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Stacy in NJ

What made Americans fat..........

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Well, you know what you know about your DH, of course. I could also tell you about my carboholic DD7 and how she's a waif.

 

But no, a case study of one person (or even a few) is not sufficient to base an entire theory of weight gain and fat storage. Never mind that it lacks any basis in science. But no one on this thread wants to discuss science so I'm going back to K-8. ;)

 

I was thinking about this in the shower. The thing is, every anecdotal person could be a person in a study. I recalled a trip I took recently with two high school friends. One has always been thin. When I was about 20, I invited her to rollerblade with me, and she complained about how much it tired her out. I was like :001_huh:. Seriously? She's never been super aware of what she eats, never dieted a day in her life. When we meet for coffee, I get a non-fat latte, she gets the works with whipped cream. She is just as thin as she was when she was 15.

 

Then, there's my other friend. She's struggled with her weight since adulthood. She went paleo-diet and seriously participated in Cross Fit. She surfs, runs, etc. She could run circles around our thin friend.

 

Then there's me. I could always maintain my weight and lose weight when I wanted. Sure, it was work, but I enjoyed the exercise. I had no problems until diagnosed with Hashimoto's. I know for a fact that I eat better than my skinny friend.

 

So, we went on a trip, and we had a continental breakfast at the hotel. My skinny friend thought nothing of having waffles with fake syrup. My heavier friend had sausage, eggs -- all protein.

 

Then, there's my brother -- Mr. UltraMarathoner. He runs and cycles. He stuffs himself with carbs -- not junk food, mind you. But, he has pasta almost every night. He says he practically lives on pasta. He does make healthy smoothies in the morning, though.

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Can you cook it on a stove instead? I don't like to use the oven much in the summer.

 

You can but it won't taste the same. The heat of the oven chars the top of the tomatoes just a bit and roasts the garlic. It's one that can be made ahead of time, though, and added to the pasta later.

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If we snacked constantly on chicken or spinach, it wouldn't BE a problem.

 

 

 

But, not with nuts. I know they are healthy, but they have so, so many calories. I love them! I could eat them all day.

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Mine is the big Pro one too!

 

I've been thinking about my turkeys because they have been sitting there since Thanksgiving. I just don't love the idea of cranking up the stove when it's 90 outside. I never thought to grind the meat and then make stock.

 

Ohhhh...yay!!

 

And do this: weigh the turkey, then weigh how much meat you get. And you can make soooo much stock with one turkey. And it's hard to go back to the ground stuff you buy. I noticed a huge difference. Except for myself, no one else just likes a big hunk of turkey, but they LOVE home made burgers.

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I don't think anyone is saying that there are not other issues that contribute to our weight issues in this country, either. But everytime someone discusses carbs, the threads get blanketed in "but a calorie is a calorie, my homemade bread can't possibly be bad for you!" Yes there are other issues. But macronutrient balance is a very important one in the US today.

 

 

 

If we snacked constantly on chicken or spinach, it wouldn't BE a problem.

 

 

 

I just have to straight-up disagree that carbs, fat, and protein don't really get at the issues. They don't get at all the issues, but they do get at several of the issues you list! Not everything of course, but we can't change every cultural issue at once, and improving our macronutrient balance addresses several issues...

 

 

 

I think it's hard to focus on other things when we are too fat, sick, and exhausted to deal with our basic lives, let alone go for a walk. That's how it was for me, anyhow. Getting my body to metabolize more efficiently makes me feel better so I CAN do other things to improve my life.

 

:D

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And do this: weigh the turkey, then weigh how much meat you get. And you can make soooo much stock with one turkey. And it's hard to go back to the ground stuff you buy. I noticed a huge difference. Except for myself, no one else just likes a big hunk of turkey, but they LOVE home made burgers.

 

any excuse for a new cooking toy...;)

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But, not with nuts. I know they are healthy, but they have so, so many calories. I love them! I could eat them all day.

