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For those of you that try to eat healthy.. what's on your grocery list?


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This is my list....

spinach and red leaf lettuce

onions (sweet)

mushrooms

carrots

sunflower seeds

beets

black beans

ginger

garlic

turkey or chicken

frozen peas

wheat bread

cheddar cheese

milk

Kashi stone ground 7 grain party crackers (so good)

berries

apples

bananas

peanut butter

Stoneyfield Farms yogurt

cereal (usually Bob's Red Mill)

All this stuff is organic/natural if available. I have a yogurt or hot cereal for breakfast, apple and peanut butter sandwich for lunch, and a salad with the chicken or turkey for dinner. I have lost about 15 lbs so far...so it is working and I feel satisfied. :)

 

 

 

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Lots and lots of fruit and veg. I'm trying to include one fruit and at least one veg in every meal (hard!!).

Chicken breasts

Low fat cheese

skim milk

bagged salad

yogurt

oatmeal

whole grain cereal (kashi, or some sort of All Bran, great to add fruit and yogurt into for breakfast)

almonds

walnuts

raisins

whole wheat goldfish crackers (the kids need a snack and these are better then chips)

100% whole wheat bread or 15 grain bread if DH prefers it

natural peanut butter

I'm trying to get better at cooking dried beans so I usually buy more of those then I acutally cook

I should add that we get all our beef from my parents farm so I don't have to buy that.

 

Good luck!!

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Spelt flour

Oatmeal

Brown Rice

Every fresh fruit in season

Every fresh veggie in season

Popcorn

Cheese

Cottage cheese

Yogurt plain and vanilla

Low fat cuts of meat

Lentils

Organic butter

Organic milk products

Salmon filets

Solid white tuna canned

Eggs

Garlic

Ginger root

Spring onions

Pesto

 

 

 

Not necessarily in this order

I find that when I want to eat health I need to stock up on staples and bulk products and make from scratch. It takes more work but in the long run it is better.

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garlic

extra Virgin Olive Oil

brown rice

orange juice

cereal

whole grain bread

flax/oat pitas

whole grain tortillas

Stonyfield farm bulk yogurt

granola (for topping the yogurt)

organic milk

free range eggs

fresh fruit

frozen or fresh spinach

vidalia onion

various fresh veggies

romaine lettuce

Muir Glen canned tomato products- the only thing that comes close to granny's garden canned tomatoes

brown rice pasta

dried cranberries

slivered almonds

jam/jelly-no/ low sugar

low fat dressing or a vinagrette dressing

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On my shopping list:

 

fresh produce, organic if possible -- all kinds

fresh herbs

brown rice

chicken

ground chicken or turkey

beans, canned and dry

organic butter

fat free milk

eggs

yogurt

high fiber, 100% whole wheat breads

steel cut oats

orange juice

cheese

salsa

walnuts, almonds or cashews

canned tuna

whole wheat flour

all purpose flour

yeast

soy sauce

 

I try to avoid eating added fats, dairy products, eggs and meat. I'd be less averse to these items if I didn't have heart problems, though.

 

I do make pot roasts, hamburgers, spaghetti sauce, chili con carne, and the like for my family. DH and one of my DS are meat & potato types.

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I always have these in stock and buy the majority through my food co-op:

wheat berries

oatmeal

couscous

quinoa( new to us)

brown rice

yeast

natural peanut butter

tahini

honey

raisins

EV Olive Oil

salsa

assortment of beans

lentils

split peas

walnuts

flax seeds

sunflower seeds

popcorn

BBQ sauce

tomato sauce

soy sauce

spices

 

We buy these every 2 weeks from SAMS. I;d love to do organic, but for now this is the best I can do.

eggs

milk

butter

cheese

garlic

onions

green peppers

celery

potatoes

tomatoes

spinach

zucchini & summer squash

sugar snap peas

carrots

assorted fresh fruit

bananas

salad stuff

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Here's my list for next week to be bought from various sources - farmer's market, Trader Joe's, Kroger, and Aldi:

 

avacado

tomatoes

fruit (lots)

lettuce

cabbage

celery

potatoes

carrots

frozen veggies

frozen fruit

corn chips

ww tortillas

yogurt

jelly

ground beef

coconut milk

tuna

white noodles (we're invited to a picnic where not everyone eats ww pasta)

sugar

pineapples

eggs

milk (stock up - it's on sale!)

