Jump to content

Menu

Recommended Posts

I was inspired by Polly's update of the 7th Grade Planning Thread to start a new 8th grade thread - I know we've had a couple, but I hoped we could use this thread to share our plans as they develop, and to talk about the skills we want our students to build in 8th grade and how we've chosen resources to build those skills.  Plus, then we can all giggle next May about how far our plans diverged from reality!

 

So, without further ado, here is our 8th grade plan as of May 2015:

 

8th Grade Synposis Syllabus

 

Math

1.       Algebra

a.       Finish Crocodiles & Coconuts, do Chuckles the Rocket Dog

b.      Khan Algebra 1 mastery for practice

2.       Geometry

a.       TC Course Geometry: An Interactive Journey to Mastery

b.      Finish Understanding Geometry

c.       Khan Geometry mastery for practice

3.       Probability & Statistics

a.       Khan for continued practice

4.Problem Solving – Skill Focus: Problem Solving

a.       Alcumus

 

English

1.       Rhetoric - Skill Focus: Essay Writing

a.       Writing With a Thesis

b.      Bravewriter Expository Essay class

c.       They Say/I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing

2.       Creative Writing

a.       TC Course Writing Great Fiction Adventures in Fantasy: Lessons and Activities in Narrative and Descriptive Writing

b.      Screenwriting & Novel - personal projects

3.       Literature – Skill Focus: Essay Writing

a.       Movies as Literature: The Music Man, ET, The Maltese Falcon, Rear Window, The Philadelphia Story, The Journey of August King, To Kill a Mockingbird, A Raisin in the Sun, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Chariots of Fire, Emma

b.      Shakespeare: The Tempest

c.       Science Fiction/Fantasy:  Frankenstein, The Island of Dr. Moreau, The War of the Worlds, His Dark Materials

4. Grammar & Style - Paragraphs for Middle School

 

 

Science

1.TC Course: Joy of Science - Skill Focus: Taking notes from lectures, discussion & critical thinking, short essay questions

a.       Science Matters

b.      What’s The Matter: Readings in Physics

c.       Nature of Life: Readings in Biology

2.       TC Course: Science of Self - Skill Focus: Taking notes from lectures, discussion & critical thinking, short essay questions

3.Unit Studies – Skill Focus: reading to learn, taking notes from text, answering short essay questions

a.       Story of Science: Einstein

b.      Carbon Chemistry – McHenry

c.       Cells – McHenry

d.      Exploring The Way Life Works

e.      HHMI Evolution Unit

f.        The Brain – McHenry

 

History of Science

1.       Independent Reads w/ Reading Log – Skill Focus: Reading & Writing to Learn, Critical Thinking

a.       String, Straight-Edge & Shadow: The Story of Geometry - done

b.      The Clockwork Universe: Isaac Newton, The Royal Society & the Birth of the Modern World – Edward Dolnick

c.       Longitude – Dava Sobel

d.      Curie in 90 Minutes – John and Mary Gribbin

e.      Bomb: The Race to Build and Steal the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon – Steve Sheinkin

f.        Stargirl – Jerry Spinelli (IR)

g.       Black Hole – Marcia Bartusiak

h.      Uncle Tungsten: Memoirs of a Chemical Boyhood – Oliver Sachs

i.         The Disappearing Spoon – Sam Kean

j.        Napoleon’s Buttons – Penny LeCouteur

k.       Itch – Simon Mayo (IR)

l.         The True Adventures of Charley Darwin – Carolyn Meyer (IR)

m.    Remarkable Creatures – Tracey Chevalier (Mary Anning) (IR)

n.      The Double Helix – James Watson

o.      The Violinist’s Thumb – Sam Kean

p.      The Adoration of Jenna Fox (2009) (IR)

q.      The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks – Rebecca Skloot

r.        The Dueling Neurosurgeons – Sam Kean

s.       The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat – Oliver Sachs

2.       Read Alouds w/ Discussion – Skill Focus: Oral Discussion & Critical Thinking, Big Ideas

a.       A Little History of Science – WF Bynum (read aloud w/ Morgan)

b.      The Story of Science – Susan Wise Bauer

c.       A People’s History of Science: Miners, Midwives and “Low Mechanicks†– Clifford D. Conner

d.      Science as a Way of Knowing: Foundations of Modern Biology – John A Moore Ch. 1-10

e.      Voyage of the Beagle – Charles Darwin

f.        The Origin of Species – Charles Darwin

g.       Why Evolution is True – Jerry Coyne

h.      The Beak of the Finch – Jonathan Weiner

a.       Science as a Way of Knowing: Foundations of Modern Biology – John A Moore Ch. 11-22

 

Metacognition – Skill Focus: Critical Thinking, Study Skills, Logic, Metacognition

1.       TC: How to Be a Superstar Student

2.       TC: Your Deceptive Mind

3.       The Demon-Haunted World – Carl Sagan

4.       TC: The Philosopher’s Toolkit

5.       A Rulebook for Arguments

6.       TC: Meaning from Data: Statistics Made Clear

7.       Letters to a Young Scientist – E. O. Wilson

 

Spanish – Skill Focus: Vocabulary, Grammar, Oral & Written Expression

1.       Easy Peasy Spanish 1

2.       Finish Easy Spanish Step by Step

3.       Finish Getting Started With Spanish

4.       Duolingo

 

PE – TBD

 

Extracurriculars

Horseback Riding

Theater

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Plus, then we can all giggle next May about how far our plans diverged from reality!

 

 

That's my favourite part. :D

 

Rose, your plans are always so detailed! Mine are going to look small in comparison but here they are:

 

Math - MEP Year 9 - he'll likely finish about mid-year so then we'll move on to Year 10

 

English - CTGE 8 - we're skipping all the grammar and just doing the rest. He's spent 5 years on grammar and it just frustrates him so I think it's time to move on and focus more on writing and literature. But he'll get one last polish on punctuation and stuff.

 

Writing - More 3-level outlines, rewrites and WTM-style lit. essays. My goal for him is to do longer compositions of each type. I also want to introduce him to essays and citing sources via a couple chapters of WWS 2 and I'll probably have him make up his own outline and write an essay from it just to see how he does.

 

Vocab - We've officially dropped spelling and he's going to do Vocabulary Cartoons.

 

Science - Apologia Physical. My goal for him is to have him do science independently and see how he likes Apologia because that will influence high school science decisions.

 

Logic - Fallacy Detective ETA: Thinking Toolbox as well. Read it this summer and really liked it.

 

History - SOTW 4 plus Canadian history stuff. Keeping it light and interesting, but he reads history textbooks for fun so I'm confident we aren't lacking here. Next year we'll get a little more serious.

 

I think art will be optional this year but he will still do memory work and possibly piano lessons. Piano lessons might just morph into voice lessons but we shall see.

 

ETA: He wants to learn some French by making a list of phrases/words he wants to know and plugging them into Google Translate. :lol:

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay, this is for my dyslexic.

