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School before chores vs after


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We always began the day with school - after breakfast, getting dressed and teeth brushed.

We get best results by focusing on academics right away. Chores don't need an alert brain.

 

I am curious what regular chores your kids have to do every morning. I'd have a hard time coming up with daily tasks.

Edited by regentrude
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We always began the day with school - after breakfast, getting dressed and teeth brushed.

We get best results by focusing on academics right away. Chores don't need an alert brain.

 

We don't have a ton of academics just yet, given my kids' ages, but some of them our routine-oriented enough (i.e., my oldest) that I feel like setting expectations ahead of time is important so they have a chance to come around! :) So thanks for your input!

 

I am curious what regular chores your kids have to do every morning. I'd have a hard time coming up with daily tasks.

My 3 yo puts the silverware away from the dishwasher (I try to run it every evening before bed), my 5yo empties the rest of the dishwasher and puts stuff away (I have to help her climb up onto the counter to reach the upper cabinets, though), and my 7 yo sorts laundry 4 days a week and puts it away (I try to run one load through every evening), and the other weekday, he cleans the kids' bathroom (supervised once a month or so to make sure he's not getting too sloppy in his habits). Once my youngest turns 2, everyone will move up a rank, and I'll have to come up with something else for my oldest to do. I think it will be handwashing any dishes that need it and wiping down counters and stove, but am undecided as yet. :)

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Depends on the chore.  Some are best done right away (put dirty clothes in hamper, straighten bed so covers aren't falling into a big pile on the floor, clean up the toothpaste blob dripping down the cabinet after brushing teeth...) but we start school before doing anything "big".  My kids do better with movement breaks so we intersperse chores with school.  For instance, if we have been doing quite a bit of seatwork then maybe it is time to load or unload the dishwasher.  DD usually takes the top part of the dishwasher and DS usually likes the bottom.  Or maybe there aren't any dishes to load or unload so we take a moment to scoop the litter box and sweep up around it.  Or we go weed and water the garden.  With all of us working together, whatever it is gets done quickly but the movement and getting something accomplished other than school peps them up (even if sometimes they roll eyes or grumble a bit) and gets them more focused on academics again.

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My 3 yo puts the silverware away from the dishwasher (I try to run it every evening before bed), my 5yo empties the rest of the dishwasher and puts stuff away (I have to help her climb up onto the counter to reach the upper cabinets, though), and my 7 yo sorts laundry 4 days a week and puts it away (I try to run one load through every evening), and the other weekday, he cleans the kids' bathroom (supervised once a month or so to make sure he's not getting too sloppy in his habits). Once my youngest turns 2, everyone will move up a rank, and I'll have to come up with something else for my oldest to do. I think it will be handwashing any dishes that need it and wiping down counters and stove, but am undecided as yet. :)

 

My kids are those same ages, and we have both morning and afternoon chores.

 

I find they need to burn off a little energy before school (and even sitting at the breakfast table goes more smoothly if they have used their muscles a bit first).  The 20 minutes before breakfast is a flurry of activity - everyone gets dressed and tidies their bed, the preschooler sets the table, the 5 year old empties (most of) the dishwasher and the 7 year old starts a load of laundry.

 

After breakfast and teeth brushing, big kids start school and little kids go play.

 

Our afternoon chores happen right after lunch (for about 20 minutes).  We have a designated chore each weekday that we all work on together.  One day we change all the sheets.  One day we dust and vacuum the main floor.  One day we dust and vacuum the upstairs.  One day we clean the main floor and kids' bathrooms and change the towels.  The fifth day we go to homeschool gym right after lunch, so our chore is to spend 10 minutes when we get home tidying the van.

 

Wendy

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These responses are so interesting to read! We've always done chores first because we wanted to get our work over with so we could play the rest of the day! lol. But now that we're moving into a phase where there is more work to be done during the day, it just occurred to me that maybe chores could and should be done later. We're taking a break to travel over Christmas, and I've just been contemplating my routine upon returning, so this is all very helpful. Thanks!

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We do school first thing, but I don't have little littles anymore. The baby here is 6 years old. He has a dry erase checklist he has to finish every day and his chore is included. He mostly gets to decide the order he completes those subjects/tasks. The chore is usually in the middle of his light school load, but sometimes he saves it for last.

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During.

