus, but we'd have to sign a lease, unless the places somehow make an exception this year. Now she's almost hoping they just go online, and even stay that way for the spring. She doesn't want to even think about finding an apartment mid-year amid all this - and then again, would they make her sign a 1-year lease? That wouldn't work at all. She's been floating the idea of moving to the nearby city where she lived her last semester of CC, with a friend who just graduated and will be working, if the university allows her to take her classes online for the year. Fortunately accounting is a fairly online-friendly major...
  4. I saw a clip on the news about a beach somewhere that the lifeguards were still supposed to rescue from water and if necessary give chest compressions, but not mouth-to-mouth; for that they said they had EMTs nearby for backup.
  5. This is what I keep thinking. With this more and more seeming to be driven so much by superspreader events, I keep worrying people could be lulled into a sense of 'see, it's fine'. Until suddenly, it very much is not.
  6. LOL. Which is why I decided to go convert everything to ml for you, because at least then apples = apples and not oranges! I usually don't convert, because Amercian recipes I just use the cups and spoons I have here, and I have a metric scale, a weird gram measuring cone, and liquid measuring cups scaled in l/ml if I have a recipe from elsewhere. I think I've always just assumed t/T was fairly consistent, good to see I was right!
  7. Whoops, it's 1/3 cup. I usually end up using about a half of a small can, which says it's 160ml, so about 80ml? Ooo, I just did looked up the conversion, and that's just about spot-on. Also looks like there's a difference in US cups and UK cups. US cup = 236.6ml, UK cup = 284.1ml, so a not insignificant ~50ml difference. Yeesh. Why don't we all use metric?? eta: in case there's a US/UK discrepancy, t. refers to teaspoon, and T to tablespoon, which here = 3 teaspoons. Calculator says t = 4.9ml (let's say 5!) and T = 14.7ml (so, ~15)
  8. You use the poles with the velcro hand-grips, not just a loop, right? I'm thinking of getting some poles for myself, as I'm really not a runner, but I'd like to have a way to make walking more vigorous. I see some do have rubber tips so I could use them on pavement, which is really my only option atm. Do you have a kind you'd recommend? Yay for baking and boo for 50mph winds and cold. It's finally warming up here. Per usual, it's cold then hot, with very little warm inbetween. I baked the black-bean brownies the other day, but they get a bit dry after a few days in the fridge. The carrot slices I make stay nice and moist - if you like carrot cake, you should try the slices. No baking, even.
  9. I also apologize on behalf of my state. We should all be staying close to home! Dd asked if I'd consider going with her to a beach here in MA, which are currently only open for 'transitory' use - aka, no sitting, just walking or running. I'd be okay taking an outside beach walk, as long as it wasn't too crowded. Big if. But no overnights, and no leaving the state! That's how it spreads to what are currently lower-risk areas, people!
  10. Ugh. Like Google doesn't have enough info on us all already...
  11. I used to love The Three Investigators. Alfred Hitchcock, for some reason, always showed up in the last chapter. Investigators are three boys, middle grade age.
  12. This was the story of my life until my kids were about 10. Oh, the guilt trips. We spent the whole day, every yesr, running around doing whatever mom and MIL wanted, paying homage, and oh the guilt trips if I muttered any complaint. I finally had it and told mom I would spend a day, any day, of the year doing what she wanted and that could be her mother's day, but I was going to do what I wanted that day with my immediate family in the years they had at home, because I was the actively mothering one and also when my kids had kids I wasn't going to do this to them, and I was going to have mother's day while they were still kids goshdarnit. And stuck to my guns. Ah, peace. Made sure to set aside the other day (usually the Saturday of the same week) and make a ridiculous fuss about her. Sent dh to his mom's to do the same.
  13. Poison Ivy is evil. It's everywhere here... it's a hazard starting about now even when walking/running on the street, as it grows along both sides and gets really large and enthusiastic and stars growing right over the pavement... 😱
  14. I'd say informed choice and involved parenting, no matter what the schooling option. I feel like I've seen it all now. I've seen some kids who were homeschooled who attended selective colleges and thrived, and others who got very little practical education and are flailing as adults. But I realize I've seen the same from some public schooled kids. Heck, I've seen kids from the pressure-cooker schools around here who are somehow still managing to skate by in the non-honors track that aren't college-ready and flail. (Others in that same environment rise to the pressure and thrive. Others who are crushed by the pressure and burn out.) Are those ps slackers still better off than their not-college-ready unschooled counterparts? Don't rightly know. It depends. On the kid, on their interests, somewhat on growing up. And if the parents are still supportive. I think you really have to look at each kid and figure it out, and it's a moving target, and then later the kid still says you didn't do it right even when you were getting their input and trying your darndest to get it right all along. But if the parent loses interest and abdicates responsibility, kids can get lost no matter what unless they're very self-driven. And then there are the kids who are so resistant that even involved parents have trouble. I had always planned on hsing straight through, but my kids all decided to try high school. Ours is a high-performing pressure cooker, and my kids were in mostly honors classes to start because there really is a dichotomy between the honors classes and the regular, where there are still a lot of slackers. One stayed and graduated. One came home after two years and did mostly DE. The youngest started earlier (when others went to hs) and tried a couple of years of middle school (in and out, another thing I said I'd never do). She actually liked middle school fine. Could.not.take the hs. No more 'advisory' period in the morning to get acclimated - it was go, go, go all day long. Couldn't sleep, having panic attacks. School's suggestion if she couldn't get up so early was to put her in remedial flex-type classes. Took her out, switched to DE (she didn't want to work with me anymore, which was a big part of the reason she'd gone to ps in the first place). Had her AS and 80+ credits by 18, will be graduating college at 20. But she got to sleep in every day, and honestly many of the classes were easier than the local ps. But if I'd left her in school, it would have been a disaster - but I also knew my options and how to switch plans on a dime - thanks, homeschooling (and these boards!). But yeah, there are successes and disasters everywhere, and they depend on a whole bunch of factors.
  15. My dd also did 4 years of DE, starting her freshman year of hs. She also had over 80 credits. Different places have wildly different rules. She decided to get an AS and transfer instead of starting as a freshman, which has turned out to be a blessing, because instead of this being her freshman year of college, she now only has one more year and she's done. It means she only got one semester of 'normal' college before thing went sideways, but she's glad to only have one more year to navigate. She's actually starting to hope things just stay online... My mom suggested she take a year off, since she's young anyways, but she just wants to be done...
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