 

I too love nuts. I think what saves me is that they are so expensive. LOL

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And do this: weigh the turkey, then weigh how much meat you get. And you can make soooo much stock with one turkey. And it's hard to go back to the ground stuff you buy. I noticed a huge difference. Except for myself, no one else just likes a big hunk of turkey, but they LOVE home made burgers.

 

Oh and not to mention I got one of those turkeys for free and the other was 59 cents a pound.

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But, not with nuts. I know they are healthy, but they have so, so many calories. I love them! I could eat them all day.

 

I do. I eat a few handfuls of almonds. Still losing weight.

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I too love nuts. I think what saves me is that they are so expensive. LOL

 

I like them on everything!

 

1/4 c. cooked oats

1/2 c. blueberries

pecans

cinnamon

a little unsweetened chocolate almond beverage

 

pecans on salads -- both warm and cold

 

sliced almonds in plain yogurt with berries

 

cocktail peanuts. I know they are so bad, but they taste so good.

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I don't think anyone is saying that there are not other issues that contribute to our weight issues in this country, either. But everytime someone discusses carbs, the threads get blanketed in "but a calorie is a calorie, my homemade bread can't possibly be bad for you!" Yes there are other issues. But macronutrient balance is a very important one in the US today.

 

If we snacked constantly on chicken or spinach, it wouldn't BE a problem.

 

I just have to straight-up disagree that carbs, fat, and protein don't really get at the issues. They don't get at all the issues, but they do get at several of the issues you list! Not everything of course, but we can't change every cultural issue at once, and improving our macronutrient balance addresses several issues...

 

I think it's hard to focus on other things when we are too fat, sick, and exhausted to deal with our basic lives, let alone go for a walk. That's how it was for me, anyhow. Getting my body to metabolize more efficiently makes me feel better so I CAN do other things to improve my life.

 

I guess when I look at this I don't see people with the wrong micronutrient balance. I see people with no respect for food or flavour, and no time to cook or have a real culture of food, and who are at the mercy of corporatism that wants to sell them as much cheap junk as possible.

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I do. I eat a few handfuls of almonds. Still losing weight.

 

Yeah I don't really limit mine except as I said they are so expensive.

 

I'm currently LOVING the Emerald cinnamon nuts.

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I do. I eat a few handfuls of almonds. Still losing weight.

 

A few? :001_huh: I'd love to see a typical day of food intake. Would you mind?

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Has anyone else felt better when they added sugar to their diet? I am pretty low carb by default because I can't have wheat, and I just don't tend to go out of my way to buy or make substitutes for bread, pasta, etc. I will eat rice, but not a ton, and I do enjoy potatoes, but usually only have them once a week or so. I recently started eating more carbs (adding honey to my yogurt, doubling or tripling my fruit intake, drinking more (whole) milk, and adding a daily banana). I have changed nothing else -- I know I feel awful if I don't get enough fat in my diet, so I still have all of my full-fat cheese, yogurt, still eat a couple of big salads most days, still have my cream/eggs/meat/fish/nuts. But I also feel like I have more energy, and I have lost weight in spite of eating more -- which made me think it was my thyroid meds, but the doctor says my TSH hasn't budged. Has anyone else had a similar experience?

 

ETA: Didn't mean to hijack -- I meant to start a new thread, but am curious now to see what answers I'll get here.

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I guess when I look at this I don't see people with the wrong micronutrient balance. I see people with no respect for food or flavour, and no time to cook or have a real culture of food, and who are at the mercy of corporatism that wants to sell them as much cheap junk as possible.

 

I see people caught in a downward spiral of carby/sugary/processed food that causes them to crave more of the same and not have the energy to cook or deal with "culture of food" or resist corporate messages. If they get rid of the crappy food, the other stuff will have a better chance at happening. It is far easier for most people to start with eliminating carbs than to overhaul their entire culture, their media exposure, their schedule, and their developed sense of taste. You have to start somewhere.

