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Book a Week in 2013 - week five


Robin M
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I didn't get a chance to post last week but I did manage to finish my fourth book just in time yesterday. I read a document from Pope Benedict XVI, Verbum Domini (a 192-page document, so still a book!). I discussed it here.

 

Completed so far this year:

1. Christmas Remembered by Tomie Depaola

2. Knowing and Teaching Elementary Mathematics by Liping Ma

3. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows

4. Verbum Domini by Pope Bendedict XVI

I'm still working--of course!--on Mike Wallace's Gotham. I really love it but it's just very, very long. Ditto David Copperfield on Audible which I'm almost half way through. And I've started my new book for this week, Acedia and Me: A Marriage, Monks, and The Writer's Life by Kathleen Norris. Norris is an author I'm continually attracted to sort of in spite of myself. I'd had this book on my mind for awhile and dh literally found it on the street or something. The first page was so startlingly dead on about some of the struggles I've had the last few years that I felt ill and had to stop reading. I picked it up again today and had a similar reaction. Not sure what to make of that but I'm more or less determined to press on. Anyone here read it?

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For a long time, I bounced off of most modern literature (and modern art, and modern poetry, and modern classical music), and it took gradual steps for me to learn to genuinely appreciate them - though there are aspects that might never speak to me. Are you interested in all of the 20th century, or just the later parts? ...because it might work better to try a more gradual transition - perhaps Henry James, Edith Wharton, or EM Forster? (Portrait of a Lady, Age of Innocence, and Room with a View, respectively, might be places to start) Some other thoughts: Arnold Bennett (Buried Alive), Joseph Conrad (Lord Jim), John Galsworthy (Forsyte Saga). Later, but in realms that might speak to you: Great Gatsby (Fitzgerald), To the Lighthouse (Woolf). The Moon is Down (Steinbeck), Brideshead Revisited (Waugh), The Old Man and the Sea (Hemingway), To Kill a Mockingbird (Lee), Watership Down (Adams). Near the end of the 20th century, but that I think you might like: Remains of the Day (Ishiguro) and Possession (Byatt) Another approach would be to try short stories from modern authors - I found it easier to appreciate some authors in short stories, still do, honestly!

 

Thanks for all the recommendations! I'm always on the lookout for good titles and I'll try to hunt these down at the Library.

 

I finished Catcher in the Rye today so that's good!

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Last week I finished book #9 - Shakespeare’s Taming of the Shrew. Today I've read and hope to finish, a short YA novel called Cascade: A Novel, book #2 in the River of Time Series by Lisa Bergren. It's a cute series about two sisters who stumble across a fresca in an escavated tomb that sends them back to the 14th century.

 

Lit selections:

Still working on Beowulf for DD's Lit. I have GOT to get that goofy story finished. DS and I will be reading Fahrenheit 451 this week for his selection. I've never read it before and only have a brief understanding of what the book is about.

 

I'm still working on the audio version of Dragonfly in Amber, and hope to get started on Never Cry Wolf by Farley Mowat as well.

 

Edited to add link to my full list.

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10 Most Anticipated Book Adaptations for 2013 which includes Mark Helprin's Winter's Tale which I have in my stacks.

 

Neat list. Even though they bumped The Great Gatsby off the list, I'm still really looking forward to that one. Winter's Tale looks interesting. Will have to look that one up. I've never read Ender's Game. This year may be the time to do so....

 

I also had been on the waitlist for The Book Theif and it became available at our digital library this week, so I am reading it also. I'm surprised at how much I dislike it after all the rave reviews. I think it has something to do with the Young Adult fiction style it has going on.

 

Interestingly, The Book Thief (which is a book by an Australian author) was released as an adult book in Australia. When it was to be released here in the US, marketers decided to market it to the YA market. Personally, I loved The Book Thief & felt it was a shame that it was listed as YA, just because that would make it less likely to be read by quite a few adults.

 

Joseph Conrad

...

Great Gatsby (Fitzgerald)

...

Remains of the Day (Ishiguro)

 

:thumbup1: All great, imo.

 

I've never read the Harry Potter series. :blushing: I'm thinking about starting those sometime soon, maybe not right after these, but soon.

 

I've never read it either. I did read the first book last year. Need to get a couple of the books in this year, I think.

 

The Happiness Project by Gretchen Rubin This book served as a caution that not all books widely recommended on these forums will wow me.