 

History/Literature/Geography/Science: AO Year 8

Math: Jacob's Algebra (fallback is MEP 8-9); we might play with this book on Euclid

Spelling: Right now we are trying studied dictation (his request), if that doesn't pan out we'll go back to Apples & Pears

Latin: Visual Latin (second half) with Lingua Latina

Greek: Elementary Greek 2

Spanish: finish GSWS, I'm not sure after that

Grammar: The Mother Tongue II (orally as a family)

Writing: focus on ordering written narrations (no program), also some lessons from an old English handbook (similar to this); possibly Roar on the Other Side (poetry)

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am still undecided about whether or not next year is going to be 8th grade for Dd12.

 

Math: AoPS Intro to Algebra (Dd's choice. We may do exercises from Jacobs if I feel she needs more practice.)

 

English: MCT Voyage, WWS 2, Figuratively Speaking (We started this one year but quit when I got pregnant.) w/40 or so lit books still to be determined

 

Science: Apologia Physical Science

 

Latin: Wheelock's (first half)

 

Everything else: Tapestry of Grace, Year 1 ( a mixture of D and R levels with a goal of doing more R)

 

 

With siblings: Getting Started with Spanish, Excavating English, various other resources

 

Extracurriculars: Piano, TKD, and (possibly) CAP

 

My main goal for next year is to get her prepared for high school work, especially in writing.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have two main areas I want to focus on with DD, writiing and math.  I also want to increase her indpendence with a few subjects.  I'll be getting my older 3 DC a planner to give them some control over their lessons.  DD has greatly improved in this area over the last year.

 

Math:

  • Get her ready for Algebra in 9th grade.  If we finish MUS Epsilon this summer, that will leave Zeta and Pre-Algebra for next year. 
  • SCM's Your Business Math (Pet Store)--I'm hoping seeing math in the "real world" will make it more interesting. 

LA: 

  • ELTL 5--My goals here are to work on grammar and get her comfortable with writing.  She is an extremely reluctant writer.  Grammar and dictation go very well for her, but she's only done basic grammar.  I'm excited about the diagramming and outlining which we haven't covered in detail until now.
  • Written narrations--I have some History Scribe notebook pages to help with this.  The History Scholar pages have some essay type questions.  I'm hoping to get her comfortable with these.  I'd love to have her up to 2 written narrations a week (plus her ELTL narrations) by the end of the year.
  • Work on cursive.  She knows all but a couple of the uppercase letters, but she still prefers writing in print.  I'm hoping to get her more comfortable with cursive.

Science:

  • SCM Bird Study--this is below her age, but I've been wanting to learn birds and bird calls and this seems like a great introduction.
  • 365 Starry Nights--learn a few constellations and about the moon cycles.  I picked up some notebook pages to go with it.
  • Woods Walk, Chipmunks at the Doorstep, Bird Watchers and Bird Feeders--just some fun living science books
  • Exploring Planet Earth--I'm using this to giver her some independent work.  I plan on switching her to Apologia science for high school and want to get her ready for learning more on her own.
  • Science Journaling--I want to move our nature notebooks to more of a science notebooks and record a few experiments in it during the year.
  • The Geography Book--this is a bit of geography and physical science.  We'll be doing one project a week from here.

History:

  • SCM Middle Ages, Renaissance, & Reformation--We haven't covered this time period before now, so I'm excited about it!  I'm still working on the actual booklist.  I'll be switching out some of the biographies and possibly the Henty book for DD's individual reading. 
  • SCM Visits to Europe--Learn European geography.  Some of Charlotte Mason's geography series is included.

Bible:

  • I'm not using SCM's Bible studies, so we'll just be adding some basic notebooking in its place.
  • We'll be doing 3 days OT reading and 2 days NT reading.  I'll probably go through the Greenleaf Guide to the Old Testament as well.  We read about 2 or 3 chapters each day. 
  • Hymns, Catechism, and Bible verses for memory work.  At this point, Catechism is just a review for her.

Foreign Language:

  • Latin--probably Latina Christiana.  We do this as a family subject.
  • Spanish--Rosetta Stone (another independent program for her)

Extras:

  • Family studies: composer study, habits (Laying Down the Rails for Children), handicrafts, etc. 
  • Computer Programming
  • Piano lessons
  • PE--We have Family Time Fitness and I've been thinking about having her lead the other DC with this.  It would give them something to do while I make lunch.
  • typing
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's what is on my planner for my 8th grader:

 

MathR&S 8, with Key to Geometry and Key to Algebra; also some select units of MEP 7 and 8.  This is my attempt at piecing together a Pre-A course that won't break the bank or that won't make him run for the hills.  Math has always been his Achilles' heel.. and teaching this particular child math is *my* Achilles' heel...hopefully this combo works well for both of us.  :001_cool:

 

Latin:  finish LfC (and more work with Latin Book One), then Latin Prep for a review.  We are taking the time to overlearn grammar forms--his translation work this past year shows that he needs to park on this for a while 'till it just becomes automatic. 

 

GreekElementary Greek 2

 

Logic: Fallacy Detective (and I consider Latin/Greek/Math to be logic as well)

 

Science: BJU Life Science (done with his younger brother, they are lab partners, and it really is an episode of the Odd Couple... :boxing_smiley: ) 

 

History/Geo/ Lit: my Dr. Frankenstein version of AO year 7, and I'm going to see if I can squeeze some state history reading in there somewhere...

 

Spelling/Grammar:  ABeka for spelling, Warriner's for grammar

 

Writing: SWB's middle grades guidelines (given on the audio lectures); The Creative Writer, and more of a focus on crafting literary analysis essays (Yes, my son, you really do have to edit and improve things.  Not just do them once and call it good...)

 

He will also continue with his soccer team, and is enjoying a new drama opportunity (outside of the drama at home... :svengo:  :rolleyes: ). 

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Someone's been teaching outlining! :D :leaving:

 

Don't mind me...just wearing my silly hat. :hat:

 

Oh man, I *think* in outlines! Always have. That was one topic easy for me to teach!  ;)  :D

 

 

Love it Rose!  Makes me think about all the things that I did NOT teach last year to ds that I should have!

 

Ruth in NZ

 

Ruth, you've been a huge inspiration to me, getting me to think of the important reading and writing skill goals, and how I can use the subject areas to focus on those skills.  Looking at my detailed 7th grade plan reminded me of the things that I didn't get around to teaching this year that I definitely want to do in 8th! 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I have two main areas I want to focus on with DD, writiing and math.  I also want to increase her indpendence with a few subjects.  I'll be getting my older 3 DC a planner to give them some control over their lessons.  DD has greatly improved in this area over the last year.

 

 

Science:

  • SCM Bird Study--this is below her age, but I've been wanting to learn birds and bird calls and this seems like a great introduction.
  • 365 Starry Nights--learn a few constellations and about the moon cycles.  I picked up some notebook pages to go with it.
  • Woods Walk, Chipmunks at the Doorstep, Bird Watchers and Bird Feeders--just some fun living science books
  • Exploring Planet Earth--I'm using this to giver her some independent work.  I plan on switching her to Apologia science for high school and want to get her ready for learning more on her own.
  • Science Journaling--I want to move our nature notebooks to more of a science notebooks and record a few experiments in it during the year.
  • The Geography Book--this is a bit of geography and physical science.  We'll be doing one project a week from here.