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Has anyone else felt better when they added sugar to their diet? I am pretty low carb by default because I can't have wheat, and I just don't tend to go out of my way to buy or make substitutes for bread, pasta, etc. I will eat rice, but not a ton, and I do enjoy potatoes, but usually only have them once a week or so. I recently started eating more carbs (adding honey to my yogurt, doubling or tripling my fruit intake, drinking more (whole) milk, and adding a daily banana). I have changed nothing else -- I know I feel awful if I don't get enough fat in my diet, so I still have all of my full-fat cheese, yogurt, still eat a couple of big salads most days, still have my cream/eggs/meat/fish/nuts. But I also feel like I have more energy, and I have lost weight in spite of eating more -- which made me think it was my thyroid meds, but the doctor says my TSH hasn't budged. Has anyone else had a similar experience?

 

ETA: Didn't mean to hijack -- I meant to start a new thread, but am curious now to see what answers I'll get here.

 

I've known a few people on low carb diets that had to add carbs back in, especially if they were really active.

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I've known a few people on low carb diets that had to add carbs back in, especially if they were really active.

 

I'm one of those. We are constantly on the go around here and I think I would collapse without some carbs in my diet. Everything in moderation though and never refined or processed.

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Many times that's because they haven't switched to a full fat burning body.

 

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/what-does-it-mean-to-be-fat-adapted/#axzz20tujpkDG

 

I admit I did the hardcore lifestyle from markdailyapple for a while. It was hard to get used to though. I was already in shape but I wanted to see if I stayed that way. I did have an amazing amount of strength for weight lifting though. Something I tend to have to supplement a little for with extra vitamin B/etc. And I was amazed how many hours I could go without food.

 

I have a hard time giving up beer though. I did for a long time, but I really, really like it. We drink some Polish beer, but not too much. I hear wine is better, but I hate wine.

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I admit I did the hardcore lifestyle from markdailyapple for a while. It was hard to get used to though. I was already in shape but I wanted to see if I stayed that way. I did have an amazing amount of strength for weight lifting though. Something I tend to have to supplement a little for with extra vitamin B/etc. And I was amazed how many hours I could go without food.

 

The first few weeks I was practically GIDDY with how long I could go without food. For a hypoglycemic person who HAD to eat and got hungry without tummy rumbles and was almost passing out daily, I'm telling you, going 1/2 a day without having to eat? Giddy is an understatement.

 

At the point I started I was taking two vit B complexes which weren't working. I now take none and I've not had to add any back at this point.

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The first few weeks I was practically GIDDY with how long I could go without food. For a hypoglycemic person who HAD to eat and got hungry without tummy rumbles and was almost passing out daily, I'm telling you, going 1/2 a day without having to eat? Giddy is an understatement.

 

At the point I started I was taking two fit B complexes which weren't working. I've not had to add any back at this point.

 

I can go for long periods of time without eating, without any kind of hunger pangs or cravings. I have to practically remind myself to eat now. This is very different than the nearly constant craving while on a low fat diet.

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I admit I did the hardcore lifestyle from markdailyapple for a while. It was hard to get used to though. I was already in shape but I wanted to see if I stayed that way. I did have an amazing amount of strength for weight lifting though. Something I tend to have to supplement a little for with extra vitamin B/etc. And I was amazed how many hours I could go without food.

 

 

Yeah that was very amazing. I could go to a party and not even be tempted after not eating before I went or after. It almost became annoying in the other direction. I never felt hungry. Sometimes I'd go so long without eating I felt like throwing up and that was my only cue that I was hungry.

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I would LOVE to eat high-protein (another hypoglycemic here!!).

 

But.

 

Any tips on eating high protein with food allergies to dairy, eggs, and all nuts?!?!?! (Plus I generally refuse to eat factory farmed meat on principle, and we're low income. I have part of a local cow & pig in my freezer, and a bit of chicken. It needs to last for 6 months.)

 

The dairy is the mildest allergy, so I am introducing Greek yogurt to the allergic kid today. *crosses fingers* He had several teeny tiny bites. The nuts are an absolute no-go zone, even with things that are cross-contaminated. No nuts. At all.