 

I didn't care for this book either.

 

9. Hounded by Kevin Hearne Once again really enjoyed this. I have the rest on hold from the library. Can't wait.
I've also just cracked Hounded.

 

:thumbup1:

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For this week, I'm dusting off a book that's been gathering dust in the corner: Evening in the Palace of Reason (James R. Gaines),

 

Me too - just started it this afternoon! :) It's been sitting on my shelf since shortly after Ladydusk read and recommended it last year.

 

Oh, I loved Evening in the Palace of Reason! It was sooo interesting and I learned a lot about that era. I was frustrated a little by the back and forth between Bach & Frederick, but I don't see how Gaines could have built the book another way. The tension becomes very real. I still need to find a copy of the piece of music. And listen a little and read a little, but I lent the book to my brother so don't have my copy right now.

 

I do hope you like it.

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This post inspires me to reread The Forsyte Saga--what a captivating series of novels! I heartily recommend them.

Hmm. I made it through 2 1/2 of the books, then halfway through To Let, I realized that I found most of the characters, especially those who were supposed to be the most sympathetic, to be insufferable. Undoubtedly further evidence of my literary misanthropy.

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Finished: Disabilities in the Gospel by Danyelle Ferguson and Lynn Parsons, Phule Me Twice by Robert Asprin and Stealing Bradford by Melody Carlson

 

Currently Working On:

Downstairs: West With the Night by Beryl Markham

Upstairs: The Road to Memphis by Mildred Taylor

Kindle: Forever More by Kathy Hake

IPhone: Katy's New World by Kim Vogel Sawyer

Sweet Boy Read Aloud: The Yellow Fairy Book

Angel Girl Read Aloud: The Wind In The Willows

WTM: Don Quixote

IPad: Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town by Stephen Leacock (for Canada)

 

Total Finished in 2013: 9

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Oh, I loved Evening in the Palace of Reason! It was sooo interesting and I learned a lot about that era. I was frustrated a little by the back and forth between Bach & Frederick, but I don't see how Gaines could have built the book another way. The tension becomes very real. I still need to find a copy of the piece of music. And listen a little and read a little, but I lent the book to my brother so don't have my copy right now.

 

I do hope you like it.

 

Oh! This is on our shelves somewhere. Maybe I'll read it next. We are huge fans of Bach here.

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Publisher's Weekly is talking about the 10 Most Anticipated Book Adaptations for 2013 which includes Mark Helprin's Winter's Tale which I have in my stacks. The cast includes Russell Crowe, Will Smith, Colin Farrell, and Jennifer Connelly which guarantees it's going to be an extraordinary movie (I hope). The book has been calling my name more and more lately saying read me, read me now. More book news and links on 52 Books. The link is in my signature. What are you reading this week? Link to week 4

 

Wonderful! I read that a few years ago. It flags a bit in the middle, but I'd love to see a condensed theatrical version. I wonder who they'll focus on?

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Here is my list so far:

  • Notorious Nineteen by Janet Evanovich
  • Flight Behavior by Barbara Kingsolver*
  • What Alice Forgot by Liane Moriarty*
  • Clockwork Prince by Cassandra Clare
  • Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
  • The Merchant's Daughter by Melanie Dickerson
  • Clockwork Angel by Cassandra Clare
  • All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque**
  • The Best Bad Luck I Ever Had by Kristin Levine*
  • Marmee & Louisa: The Untold Story of Louisa May Alcott and Her Mother by Eve LaPlante
  • Elsewhere: A Memoir by Richard Russo

*recommended

**highly recommended

 

ETA: I should add that one of those library books is Flight Behavior by Barbara Kingsolver. It's interesting so far, but I've really just started.

 

Barbara Kingsolver is one of my favorite authors. There are some of her sentences that I like to read over and over again. I didn't love the characters or the story, but I'm glad I read it. I loved the words.

 

Week four: The Dovekeepers by Alice Hoffman

 

I'm reading this now. I can't decide if I am enjoying it.

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I finished book 3 and 4 this week.

 

Book 3 was Water Street. It's the third book of the series that begins with Nory Ryan's Song. It has a coming-of-age theme to it.

