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Amy Jo

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About Amy Jo

  • Rank
    Hive Mind Queen Bee
  • Birthday 08/30/1980

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  • Website URL
    http://crossingthebrandywine.com
  • Location
    Northwest Montana

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    Female
  • Location
    Montana

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  1. I think the most independent is Hey Andrew Teach Me Some Greek. You could do level 2, or maybe 3 (if they know the alphabet) and see if their interest holds. Sent from my XT1526 using Tapatalk
  2. THIS ADVERT HAS EXPIRED!

    • For Sale
    • USED

    Student textbook for Jacobs' Elementary Algebra ISBN 0-7167-1047-1 In good condition, no markings that I can see. $35 ppd (US), Paypal preferred.

    $35.00

  3. We read and narrate. For the little ones, just learning, we read smaller sections, or sometimes I would (randomly) narrate. If I thought a word was beyond them I would insert a synonym after it. Oh and for my dyslexic/late reader we used audio books. I had to be more careful with him. For a while I would preread, and choose 2-5 words he might not know, we would discuss those before he read/listened. (I couldn't do more than 5, he just couldn't handle more.) Remember we can pick up a lot of words by context. Also keep in mind that our passive vocabulary is larger than our active vocabulary. Sent from my XT1526 using Tapatalk
  4. Now I'll have to add the Greek 101 course to my wishlist. Is it bad to just buy it off of Amazon? I like your Greek letter of the day plus root words approach!
  5. For something different and fun you could try Paper Sloyd. :) You'll have to browse through projects as some aren't very useful anymore, but I found it helped my little wild man slow down and pay attention. Plus it's free with stuff you probably have around the house - this post links to a helpful OOP book on Sloyd: http://rarefied.weebly.com/captain-idea-log/paper-sloyd-envelope
  6. I haven't used it for a long while, but what I liked was assignments automatically rolling over and the ability to control the order of subjects/classes. What I didn't like was its rigid marriage to hours and the difficulty of schedule adjusting if something took longer than planned. It was also more difficult if I missed a day which I did often. The price was nice though!
  7. There are similarities between AO & MP - some of the books are the same, and some authors are the same for both. So you probably aren't as far off as you think you are. :) I just thought I'd point to this fairly extensive blog series about CM-style narration, since people were wondering. http://thecommonroomblog.com/2015/06/charlotte-mason-grammar-and-composition-grades-7-9.html (At the bottom of this post several others are linked.)
  8. I considered it but decided not to jump in. I did have the same concerns about where the higher levels were going - especially when I couldn't even see the middle/end of level 2. But the main reason is my kids just don't "one size fits all". My eldest is dyslexic, so while he could handle the grammar in level 2 (probably easily) he could not manage the spelling. And my next is very quick in the language areas - it was just too easy for him (at least judging by the sample -- and really, I could just tell him to mark the parts of speech in his copywork, he wouldn't need a program for that). Perhaps it would work for my third child, but he is a hyperactive late reading pencil phobe so ... :lol:
  9. All schoolbooks are on one shelf. And I've simplified back to ONE notebook for most things - math notes, written narrations, assignment list, writing their answers for Spanish, etc. - rather bullet journal-esq..
  10. To be comfortable putting things on paper, to not freeze up and to just get his thoughts out. (He is dyslexic and language in general is difficult for him.) I'm not sure how far we'll get, I have a few resources and ideas, but will only plan term by term. I'm also going to go by time instead of lessons, so if in half an hour he works through 2 lessons or a fourth of a lesson that is fine. I do not want to overwhelm him.
  11. (1) Number of kids: Two for me as well. I realize I have four, but what is working really well is having the big boys do independent work first while I work with the younger two (DS9, then a couple things with DD5, then finish with DS9). The the littles can do independent things (or just play) while I work with the older boys (one at a time). (2) Combining: Actually combining doesn't work well for me, the older two are opposites academically, the middle two are opposites personality-wise, and the last two are too far apart. Really the middle two just don't combine well in any direction. But with the above focuses, I'm only bouncing between two kids at a time, so I don't feel frazzled.
  12. I buy MP3s on Amazon for our music. :) I agree about YouTube - for me turning it on is a time-sink. I also like the classics for kids radio show. I think another part of the modern titles (besides availability [not going OOP] and cost) is the multiple people. So a strength of AO - having many people giving input - can also become a weakness, when they would all have to buy (or wait for others if sharing) a book, then read it and decide what to replace. It seems one can't have everything. I also try to do too much when I am the planner, so I understand. I really need a challenging, but reasonable list to start with. For me, AO works very well and I'm really excited to watch some of these changes.
  13. I use AO, and have never used the other two you mention. I wanted to mention that a child really does grow to meet expectations. My youngest son is a May birthday, so he was 6 and a few months when we started AO year 1. He did have to learn to narrate, to pay attention, he was not ready for reading lessons (very, very hyper). But he rose to the challenge. If you looked at him, even today, you'd never think he could handle those old books. His grandmother is shocked by what we read, and he understands and enjoys the selections! Anyway, we are having a very good discussion on modifications to AO on the forums now. No one is being jumped on. :) As others here have said, you need a grounding in CM. AO will not give your child a Charlotte Mason education if you don't know why she did what she did. Likewise, before just replacing a book you should think about why the book is there. Some books are for helping the child grow as a reader (or listener as the case may be), so it's good to substitute carefully, as well as to not overload. You want time to play, to paint, to make things, etc. And I love the deeper probing into CM's philosophy - the new books on her, plus the wonderful work Circe has been doing for years, has really helped me with the vision for our homeschool. I know not everyone loves that type of thing though. Which is good, if we were all like me we dream all day and accomplish nothing. Forgive any typos, my battery is dying.
  14. I use AO, and have never used the other two you mention. I wanted to mention that a child really does grow to meet expectations. My youngest son is a May birthday, so he was 6 and a few months when we started AO year 1. He did have to learn to narrate, to pay attention, he was not ready for reading lessons (very, very hyper). But he rose to the challenge. If you looked at him, even today, you'd never think he could handle those old books. His grandmother is shocked by what we read, and he understands and enjoys the selections! Anyway, we are having a very good discussion on modifications to AO on the forums now. No one is being jumped on. :) As others here have said, you need a grounding in CM. AO will not give your child a Charlotte Mason education if you don't know why she did what she did. Likewise, before just replacing a book you should think about why the book is there. Some books are for helping the child grow as a reader (or listener as the case may be), so it's good to substitute carefully, as well as to not overload. You want time to play, to paint, to make things, etc. And I love the deeper probing into CM's philosophy - the new books on her, plus the wonderful work Circe has been doing for years, has really helped me with the vision for our homeschool. I know not everyone loves that type of thing though. Which is good, if we were all like me we dream all day and accomplish nothing. Forgive any typos, my battery is dying.
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