 

 

 

Holly, I particularly like your science plans! Shannon is rounding out this year doing MP's Book of Trees science unit, and though it is also "below" her level, she is enjoying it so much! I think it's so important to let them explore their interests and learn about the world around them in these years. We'll be doing a lot of field studies and nature journalling this summer, and we'll try to keep that up during next school year - that will be the focus of my younger's science studies.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was inspired by Polly's update of the 7th Grade Planning Thread to start a new 8th grade thread - I know we've had a couple, but I hoped we could use this thread to share our plans as they develop, and to talk about the skills we want our students to build in 8th grade and how we've chosen resources to build those skills.  Plus, then we can all giggle next May about how far our plans diverged from reality!

 

So, without further ado, here is our 8th grade plan as of May 2015:

 

8th Grade Synposis Syllabus

 

Math

1.       Algebra

a.       Finish Crocodiles & Coconuts, do Chuckles the Rocket Dog

b.      Khan Algebra 1 mastery for practice

2.       Geometry

a.       TC Course Geometry: An Interactive Journey to Mastery

b.      Finish Understanding Geometry

c.       Khan Geometry mastery for practice

3.       Probability & Statistics

a.       Khan for continued practice

4.Problem Solving – Skill Focus: Problem Solving

a.       Alcumus

 

English

1.       Rhetoric - Skill Focus: Essay Writing

a.       Writing With a Thesis

b.      Bravewriter Expository Essay class

c.       They Say/I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing

2.       Creative Writing

a.       TC Course Writing Great Fiction

b.      Screenwriting

3.       Literature – Skill Focus: Essay Writing

a.       Movies as Literature: The Music Man, ET, The Maltese Falcon, Rear Window, The Philadelphia Story, The Journey of August King, To Kill a Mockingbird, A Raisin in the Sun, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Chariots of Fire, Emma

b.      Shakespeare: The Tempest

c.       Science Fiction/Fantasy:  Frankenstein, The Island of Dr. Moreau, The War of the Worlds, His Dark Materials

4. Grammar & Style - Paragraphs for Middle School

 

 

Science

1.TC Course: Joy of Science - Skill Focus: Taking notes from lectures, discussion & critical thinking, short essay questions

a.       Science Matters

b.      What’s The Matter: Readings in Physics

c.       Nature of Life: Readings in Biology

2.       TC Course: Science of Self - Skill Focus: Taking notes from lectures, discussion & critical thinking, short essay questions

3.Unit Studies – Skill Focus: reading to learn, taking notes from text, answering short essay questions

a.       Story of Science: Einstein

b.      Carbon Chemistry – McHenry

c.       Cells – McHenry

d.      Exploring The Way Life Works

e.      HHMI Evolution Unit

f.        The Brain – McHenry

 

History of Science

1.       Independent Reads w/ Reading Log – Skill Focus: Reading & Writing to Learn, Critical Thinking

a.       String, Straight-Edge & Shadow: The Story of Geometry

b.      The Clockwork Universe: Isaac Newton, The Royal Society & the Birth of the Modern World – Edward Dolnick

c.       Longitude – Dava Sobel

d.      Curie in 90 Minutes – John and Mary Gribbin

e.      Bomb: The Race to Build and Steal the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon – Steve Sheinkin

f.        Stargirl – Jerry Spinelli (IR)

g.       Black Hole – Marcia Bartusiak

h.      Uncle Tungsten: Memoirs of a Chemical Boyhood – Oliver Sachs

i.         The Disappearing Spoon – Sam Kean

j.        Napoleon’s Buttons – Penny LeCouteur

k.       Itch – Simon Mayo (IR)

l.         The True Adventures of Charley Darwin – Carolyn Meyer (IR)

m.    Remarkable Creatures – Tracey Chevalier (Mary Anning) (IR)

n.      The Double Helix – James Watson

o.      The Violinist’s Thumb – Sam Kean

p.      The Adoration of Jenna Fox (2009) (IR)

q.      The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks – Rebecca Skloot

r.        The Dueling Neurosurgeons – Sam Kean

s.       The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat – Oliver Sachs

2.       Read Alouds w/ Discussion – Skill Focus: Oral Discussion & Critical Thinking, Big Ideas

a.       A Little History of Science – WF Bynum (read aloud w/ Morgan)

b.      The Story of Science – Susan Wise Bauer

c.       A People’s History of Science: Miners, Midwives and “Low Mechanicks†– Clifford D. Conner

d.      Science as a Way of Knowing: Foundations of Modern Biology – John A Moore Ch. 1-10

e.      Voyage of the Beagle – Charles Darwin

f.        The Origin of Species – Charles Darwin

g.       Why Evolution is True – Jerry Coyne

h.      The Beak of the Finch – Jonathan Weiner

a.       Science as a Way of Knowing: Foundations of Modern Biology – John A Moore Ch. 11-22

 

Metacognition – Skill Focus: Critical Thinking, Study Skills, Logic, Metacognition

1.       TC: How to Be a Superstar Student

2.       TC: Your Deceptive Mind

3.       The Demon-Haunted World – Carl Sagan

4.       TC: The Philosopher’s Toolkit

5.       A Rulebook for Arguments

6.       TC: Meaning from Data: Statistics Made Clear

7.       Letters to a Young Scientist – E. O. Wilson

 

Spanish – Skill Focus: Vocabulary, Grammar, Oral & Written Expression

1.       Easy Peasy Spanish 1

2.       Finish Easy Spanish Step by Step

3.       Finish Getting Started With Spanish

4.       Duolingo

 

PE – TBD

 

Extracurriculars

Horseback Riding

Theater

 

Rose:  Thank you for this, but your history plans need to be for American History, modern foreign language needs to be German, and science needs to be a general, pre-high school wrap-up.

 

I mean, come on, you don't expect me to plan anything for myself, do you? :toetap05:

 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with Ruth and love what you have planned Rose. I keep coming back to gaze at it. I don't want to hijack the thread and please let me know if I am. Your point about getting it all done really resonates with me. That's always, always, always the hitch in my plans and eventually I've let so much go because #1 my learner is so all over the place and #2 I know there's no way we are going to get to it all. So rather than plan out so much now I plan less and the difference is tremendous in how productive *I* feel. Everything else that we get down feels like a feather in the cap this way lol. I love watching how you guys plan and feel so inspired afterwards.

 

We have a big bunch of TC lectures that we still haven't gotten to. One of the ways I think we'll finally get some of it done this year is to play it in the car on the way to classes and talk about it as he watches it (and I drive, eeek). We have a mix of video and audio and unfortunately, a higher number of video. I don't know why I didn't just get the audio versions (but some of them are more visual and video is better). I bought a laptop charger for the car and should have thought of that sooner.

 

Where skills are concerned, we are quite set in most goal areas but writing is still a concern here. He will take a lit-heavy class in fall with (I hope) lots of writing and I think he will be fine after possibly failing the first two assignments (I kid you not) because that's really how he seems to learn best and sometimes I just have to throw him to the wolves with certain skills and trust in the process of learning through making mistakes or misjudging what is needed. But I am also hoping very much to shore up skills in summer. The problem is always time. Even when we carve it out and put it in a schedule, we are just too pampered by taking bunny trails all this time.