 

Book 4 was a free Kindle book, Face the Winter Naked. I was pleasantly surprised by this one. It takes place during the Great Depression. The main character is a WWI vet struggling with PTSD and being unable to support his family. He deserts his family, telling himself he's looking for a job and will come back with a gunnysack full of money. The story alternates between his struggles, physically and mentally, and his wife's struggles. This book has a couple of violent scenes. If anyone is interested, I'll divulge what they are in PM but don't want to give away important parts of the plot.

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Completed:

 

5.) A Christmas Carol

4.) Dracula

3.) The Night Circus

2.) Switch

1.) Getting Things Done

 

Starting this week - The $100 Start Up by Chris Guilleau

 

I was pleasantly surprised by Dracula but adored A Christmas Carol.

 

"The air was filled with phantoms, wandering hither and thither in restless haste, and moaning as they went.....The misery with them all was, clearly, that they sought to interfere, for good, in human matters and had lost the power forever." A Christmas Carol

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Finished "The Song of Achilles" and "Alias Grace" this week. Loved them both. (It was a good reading week.) :) Also listened to the first two books of "The Iliad" on audiobook. Alfred Molina's voice is just perfect for this. I am concentrating on two library books that just came in so I can finish them before I have to return to Turkey. So....

 

Finished:

The Handmaid's Tale, Atwood

The Song of Achilles, Miller

Alias Grace, Atwood

 

In Process:

The Iliad, Homer

The Histories, Herodotus

 

On Deck this week:

Book Was There, Piper

The Artist, the Philosopher, and the Warrior, Strathern

 

I'll write better reviews, ratings, comments in a couple of weeks when life settles back down for me.

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I finished:

Anne of Green Gables L. M. Montgomery (Canadian) I really enjoyed Anne and plan to continue with the sequels. She was so refreshing!

Little Women Louisa May Alcott (audiobook, A-Z ) I read this probably 20 years ago. It is different reading it as an adult, I still identify with Jo so much.

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz L. Frank Baum (audiobook, A-Z ) I read this to my son 2 years ago and it was time to read it to my daughter. We all enjoyed it but I did miss the illustriations, so I will have to show those to her.

 

Continued:

The History of the Ancient World Susan Wise Bauer

 

Began:

The Mysterious Affair at Styles Agatha Christie (audiobook, A-Z )

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Interestingly, The Book Thief (which is a book by an Australian author) was released as an adult book in Australia. When it was to be released here in the US, marketers decided to market it to the YA market. Personally, I loved The Book Thief & felt it was a shame that it was listed as YA, just because that would make it less likely to be read by quite a few adults.

 

I'm really hoping I can get into it more as I keep going. Admittedly, I'm not *that* far into it..... maybe 50 pages or so. I can't even put my finger on what it is that I dislike. The writing style seems so disjointed..... I hope I love it when I am done!

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I only managed to finish Call for the Dead, John Le Carre' s first novel. Everything is on hold while I figure out my son's school plans, but Eliana's post reminded me that it is probably time to read A Man's Search for Meaning again. It is one that will never leave my bookshelves.

 

May you all have a wonderful week.

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Undoubtedly further evidence of my literary misanthropy.

Which leads me to wonder how you will feel about the dear rogue, Tom Jones. Storyline aside, I hope that the philosophical and theological analysis offered by philosopher Square and clergyman/school master Thwackum (fabulous name, yes?) will amuse you.

 

Jane

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Which leads me to wonder how you will feel about the dear rogue, Tom Jones. Storyline aside, I hope that the philosophical and theological analysis offered by philosopher Square and clergyman/school master Thwackum (fabulous name, yes?) will amuse you.

 

Jane

 

It will be a re-read for me, and one of my favorites. I don't really start despising the denizens of great literature for another century. Right now the only thing keeping me going through my forced read-aloud of Tale of Two Cities (which Middle Girl loves) is the unrealistic hope that, before the end of the book, Lucie Manette will go to the guillotine.

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Okay, I missed a week or two of posting...but I'm still reading! I finished 3 books since my last post. I loved The Secret Keeper. There were definitely some plot twists that I didn't see coming. I was completely unimpressed by The Self-Esteem Workbook despite the fact that it came highly recommended and has received good reviews; it just didn't work for me. I am reading aloud the Junie B. Jones books to my DS. They are super funny. Technically speaking non of the first 24 books is long enough to count for the challenge, but I did read a combined 2000 or so pages so I thought that ought to be sufficiently challenging to count as 1 book. :tongue_smilie: The last couple of books in the series are over 100 pages so I'll count them individually. I'm working on #25 now, and who wouldn't love a book titled Jingle Bells, Batman Smells! (P.S. So Does May)? I've also started Emily of New Moon for the Oh! Canada challenge. I remember really liking the Anne of Green Gables books, but I'm still not sure how I feel about Emily...

