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Maus

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Maus last won the day on February 20 2013

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  1. Couple of more from my massive "due soon at the library" pile: 29. " The Instant Economist: Everything You Need to Know About How the Economy Works" by Timothy Taylor. The publisher is Great Courses, and the author is the professor featured in several of their courses. It seems like a really good introduction on a 101 level, though I found microeconomics much clearer than macroeconomics. 28. "White Like Her: My Family's Story of Race and Racial Passing" by Gail Lukasik. Fascinating read about the author's mother and other family members who "passed" as white for the better opportunities it offered. I had heard of this phenomena somewhere, but this is the first account of it I've read. I was also interested in the genealogical research the author did to track down her story. 27. "Personal, Career, and Financial Security" by Richard J. Maybury. 26. "Rascal" by Sterling North. 25. "Whatever Happened to Penny Candy?" by Richard J. Maybury. 24. "Joy in the Covenant" by Julie B. Beck. (LDS) 23. "The Essential 55" by Ron Clark. 22. "How to Tutor Your Own Child" by Marina Koestler Ruben. 21. "Faith is Not Blind" by Bruce and Marie Hafen. (LDS) 20. "Silent Souls Weeping: Depression, Sharing Stories, Finding Hope" by Jane Clayson Johnson. (LDS) 19. "Leap of Faith" by Bob Bennett. (LDS) 18. "Covenant Keepers" by Wendy Watson Nelson. (LDS) 17. "Manga Classics: MacBeth" adapted by Crystal S. Chan. 16. "One Dead Spy" by Nathan Hale. 15. "Stellar Science Projects About Earth's Sky" and "Wild Science Projects About Earth's Weather" by Robert Gardner. 14. "Stuff Matters" by Mark Miodownik. 13. "Led by Divine Design" by Ronald A. Rasband. (LDS) 12. "Forensic Science Projects with a Crime Lab" by Robert Gardner. 11. "Manga Classics: The Jungle Book" adapted by Crystal S. Chan 10. "Donner Dinner Party" by Nathan Hale. 9. "Manga Classics: The Stories of Edgar Allan Poe" adapted by Stacy King. 8. "Bodies We've Buried" by Jarrett Hallcox and Amy Welch. 7. "The Forensic Casebook" by N.E. Genge. 6. "Shaken Faith Syndrome" by MIchael R. Ash. (LDS) 5. "Fingerprints: Crime-Solving Science Experiments" by Kenneth G. Rainis. 4. "Forensic Investigations" (6) by Leela Burnscott. & ("Bones Speak" by Richard Spilsbury) 3. "A Reason for Faith" edited by Laura Harris Hales. (LDS) 2. "Left Standing" by Mason Wells, et al. (LDS) 1. "Camino Easy" by B. G. Preston.
  2. Dry erase markers for the windows, and a challenge to draw and write mirror image so it can be read from outside... ... with appropriate guidelines for each child. (I have to remind one "nothing rude or crude," and another that the markers are permanent if they get on the upholstery.)
  3. Hey, wait! 27 on week 27 means I caught up! (I don't really worry about that. I participate so that I have a searchable record of what I've read, to stay motivated in my own reading, and to see what other people are enjoying.) 27. "Personal, Career, and Financial Security" by Richard J. Maybury. I don't know if his model is a model I would advise my kids to follow, necessarily, but I like the idea of teaching that we can understand the world based on models. I think DS16, with his Aspie thinking, could grasp the ideas of cognitive dissonance and paradigm shifts by reading this. 26. "Rascal" by Sterling North. I read a description of this book on a "don't let your kids read this" list, and had to give it a try! Now DD9 and I are listening to the audio version, so obviously I disagree with the list author. 25. "Whatever Happened to Penny Candy?" by Richard J. Maybury. Saw this on the shelf at the library while looking for something else, and recognized the title as one that was mentioned on the High School Board. I don't know enough about economics to know whether I share his bias or not, but I appreciate how easy to understand his explanation is. 24. "Joy in the Covenant" by Julie B. Beck. (LDS) 23. "The Essential 55" by Ron Clark. 22. "How to Tutor Your Own Child" by Marina Koestler Ruben. 21. "Faith is Not Blind" by Bruce and Marie Hafen. (LDS) 20. "Silent Souls Weeping: Depression, Sharing Stories, Finding Hope" by Jane Clayson Johnson. (LDS) 19. "Leap of Faith" by Bob Bennett. (LDS) 18. "Covenant Keepers" by Wendy Watson Nelson. (LDS) 17. "Manga Classics: MacBeth" adapted by Crystal S. Chan. 16. "One Dead Spy" by Nathan Hale. 15. "Stellar Science Projects About Earth's Sky" and "Wild Science Projects About Earth's Weather" by Robert Gardner. 14. "Stuff Matters" by Mark Miodownik. 13. "Led by Divine Design" by Ronald A. Rasband. (LDS) 12. "Forensic Science Projects with a Crime Lab" by Robert Gardner. 11. "Manga Classics: The Jungle Book" adapted by Crystal S. Chan 10. "Donner Dinner Party" by Nathan Hale. 9. "Manga Classics: The Stories of Edgar Allan Poe" adapted by Stacy King. 8. "Bodies We've Buried" by Jarrett Hallcox and Amy Welch. 7. "The Forensic Casebook" by N.E. Genge. 6. "Shaken Faith Syndrome" by MIchael R. Ash. (LDS) 5. "Fingerprints: Crime-Solving Science Experiments" by Kenneth G. Rainis. 4. "Forensic Investigations" (6) by Leela Burnscott. & ("Bones Speak" by Richard Spilsbury) 3. "A Reason for Faith" edited by Laura Harris Hales. (LDS) 2. "Left Standing" by Mason Wells, et al. (LDS) 1. "Camino Easy" by B. G. Preston.