 

Do you guys have any other strategies on how you get some of the writing/ reading/ discussing done? I will also be juggling some work and class in fall so my time will be more limited than usual. (Once again, if it's better to start a s/o for this please let me know!)
 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's our plans so far, feel free to add suggestions.  We need a light year as DS is having major surgery in September.  We will be taking 2 weeks off for recovery, then getting back to it but will have 60ish hours a week of rehab for at least 6 weeks, then down to 10 or so hours of rehab a week for another 3-4 months. 

 

Math-Teaching Textbooks Algebra 1

 

Science-Mr Q Physical Science

 

Language Arts- Jensen's Grammar (splitting into 2 years) with various Literature Guides and Writing from Rhetoric II if she gets it done!

 

History-----------have no clue.  In the past we have already done SOTW, 2 years of American History, and just did a year solely of Living books on Ancient Greece and Rome.

 

Minecraft Homeschool for fun.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with Ruth and love what you have planned Rose. I keep coming back to gaze at it. I don't want to hijack the thread and please let me know if I am. Your point about getting it all done really resonates with me. That's always, always, always the hitch in my plans and eventually I've let so much go because #1 my learner is so all over the place and #2 I know there's no way we are going to get to it all. So rather than plan out so much now I plan less and the difference is tremendous in how productive *I* feel. Everything else that we get down feels like a feather in the cap this way lol. I love watching how you guys plan and feel so inspired afterwards.

 

We have a big bunch of TC lectures that we still haven't gotten to. One of the ways I think we'll finally get some of it done this year is to play it in the car on the way to classes and talk about it as he watches it (and I drive, eeek). We have a mix of video and audio and unfortunately, a higher number of video. I don't know why I didn't just get the audio versions (but some of them are more visual and video is better). I bought a laptop charger for the car and should have thought of that sooner.

 

Where skills are concerned, we are quite set in most goal areas but writing is still a concern here. He will take a lit-heavy class in fall with (I hope) lots of writing and I think he will be fine after possibly failing the first two assignments (I kid you not) because that's really how he seems to learn best and sometimes I just have to throw him to the wolves with certain skills and trust in the process of learning through making mistakes or misjudging what is needed. But I am also hoping very much to shore up skills in summer. The problem is always time. Even when we carve it out and put it in a schedule, we are just too pampered by taking bunny trails all this time.

 

Do you guys have any other strategies on how you get some of the writing/ reading/ discussing done? I will also be juggling some work and class in fall so my time will be more limited than usual. (Once again, if it's better to start a s/o for this please let me know!)

 

 

Getting it all done is a chronic issue around here, too.  At least, Getting All I Planned done! That's why I put the time into up-front planning, because I always initially want to do more than is practical. So once I see it all in one place, I have to start cutting.  Sometimes cutting readings, sometimes cutting planned assignments or other things. For instance, I realized that rather than trying to write after every Joy of Science lecture and correlated reading, it will make more sense to write once a week, on Fridays (the day that I work), and choose one of the discussion questions from the week to write about.  Once I cut that down, the whole thing looks much more manageable!

 

One thing we'll be adding this year is writing assignments in more than one class at a time. I think juggling writing projects across more than one class is an important high school skill, so we'll be practicing it.  In 7th grade, she wrote one essay at a time, in history or in lit, not in both  In 8th, we'll be having concurrent lit/rhetoric & history/science writing. We're also adding a reading log and some other kinds of exploratory writing assignments.  So there will be writing in multiple subjects, multiple format every day.  That will be a big change to get used to.

 

As far as day to day, and dealing with bunny trails - I need to do the big master plan, but then for day to day planning, I only plan a week or two in advance. That's so we can maximize flexibility. We'll add things, drop things, and go on bunny trails as interest and energy demand.  But because I have articulated the skills I want to work on, hopefully I will still incorporate the skill-building activities, even if books or topics change.

 

We definitely have a nonlinear school year in terms of time available.  Less when there is a theater show, more when there isn't.  I also have a very non-even workload, so when I do have free time, I work with her a lot, but then when I have a big work project, I have to pull away and let her work more independently. I'm hoping to front-load the modelling of note taking for books and lectures, and work on answering short essay questions, a lot at the beginning of the year, and then I see her being able to do that more independently as the year progresses.  At least that's my hope . . . 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My goals for my upcoming 8th grader are to get him to take more responsibility over his work, get him ready for Algebra 1 in 9th grade, and get him up to or at least closer to being on grade level for his English skills (reading, writing, spelling, etc.).

 

He was in public school for K, homeschooled for 1st and half of 2nd, homeschooled for 3rd and half of 4th, and public school ever since. We move a lot and I'm not always happy with the schools, hence the back and forth. He will be homeschooled for 8th with the intention of going to public school (which is really a DoDEA school) in 9th, but we will see when the time comes. 

 

Here is what I have right now:

 

English:

Grammar- Easy Grammar Plus with Daily Grams along with Fix It! Grammar

Spelling- Apples & Pears, he will start with Book B and hopefully get through Book D by the end of the year

Writing- Essentials in Writing 8

Vocabulary- English From the Roots Up, nothing too time consuming, just going over the cards a couple of times each week

Literature- NO CLUE YET, possibly just the literature from Bookshark 8 but I'm not positive

 

Math:

NO CLUE YET, I still have to figure out where he is in math; he needs to be ready for Algebra 1 in 9th grade so probably a PreAlgebra program

 

History:

Bookshark 8, I plan on either typing the questions up in worksheet form or having him take notes or outline from the history reading

 

Science:

Elemental Science Earth Science and Astronomy for Logic

 

Others:

Japanese

Typing Instructor

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I posted in a few other threads, but I'd love to join the discussion here.

 

 

English Language via Landry Academy English IV using MCT materials.  The class meets live online once a week.   Then, my son & I come up with a schedule to complete the assignments before the next class meeting. 

-Grammar

-Composition

-Vocabulary

-Literature

 

He still needs remediation in spelling.  Any recommendations?

 

Math.

-Finish TT Algebra 1 sometime in October/November. 

-Attempt AoPS Algebra (though I have no Plan B)

 

Earth Science

-1st semester geology

-2nd semester astronomy and flight science

 

World history survey as a prep before repeating the history sequence in-depth one last time in high school.  We'll use Abeka's History of the World.

 

I am looking for a Latin study to add to our year.  I'm thinking First Form Latin?  Latin Alive!?

 

Extras that he loves:

Performance guitar, Boy Scouts, Baseball,Basketball

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you Rose. The above especially, is very helpful to know. Maybe I should really put some of the worry to rest because honestly, I drive myself batty about not being writing-heavy enough.

 

I haven't listed our plans yet! I did sometime ago on another thread but things changed again and I took it out. Most of his classes will be outsourced/DE again this coming year and he will have to write for two of them now that I think of it.

 

Fall line up for now (things might still change):

 

Math: still up in the air as he is trying to see if he can concurrently enroll somewhere other than where he was taking math last semester (he might add an AoPS online class--a bit frustrating planning-wise because the AoPS schedule is never neatly planned to begin when fall semester begins, it begins mid-semester instead--but then, also an advantage because if the concurrently enrolled class ends up being too busy, he will know ahead of time and be able to postpone the AoPS class to some other time)

 

Social Studies/ Behavioral Science: introduction to psychology (skills: intensive reading and note-taking/ essay writing)

 

English/ Literature: science fiction and fantasy literature (skills: critical thinking, lit analysis, essay writing)

 

Music: jazz improvisation -- piano (skills: composing, improvising, playing for a formal audience, having fun!)

