Jump to content

Menu

What Latin program do you love and why?


WiseOwlKnits
 Share

Recommended Posts

My sister, who also home schools, sweetly gave me Latina Christiana I with the DVD's and I bought a couple of workbooks to go with it, thinking I was good to go. About a week or so before we were supposed to start I finally sat down and watched the first lesson. :blink: I couldn't even watch the 2nd lesson b/c I really hated it. The lady teaching the lesson kept misspeaking and stumbling over her words and saying, "um"--enough that it drove me nuts! I had to sell it immediately and that sent me searching for another program.

 

I finally decided to go with Latin for Children A. It looked like a lot of fun for the kids and I loved the DVD teacher. It has been a great fit for all of us. I wasn't sure how my kids would like Latin but it's been a pleasant surprise that they enjoy it so much. The chants are fun and memorable and I like that the grammar lessons dovetail nicely with what we've been learning in grammar (FLL4). My kids have also enjoyed the online component of playing with the online flashcards.

 

We watch the DVD lesson on Monday, usually two times, and then read over the first page or two of the new lesson in the workbook. The rest of the week we use the audio CD to listen to all the past vocabulary lessons plus the one we're currently working on. They also complete a page from the workbook every day Tues-Fri. We probably spend about 20 minutes a day on it.

 

The only other program I gave serious consideration to was Lively Latin. I went back and forth for quite a while trying to decide which one I should try but found more negative reviews about LL than LfC. I also read that the author of LL wasn't great about responding to their on-line forum and that scared me off as well. I know there were a lot of positive reviews for LL as well and maybe some of those folks will chime in with their experience so you can get a balanced view.

 

I'm not sure if that gives you the answers you're looking for but just ask if not. :001_smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Latin is the only thing that I haven't decided on for next year. We're doing Song School Latin this year and DD absolutely loves it. She's a strong reader and good at English grammar (for a 2nd grader).

 

So help me out. Please sell me on your favorite Latin program! :001_smile:

 

I could have written your post! I'm wondering what to do after SSL also. The program that looked the most interesting (to me) was LL, but now after the comment from a PP I'd like to know more.

 

:bigear:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We're using SSL and GSWL simultaneously. They have very different approaches. (SSL is more conversational and vocabulary. GSWL introduces grammar and translation.) GSWL has absolutely no color, flash, "fun", bells or whistles. Ds adores GSWL and actually prefers it to SSL. It's a nice gentle introduction before diving into a more complex Latin program.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I finally decided to go with Latin for Children A. It looked like a lot of fun for the kids and I loved the DVD teacher. It has been a great fit for all of us. I wasn't sure how my kids would like Latin but it's been a pleasant surprise that they enjoy it so much. The chants are fun and memorable and I like that the grammar lessons dovetail nicely with what we've been learning in grammar (FLL4). My kids have also enjoyed the online component of playing with the online flashcards.

 

We watch the DVD lesson on Monday, usually two times, and then read over the first page or two of the new lesson in the workbook. The rest of the week we use the audio CD to listen to all the past vocabulary lessons plus the one we're currently working on. They also complete a page from the workbook every day Tues-Fri. We probably spend about 20 minutes a day on it.

 

The only other program I gave serious consideration to was Lively Latin. I went back and forth for quite a while trying to decide which one I should try but found more negative reviews about LL than LfC. I also read that the author of LL wasn't great about responding to their on-line forum and that scared me off as well. I know there were a lot of positive reviews for LL as well and maybe some of those folks will chime in with their experience so you can get a balanced view.

 

I'm not sure if that gives you the answers you're looking for but just ask if not. :001_smile:

 

:iagree:We have been having a great experience with LfC too. Our weeks look very much like the schedule in the post above. MY DC love the online game and it is a great review to assign as independent work while I'm working one on one with another child. There are a few nit-picky things that annoy me about it, but it certainly is easy on the parent and my kids are picking up Latin without a lot of effort on my part. I wish I had started it sooner. With all the other planning I do, I really needed something easy to implement.