  4. Based on what I see most often doing genealogy, this would be the standard. It's unusual to put a woman's maiden name on the stone, and most often, her current legal surname is the one used. (You can put all the names and relationships on Findagrave.) However, if it is a shared stone with the first husband, then I've seen the wife's given name just added to that, as though the later marriages had never taken place. (It's probably the cheapest and easiest option, and looks the most balanced and aesthetically pleasing, considering the format of that type of stone.) You could use the format they chose for my great-aunt. She was a war widow who remarried, and they left off her middle name and maiden name, and put her first name, first married name, and last married name on the stone. She's not buried with either of them. The first husband is in the American Cemetery in the Phillipines, where he was killed, and she had divorced the second husband. (All of her children were with her first husband.) In the end, you can put whatever you care to pay for.
  5. Sadder than realizing that I haven't posted here since April is realizing how little I've read since April 😮. Somehow, I always think Summer is going to be less busy, but really it's just busy without the benefit of a predictable schedule, 23. "The Essential 55" by Ron Clark. A few of his rules are pretty specific to the classroom setting, but the vast majority are really just good, basic social skills everyone ought to know. 22. "How to Tutor Your Own Child: Boost Grades and Inspire a Lifelong Love of Learning--Without Paying for a Profesional Tutor" by Marina Koestler Ruben. Mostly familiar ideas, since she draws a lot on popular homeschool resources, but I picked out a few things that I hadn't thought of that I think could be helpful. 21. "Faith is Not Blind" by Bruce and Marie Hafen. (LDS) 20. "Silent Souls Weeping: Depression, Sharing Stories, Finding Hope" by Jane Clayson Johnson. (LDS) 19. "Leap of Faith" by Bob Bennett. (LDS) 18. "Covenant Keepers" by Wendy Watson Nelson. (LDS) 17. "Manga Classics: MacBeth" adapted by Crystal S. Chan. 16. "One Dead Spy" by Nathan Hale. 15. "Stellar Science Projects About Earth's Sky" and "Wild Science Projects About Earth's Weather" by Robert Gardner. 14. "Stuff Matters" by Mark Miodownik. 13. "Led by Divine Design" by Ronald A. Rasband. (LDS) 12. "Forensic Science Projects with a Crime Lab" by Robert Gardner. 11. "Manga Classics: The Jungle Book" adapted by Crystal S. Chan 10. "Donner Dinner Party" by Nathan Hale. 9. "Manga Classics: The Stories of Edgar Allan Poe" adapted by Stacy King. 8. "Bodies We've Buried" by Jarrett Hallcox and Amy Welch. 7. "The Forensic Casebook" by N.E. Genge. 6. "Shaken Faith Syndrome" by MIchael R. Ash. (LDS) 5. "Fingerprints: Crime-Solving Science Experiments" by Kenneth G. Rainis. 4. "Forensic Investigations" (6) by Leela Burnscott. & ("Bones Speak" by Richard Spilsbury) 3. "A Reason for Faith" edited by Laura Harris Hales. (LDS) 2. "Left Standing" by Mason Wells, et al. (LDS) 1. "Camino Easy" by B. G. Preston.
  6. They've been found! In Queens. Someone recognized them from the pictures on social media and called in.
  7. https://newyork.cbslocal.com/2019/06/04/police-seek-missing-brooklyn-mother-daughter-last-seen-in-bed-stuy/ A dear friend of mine is this woman's step-mother. We are both far from NY, but I know some of you are near enough to help spread the word.