 

Finished:

4 - The Self-Esteem Workbook by Glenn R. Schiraldi (*)

5 - The Secret Keeper by Kate Morton (Continental - Australia; *****)

6 - Junie B. Jones Complete Collection (#1-24) by Barbara Park (Continental - USA; ****)

 

Started:

Junie B., First Grader: Jingle Bells, Batman Smells! (P.S. So Does May.) (#25) by Barbara Park (Continental - USA)

Emily of New Moon by L. M. Montgomery (Oh Canada; Continental)

 

Continuing:

Peter Pan by J. M. Barre (Continental - England)

Global Health Disparities: Closing the Gap Through Good Governance by Enku Kebede-Francis

Textbook of International Health: Global Health in a Dynamic World by Anne-Emanuelle Birn (Chunky)

The One Year Devotions for Women: Becoming a Woman at Peace by Ann Spangler (Inspiration)

The One Year Chronological Bible NLT (Chunky; Inspiration)

 

 

 

2013 Reading Completed

 

 

1 - Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (Continental - England; ****)

2 - Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There by Lewis Carroll (Continental - England; ****)

3 - When Dad Hurts Mom: Helping Your Child Heal the Wounds of Witnessing Abuse by Lundy Bancroft (****)

4 - The Self-Esteem Workbook by Glenn R. Schiraldi (*)

5 - The Secret Keeper by Kate Morton (Continental - Australia; *****)

6 - Junie B. Jones Complete Collection (#1-24) by Barbara Park (Continental - USA; ****)

 

Rating System:

***** it was amazing

**** really liked it

*** liked it

** it was okay

* didn't like it

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And I've started my new book for this week, Acedia and Me: A Marriage, Monks, and The Writer's Life by Kathleen Norris. Norris is an author I'm continually attracted to sort of in spite of myself. I'd had this book on my mind for awhile and dh literally found it on the street or something. The first page was so startlingly dead on about some of the struggles I've had the last few years that I felt ill and had to stop reading. I picked it up again today and had a similar reaction. Not sure what to make of that but I'm more or less determined to press on. Anyone here read it?[/size][/size][/font][/color]

 

I read quite a lot of Kathleen Norris about 10 or 15 years ago, and I really enjoyed all of her work. I don't think I've read that one, though. I'll put it on my TBR list!

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Oh, I loved Evening in the Palace of Reason! It was sooo interesting and I learned a lot about that era. I was frustrated a little by the back and forth between Bach & Frederick, but I don't see how Gaines could have built the book another way. The tension becomes very real. I still need to find a copy of the piece of music. And listen a little and read a little, but I lent the book to my brother so don't have my copy right now.

 

I do hope you like it.

 

 

Good idea to alternate music and reading! I tend to get frustrated with a "meanwhile back at the ranch" narrative structure because I get so caught up in the thread I'm reading that I resent the changeover. I'll let you know how the reading goes. I saw a review of this at the Touchstone Editors' blog Mere Comments and ordered it, but was out of town when it arrived. Dh put it away carefully, and I found it last week while dusting. I should dust more often, but in NM it's a waste of time.

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I finished Secrets of Meditation: A Pratical Guide by Davidji

 

I didn't care for it, and I'm mad at myself because I bought it (the library didn't have it). I wanted something that explained the different kinds of Eastern meditation practices. It sort of did. Mostly he gave a glimpse and then explained why he didn't care for it. He spent a lot of time on the type of meditation he practices and why it's better. I guess I did get a small understanding of the different types and how to find out more about them, but it wasn't what I wanted.

 

This week I'm starting Tehanu by Le Guin. I know I'll enjoy that. :)

 

I also started a Sunday or Sabbath reading devotional by Krummmacher, The Suffering Saviour. I can tell that I'm going to enjoy it. I spent last night underlining (!!) in the book and taking notes. I plan on reading a chapter a week (there are 53) and using it as my meditation for the week. I have a daily devtional too, but I wanted something that I could spend a prolong time meditating over.