 

Electives/ fun hobbies we will focus for the semester: origami, programming and game design as time allows; audiobooks and TC lectures in the car (spans math, history, literature etc)

 

(He will most likely fulfill the science, foreign language and history courses in spring, along with another math and maybe, a programming course.)

 

Edited to strikethrough and add: should have known that listing our plans anywhere was the surefire-est way to ensure there will be yet another change. Sigh.

 

Of course! I've been waiting for something like that to happen over here, too.  Keep us posted on what you decide! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is still very much under construction for our 8th grade year LOL.

 

 

History - Finish HO2, HO3 (1850-present)

Skill Goals - Essay writing, note taking/learning from a text, outlining

 

Math - Jurgensen Geometry w/duke tip videos

Skill Goals - Taking notes from an audio lecture

 

Problem solving - Algebra word problem review from Foerster and AOPS/Alcumus?

 

Science - Homegrown Physics    Skill Goals - Taking notes/learning from a textbook, taking notes from audio lecture

  1. How Things Work by Bloomfield - Coursera course (Chapters 1 & 2) and text (selected chapters)
  2. Snap Circuits with curriculum guide
  3. Lego EV3 Robots - work through EV3 Laboratory book
  4. Home Science Tools kit: Physics Introduction Kit
  5. And more? Still working on this...

Latin - Finish Latin Alive 1, continue onto Latin Alive 2

 

Writing - outlining, writing from outlines, literary analysis essays, history short answer (from SWB writing lecture)

possibly some lessons from WWS 2 applied to our studies

 

Grammar - Analytical Grammar

 

Vocabulary - Vocabulary from Classical Roots

 

Literature - Fiction list from WTM to go with modern history study, read through Figuratively Speaking

Skill Goals - longer, more organized literary essays (model after literary essays from WWS 1/2), work on reading and comprehending more difficult text

 

Logic - Art of Argument 

Skill Goals - work on discussion and analyzing skills

 

Programming - ??? Continue Python (currently doing Codecademy Python)

Skill Goals - work on logic/problem solving

 

Study/Learning Skills   Skill Goals - apply these principles across the curriculum, prep for high school

Teach/read selections to him - Study is Hard Work, What Smart Students Know

TGC How to Become a Superstar Student

Teach Cornell and other notetaking systems

 

+ A fun math class at coop and outside PE class twice a week

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is for DD (copied from the list I put in OneNote for DH in case his parents or anyone ask; he's had some homeschooling clients too, one of whom mentioned using Veritas Press, so I wanted him to be familiar with our materials)

 

• Math -- Saxon Algebra 1, Kahn Academy

 

• Literature -- Integrated with history; others chosen from lists of great books; one Shakespeare play (considering Hamlet); Words Aptly Spoken: Short Story (Classical Conversations)

 

• Writing -- Writing With Skill 2 by Peace Hill Press; The Creative Writer 1 and 2 by Peace Hill Press

 

• History (with geography, literature, and writing integrated) -- History Odyssey Modern Level 2 by Pandia Press, using Kingfisher History Encyclopedia and Human Odyssey Volumes 2 and 3 (by k12)

 

• Foreign Language -- Latin's Not So Tough Level 6 (and possibly Latin Alive 1 from Classical Academic Press); DuoLingo Spanish and Getting Started With Spanish

 

• US Geography -- Trail Guide to US History; The 50 States and Where to Find Them; US Atlas; Holling C. Holling books

 

• Science -- Physical Science with Kingfisher Science Encyclopedia, Mr. Q, and Physics Lab in a Housewares Store

 

• Miscellaneous Extras -- The Thinking Toolbox (logic); Art of Poetry (poetry -- from Classical Academic Press); Diagramming Sentences booklet (Mark Twain Media); Health and Safety booklet; SAT Question of the Day app; National Latin Exam online test questions; Spelling Power; TypingWeb.com; Life in the Word Bible Study (SimplyCharlotteMason.com); Bible memory work

 

• Fine Arts -- ARTistic Pursuits for visual arts; homegrown artist and composer studies; general music history (DK Music and YouTube); A Child's History of Art: Sculpture and A Child's History of Art: Painting (by V. M. Hillyer); Synthesia and Rocksmith

 

• Family Subjects -- Fifty Famous Stories Retold (James Baldwin); Mr. Pipes hymn stories (Douglas Bond and YouTube); Famous Men of Greece and Famous Men of Rome (Memoria Press); The Children's Book of Virtues (William J. Bennett); various from Poetry for Young People series; English From the Roots Up (Latin and Greek vocab cards); Evan Moore Word-A-Day vocabulary; Wordly Wise vocabulary; family literature

 

• PE -- bike rides, summer swimming, and martial arts (she's on her fifth belt level and would like to complete two or three more in the next year)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Our plans for 8th grade:

  • Math: continue Foerster Algebra I with Math Without Borders videos. This has been great for note-taking skills and learning how to prepare for tests. We should finish Foerster mid-year, then start a gentle intro to geometry (resources TBD) while keeping Algebra I sharp with various things including Alcumus (with a plan of outsourcing full-on geometry with an online provider TBD, in 9th grade).
  • English: This past year, we finished WWS1, and did Mosdos lit, separate vocab and grammar, and a library book basket. Rather than moving up to the next level of the same materials for 8th grade, DS requested a new approach for "English". So we're planning a high-school-ish Intro to Literature and Composition course. We'll focus on reading more challenging literature and improving essay-writing and revising skills, writing mostly about literature and adding a few history-related papers too. We'll build this around skills learned/improved using multiple resources including The Lively Art of Writing (already started), Essential Literary Terms, Writing With a Thesis, The Elements of Style and perhaps some Lost Tools of Writing.
  • Science: Physical Science - Concepts in Action -- Working on note-taking from a science textbook and responding in writing to short-answer questions.
  • History: K12's American Odyssey with Luckymama's schedule/supplements: http://nowisthebestt...y-with-the.html. Will include outlining the text plus planning, writing, and revising a few persuasive essays or research papers. Might use Take A Stand! as inspiration for writing prompts.
  • Electives: 1st semester - finish Art of Argument; 2nd semester - not sure, probably Visual Link Spanish or The Bible and Its Influence
  • continue outsourced piano and art lessons, HS PE class, YMCA membership (swimming and yoga), martial arts
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Writing: IEW Elegant Essay with some kind of grammar through local co-op

 

Math: Videotext Algebra through local co-op supplementing with something else, not sure what.  I will have to look at this videotext more before I decide.

 

History and Literature: The Great Conversation 2 with Wilson Hill

 

Latin: Latin Alive II through Veritas Press

 

Science: BJU Earth and Space or Physical Science.  I haven't made a decision here,  but it will be BJU online.

 

Spanish: Rosetta Stone 2, video only informally.  

 

Extracurricular: Horseback riding

 

Does anyone have input on videotext or what I should do about science?  My daughter is science oriented and wants to continue with BJU.  I just need to make a decision about which one.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rose,

Do you have a resource for the screenwriting?