  8. I got this pass for my older two kids about five years ago using Autism as their disability. I took the evals for each from the neuro-pysch, which was printed on her letter head and had her signature and which named their disability. I think you also need to bring their birth certificates, and the child(ren) are supposed to be with you if you go in person. I went to our local forest service office, and they issued the passes on the spot. The passes were free when I got them in person. (There is a processing fee if you mail it in.) I would use autism over dyslexia because it more clearly fits this definition: The instructions for what counts as documentation are here. Specifically,
  9. OP, based on what you said, it sounds like she needs three types of materials: 1) something he can use during the few hours two days a week when he actually alone alone. 2) something he can use that is self-teaching with minimal oversight that he can use while the babysitter is there. 3) something he can use with Mom and/or Dad that addresses his areas of weakness -- writing, and probably social skills? For the first situation, she is going to want things that are "fun" and self-motivating. We like Prodigygame (math). It feels like a game, but if the parent chooses "teacher" for the parent login, which they recommend for homeschool parents, you can set learning objectives and get reports and stuff like that. Is he good at following a checklist? My ASD son was at that age. That would open up a few more things he could do completely on his own. If so, she could assign him so many minutes or badges at Khan Academy, and so many minutes in a typing program (which will help with writing and is a common accommodation for ASD). My youngest (also ASD), who is currently nine, has been working on Typing.com with her SPED teacher. It's another free program, and looks pretty good. For the babysitter days, he could do more of the same, or he could do something like K12 -- sometimes provided for free if her state offers a virtual alternative through the public school system. Our local eSchool also offers IXL.com, lexiacore5, MobyMax, iReady, and Odyssey (which is the school version of Time4learning). As mentioned above, Time4Learning is not terribly expensive if she can't use an eSchool to get the others provided for free. These types of programs all provide the teaching, so all the babysitter would have to do is make sure he is on the computer and not messing around on other sites. More expensive, of course, are other "teaching built in" programs like Teaching Textbooks. For his areas of struggle, self-directed is not going to work. Have his specific problems in writing been identified? ASD children can struggle with the mechanics of writing, with comprehension, with composition, with inference, or any combination of the preceding. This and any other areas of weakness will require the most time investment from the parents, and the most financial investment in appropriate programs. The neuro-pysch who evaluated my older two actually recommended WWE/FLL, and All about Spelling. Neither is free, but both provide the "rules why we do this", incremental learning needed. Free samples are great to check for fit, and good programs can sometimes be found used to save costs. All three of my children have ASD. Two are level 2 (used to be called Asperger's); one is level 1 (used to be called PDD-NOS). In some subjects, they are just as capable of self-educating as any other children. (In fact, they have a tendency to hyper-focus on topics of interest.) I had a couple of months while my youngest was getting evals and we getting her IEP in place where I didn't supervise my older two in their schoolwork. I assumed they'd accomplish nothing and that we'd need to do some serious catching up/getting back on track when the eval/IEP process was done. My level 1 girl actually did walk out of her bedroom having educated herself. "Just for fun," she'd located an online youtube series that teaches how to draw anime, and another that teaches Japanese, and worked through both. She picked up enough Japanese that my niece, who just returned from a three-year contract teaching English in Japan, understood what she was saying. She's 14, so a little more mature, but she's done that kind of thing for years. My oldest studies all things train-related in his spare time, including checking out books intended for adult rail-fans and devouring them when he was only seven or eight. (He read out loud even to himself until he was almost ten, so I know he actually read them.) I currently don't work outside the home, though I did work part-time a few years ago, but because I have three ASD kids, and a husband with diabetes, heart-disease, and OCD, I have had times where my kids have had to be self-directed. It's hard, and less than ideal, and they are less good at it than typical kids, but it can work. The trick is to divide it that way, so that he is studying his strong subjects/passions during the self-directed times, and getting good, direct instruction for his weak areas. And building off what Janeway just said, it doesn't have to be perfect; it just needs to be better than what was happening in the public school.