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Well, I don't know anyone who ever used the "food pyramid" as a guide. It was more of an "oh, isn't that interesting" type of thing, and then forgotten about. So my Official Scientific Theory is that Americans have NOT gotten fatter due to "Outmoded Food Pyramid Concepts," but rather because people don't use any guide AT ALL and just eat what's easy, cheap and tastes good. Without doing any research whatsover on the subject.

 

I call it Trish's Path of Least Resistance Theory on American Weight Gain. I may even turn it into a geometric shape with arrows to make it more believable.

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And I had boat loads of energy. I am going to go back to that, really dedicated. And I am a heavy weight lifter. I have to, it's the only fitness that I like. I hate running, and I hate sitting on those machines moving my legs forever. I feel like I should be flying on those eliptical things. Right now I drink diet energy drinks which are just a load of B vits, carp, and caffeine LOL.

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I can go for long periods of time without eating, without any kind of hunger pangs or cravings. I have to practically remind myself to eat now. This is very different than the nearly constant craving while on a low fat diet.

 

That's where I am now. If I crave carbs it's because I haven't eaten enough fats for the day.

 

I would LOVE to eat high-protein (another hypoglycemic here!!).

 

But.

 

Any tips on eating high protein with food allergies to dairy, eggs, and all nuts?!?!?! (Plus I generally refuse to eat factory farmed meat on principle, and we're low income. I have part of a local cow & pig in my freezer, and a bit of chicken. It needs to last for 6 months.)

 

The dairy is the mildest allergy, so I am introducing Greek yogurt to the allergic kid today. *crosses fingers* He had several teeny tiny bites. The nuts are an absolute no-go zone, even with things that are cross-contaminated. No nuts. At all.

 

 

Wow, you'd have to do just meats? It's not impossible, but that would be hard. The really good thing about paleo/low carb is that you really get to the point where you don't eat a lot.

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The whole "Americans are fat because they don't walk or bike to work, the market, school, etc." comment just never fails to make me wince. It's almost always offered through the lenses of those who live in smaller, densely populated nations with adequate public transportation, a fresh market on nearly every corner and super highways circling AROUND the cities, not THROUGH them.

 

Walk or bike to the market? I'd definitely be thin because I'd be flattened by an 18 wheeler if I attempted that. ;)

 

astrid

 

I live in a VERY walkable city/suburb with sidewalks, local groceries, and paved bike paths. I think the farthest ANYONE could live from a store is about two miles. The farmers market comes to every neighborhood at least one day a week. For the folks that WANT to walk, it's great. Most people DON'T WANT to take the extra time or have to carry things. The parking lot is always full.

 

My daughter began school last February. She complains that she's the only one walking to school. This is high school! It's only half a mile and there are only a couple kids walking. They don't even have to cross the street. The bike path runs under the road. Also, there are crossing guards at the intersections. I consider it VERY walkable. (I will drive it it's stormy.)

 

I know a LOT of people who spend more time sitting EVERY DAY than they spend on their feet. I know one lady who mounted her computer higher so she'd have to stand to use it. She lost 40 lbs! I think it DOES VERY OFTEN come down to making quick, easy choices that are bad in the long run. Collectively, we ARE effort adverse or over scheduled with business that encourage us to cut corners in the health and nutrition department.

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I would LOVE to eat high-protein (another hypoglycemic here!!).

 

But.

 

Any tips on eating high protein with food allergies to dairy, eggs, and all nuts?!?!?! (Plus I generally refuse to eat factory farmed meat on principle, and we're low income. I have part of a local cow & pig in my freezer, and a bit of chicken. It needs to last for 6 months.)

 

The dairy is the mildest allergy, so I am introducing Greek yogurt to the allergic kid today. *crosses fingers* He had several teeny tiny bites. The nuts are an absolute no-go zone, even with things that are cross-contaminated. No nuts. At all.

 

Meat.

 

Although I don't know about going totally non grocery store/factory meat.