 

Chores are a good way to get them to take a brain break but keep them on task so they aren't off on their own projects or in lala land before coming back to do some more work.

 

We don't have super regular daily chores though. There are things they're responsible for. Mostly I ask them to chip in for something most days.

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During.

 

Chores are a good way to get them to take a brain break but keep them on task so they aren't off on their own projects or in lala land before coming back to do some more work.

 

We don't have super regular daily chores though. There are things they're responsible for. Mostly I ask them to chip in for something most days.

This is what we do. I am more of the "clean as you go" variety rather than a cleaning schedule, per say. When it needs to be done, I ask them to do it. I try to mix it up so they learn all.of.the.things:-)

 

But, I definitely find that they need breaks during the day. However, the breaks need to be short and not overly fun or I will lose them, lol. So chores.

Edited by Professormom
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We've anyways started our morning off with chores, but I'm curious to hear from others pros and cons of chores later in the day.

 

Both.

 

Some things should be done first: make beds, get dressed, have breakfast, clean the kitchen, feed the pets.

 

Other things surely can be done later, e.g., laundry, cleaning bathrooms, whatever chores need to be done in your home.

 

Homekeeping is part of our children's education. We cannot neglect teaching them how to take care of their homes, because some day they will have their own homes to take care of. And besides, things Must Be Done in a place where people live. You have to find the best time to do them, and get them done.

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It depends on the chores.

 

My children get dressed, do morning chores, eat breakfast, and do schoolwork. Sometimes they get up early to start schoolwork before the little guys wake up, so they might have eggs or toast or yogurt and then a second breakfast later after chores and getting dressed. (DS age 11 especially likes to do this and will drag himself out of bed voluntarily at 6:30 am so he can have breakfast with DH and conquer a couple of big school subjects before the rest of us have even made an appearance.).

 

But morning chores here aren't major cleaning chores. They're emptying the dishwasher, feeding pets, collecting up laundry and bringing it down to the laundry room, emptying trash cans from around the house, taking out trash and recycling, restocking toilet paper. Stuff that really helps me out because it keeps the household running nicely and frees me up to make breakfast, start dinner prep, start the day's laundry, etc. without taking up my entire morning.

 

Heavier chores wait until later. We do cleanup and put laundry away (and empty trash, recycling, and dishwasher again if need be) late afternoon/early evening. After schoolwork (although the high schooler often has work in the evening because she isn't generally an early riser) and generally before dinner.

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My 3 yo puts the silverware away from the dishwasher (I try to run it every evening before bed), my 5yo empties the rest of the dishwasher and puts stuff away (I have to help her climb up onto the counter to reach the upper cabinets, though), and my 7 yo sorts laundry 4 days a week and puts it away (I try to run one load through every evening), and the other weekday, he cleans the kids' bathroom (supervised once a month or so to make sure he's not getting too sloppy in his habits). Once my youngest turns 2, everyone will move up a rank, and I'll have to come up with something else for my oldest to do. I think it will be handwashing any dishes that need it and wiping down counters and stove, but am undecided as yet. :)

 

OK, I see why you need to do those in the morning - because breakfast dishes cannot be put away until the dish washer is empty. this is why I hate running the dishwasher in the evening - I'd much prefer to run it after breakfast so it can be emptied some time during the day and does not need to be done first thing in the morning.

So you're stuck with this, unless you decide to either do it yourself quickly in three minutes or move dishwashing to a different time.

I also do my laundry during the day because it is a good use for the time confetti that is left between homschooling and other commitments.

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We end the school day with chores, that way they clean any messes they made throughout the day.  They aren’t officially “released†from school and allowed to do as they please until their chores have been completed.  My oldest (10) is kind of on call for some of her chores though, such as helping with laundry or cooking and other random stuff that isn’t always necessary right after school.  When we lived in a house with tile in the room we use for school, I did have my oldest sweep and mop it on Friday mornings before school.  That was because Friday was our fun day, and we often played games on the floor and if we didn’t clean it first we’d be covered in dog hair.

 

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We do ours in the morning. But, most of them need to be done in the morning - making bed, brushing teeth, feeding the animals. Basically, the only things that wouldn't *need* to be done in the morning are dumping trashes, picking up dog/cat waste, and putting dishes away. In the grand scheme of things, those are very quick. I'm currently on a kids-not-cleaning-the-house kick, so Monday afternoons after park day, they'll tidy/vacuum their own rooms, but for the most part, that's it. When they were cleaning the house, they would do a cleaning chore daily in the afternoon. 