 

Shannon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Although not a straight Latin program, I am very impressed with the word study in The Phonics Road. It has been effortless for my dd. It starts in the middle of PR 3. Here is a post about it. Each week, the child does 4 days of spelling, then on the 5th day, adds to the word study. It continues in Level 4, then leads into a full blown Latin course, The Latin Road. Going beyond memorization in the PR word study, the dc actually learn the application of Latin principles in the English language. My dd has become amazingly fast at identifying word roots and parts of speech, as a result. She can break down a word meaning quite well and can then take the word and change the part of speech b/c of her knowledge of suffixes.

 

We're into Latin Road 2 right now and I find it to be complete, thorough and easy to follow. It doesn't always get great reviews, but I don't get that. We are learning so much. While the Classical Model of copywork and word study is incorporated to design a notebook your dc could use to teach Latin themselves, they are copying, applying, translating, studying derivatives, translating, completing a chapter review worksheet and taking a test every 2 lessons. I honestly do very little with my children and simply by following the text, they are all (3 different dc w/ different abilities and styles of learning) are all excelling.

 

So, to answer your question, I find the whole of the program easy to apply and incredibly efficient.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm here :bigear: as well!

 

DD6 is totally taking off with languages and just loves Song School Latin. I have GSWL that we can do simultaneously. So far it's just been me that's been reading that one. I should start that with her today...

 

Since she's strong in all language arts and loves grammar, I hope we get through enough grammar to be able to start Lively Latin in grade 2.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We're using SSL and GSWL simultaneously. They have very different approaches. (SSL is more conversational and vocabulary. GSWL introduces grammar and translation.) GSWL has absolutely no color, flash, "fun", bells or whistles. Ds adores GSWL and actually prefers it to SSL. It's a nice gentle introduction before diving into a more complex Latin program.

:iagree::iagree::iagree:

I love teaching GSWL because it is so easily done. We usually do one lesson a day and it takes just a few minutes orally. I don't require ds to write anything. I have been able to do it faithfully every day that we do school. It usually comes before or after our AAS 3. Go figure. Both are teacher intensive in a very gentle not intensive way and in bite size so that they get done consistently. My younger ds (6 yrs 1 month) does better than my older ds (8 yrs 2 months).

We finished SSL in the fall and then started GSWL. I am in love.

I already have LfC A waiting on the shelf, but I love GSWL so much (and the younger ds is too young) that we want finish this before we do LfC A.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We LOVE Latin for Children. I don't think I'd start it sooner than 4th grade, and my son is a very fast learner and good with grammar. I think it moves pretty quickly and I think the grammar concepts would be hard for even an advanced third-grader. Yes, it might be do-able, but I think it would really be a struggle and not as fun.

 

I like it because:

- The DVD is the best part. The guy is kind of goofy/funny, but he explains concepts very well. There are some silly skits after the lessons that crack us up and we look forward to them!

 

- the layout of the book: clear and also interesting

 

- Classical Academic Press has some fun on-line stuff: weekly deriviative, vocab game, other. Also they have downloadable worksheets

 

- I took 4 years of Latin in high school, and I think this book explains many things in a way that I never really understood

 

- My SON LIKES IT!!!! His favorite subject, and he was really resistant to studying Latin. He was ready to hate it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I guess I should add that part of the reason I like the Latin for Children DVD is that it helps teach me! I watch the DVD with him on Monday, and then he does the rest by himself throughout the week. But I understand what he's supposed to be doing and all I had to do was sit through 10 minutes of the DVD.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

LfC A has worked for my DD, even though she's young for the program (she decided she wanted to learn Latin a few months after turning 5, went through SSL in the summer, and we started LfC A in August). She didn't get into the DVD, but loves the chants and online games and the history reader. We're doing the book orally, and do the occasional activity in the Activity book (I make copies of those, because I expect her to go back and do many more of them when she's older) She's even picking up a lot of the grammar. My plan is to go through LfC with her at age 5-6-7 once, and then go back starting at age 8 and work through the series again, more as intended, and have her do the writing, and move on to a more serious Latin curriculum after that. There's enough "new" to keep her interested, and it's low key and fun enough that it keeps her engaged, without burning her out by demanding too much.