 

I don't get the argument that it's super expensive though. For example, I often buy chicken quarters for 59 cents a pound. If you ate a pound of that you would get about 1/2 pound of meat. That's plenty for a meal! How is that expensive? Even if you paid $1.50 a pound it's not too bad. I usually serve meat and veggies. I have completely cut out the starchy sides. I don't buy packaged snacks. Everything is pretty much meat and veg and some fruit for my kids.

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The whole "Americans are fat because they don't walk or bike to work, the market, school, etc." comment just never fails to make me wince. It's almost always offered through the lenses of those who live in smaller, densely populated nations with adequate public transportation, a fresh market on nearly every corner and super highways circling AROUND the cities, not THROUGH them.

 

Walk or bike to the market? I'd definitely be thin because I'd be flattened by an 18 wheeler if I attempted that. ;)

 

astrid

 

Not only that, but if I look around me I don't see that walking is doing much. I live in a walkable city with public transportation. The people who tend to do the most walking can't afford a car for the most part. They aren't generally thin. Yet I sit on my lazy rear... I think it comes down to the fact I have more money for better food.

 

But bike? No. I don't have a death wish.

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None of this explains why other cultures with a diet that is heavily based on carbs do not have the same obesity problems as Americans do.

The main difference is not that the Americans eat more carbs (I am coming from a country of bread lovers with amazing bread which is the basis for two meals each day) but rather the amount of physical activity that is built into a daily schedule.

 

ETA: In former times, most people could not afford a diet high in protein and fat - carbs was almost all they had to satisfy their hunger. Yet obesity was not an issue because they did physical work. Nor is obesity a problem for people in other parts of the world whose daily meals consist mainly of a couple bowls of rice because they have nothing else.

 

High protein does not necessarily mean meat. Dairy has protein, beans, other sources are just as effective. And fat does not have to come from meat either, think butter and olive oil.

 

It is true that activity is important as well, but we simply aren't planting fields by hand or threshing anymore. The amount of activity needed to burn a high number of carbs used to be built into daily life, where as now we have technology to do most of our daily labor. Since it is hard for us to get 6-8 hours of excercise a day, we need to reduce our carbs (not just grains and natural sugars, but processed sugar as well).

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Meat.

 

Although I don't know about going totally non grocery store/factory meat.

 

I don't get the argument that it's super expensive though. For example, I often buy chicken quarters for 59 cents a pound. If you ate a pound of that you would get about 1/2 pound of meat. That's plenty for a meal! How is that expensive? Even if you paid $1.50 a pound it's not too bad. I usually serve meat and veggies. I have completely cut out the starchy sides. I don't buy packaged snacks. Everything is pretty much meat and veg and some fruit for my kids.

 

Up here chicken is $2.50/lb. Unless you raise it yourself. If you dare to look at beef you'll pay $5 and up per lb.

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Well, I don't know anyone who ever used the "food pyramid" as a guide. It was more of an "oh, isn't that interesting" type of thing, and then forgotten about. So my Official Scientific Theory is that Americans have NOT gotten fatter due to "Outmoded Food Pyramid Concepts," but rather because people don't use any guide AT ALL and just eat what's easy, cheap and tastes good. Without doing any research whatsover on the subject.

 

I call it Trish's Path of Least Resistance Theory on American Weight Gain. I may even turn it into a geometric shape with arrows to make it more believable.

 

You do know that millions of Americans are relying on the advice of experts(doctors, nutritionists) who are giving them not only wrong information but information that is actually promoting the obesity, right?

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Up here chicken is $2.50/lb. Unless you raise it yourself. If you dare to look at beef you'll pay $5 and up per lb.

 

Ok. So lets say it is $2.50 a pound. If you eat a pound of meat with a bit of veg on the side it's still relatively inexpensive. And you are fuller.

 

Granted one can buy 10 pounds of rice for peanuts, but I am starved on rice and I don't think it's all that healthy.

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I do not buy all non grocery meat. I get a lot at Costco. It would cost me about $30 for ONE BIRD, to find a source of pastured meat birds. I just can't do that.