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We don't have a ton of academics just yet, given my kids' ages, but some of them our routine-oriented enough (i.e., my oldest) that I feel like setting expectations ahead of time is important so they have a chance to come around! :) So thanks for your input!

 

 

My 3 yo puts the silverware away from the dishwasher (I try to run it every evening before bed), my 5yo empties the rest of the dishwasher and puts stuff away (I have to help her climb up onto the counter to reach the upper cabinets, though), and my 7 yo sorts laundry 4 days a week and puts it away (I try to run one load through every evening), and the other weekday, he cleans the kids' bathroom (supervised once a month or so to make sure he's not getting too sloppy in his habits). Once my youngest turns 2, everyone will move up a rank, and I'll have to come up with something else for my oldest to do. I think it will be handwashing any dishes that need it and wiping down counters and stove, but am undecided as yet. :)

Do kids these ages actually do a good job with these chores? I have a 3 year old and an almost 8 year old, and they aren't tall enough to do these types of tasks, strong enough to take out the trash, or have enough attention to detail to scrub anything that I'd actually need clean. My oldest is barely coordinated enough to take the 10 lb dog out for a walk without strangling the poor dog.

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Do kids these ages actually do a good job with these chores? I have a 3 year old and an almost 8 year old, and they aren't tall enough to do these types of tasks, strong enough to take out the trash, or have enough attention to detail to scrub anything that I'd actually need clean. My oldest is barely coordinated enough to take the 10 lb dog out for a walk without strangling the poor dog.

 

I'm not the original poster, but I have kids of similar ages who do similar chores.

 

In general, if I break a job down into concrete simplified steps (which I write out and post), then my 7 year old can do it about 75% as well as I could.  He can wash, dry and clumsily fold a load of regular laundry.  He can very adequately surface clean a bathroom (I do deeper cleaning as required).  He can empty 75% of the dishwasher.  He can take small bags of garbage outside to the can.  He is starting to learn about loading the dishwasher, but that is a work in progress.  The one task he has been complete unable to master despite consistent training is vacuuming.

 

My 3 year old is a big helper, but generally he is not ready to tackle many tasks on his own.  He can put away the silverware from the dishwasher and he can lay out napkins and silverware on the table.  Other than that he is my main errand runner: put this in the hamper, get Audrey some socks, turn off the lights, check if the dryer is done, etc.

 

Wendy

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We generally do chores first, since we have a lot of animal-related chores. I also like to have the kids pick up their rooms a bit and make their beds before they start, because that's something that bugs me if it's left undone.  Other than that, they help with things like vacuuming and general house pick up just before dinner. The only exception is my boys who share a room. I only have one of them do their bedmaking and tidying at a time while the other starts their schoolwork, then they switch. Otherwise, they get distracted and take forever to finish. 

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They make beds and do a quick roon tidy (nothing deep) before breakfast and then we dive right into school. Weekly chores and piano practice happen after school, often after afternoon quiet time. They each have something to help with around dinnertime (set or clear table).

 

Weekly chores (1x/week) include:

 

- sweep upper level

- sweep basement

- clean out van

- dust upper/main/basement

- sort/fold own laundry/put away

- wipe bathroom sinks and mirrors

 

I've found kids as young as six can do all these things well.

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OK, I see why you need to do those in the morning - because breakfast dishes cannot be put away until the dish washer is empty. this is why I hate running the dishwasher in the evening - I'd much prefer to run it after breakfast so it can be emptied some time during the day and does not need to be done first thing in the morning.

So you're stuck with this, unless you decide to either do it yourself quickly in three minutes or move dishwashing to a different time.

Goodness are you suggesting the dishwasher in your house ISN'T run 2-3x a day? :)

 

****

We do routine type things in the morning before school but nothing I really consider chores. The list used to include making beds and 5 minutes (with a timer) pickup/clean/dusting of each person's room but we have gotten off track with that. It was much easier when bedrooms were only for sleeping but more stressful even to start when toy mess is in the mix.

 

I just make judgements during the day about whether to ask a kid to do a job like empty the dish washer or if I will do it myself. I do have my bigger kids help the littles quite a lot so I can do other things that only I can do-- They are always serving breakfast to the littles, getting cups of water, running for new packs of diapers or clean clothes for the toddler. I don't consider those chores but they do contribute well to running a house full of tiny people.