  10. I'm also a Latter-day Saint, and I agree. I've only looked at the free stuff, but there is nothing "Mormon" in it, except perhaps the notion that God created animals for us to use, but we need to be good stewards. I don't believe that is a uniquely Latter-day Saint view, though. I've only seen Red Rock paintings in homes that have the whole Southwestern look going ... you know, with cow skulls and spurs and all that. Or the other extreme: the 4-wheelin' or mountain biking crowds who have made Moab the trendy red rock capital of the world. There IS an almost ubiquitous Latter-day Saint decor, which features a photo of the temple the parents were married in, a photo of the entire family wearing matching shirts, and a framed copy of either "The Living Christ" or "The Proclamation on the Family" or both..... ....I can't figure out where to hang mine 😉, 'cause I decorate with wall-to-wall IKEA (Billy, of course!) bookcases! I, too, would rather have my children read great classics with a little cussing. I think what gives it the preachy, fundy feel is that she seems to be promoting that protective parenting style ... what do they call it -- greenhouse, I think maybe -- that is common among fundamentalist from many faiths. The folks who don't allow Harry Potter, lest their children become witches or whatever? Many of my favorite books, like LOTR (it has magic), are on her "don't read this" list, and the books she assigns are all books I have never heard of. I'm guessing they are all past copyright and are out in the public domain. That's probably the case with the art she has selected, too. Here's a funny thing: I don't see a single Latter-day Saint author on her approved list, but there are at least three prominent Latter-day Saint authors on her "avoid these" list. For my family, we'll keep reading LOTR. We might use the Marine Biology unit she has, and perhaps I could pull some of the grammar lessons out, but the rest isn't to my taste, as her worldview does not match mine.
  11. I finally got to see the movie! I generally liked it and hope to see it again, but I did not like the "girl power" scene at all! I agree with the comments that it was contrived, and I'd even go so far as to say it was the most sexist scene in the Marvel Universe. Here's why I think so: They are in the middle of hand-to-hand combat for their very lives and for the survival of the planet. All of a sudden all of the women and only the women are available to come help Captain Marvel. Under what possible scenarios could that be the case? A) They were available because they had been standing around watching the menfolk do battle. B) They had been fighting the whole time, but when they saw a women some of them had never met and the others had only briefly interacted with, everyone of them decided to abandon their battle posts and the men who were their friends and colleagues to come aid this woman who is supposed to be extremely strong and capable herself, just because "girls stick together." C) It didn't have anything to do with Captain Marvel being a woman. All the women -- and only the women -- saw that there would be more glory in being part of the winning touchdown*, than in just doing their quiet part in the hand-to-hand combat battle, so they all came rushing in to be part of it. Or D) They had been fighting the whole time, but by some powerful coincidence, all the women -- but only the women-- had just defeated the foe they'd personally been fighting hand-to-hand, leaving them available to come help Captain Marvel. And all the men were still battling, but not in such desperate circumstances that their women colleagues would see a more pressing need to give them a hand, instead of assisting CM. Only the most far-fetched one, D, is what real women -- strong women -- would do in real life. *'Cause that whole scene was such a football metaphor1 One guy has the ball, er gauntlet, that he's trying to move downfield, er across the battlefield, with the help of his team running interference, to reach the end-zone, er van. When he's trapped, he passes the ball, er gauntlet, to another team member, who moves it as far as he can, etc.
  12. So DS16 and I participated in part of "The Great Race," from Evanston to Ogden yesterday, and it was something else! Like game day traffic! We alternated between following along on frontage roads, or the freeway, or zooming ahead and getting out at vantage points so DS could get his photos. But we talked to rail fans from all over the world who came just to see the Big Boy under its own steam for the first time in 59 years. We shared a table at breakfast in our hotel with a man who came all the way from Italy, and he'd met people who came from Japan and Germany. I talked to a fellow special needs parent at the depot in Evanston, who'd brought his son from New Jersey to do the whole chase (they started in Cheyenne), and tried to eavesdrop on two German guys standing near me (the train was loud, and they were using a lot of slang....) I'm not a great photographer, and I was more interested in capturing the number of people and the excitement of my son, but anyway... https://photos.app.goo.gl/nVw3Bkt9qLFrd8cs8 https://photos.app.goo.gl/kLnKBpP7bJqoW4hP6 https://photos.app.goo.gl/rcoa4Dmab1mpahCa9 https://photos.app.goo.gl/CAncLX84qJJA9jnq5 (DS16 is right in the middle - two-tone blue coat, blue jeans, and you can just see his tri-pod.)