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Finished lots this week:

 

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain (audio) - Well, this one is a classic for a reason. I hadn't read it since high school, and I thoroughly enjoyed revisiting the story; I had even forgotten about some of the twists so I got to be surprised again. This was a great reading by Dick Hill and I found myself actually disappointed on days when traffic was light because it cut into my listening time!

 

Forgotten Bookmarks by Michael Popek - I heard about this one from someone on this thread. While the pp didn't seem too enthused about the book, I thought it was a cute concept so gave it a try. It didn't fulfill my expectations either. A couple of the items were interesting, but most were rather bland. I thought the shopping lists would have quirky items or something, but there was nothing fascinating about sugar, salt, bread, etc.

 

Breaking Night by Liz Murray - This was a neat memoir of a girl, the neglected child of drug addicts, who goes on to Harvard. What a great and inspirational story, and well written, too.

 

An Invisible Thread by Laura Schroff - Another memoir about a neglected child of drug addicts (I seem to be reading a lot of these lately). This one was from the perspective of a successful advertising sales rep who became friends with the young man when she met him panhandling on the street at the age of 11. This was a neat one to read after Breaking Night. The both come from similarly horrid backgrounds. Liz Murray ends up a Harvard graduate who forms her own company. Maurice becomes a security guard, but his outcome seems equally successful as just surviving their childhoods was the greatest challenge for both.

 

The Four Story Mistake by Elizabeth Enright - This is the second of the Melendy Quartet. Another great story, even if it didn't grab me quite as much as the first. DD loved it; she claims she enjoyed it as well as The Saturdays.

 

Nothing in progress right now. I'll have lots of time to read over the next couple of days, so I hope to find something great.

 

Finished This Year:

11. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain (audio)

10. Forgotten Bookmarks by Michael Popek

9. An Invisible Thread by Laura Schroff

8. Breaking Night by Liz Murray

7. The Four Story Mistake by Elizabeth Enright (Read aloud)

6. The Autobiography of an Execution by David Dow

5. A Complicated Kindness by Miriam Toews (Canada)

4. The Children of Noisy Village by Astrid Lindgren (Read aloud)

3. The Saturdays by Elizabeth Enright (Read aloud)

2. Lullabies for Little Criminals by Heather O'Neill (Canada)

1. A Walk Across the Sun by Corban Addison

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I finished The Maltese Falcon, and had fun reading it. I can certainly see why Hammett is considered the father of Noir. Some of the lines made me chuckle, though I doubt that was his intent. This one still has me smiling and shaking my head:

 

"His eyes burned yellowly."

 

Now I think I'd like to read The Thin Man. I read that Nick and Nora's personalities are loosely based on Hammett and Lillian Hellman (his lover).

 

There are only a few days left in the month, so I need to start thinking about my next dusty book. My version of the challenge is that each month I can't start a new book until I've read at least one dusty book. Since most of my reading now is done on my Kindle, a dusty book is one that has been in my archives for at least 6 months. I think February's dusty book will be Midnight Cowboy. This is another one of those books where I've seen the movie but have not read the book. Jon Voight squicks me out for no particular reason, so I hope that doesn't cloud my opinion of the book.

 

I was looking for something to fill in the last few days of January. I will probably read Murder in the North End, the second to last in an historical mystery series I've been reading, and Pride and Prejudice, in honor of the anniversary.

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Hmm. Pride and Prejudice is on my Top Five list and I was thinking of re-reading it at some point this year. If I cancel school tomorrow I could probably read it in one day.

 

 

 

A girl after my own heart. :laugh: Oh, how I miss the pre-high school days, when school was easily cancelled for fun days, rainy days, reading days, or whatever came up. Next year we expect both my kids to be in ps (boo), and I plan on reading and reading and reading. Ahhhh...:D

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Good idea to alternate music and reading! I tend to get frustrated with a "meanwhile back at the ranch" narrative structure because I get so caught up in the thread I'm reading that I resent the changeover. I'll let you know how the reading goes. I saw a review of this at the Touchstone Editors' blog Mere Comments and ordered it, but was out of town when it arrived. Dh put it away carefully, and I found it last week while dusting. I should dust more often, but in NM it's a waste of time.

 

 

I feel your pain! We live in AZ, and the desert is the only place I've lived where the dust is brown-ish and to keep it away I'd have to dust every. single. day. Not gonna happen.