 

I've picked up a couple of things that look very good - Save the Cat! and Save the Cat Goes to the Movies

 

http://store.savethecat.com/

 

I also got Good Scripts/Bad Scripts: Learning the Craft of Screenwriting Through 25 of the Best and Worst Films in History by Thomas Pope

 

My goal with these resources is feeding an interest - my dd loves theater and has tried her hand at screenwriting and directing her own show, and we really love analyzing films (Movies as Literature has been a hit) so I want to be able to extend that analysis and to give her tools to grow her screenwriting skills.  But this will be interest-led, not assigned.  

 

I actually showed her this book yesterday, from another thread, and she decided she wants to work through it next year. Her current project is a fantasy novel, rather than a screenplay, and so this would be more directly relevant at the moment:

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0787992909/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A2FM0APY2EJDCX

 

I like incorporating these studies - I'm finding that it's a great way to teach her the skills and concepts of literary analysis. It's so much more fun and interesting when you are trying to apply the skills to your own writing!  Creative writing is not something I would ever force or require, but since the interest is there, I do try to use it to work in some academic skills and concepts that I wanted to cover anyway.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Does anyone have input on videotext or what I should do about science?  My daughter is science oriented and wants to continue with BJU.  I just need to make a decision about which one.

 

BJU's Earth/Space is one of the best courses we have done in our 12 years of homeschooling. It covers a WIDE variety of interesting topics that students might not get exposure to otherwise (such as meteorology). We have not used the online version, but the newest edition of the text is fantastic, and the majority of the labs are very doable at home. Highly recommended. 

 

We have also done BJU's Physical Science course, and we were just "meh" about it. Personally, I think BJU makes the course harder than it should be...neglecting basic conceptual understanding in many cases. It truly is an "integrated physics/chemistry" course. I used it with my older son in 8th (he did Earth/Space in 7th), but I'm skipping it with my younger son. 

 

HTH!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've picked up a couple of things that look very good - Save the Cat! and Save the Cat Goes to the Movies

 

http://store.savethecat.com/

 

I also got Good Scripts/Bad Scripts: Learning the Craft of Screenwriting Through 25 of the Best and Worst Films in History by Thomas Pope

 

My goal with these resources is feeding an interest - my dd loves theater and has tried her hand at screenwriting and directing her own show, and we really love analyzing films (Movies as Literature has been a hit) so I want to be able to extend that analysis and to give her tools to grow her screenwriting skills.  But this will be interest-led, not assigned.  

 

I actually showed her this book yesterday, from another thread, and she decided she wants to work through it next year. Her current project is a fantasy novel, rather than a screenplay, and so this would be more directly relevant at the moment:

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0787992909/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A2FM0APY2EJDCX

 

I like incorporating these studies - I'm finding that it's a great way to teach her the skills and concepts of literary analysis. It's so much more fun and interesting when you are trying to apply the skills to your own writing!  Creative writing is not something I would ever force or require, but since the interest is there, I do try to use it to work in some academic skills and concepts that I wanted to cover anyway.

 

You find the coolest resources Rose! :001_rolleyes: :001_wub:

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My 8th grader will be using :

 

Calvert Grade 8

AOPS Alg 1 during the second semester. (The first he will finish ALg 1/2 and AOPS Pre-A selected problems with tutor)

 

We really have relied on Calvert to provide my son with some very challenging and well rounded years.  I know it'll help me get him more than ready for high school as well as polishing up some writing skills, feedback from the ATS teacher, and plenty of help for me to have everything scheduled out, clear and no nonsense.  I really love Calvert...used several years now and it really served its purpose each time.   :hurray:

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ruth, do you mind me lurking and asking if you are scheduling the whole Exploring the Way Life Works, or only selections? I am hoping to use some of The Way Life Works for my twins, though definitely not all since they are only fourth grade! However when I flip through my copy I realize how inadequate my science background is and it all looks so ESSENTIAL to me:-). We are doing Ellen Mchenry's Carbon Chemistry and The Cells (they loved Botany and The Elements) and since I see you are using those as well I was wondering if that would affect how much of the Way Life Works you were planning to use. Though since your daughter seems to be such an avid reader I suspect one small textbook wouldn't put too much of a dent in her schedule!

 

Sorry to hijack an eighth grade thread! It is definitely strange to be so all over the place when it comes to content - the ability to grasp concepts and read more advanced level material mixed with a grade level output and possibly an even lagging ability to handle intense or emotional literature has made it interesting trying to figure out how much to expect from them!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are you asking me? Because Ruth has boys . . . I'm guessing it's a Ruth/Rose switcheroo.  Happens to me all the time!

 

Yes, Shannon will do the whole book of Exploring the Way Life Works.  I look at it as a great, foundational introduction to her "official" biology study next year in 9th grade.  With 4th graders, I would definitely be working through it with them - my rising 4th grader wouldn't be ready for the book. I don't imagine Shannon would have been ready before 6th grade, but we were doing other topics the last couple of years.

 

ETWLW is 8 chapters, we could get through it in 8 weeks, but may take longer - we may take two weeks for some of the chapters.  I think she can do The Cells and Carbon Chemistry in 4-5 weeks for each book.  I've already rearranged plans and tweaked the book list a bit, but I think it's doable for an 8th grader.   Again, with a 4th grader I'd be going much more slowly.  My dd's ability to process this kind of information efficiently, or even at all independently, didn't really kick in till she was 11/7th grade.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Rose! Both having a four letter name that starts with R... just too much for me on a lazy Saturday afternoon!  I'm thinking I will pull passages from it, to work on higher level reading skills (a la RUTH'S post on how she planned out her progression through more academic reading).  I can see their eyes glazing over if we tried to use the book in its entirety. Or maybe I will hold off for a couple of more years... It has been incredible the progress they have made in just one year of homeschooling in their ability to comprehend higher level material, but I also don't want them to be using higher level material for every single subject. I think I might have a revolt on my hands. :-) 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Maybe this will solidify the upcoming year at least in my fevered brain ( :smilielol5:):

 

MATH

1. Pre-algebra w/My Homeschool Math Class. (This boy is the antithesis of "mathy".)

2. Khan Academy for additional practice, prn

 

Skills Focus:  firming up knowledge base and getting ready for algebra

 

ENGLISH

1. Writing - WTMA's Expository Writing 1

2. Literature

         a. Homemade list compiled from various sources

                   i. Some possibly supplemented w/various TC courses

         b. Shakespeare - Hamlet and another of ds' choosing

                   i. TC's "How to Read and Understand Shakespeare" (probably)

 

Skills Focus: essay writing; discussion of literature

 

SCIENCE

1. SWB's The Story of Science

2. Hakim's series of the same name

3. TC's The Joy of Science

 

Skills Focus: taking notes from readings & lectures; short essay questions

 

HISTORY

1. Complete his WWII study

2. Big History Project - which will also encompass science

3. MP's Famous Men of Modern Times - this is at his request. We may drop this depending on how the year goes.

 

Skills Focus: discussions from readings, lectures, etc; critical thinking

 

STUDY SKILLS

1. WTMA's Study Skills for the Logic Stage

2. TC's How to be a Superstar Student

 

Skills Focus: study skills, organization, critical thinking

 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

None. He's taking a year off Latin at his request and hasn't indicated a modern foreign language.