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We don't really have set chores. The kids all help with what needs to be done. Chores like cleaning up after their own breakfast, they do then because that's what makes sense. School comes before other daily house tasks for them and me. During the day they will help as needed. That might mean switching laundry, doing a quick sweep, helping with lunch, etc. It's more like "Hey, C. can you run downstairs and switch the laundry?" if I notice he is between subjects and I'm working with someone else. If everyone is working well, I would go and do it. Sometimes I make lunch, sometimes I call in whoever isn't working or needs a break to help and sometimes I ask them to make it while I do something else. The boys might fold laundry when I take my daughter to ballet. 

 

Bigger weekly chores we usually do on Fridays. We do school first and then I'll make a list of what needs to be done and we all work off the list until it's finished. 

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Do kids these ages actually do a good job with these chores? I have a 3 year old and an almost 8 year old, and they aren't tall enough to do these types of tasks, strong enough to take out the trash, or have enough attention to detail to scrub anything that I'd actually need clean. My oldest is barely coordinated enough to take the 10 lb dog out for a walk without strangling the poor dog.

They do a pretty good job. My 3 yo uses a stool to put silverware away, but I take the container out of the dishwasher and put it on the counter so she can reach it better.

 

My 5 yo stacks all the dishes on the counter (we talked a lot a few months ago when she first started about the "right" way to stack dishes), and then uses a stool to climb up on to the counter to put stuff away, since she's also far to short to reach otherwise. But I have no problem with her sitting or kneeling on the counter to put the dishes away. Sometimes a stack is too heavy, and then we've talked about splitting it up and not doing it all at once because I don't want her to drop them or get too off balance.

 

My 7 yo is good about picking up the bathroom and wiping everything clean and sweeping (though that is the hardest for him to do, honestly), but I still clean the inside of the toilet because he doesn't really have the arm strength for a good scrub. But all the pee splatters on the seat and around the base, he can wipe up just fine. And we worked a LOT on not touching other stuff once you start cleaning the toilet, except to toss your rag in the rag bucket and then wash your hands when you're done! lol. As far as laundry goes, it's easy enough for him to sort the clothes (when in doubt, I just taught him to read the size on the tags). I don't require my younger children to fold their clothes because they're just going to dig through them and mess them all up deciding what to wear anyway. My 7 yo has started folding his clothes voluntarily and he's also in charge of putting away the baby's laundry, and my 3 yo still requires supervision to put her clothes away right (pants with pants, shirts with shirts, etc).

 

I do have to watch them carefully and help them at times, but I'm *hoping* (please, God! lol) that the time I invest in them now with this will have dividends down the road. Right now we're kind of at a middle ground where their chores *probably* save me time and effort, but it's hard to gauge because I have so much more work in "helping" them. Oh well! :)

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We don't really have set chores. The kids all help with what needs to be done. Chores like cleaning up after their own breakfast, they do then because that's what makes sense. School comes before other daily house tasks for them and me. During the day they will help as needed. That might mean switching laundry, doing a quick sweep, helping with lunch, etc. It's more like "Hey, C. can you run downstairs and switch the laundry?" if I notice he is between subjects and I'm working with someone else. If everyone is working well, I would go and do it. Sometimes I make lunch, sometimes I call in whoever isn't working or needs a break to help and sometimes I ask them to make it while I do something else. The boys might fold laundry when I take my daughter to ballet.

I have to say that I am AMAZED at the number of replies on here of folks who don't have set daily chores. When I try to vary from the set daily chores, my kids absolutely lose it. Even my non ASD kids can't do housework without meltdowns unless they know what to expect each day, but my ASD kid can't handle it at all. Shoot, last week I asked him to move his bathroom cleaning day from Wed to Tues because we had plans Wed morning and you would've thought it was the end of the world. I get enough grumbling about chores as is, but I find it's minimized when they know exactly what's expected and can work on it quickly. If my kids get it into their heads (whether I told them the exact opposite or not...) that they'll be "done" with their chores after a particular job and then I give them another job (no matter how quick it is, like bring your dirty clothes and put them in the wash), we practically have world war 3 around here.