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A girl after my own heart. :laugh: Oh, how I miss the pre-high school days, when school was easily cancelled for fun days, rainy days, reading days, or whatever came up. Next year we expect both my kids to be in ps (boo), and I plan on reading and reading and reading. Ahhhh... :D

 

Except I can't find my copy anywhere! I think dh was working on it a couple years ago and I think it might have been in his briefcase that got stolen. Right next to his laptop. Maybe the thief got some cultural education?

 

It's free on Kindle so I have it up on my little iPod Kindle app and I'm sneaking in chapters between school subjects :)

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This was a quiet week for me as far as reading was concerned. I finished The Propostion by Katie Ashley, a free kindle book. It's an easy read romance about a couple who married for convenience and decide to look for their HEA.

 

When Snow Falls (Whiskey Creek) by Brenda Novak is a continuation in the Whiskey Creek series. I like this series, it's about a group of friends from a small town and how they each find their significant other. It mixes details of all the characters in each book, which I think adds to the appeal. This story was about Cheyenne, who grew up moving from town to town before setting in Whiskey Creek. Her mother is dying of cancer and all her friends go out of town on vacation. She has a chance with the guy she's has a crush on forever, or the "bad boy" that she's avoided. We all know where the story goes, but it's a good read getting there.

 

Ever After (Rachel Morgan) by Kim Harrison is book 11 in the Hollows series. I love this series, but you need to read it in order IMO to understand what is going on, each book builds on the last.

 

Week 4

23. The Proposition by Katie Ashley

24. When Snow Falls (Whiskey Creek) by Brenda Novak

25. Ever After (Rachel Morgan) by Kim Harrison

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Completed:

Book #13 - "Portuguese Irregular Verbs" by Alexander McCall Smith. That was a strange little book! I was describing it to DH, and he said, "So, it's kind of like Amelia Bedelia, but for grownups?" That's as good a description as any.

Book #12 - "In Cold Pursuit" by Sarah Andrews. Not a cozy, but a decent mystery and set in Antarctica.

 

Book #11 - "Anna Karenina" by Leo Nikoleyevich Tolstoy.

Book #10 - "The Sunday Philosophy Club" by Alexander McCall Smith.

Book #9 - "The Limpopo Academy of Private Detection" by Alexander McCall Smith.

Book #8 - "The Saturday Big Tent Wedding Party" by Alexander McCall Smith.

Book #7 - "The Double Comfort Safari Club" by Alexander McCall Smith.

Book #6 - " Tea Time for the Traditionally Built" by Alexander McCall Smith.

Book #5 - "Crime and Punishment" by Fydor Dostoevsky.

Book #4 - "The Miracle of Speedy Motors" by Alexander McCall Smith.

Book #3 - "The Good Husband of Zebra Drive" by Alexander McCall Smith.

Book #2 - "Blue Shoes and Happiness" by Alexander McCall Smith.

Book #1 - "In the Company of Cheerful Ladies" by Alexander McCall Smith.

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I finished "Memoirs of a Gnostic Dwarf", and hmmmm. I liked parts of it, and understood the dark humor and all that, but w-a-y too much s*x stuff for me, and I've never considered myself a prude. If those parts were taken out, or at least not so graphically in-your-face, I'd have liked it much better.

 

I had to laugh at myself because when I finished reading I said, "Now I REALLY need some Pride & Prejudice going on!" So, that's coming up. :laugh:

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As a balm to my soul after reading the above, I also read The Life and Prayers of Saint Augustine of Hippo. It's a very short book, with the first 2/3's being the life story of Augustine, and the rest prayers that he wrote. Uplifting ones, and thoughtful, but not a ton. I thought the history portion would also do very well if, for whatever reason, you don't have to time to cover St. Augustine very well in school! :D

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Forgotten Bookmarks by Michael Popek - I heard about this one from someone on this thread. While the pp didn't seem too enthused about the book, I thought it was a cute concept so gave it a try. It didn't fulfill my expectations either. A couple of the items were interesting, but most were rather bland. I thought the shopping lists would have quirky items or something, but there was nothing fascinating about sugar, salt, bread, etc.

 

Yes, that was my feeling, too. My favorite find was one the author recounted in the preface -- a marijuana leaf pressed between the pages of a microwave cookbook. The author made a remark about imagining someone with the munchies trying to make a quick meal and using the nearest thing for a bookmark.