 

PE

1. Continue TKD

2. PT for Civil Air Patrol

 

Extracurriculars

Civil Air Patrol

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's our plan:

 

Math - Geometry

- Jacobs Geometry 4 days/week (was going to try Saxon, but just learned local high school where DD will go in a year uses Jacobs 3rd edition)

- Saxon Algebra 1 day/week (as Algebra review)

 

English - American Lit

- Windows to the World

- Novels: The old man and the sea, A tree grows in Brooklyn, To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, House on Mango Street, I know why the caged bird sings, The secret life of bees

- Short stories and poems from Glencoe American Lit

- They say, I say

 

History -- US History

- American Odyssey Ch. 22-41 (mostly 20th century)

- DBQs for US History

- Reading like a historian

- Timelines, pictures, writing all in a portfolio

- American Experience documentaries

- Crash Course US History

 

Science -- General science

- So you really want to learn science 2

- documentaries, crash course sciences

 

French

- First start French

- Duolingo

- Concordia language village summer immersion camp

 

Study skills/Current Events (not sure yet about this...)

- How to be a superstar student

- NACLO prep (computational linguistics)

- Possibly some SAT or generic test prep

- Newspaper reading

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Brehon, I love your plan! Very concise. I need to cut mine down more.

Thanks, Rose! I'm not sure if it's enough, though. Argh! The indecision. Should I add some geography? Beef up science? Add a pinch of this? More of that?

 

<sigh> I have no idea. I do know that when I showed my previous post to ds he gave it a grunt and a thumbs up which I take as agreement. :)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I had planned to use a great books tutorial (gbt.org) for 8-12th grades with my oldest until I saw the time of the online course is midnight-2AM for us. He will be using Apologia Biology and Life of Fred Algebra I. Foreign language will likely be Japanese. I'm having to think about history, lit, and Bible now that the tutorial is out. I'm leaning towards MFW AHL since two of his younger siblings will be doing MFW CTG, but everything I've found online says not to do AHL with an eighth grader.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Oh man, I have edited this down so much . . . let the strikethroughs begin! Additions in blue

 

I was inspired by Polly's update of the 7th Grade Planning Thread to start a new 8th grade thread - I know we've had a couple, but I hoped we could use this thread to share our plans as they develop, and to talk about the skills we want our students to build in 8th grade and how we've chosen resources to build those skills.  Plus, then we can all giggle next May about how far our plans diverged from reality!

 

So, without further ado, here is our 8th grade plan as of May 2015:

 

8th Grade Synposis Syllabus

 

Math

1.       Finish Algebra - Schoolyourself.org Algebra 1, Crocodiles & Coconuts, Chuckles the Rocket Dog

2.       Geometry - saved for 9th grade

a.       TC Course Geometry: An Interactive Journey to Mastery

b.      Finish Understanding Geometry

c.       Khan Geometry mastery for practice

3.       Probability & Statistics

a.       Khan for continued practice

b. EdX/School Yourself's Statistics

4.Problem Solving – Skill Focus: Problem Solving

a.       Alcumus

 

English

1.       Rhetoric - Skill Focus: Essay Writing

a.       Writing With a Thesis and consolidated review of Topoi in WWS 1-3

b.      Bravewriter Kidswrite Intermediate and Expository Essay class

c.       They Say/I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing saved for 9th grade

2.       Creative Writing

a.       TC Course Writing Great Fiction Adventures in Fantasy: Lessons and Activities in Narrative and Descriptive Writing

b.      Screenwriting & Novel - personal projects

c. Steering the Craft - Ursula Le Guin

3.       Literature – Skill Focus: Essay Writing

a.       Movies as Literature: The Music Man, ET, The Maltese Falcon, Rear Window, The Philadelphia Story, The Journey of August King, To Kill a Mockingbird, A Raisin in the Sun, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Chariots of Fire, Emma

b.      Shakespeare: Twelfth Night, A Winter's Tale, The Tempest

c.       Science Fiction/Fantasy:  Enchantress from the Stars, War of the Worlds, Ender's Game, His Dark Materials trilogy, Frankenstein, The Island of Dr. Moreau, The Adoration of Jenna Fox, The House of Stairs, The Matrix, Fahrenheit 451

4. Grammar & Style - Paragraphs for Middle School

 

 

Science

1.TC Course: Joy of Science - Skill Focus: Taking notes from lectures, discussion & critical thinking, short essay questions

a.       Science Matters

b.      What’s The Matter: Readings in Physics

c.       Nature of Life: Readings in Biology

2.       TC Course: Science of Self - Skill Focus: Taking notes from lectures, discussion & critical thinking, short essay questions

3.Unit Studies – Skill Focus: reading to learn, taking notes from text, answering short essay questions

a.       Story of Science: Einstein

b.      Carbon Chemistry – McHenry

c.       Cells – McHenry

d.      Exploring The Way Life Works

e.      HHMI Evolution Unit

f.        The Brain – McHenry

 

History of Science

1.       Independent Reads w/ Reading Log – Skill Focus: Reading & Writing to Learn, Critical Thinking

a.       String, Straight-Edge & Shadow: The Story of Geometry - done

b.      The Clockwork Universe: Isaac Newton, The Royal Society & the Birth of the Modern World – Edward Dolnick - moved to read aloud

c.       Longitude – Dava Sobel

d.      Curie in 90 Minutes – John and Mary Gribbin

e.      Bomb: The Race to Build and Steal the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon – Steve Sheinkin

f.        Stargirl – Jerry Spinelli (IR)

g.       Black Hole – Marcia Bartusiak

h.      Uncle Tungsten: Memoirs of a Chemical Boyhood – Oliver Sachs

i.         The Disappearing Spoon – Sam Kean

j.        Napoleon’s Buttons – Penny LeCouteur

k.       Itch – Simon Mayo (IR)

l.         The True Adventures of Charley Darwin – Carolyn Meyer (IR)

m.    Remarkable Creatures – Tracey Chevalier (Mary Anning) (IR)

n.      The Double Helix – James Watson

o.      The Violinist’s Thumb – Sam Kean

q.      The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks – Rebecca Skloot

r.        The Dueling Neurosurgeons – Sam Kean

s.       The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat – Oliver Sachs

2.       Read Alouds w/ Discussion – Skill Focus: Oral Discussion & Critical Thinking, Big Ideas

a.       A Little History of Science – WF Bynum (read aloud w/ Morgan)

b.      The Story of Science – Susan Wise Bauer

c.       A People’s History of Science: Miners, Midwives and “Low Mechanicks†– Clifford D. Conner

d.      Science as a Way of Knowing: Foundations of Modern Biology – John A Moore Ch. 1-10

The Map That Changed The World - Simon Winchester

e.      Voyage of the Beagle – Charles Darwin

f.        The Origin of Species – Charles Darwin

g.       Why Evolution is True – Jerry Coyne

h.      The Beak of the Finch – Jonathan Weiner

a.       Science as a Way of Knowing: Foundations of Modern Biology – John A Moore Ch. 11-22

 

Metacognition – Skill Focus: Critical Thinking, Study Skills, Logic, Metacognition

1.       TC: How to Be a Superstar Student

2.       TC: Your Deceptive Mind

3.       The Demon-Haunted World – Carl Sagan

4.       TC: The Philosopher’s Toolkit

5.       A Rulebook for Arguments

6.       TC: Meaning from Data: Statistics Made Clear

7.       Letters to a Young Scientist – E. O. Wilson

 

Spanish – Skill Focus: Vocabulary, Grammar, Oral & Written Expression

1.       Easy Peasy Spanish 1

2.       Finish Easy Spanish Step by Step

3.       Finish Getting Started With Spanish

4.       EdX Elementary Spanish

PE – TBD

 

Extracurriculars

Horseback Riding

Theater

Community Choir

 

Yeah, I think I crossed out more than I added!  :001_rolleyes:

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure if this is going to be 7th or 8th grade--that is, more importantly, whether next year will be start of HS or whether one more year will be taken.