 

All that to say that I don't know if my kids are just different or if I'm just enabling them to be set in their ways! But my kids don't currently seem to have the flexibility in their thinking to do quick jobs in between other things. I'm going to spend some more time thinking about this over Christmas though, because it's something I need to work on more with them.

 

ETA: My amazement isn't in any way derisive. It's honest wonder at what works for so well for so many of you! You're awesome! :)

Edited by deanna1ynne
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I have to say that I am AMAZED at the number of replies on here of folks who don't have set daily chores. When I try to vary from the set daily chores, my kids absolutely lose it. Even my non ASD kids can't do housework without meltdowns unless they know what to expect each day, but my ASD kid can't handle it at all. Shoot, last week I asked him to move his bathroom cleaning day from Wed to Tues because we had plans Wed morning and you would've thought it was the end of the world. I get enough grumbling about chores as is, but I find it's minimized when they know exactly what's expected and can work on it quickly. If my kids get it into their heads (whether I told them the exact opposite or not...) that they'll be "done" with their chores after a particular job and then I give them another job (no matter how quick it is, like bring your dirty clothes and put them in the wash), we practically have world war 3 around here.

 

All that to say that I don't know if my kids are just different or if I'm just enabling them to be set in their ways! But my kids don't currently seem to have the flexibility in their thinking to do quick jobs in between other things. I'm going to spend some more time thinking about this over Christmas though, because it's something I need to work on more with them.

 

I think every family is different and what works for one doesn't work for another. That is probably more true with kids who are ASD or who have other special needs. 

 

I tried doing chore charts and having set chores early on because it seemed like the thing to do. It was a failure, mostly because I was lazy at keeping up with it and it became more of a burden for me than a help. So I thought about what I was trying to accomplish with chores. I decided it was two fold 1)Teaching the kids how to do things that they would need to do on their own eventually (laundry, cooking, etc). and 2) Raising kids who were willing to be helpful, both now and as a future spouse/parent/roommate. I wanted them to just see it as normal that everyone pitches in to get work done. 

 

I found we got more complaining about chores when we had a set list. They saw it as a somewhat arbitrary assignment. Kind of like busywork. They also were more likely to complain if I gave them another job or asked for extra help. "But I did my chores already." "But that's not my job." Now we approach it as "Hey, we all like to have fun as a family and to have time to do the stuff we want and need to do. There are things around the house that need to get done. Let's all work together to do it." I won't say they have always been happy and cheerful at pitching in but heck, I'm not excited about cleaning either so I'm ok with that. I acknowledge that no one really LIKES cleaning the bathroom but that it's pretty gross if no one does it. 

 

It probably doesn't work as well with little kids but my kids are more willing to work when I give them choices of what chores to do and mix it up. They all hate dusting and vacuuming. I can see why, it's never finished and it always has to be done. But for some odd reason they love to wash the windows. They all like to cook so there have been times when I let them cook dinner while I do something else less fun. That takes some training first, obviously. 

 

For the times when we need to do a bigger clean I make up a list of a bunch of jobs and let them come and pick their job and check it off. We put on loud dance music and it's usually pretty painless.  

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Do kids these ages actually do a good job with these chores? I have a 3 year old and an almost 8 year old, and they aren't tall enough to do these types of tasks, strong enough to take out the trash, or have enough attention to detail to scrub anything that I'd actually need clean. My oldest is barely coordinated enough to take the 10 lb dog out for a walk without strangling the poor dog.

 

My DD7&8 are able to straighten up and surface clean bathrooms, wipe and dust tables ,desks, and shelves, help with meal prep and clean up, feeding dogs, weeding flower beds, and vacuuming using a lightweight stick vacuum.  It’s usually less than 10 minutes worth of chores, but it goes a long way in helping me out!  And it gives them a sense of responsibility for contributing to the family.  DD10 also brushes the dogs and prepares their freeze-dried food, dishes, laundry, making simple meals, mopping, and trimming bushes and general yard work.  And when we moved, I found out that she is also super good at helping assemble furniture!  I think 7-8 is a perfect age to start doing chores with your child.  They are young enough to think it is fun and old enough to actually help out, even if you need to supervise for a while.  I wouldn’t expect a 3 year old to be too helpful, but you can start by having him straighten up toys or help fold easy laundry like washcloths and hand towels. 