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How we lived changed rapidly in a short period of time. Our biology hasn't caught up with those changes. ;) Far fewer of us living a hunt & gather, or agrarian life.

 

We've don't have go to miles to fetch village well water. We also stopped running from saber tooths ;), and the physical challenge of bringing down a wooly, and getting it ready for lunch, is not the same as walking up a couple of flights of stairs at work, or throwing a couple of grocery store steak tips on the grill. We also get food year 'round now. Anything we want. Not just some skinny bunny we chased down in the snow.

 

Everyone is getting fat, just not at the same rate.

 

The kids in China who can get sugar and soda, get it. A lot of it. Same for Japan. South Korea, too.

 

High fructose corn syrup. I High Five those countries who don't allow it.

 

(Fat people live in Europe too, btw. The skinny folks in the cities are skinny everywhere. You won't find too many local chubs shopping on 5th Ave in Manhattan, or on Newbury St in Boston any more than you will find local chubs scooting off on their Vespas in Rome or Paris.)

 

The belief that children should not walk a mile in the rain, or play stick ball in the street with 'mean kids' who will teach your kids bad manners.

 

And hardly anyone has a horse to ride and care for these days. Just 100 years ago, one had to harness up, shovel manure etc, even in Manhattan.

 

Plus Eve eating that apple surely screwed up the prior perfect female metabolism. ;)

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You do know that millions of Americans are relying on the advice of experts(doctors, nutritionists) who are giving them not only wrong information but information that is actually promoting the obesity, right?

 

Yeah. What a lot of people don't realize is that a lot of the information is based on food lobby (AKA economics). It's not all based on sound scientific/medical advice. Kids are brainwashed from the start. I remember being told all about the food pyramid in school year after year as a child. And I had no idea how the food pyramid was really developed.

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I've known a few people on low carb diets that had to add carbs back in, especially if they were really active.

 

Okay, this could be me. I am not very good at sitting still.:D

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I do not buy all non grocery meat. I get a lot at Costco. It would cost me about $30 for ONE BIRD, to find a source of pastured meat birds. I just can't do that.

 

Neither can I. I still feel like eating the factory bird is better than eating the factory box of Twinkies.

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Ok, but the time period between running away from saber tooth's to now is huge and people weren't as fat 100 years ago as they are now.

 

The evolution from running away from sabertooths, the physical challenge of bringing down a mastadon and getting it ready for lunch. It's not the same as walking up a couple of flights of stairs at work, or popping a couple of steak tips on the grill

 

Everyone is getting fat, just not at the same rate.

 

The kids in China who can get sugar and soda, get it. A lot of it. Same for Japan.

 

High fructose corn syrup.

 

The belief that children should walk a mile in the rain, or play stick ball in the street with bullies.

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I would LOVE to eat high-protein (another hypoglycemic here!!).

 

But.

 

Any tips on eating high protein with food allergies to dairy, eggs, and all nuts?!?!?! (Plus I generally refuse to eat factory farmed meat on principle, and we're low income. I have part of a local cow & pig in my freezer, and a bit of chicken. It needs to last for 6 months.)

 

The dairy is the mildest allergy, so I am introducing Greek yogurt to the allergic kid today. *crosses fingers* He had several teeny tiny bites. The nuts are an absolute no-go zone, even with things that are cross-contaminated. No nuts. At all.

 

There's a great cookbook by Bill Staley and Hayley Mason that's wonderful. Palo's don't do dairy - as I understand it. They focus on protein, veggies and fruit.

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Ok. So lets say it is $2.50 a pound. If you eat a pound of meat with a bit of veg on the side it's still relatively inexpensive. And you are fuller.

 

Granted one can buy 10 pounds of rice for peanuts, but I am starved on rice and I don't think it's all that healthy.