 

 

Plans in any case:

 

Math:  60-90 minutes/day, 4 days per week.  1 session per week math games. Goal re-instill an interest in math if possible.  

 

Writing: 30 minutes/day, 4 days per week.  

 

Science/Social Studies: 60 minutes/day, 2 days per week Introduction to Technology and Physics (ds's own choice for science for this next year).   60 minutes/day, 1 or 2 days per week, other Science/Social Studies such as current events, geography, economics, or history.

 

 

The rest to be student initiated/unschool approach learning--though to an extent the Science etc. is also in that category other than that something was required.

 

 

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I (we) still haven't decided if this is Dd's 7th or 8th grade year.

 

One fun thing we want to do this year is a course based on We Didn't Start the Fire. Dd will read biographies and novels and watch documentaries and movies. We'll listen to music and write some essays. Mostly, though, we'll just have some fun with it.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Glad I'm not the only one who hasn't decided whether this is 7th or 8th grade.  DS was in public school thru 5th, and when he started we lived in CT, where the cut-off for starting K was 5 by 12/31. He has a late September birthday so I thought why not start him the year he turns 5? Wish I hadn't done that. He was fine, but when we moved to IL before the start of 3rd grade (where the cut-off is 5 by 9/1) he had a few kids who were a whole year older than he was in his grade.

I will still technically call this year 8th grade but we are considering a gap-year before high school where we focus on math and writing, but do more fun activities, travel a little here and there, work on projects, and just grow up a little more.

 

Here's what I've planned so far. Always subject to change, of course  :cursing:

 

English - Literary Lessons from Lord of the Rings and Bravewriter classes, Fix-It grammar

 

History - Big History Project and continuation of 10 bloodiest wars in history (which consists of just reading about them)

 

Science - Finish up last year's Cells and move onto The Elements (Ellen McHenry) + Quick Study labs 4 week Robotics class and Edison Project classes (snap circuits)

 

Math - Algebra with AoPS book

 

Latin - Hopefully big sis will teach little bro what she learns in Lone Pine Latin 100 and I will supervise (very relaxed)

 

Home Ec - both kids will plan, shop for and cook one meal a week for the school year with monthly themes (grilling, roasting, slow cooker, etc...) with lessons thrown in on things like knife skills, etc...

 

Computer - continuation of Minecraft mod work and game creating with the program learned over the summer at IDTech camp

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rose, it is looking great!

 

I see that you are using a lot of TTC lectures.  How do you use them?  Do you guys watch them together?  Are you teaching her to take notes, or is she just giving it a go and getting better over time?  Did you build her up to this number by doing a few last year?  Does it end up at about 1 lecture per day?  Are you interweaving them, or do you finish a series before moving onto the next?  

  

Sorry for so many questions, but really curious how you lay it out.  I think this would be a very good addition to my younger's education, but right now he has to watch them sitting next to someone and stop it a lot to ask questions.  DH and DS have been working on the music theory one. So I am trying to figure out how I could make them independent but have the material actually used and absorbed, rather than him going through the motions of watching them but retaining nothing.  

 

Thanks!

 

Ruth in NZ

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ruth, this will be our first time using entire TC lecture courses. We have used selected lectures in the past (from Shakespeare courses) and  we have done some Coursera or EdX lectures, or other online videos (Big History had lots, and we did Crash Course World History & ecology last year). But this will be the first time we work through entire TC courses, start to finish.

 

 And yes, part of the goal of using them is a skills goal, to practice note-taking.  We'll watch, takes notes on, and discuss the Joy of Science and Science of Self lectures.  Those will be done consecutively - JOS is 60 lectures and SoS is 24, so that will be 2-3 lectures per week. Those are part of her core science, she will also be reading independently and learning to take notes from texts, and then we'll do read-alouds.  I do have that stuff all lined up with the lectures. On the days we aren't watching a lecture we'll be doing more read alouds.

 

The TC courses we are using for Metacognition will probably just be watch together and discuss courses.  How to Be a Superstar Student she will do on her own, but the others we will watch together.  I don't know that we'll get through all of them this year, but I listed them in the order I want to go through them.  Those will be consecutive, too, and we'll probably do a couple of lectures a week.  I probably won't have us do two lectures in one day, so on the JOS days we won't do a Metacognition lecture.   So there will be 1 lecture on most school days, but usually just one.  

 

Did I answer everything? If not tell me!  We'll see how it all works, school starts Monday!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Officially I won't start planning until I'm back from summer camp.  But here are some of the basic plans:

 

Math - continue with Khan Academy (actually taught by me, iow, she does not do this independently)

 

Science - continue with Galore Park's So You Want to Learn Science Book 2.  I think we're in chemistry and will then do physics.  We did biology last year.  I match all of this up with YouTube videos (Lammas science has some great ones that coordinate)

 

History - ala TWTM 

 

Writing - not totally sure yet 

 

Vocabulary - the next book in the series whose name has totally escaped me at the moment.  

 

Lit - see history

 

Logic - Not totally sure but I want to start with a book we got from the library called "How to think like Sherlock"

 

Foreign Language - Japanese

 

Misc. - do projects on DIY.org

 

Computer programming - Khan academy

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My dd's 8th grade year:

 

Math: last half of Life of Fred Elementary Algebra, Balance Benders

 

Science: Quarks and Quirks Biology -- practice note-taking (Cornell) in this area

 

Literature: Modern Authors (my list), online book club, library book club, co-op class on The Giver -- she does better discussing the book with people other than me!

 

Spelling: All About Spelling level 5 & (hopefully) 6

 

Grammar: 2nd half of The Giggly Guide to Grammar

 

Writing: Jump In, maybe moving into WWS I.  This and Spelling are her hardest subjects.  

 

History: last half of 19th century, 20th century.  Loosely follows SOTW 4 (in order to coincide with siblings' history), but she'll be using Human Odyssey, Kingfisher Encyclopedia, and a booklist about a mile long to cover it.  Practice writing in this area -- biographies, paragraphs.

 

Latin: Lively Latin 2

 

PE: Fall?, Spring: Ice Skating - new skating rink opening in January

 

Music: local city kids' chorus

 

Other: Fallacy Detective (possibly Thinking Toolbox), looking at TC: How to Become a Superstar Student

 

Art: Impressionists (to follow the local art museum fall classes) & 20th century (to follow history)

 

Skills to be worked on: 

 

Cornell Note taking

Writing narrations, paragraphs

Taking weekly assignments and breaking them into daily work

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...