  13. This year (May 10th) is the 150th anniversary of the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad, if anyone wants to work that in to your history lessons. Here in Utah, it's such a big deal, with all kinds of special events and art exhibits, and history lectures at all the universities, that we are going to have to pick which we have time to take part in. We just got back from a trip to Cheyenne, Wyoming, where they are making a pretty big deal out of it, too. If you are anywhere in Union Pacific territory, check to see what might be happening. I know Utah, Wyoming, Nebraska, and California, at least, are celebrating. https://www.goldenspike150.org/national-golden-spike-events https://www.up.com/media/releases/170510-great-race.htm https://www.californiarailroad.museum/events/transcontinental-railroad-event https://events.stanford.edu/events/829/82927/ https://www.up.com/heritage/steam/ https://www.unleashcb.com/sites/anniversary/?utm_campaign=social2019_rr_anniversary&utm_medium=organic_social&utm_source=twitter https://spike150.org/statewide-events/?gclid=Cj0KCQjw5J_mBRDVARIsAGqGLZDPcX8jzTlS7OAqu01CuFDYTlAeffb1Y3-qSmU-cAi0FBIzYZr1RL0aAn1DEALw_wcB
  14. I'm slacking a bit. Every time I sit down to read lately, I end up taking an accidental nap instead. 20. "Silent Souls Weeping: Depression, Sharing Stories, Finding Hope" by Jane Clayson Johnson. (LDS) She addresses Post-Partum Depression, teen depression - which doesn't always look like "sad," how hard it is to feel spiritual feelings when you are depressed, how perfectionism contributes to depression, and other kinds of important issues, some of which are specific to our faith, but many of which are universal. 19. "Leap of Faith" by Bob Bennett. (LDS) Interesting take on apologetics, since the late Bob Bennett was one of our state's senators, and not an apologist, per se. He wrote it in response to questions he was getting from reporters and colleagues in Washington, D.C. when Mitt Romney was running for president. 18. "Covenant Keepers" by Wendy Watson Nelson. (LDS) 17. "Manga Classics: MacBeth" adapted by Crystal S. Chan. 16. "One Dead Spy" by Nathan Hale. 15. "Stellar Science Projects About Earth's Sky" and "Wild Science Projects About Earth's Weather" by Robert Gardner. 14. "Stuff Matters" by Mark Miodownik. 13. "Led by Divine Design" by Ronald A. Rasband. (LDS) 12. "Forensic Science Projects with a Crime Lab" by Robert Gardner. 11. "Manga Classics: The Jungle Book" adapted by Crystal S. Chan 10. "Donner Dinner Party" by Nathan Hale. 9. "Manga Classics: The Stories of Edgar Allan Poe" adapted by Stacy King. 8. "Bodies We've Buried" by Jarrett Hallcox and Amy Welch. 7. "The Forensic Casebook" by N.E. Genge. 6. "Shaken Faith Syndrome" by MIchael R. Ash. (LDS) 5. "Fingerprints: Crime-Solving Science Experiments" by Kenneth G. Rainis. 4. "Forensic Investigations" (6) by Leela Burnscott. & ("Bones Speak" by Richard Spilsbury) 3. "A Reason for Faith" edited by Laura Harris Hales. (LDS) 2. "Left Standing" by Mason Wells, et al. (LDS) 1. "Camino Easy" by B. G. Preston.
  15. Wow! I'm actually finding it difficult to keep up with DD14. I may have to abandon my own books. 17. "Manga Classics: MacBeth" adapted by Crystal S. Chan. DD14 is still ahead of me. She just finished Scarlet Letter. MacBeth is all original language, right down to the "Is this a dagger that I see before me?" and all that great stuff. DH asked DD what it was about, and her reply was, "He ends up with his head on a stick!!!" She's a bit morbid, so I think that means she liked it. 16. "One Dead Spy" by Nathan Hale. One of the two series DD14 is reading that I'm trying to keep up with. 15. "Stellar Science Projects About Earth's Sky" and "Wild Science Projects About Earth's Weather" by Robert Gardner. These are for younger readers than the other one by him that I read, so I'll count the two together. These should be just about right to try with DD9. 14. "Stuff Matters" by Mark Miodownik. Loved this! We were fans of James Burke's Connections back in the day, and I love seeing connections between things. 13. "Led by Divine Design" by Ronald A. Rasband. (LDS) 12. "Forensic Science Projects with a Crime Lab" by Robert Gardner. 11. "Manga Classics: The Jungle Book" adapted by Crystal S. Chan 10. "Donner Dinner Party" by Nathan Hale. 9. "Manga Classics: The Stories of Edgar Allan Poe" adapted by Stacy King. 8. "Bodies We've Buried" by Jarrett Hallcox and Amy Welch. 7. "The Forensic Casebook" by N.E. Genge. 6. "Shaken Faith Syndrome" by MIchael R. Ash. (LDS) 5. "Fingerprints: Crime-Solving Science Experiments" by Kenneth G. Rainis. 4. "Forensic Investigations" (6) by Leela Burnscott. & ("Bones Speak" by Richard Spilsbury) 3. "A Reason for Faith" edited by Laura Harris Hales. (LDS) 2. "Left Standing" by Mason Wells, et al. (LDS) 1. "Camino Easy" by B. G. Preston.
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