 

 

We also have used Minimus as a fun supplement, but I think it would take even less time than SSL to do it if it were our only Latin program.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I finally decided to go with Latin for Children A. It looked like a lot of fun for the kids and I loved the DVD teacher. It has been a great fit for all of us. I wasn't sure how my kids would like Latin but it's been a pleasant surprise that they enjoy it so much. The chants are fun and memorable and I like that the grammar lessons dovetail nicely with what we've been learning in grammar (FLL4). My kids have also enjoyed the online component of playing with the online flashcards.

 

We watch the DVD lesson on Monday, usually two times, and then read over the first page or two of the new lesson in the workbook. The rest of the week we use the audio CD to listen to all the past vocabulary lessons plus the one we're currently working on. They also complete a page from the workbook every day Tues-Fri. We probably spend about 20 minutes a day on it.

 

 

This is exactly the sort of thing I'm looking for. Thanks!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We also love SSL! The current plan is to use Minimus and Prima Latina for second grade, then move to the LFC series. I'm using GSWL (Getting Started With Latin) and love it for myself.

 

Hmmm, this sounds like a good plan too - to do something for year and then switch to LfC. Why are you doing both Minimus and Prima? Are they not complete Latin programs on their own?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmmm, this sounds like a good plan too - to do something for year and then switch to LfC. Why are you doing both Minimus and Prima? Are they not complete Latin programs on their own?

 

We dropped Minimus because I didn't think it was strong enough on grammar for me to teach it properly, so in that sense it's not a complete program for me. Prima Latina is fine on its own, but Minimus brings a bit of levity to the study of Latin. I dropped both and only used GSWL, which is straightforward, gets the teaching done and gives the child a sense of accomplishment by the end of the book.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't tried out a bunch of different programs because I began using the Latin Primer/Grammar series with my older son years ago and it worked well. The books were not laid out well, but tabbing them myself overcame that difficulty. In fact, I'm using the series again for the second time with my younger son now. He's in Primer III this year. I hear they have been redone now and are better even than before.

 

My older son also use Jenney's Latin in a group class one year and it was nice, too....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We (my 3rd grade son and I) LOVE Lively Latin! We're in Big Book 1 and it has been a great fit. The pace is steady without being overwhelming, there are video lessons taught by the Magistra (creator/teacher of the curriculum), lots of exercises/lessons, as well as games to play online. She has included history lessons as well (centered around Rome/Latin), but we do not do those - doesn't take away from the Latin lessons in the least.

Can't say enough good about Lively Latin! :001_smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We used the beta version of LL, and while I'm sure it's a great program now, at the time I didn't know a lick of Latin, and the errors were confusing. Then we tried Latin for Children. Again, we used an early version, and I hear it's much improved now. The chants we learned were helpful.

 

We now use The Great Latin Adventure, and we love it! The author includes extensive notes at the beginning of each chapter explaining the grammar and giving tips as to things to emphasize, etc. This program really helped me, a mom with no Latin knowledge, to finally understand how the pieces fit together. I especially appreciated the first (optional) chapter that explained how to pronounce the Latin words we were learning. Not even knowing how to say the vocabulary words was very uncomfortable to say the least! The program includes vocabulary, grammar, translation, and derivative work.

 

Anyway, just another option to consider. I'm not affiliated in any way with the program or author; I just love the program!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmmm, this sounds like a good plan too - to do something for year and then switch to LfC. Why are you doing both Minimus and Prima? Are they not complete Latin programs on their own?

 

I wanted a light introduction to Latin grammar. I am also excited about the prayers in Prima Latina, as we already use some of them during mass and at home. I decided to also do Minimus for fun, because I know my kids will love the storyline.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We (my 3rd grade son and I) LOVE Lively Latin! We're in Big Book 1 and it has been a great fit. The pace is steady without being overwhelming, there are video lessons taught by the Magistra (creator/teacher of the curriculum), lots of exercises/lessons, as well as games to play online. She has included history lessons as well (centered around Rome/Latin), but we do not do those - doesn't take away from the Latin lessons in the least.