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Morning chores are before - mostly personal stuff like make beds, get dressed, quick tidy of room if necessary, open the curtains. 

 

Other chores get done through the day, sometimes on a break or while I work with a sibling or sometimes after.  Some have to be done at a specific time, like table setting.

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I'm just amazed how many people have the energy and brain power to not only do chores after school, but to organize their kids chores. :D By the time the school day is done, I'm wiped. Getting dinner on the table is my only priority at that point, anything else is bonus. And yes, my house is a mess. I hate it.

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The only set chores my kids have are feeding the pets, they do that before school. Most days my 4 and 6 year old empty the dishwasher before school but it depends on when they wake up.

 

My 9 year old has more variety of chores based on what needs to be done, he always does them after school. He likes to sleep in later than my other kids and I need to have the majority of our schoolwork done before lunch.

 

I do the majority of my chores after the kids are in bed for the night, I prefer working when it's quiet.

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I'm just amazed how many people have the energy and brain power to not only do chores after school, but to organize their kids chores. :D By the time the school day is done, I'm wiped. Getting dinner on the table is my only priority at that point, anything else is bonus. And yes, my house is a mess. I hate it.

I organize chores ahead of time for this reason. There is a chart on the fridge with space for check marks. It requires no brain power on my part, which is a win. 😀 And I get the added bonus of having other people clean at my tired hour!

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During.

 

Chores are a good way to get them to take a brain break but keep them on task so they aren't off on their own projects or in lala land before coming back to do some more work.

 

.

This. We do a couple subjects. Then my younger ones brush teeth, pick up their bed (mat),and bring in some wood, just enough for a day. If we don't need wood I might just let them have outside recess for awhile. They need a break but I don't want them to get involved with a giant Lego project or something like that because the they don't want to go back to school. We save major chores like vacuuming or cleaning their room if it gets out of hand for after school or the weekend.

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Do kids these ages actually do a good job with these chores? I have a 3 year old and an almost 8 year old, and they aren't tall enough to do these types of tasks, strong enough to take out the trash, or have enough attention to detail to scrub anything that I'd actually need clean. My oldest is barely coordinated enough to take the 10 lb dog out for a walk without strangling the poor dog.

 

8 is right on the edge of being really really helpful. My youngest is 9 but last year he fed the dog but didn't walk him. I or an older child would deep clean the bath but he always got toothpaste everywhere so he was required to just wipe the counter, folding and putting away clothes, organizing the shoes that didn't make it to the shoe rack, hauling wood, and learning to sweep by just doing the little entry (it really doesn't have to be perfect). He also emptied the dishwasher but he is really tall so perhaps it was easier for him. It is too much work to teach them to actually do dishes though because you actually want them clean but it doesn't matter if there is a wrinkle in their bed when they make it. So I chose easier to teach tasks.

 

I can't say I bothered with my three year olds other then in a "help mommy" fashion. "Mommy is folding clothes, can you find the match?" type of thing. Oh and picking up their own toys and such.

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School first.  

 

But our school day lasts from 8 until 4 (or longer) plus one of my students has ADHD and take meds for it which wear off by about 4:00ish. 

 

A person's ADHD meds can be worn off and they can still wash dishes.  But if a person's ADHD meds wear off before Geometry or Biology is done--woe to that poor student!  I am very careful to plan the easiest classes for the end of the day when my student's brain starts spinning its wheels.

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My 8yo does a daily bathroom tidy. That includes hauling out any laundry and/or trash, sweeping/vacuuming, decluttering the counter, and wiping down the counter with a lysol type wipe. Occasionally she mops it. Someone bigger than her will take care of the loo and shower.

 

That task is included in her daily checklist and she does it when she chooses. Usually after she's done a few subjects and wants a break from the school table.

 

She also pitches in on family cleaning day once a week and other as needed tasks. She can empty the dishwasher if needed.

 

Every kid has one main task that they're responsible for daily and beyond that we make it up as we go along. The kids older than most mentioned in this thread might have cat boxes and backyard dog mess, dishes, and such.

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Wow, school before chores. I must say, this is a novel idea to me. I recently heard Carole Joy Seid recommend the same thing on her DVDs. I may try this and see how it goes.

 

Ours are:

Beds

Bathroom wipe-down

Kitchen sweep and mop

Entry vacuumed

Dishwasher emptied

Animals

 

(Divided among kiddos)

 

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