 

Regards,

Kareni

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Finished

 

2. Ariosto, Orlando Furioso, vol. 2

 

An excerpt from the girlfight between Bradamante and Marfisa:

 

'Though courteous with others I may be,

I will not show such courtesy to you,

Who are endowed with every villainy,

And insolent and overweening too.'

As in a rocky cavern by the sea

A piercing wind is heard to shriek, just so

Marfisa's rage is uttered not in speech

(She cannot find the words) but in a screech.

 

She wields her weapon, aiming it as much

At her opponent's steed in paunch and breast

As at the rider. At a skilful touch

Upon the rein, it rises to the test

And leaps aside; at the same moment, such

Is Bradamante's rage, that, lance in rest,

She strikes her adversary down again,

Sending her sprawling backwards on the plain.

 

-------------------------------

 

Tom Jones is underway.

 

I finally decided what challenges I wanted to do: Chunksters, Catholic, and my own private half-fiction challenge: no more than 50% of my reading to be English-language novels/short stories. Otherwise Balzac and James may consume all.

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OK, I'm still getting the hang of this- keeping up with the reading and the reviewing!

I read The Handmaid's Tale.

 

http://homeschoolfor...handmaids-tale/

 

Started last night, finished this afternoon. Serious creep factor imho. My review here.

 

I'm really hoping I can get into it more as I keep going. Admittedly, I'm not *that* far into it..... maybe 50 pages or so. I can't even put my finger on what it is that I dislike. The writing style seems so disjointed..... I hope I love it when I am done!

Loved the Book Theif. I found the author's choice of narrator fascinating!

 

Linda- I couldn't find your original post but The Happiness Project wasn't all I'd hoped either.

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I wish I'd checked this thread yesterday for a head's up on the birthday of Pride and Prejudice! It's my favorite book, I would have pulled it out and snuck it in here and there! I still might pick it up and read what I can with what's left of the day. I don't get a lot of evening time, though. Our family is on a swing shift so it's just me and the girls and they won't be down until about 11:00.

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Oh, I loved Evening in the Palace of Reason! It was sooo interesting and I learned a lot about that era. I was frustrated a little by the back and forth between Bach & Frederick, but I don't see how Gaines could have built the book another way. The tension becomes very real.

 

I love this book, too! I talk about it SO often to my music students in their lessons. Don't dare tell me baroque music is simplistic or boring! :laugh:

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Finished books 9 and 10 - The Reading Promise by Alice Ozma and Factotum by Charles Bukowski. The Reading Promise wasn't as much about books and reading as I was hoping, but I thought it was a great book anyway. Sounds like she lucked out with an exceptional dad. Factotum was pretty much what I expected. There are things about Bukowski that I really appreciate and other things that both bore and repel me. In both cases, I like his honesty.

 

Have moved onto The Power of Half by Kevin and Hannah Salwen - from the 100s section of the library - and The Story of the Stone by Barry Hughart - the sequel to Bridge of Birds - a fun book I read a couple years ago.

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I wish I'd checked this thread yesterday for a head's up on the birthday of Pride and Prejudice! It's my favorite book, I would have pulled it out and snuck it in here and there! I still might pick it up and read what I can with what's left of the day. I don't get a lot of evening time, though. Our family is on a swing shift so it's just me and the girls and they won't be down until about 11:00.

 

 

I'm regretting that I told myself I wasn't aloud to read and count any Austen this year! I did watch some of the BBC video today .... just because.

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I actually finished Pirate Latitudes and it was interesting to say the least since you have an antihero who is the lead character. Right now I'm reading a ya dystopian story Birthmarked by Caragh O'Brien. Quite good.

 

"After climate change, on the north shore of Unlake Superior, a dystopian world is divided between those who live inside the wall, and those, like sixteen-year-old midwife Gaia Stone, who live outside. It’s Gaia’s job to “advance†a quota of infants from poverty into the walled Enclave, until the night one agonized mother objects, and Gaia’s parents disappear. As Gaia’s efforts to save her parents take her within the wall, she faces the brutal injustice of the Enclave and discovers she alone holds the key to a secret code, a code of “birthmarked†babies and genetic merit. Fraught with difficult moral choices and rich with intricate layers of codes, Birthmarked explores a colorful, cruel, eerily familiar world where a criminal is defined by her genes, and one girl can make all the difference."

 

 

 

Oh, thanks! I added this to my to-read list!!

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