Can't say enough good about Lively Latin! :001_smile:

 

 

same here with my 6yo. and it is easy for me to slow it down for her. also i love that i can download the audio and video files.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My ds just turned 10 and has been using Cambridge since the beginning of the semester (Jan). He really loves it but I wouldn't recommend it for a child younger than 9 or 10. The content is actually written for grades 9-12 so every other translation ends with "Caecilius Grumionem vituperat"... (Caecilius curses Grumio) or something like that... LOL however, my ds10 of course thinks its funny and its stuff like that that keeps him going. :)

 

One thing I have been amazed with, using Cambridge, is the amount of vocabulary taught/learned. The language immersion thing is has been GREAT for us (me especially, I think I'm learning it easier than ds and I have 1yr highschool spanish under my belt, so not much foreign language exposure)--we have been using this for a little over a month, and by the end of the 3rd chapter, we will have learned 140 Latin vocabulary words.

 

The derivative study with Cambridge also seems to be pretty awesome. So much so that I've decided to drop the Sadlier-Oxford Vocab workshop we've been using. It has just become redundant now that we're studying with Cambridge.

 

I LOVE the online games that are on the website, and the "explore the story" part that is online. It really makes learning the language, and translation, a breeze.

 

Cambridge is also very rich in culture, learning all about Pompeii, Rome, the people, the housing, etc... lots if interesting tidbits of info to read/learn along the way...

 

One thing I am worried about at this point is the actual Grammar--mechanics and usage of the language. There is a lot of information about the language, grammar and usage, but I don't feel like it's being formally TAUGHT, if that makes sense? I really want to pick up GSWL just to make sure all our bases are covered.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cambridge is also very rich in culture, learning all about Pompeii, Rome, the people, the housing, etc... lots if interesting tidbits of info to read/learn along the way...

 

One thing I am worried about at this point is the actual Grammar--mechanics and usage of the language. There is a lot of information about the language, grammar and usage, but I don't feel like it's being formally TAUGHT, if that makes sense? I really want to pick up GSWL just to make sure all our bases are covered.

 

GSWL will cover a good bit of beginning grammar, but keep in mind that it's just an introductory book, not a full program, so it won't cover all of Latin grammar. You may want to see the list of grammar that GSWL covers ( http://www.gettingstartedwithlatin.com/faq.php ) and compare that to the grammar that is covered in a complete program. For example, GSWL only gets to the first two declensions and only present tense. I *love* GSWL, and I think it's a fantastic introduction for almost any age, but if you want grammar that's at all thorough, you'll have to go much further after that. DD9 recently started Henle, and GSWL was the perfect springboard for that. I do think that GSWL is an excellent, gentle way for younger kids to be introduced to the grammar.

Edited by wapiti
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is there any chance that William Linney will come out with a second Latin book? I know that he has the materials for a further study of Latin (Linney's Latin Class) on his website, but I am hoping for a second book like GSWL. Sort-of a Continuing on With Latin, kwim? Does anyone know whether he has plans for that?

 

Tara

Link to comment
Share on other sites

GSWL will cover a good bit of beginning grammar, but keep in mind that it's just an introductory book, not a full program, so it won't cover all of Latin grammar. You may want to see the list of grammar that GSWL covers ( http://www.gettingstartedwithlatin.com/faq.php ) and compare that to the grammar that is covered in a complete program. For example, GSWL only gets to the first two declensions and only present tense. I *love* GSWL, and I think it's a fantastic introduction for almost any age, but if you want grammar that's at all thorough, you'll have to go much further after that. DD9 recently started Henle, and GSWL was the perfect springboard for that. I do think that GSWL is an excellent, gentle way for younger kids to be introduced to the grammar.

 

 

 

Interesting... We're already touching on declension (nomnative & accusative forms?) in Ch. 3 of Cambridge. I'm wondering if maybe we should just use Cambridge and then do something like Henle when he's a bit older?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have used Latin Primer I-III and are now on Latin Grammar I. They have been great. And the kids are really hitting their stride now.