 

I'd have to eat a lot of chicken to get enough b12 into my diet. I guess I'm lucky in that I get to choose from a variety of meat for relatively cheap since we raise it ourselves. On the times that I have to buy things I estimated that we spend approximately $25/ meal to feed our family of 5. Not too bad, and that was a meal of chicken, mashed sweet potatoes, raw carrots, steamed broccoli, and a tossed salad with kale and spinach instead of lettuce.

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You do know that millions of Americans are relying on the advice of experts(doctors, nutritionists) who are giving them not only wrong information but information that is actually promoting the obesity, right?

 

Drs have NO right to be handing out nutrition advice. Not at all. They know nothing about it, unless they specialize in it. My just brand spankin new diabetic Dad got advice that was *horrible* from his GP. There are good ones out there, but the majority are ignorant oh nutrition.

 

HEre's a mind boggling graph.

http://www.dietdoctor.com/stunning-saturated-fat-and-the-european-paradox

 

Fat-CVD.jpg

 

That would make a nutritionists head explode. And it's also WHY the Italians, French, and so forth are leaner. Full fats, moderate portions.

 

Dr Mary Vernon, MD, is one of the world's foremost experts on treating obesity and diabetes with low carbohydrate nutrition. She is a practicing family physician, educates doctors on low carb and is active in and former president of the American Society of Bariatric Physicians (doctors specializing in treating obese patients).

 

Nobody knows more about the practicalities of low carb than dr. Mary Vernon. Here she explains it for you.

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I've seen this one too!

 

Drs have NO right to be handing out nutrition a dive. Not at all. They know nothing about it.

 

HEre's a mind boggling graph.

http://www.dietdoctor.com/stunning-saturated-fat-and-the-european-paradox

 

Fat-CVD.jpg

 

That would make a nutritionists head explode. And it's also WHY the Italians, French, and so forth are leaner. Full fats, moderate portions.

 

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Neither can I. I still feel like eating the factory bird is better than eating the factory box of Twinkies.

 

Um, yeah. Though I did once do the "side of beef" thing. It was grass fed. It was HORRID. I know there are good sources, but I did not find one. We just couldn't eat anymore. I ended up giving much of it away, and to some lady who made animal food. I think that is why I hate beef so much. Maybe I should try one of those marbly looking ribeyes I make the rest of them :tongue_smilie:

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Um, yeah. Though I did once do the "side of beef" thing. It was grass fed. It was HORRID. I know there are good sources, but I did not find one. We just couldn't eat anymore. I ended up giving much of it away, and to some lady who made animal food. I think that is why I hate beef so much. Maybe I should try one of those marbly looking ribeyes I make the rest of them :tongue_smilie:

 

Well, I will confess that I bought some Australian grass fed beef I saw in my local grocery store and for whatever reason was kinda freaked out, didn't enjoy it, and threw most of it away. I have no idea what the deal was!

 

My husband won't eat beef because he claims he doesn't like the taste. Honestly I think he is freaked out about mad cow disease (something talked about a lot in Germany). So I buy beef for me and anything else for him.

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Well, I will confess that I bought some Australian grass fed beef I saw in my local grocery store and for whatever reason was kinda freaked out, didn't enjoy it, and threw most of it away. I have no idea what the deal was!

 

My husband won't eat beef because he claims he doesn't like the taste. Honestly I think he is freaked out about mad cow disease (something talked about a lot in Germany). So I buy beef for me and anything else for him.

 

Yeah my FIL is like that. Maybe living most his life in Poland. Seriously dont' know what's up with the grass fed meat. I really wish I knew where these people are getting this awesome tasting stuff. I think our bad cow incident 5 years ago is why it still makes me gag. Though it's weird, I LOVE the smell of it and have no problem cooking it.

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Ok, but the time period between running away from saber tooth's to now is huge and people weren't as fat 100 years ago as they are now.

 

 

I talked about shoveling the manure. I talked about not playing stickball. I thought I covered everything. I thought I did a decent job covering 2.2 million years. :D Although only 35k years as the beings we think of as human. We were really quite something else 2-3 millions years ago.

 

Btw, folks were fat 100 years ago, just not so many were so fat.

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