 

Don't be afraid to take more than one year to complete a book if necessary. I found we needed this when the kids were younger. Also be sure to work on the vocabulary and chants.

 

If I had to do it over I think the only other program I would have considered is Latina Christina.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a good friend who started w/ Song School Latin and when it was done progressed onto Prima Latina and loved it.

 

I'm not sure why other then to say that the DVD that accompanies it is great. I plan to use it in Sept.

 

Now she's on Latina Christiana and seems to like that too.

 

Alley

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So I have been tutoring Latin with Classical Conversations for two years now. Prior to that, I just had my dd watch Latina Christian DVDs and doing the workbook. It was a disaster! Angela in Ohio has some great ideas about teaching Latin and they are definitely worth doing a search for. As for me:

 

I no longer want a 'program' for my littles. They memorized the 5 declension endings last year in CC and are memorizing the conjugation of amo in all 6 tenses [active voice only] I am using this and English grammar to prepare them for a more formal study of the language starting in 6th or 7th grade.

 

The problem I have with the younger programs is that they don't begin with having your child learn the nominative and genitive sing nouns when learning vocab. Plus they don't teach the principal parts of the verb from the beginning. This really messed up my dd. I understand that when they are younger, less can be better, but why not have them memorize only mensa and not mensa, mensae? That way they don't have to learn it over.

 

IDK, after 2 years of tutoring, I realize that I am still new at this, but thems still my $0.02.

:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So I have been tutoring Latin with Classical Conversations for two years now. Prior to that, I just had my dd watch Latina Christian DVDs and doing the workbook. It was a disaster! Angela in Ohio has some great ideas about teaching Latin and they are definitely worth doing a search for. As for me:

 

I no longer want a 'program' for my littles. They memorized the 5 declension endings last year in CC and are memorizing the conjugation of amo in all 6 tenses [active voice only] I am using this and English grammar to prepare them for a more formal study of the language starting in 6th or 7th grade.

 

The problem I have with the younger programs is that they don't begin with having your child learn the nominative and genitive sing nouns when learning vocab. Plus they don't teach the principal parts of the verb from the beginning. This really messed up my dd. I understand that when they are younger, less can be better, but why not have them memorize only mensa and not mensa, mensae? That way they don't have to learn it over.

 

Interesting. LFC has the children do exactly what you are suggesting.

 

IDK, after 2 years of tutoring, I realize that I am still new at this, but thems still my $0.02.

:D

 

 

I'm not sure it continues to give the info and practice you advocate, but just thought I'd say, so far it has.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We are using SSL and the kids love it so far. Quite catchy little tunes! I plan on buying Lively Latin for next year. We already do some Greek and a lot of French and I have a background in French/German/and very little Latin. I will have to look up about the Lively Latin errors.

 

Is Cambridge Latin Ecc. or Classical? I want Classical for my kids and I have Wheelock's for myself.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't say enough praises for GSWL because I saw amazing results with a 4 year old. After we finished the book, I asked the author for suggestions, but then decided to use Henle since it's considered a solid program. I didn't know about any of the other Latin programs since I hadn't heard of this forum. Henle is probably not a "fun" program (ok, it's not) like some of the popular books that people here use, and even though I have been very tempted to try other ones, we've managed to slowly work our way through the 5 declensions. The content may be disturbing to some kids (e.g. Romans slaughtering the Gauls), but it hasn't been a problem for us. At some point, I think Henle will be too difficult for DD and I may have to then switch over to Latin Prep.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just wanted to clarify that the errors I found with Lively Latin were during it's Beta testing. I'm sure they have been fixed at this point, but at the time I had already printed copious amounts of pages and was ready to move on. I also had problems with errors in Latin for Children, but again, I bought an older, used version, and I'm sure they are now also resolved. I just mentioned those two programs to show the road we took to get to our current program. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is there any chance that William Linney will come out with a second Latin book? I know that he has the materials for a further study of Latin (Linney's Latin Class) on his website, but I am hoping for a second book like GSWL. Sort-of a Continuing on With Latin, kwim? Does anyone know whether he has plans for that?

 

Tara

 

I have been wondering the same thing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...