 

We already have on hand:

 

sunflower seeds

raisins

oatmeal

rice

chicken

bread

cheese

milk

 

 

I think that's it! That should last us a week. I estimate it'll cost us $125.

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You all are awesome! I'm printing this stuff off for my next shopping trip. I used to eat healthier but got away from that due to it being so expensive but I'm going to start back up because it's worth it in the long run. Thanks so much everyone.

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We/I have been making huge changes with our diets of late. I am on mission to buy as little, if any processed foods or canned foods, and I have started cooking more from scratch. My next big thing is to start using my pasta machine, still a little scared of it. :blink:

 

My main items now are:

 

: eggs

: butter, no more margarine

: milk

: cheese, all sorts of cheese!

: honey

: peanut butter

: 100% juices

: whole grain breads, also started making my own!

: whole grain pastas

: jars of pasta sauce

: fresh fruits & veggies

: beef, chicken, pork, etc.

: brown rice

: dried beans(various types), lentils, and such

: spices, lots of spices!

: olive oil

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It differs....and we *DO* have some junk food from time to time but here is a list of our staples:

 

Bananas

apples

grapes

romaine lettuce

carrots

cucumbers

onions

garlic

potatos

brown rice

yogurt (make sure it doesn't contain HFCS/high fructose corn syrup)

cottage cheese

various kinds of cheese

crackers

whole grain bread (again, no HFCS)

Peanut Butter (all natural...just peanuts and salt)

Jam (again, no HFCS)

olive oil

safflower oil

canola oil

a variety of frozen veggies

black beans

meat

1% milk

oatmeal

free range organic eggs (they really do taste better)

 

that's pretty much it for staples...but the rest of the list just depends on what else is in season produce wise....and what we are having for meals that week.

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Various fruits and veggies--we eat a lot of these raw

organic milk

whole grain breads/crackers

meat without hormones

yogurt (as low sugar as possible)

hummus

Kashi TLC bars

dark chocolate!

olive oil

sucanat

brown rice

natural peanut butter

all-fruit spread

 

what we try to not to buy: processed anything (if we have treats, we'll almost always make them ourselves)

 

 

This year we've been part of a CSA (community share agriculture), where we buy a "share" of a local farm's harvest. They deliver to a church nearby once a week. We get all kinds of fruits and veggies and eggs and chicken and beef--organic and without hormones. So far, so good. We don't know what we'll get each week, so when we open the box, we realize what our meal plan will be for the next several days!

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I try to eat according to the DASH diet (low sodium, high fiber, big on fruits and veggies.)

 

organic butter (salted and unsalted)

organic yogurt (whole vanilla and low-fat vanilla)

organic whole milk for dc

regular 1% milk for dh and I

organic strawberry kefir (when we get to TJ)

good eggs

Swiss cheese, mozzarella sometimes

 

chicken breasts (when we don't have any real chickens in the freezer)

turkey breast (to slice for "lunch eat")

fish

ground sirloin or roast (if we don't have some from the freezer)

tuna in olive oil (yummy!)

kippers (for dh)

fish sticks (my secret for crazy nights when I'm short on time)

 

raw nuts

organic almond butter

 

sprouted bread

whole wheat bread and/or buns

whole wheat mini pitas (a staple at our house)

brown and wild rice

small red potatoes

whole wheat pasta

whole grain cereal

 

bananas (about 40 a week, LOL)

strawberries, blueberries, or raspberries

pears

oranges

kiwi

pineapple

mango

seasonal fruits (plums, peaches, apples)

 

broccoli (a LOT!)

cauliflower

brussel sprouts

carrots

sprouts (mixed)

tomatoes

greens (usually leaf lettuce, baby spinach, spring mix, etc.)

seasonal vegetables (squashes, beans, etc.)

 

whatever spices we are low on (though I get most through the co-op)

whatever staples we need: natural sugar, sea salt, oats, olive oil, etc.

any odd ingredients for new recipes I'm trying

 

We get organic crackers and food service cans of organic tomato sauce through the food co-op. We usually have good beef in the freezer from a quarter we buy, too. We have a natural honey guy we buy from once a year or so, and we are working on finding an egg place up here. We seem to have moved to farm-stand paradise, too, so I usually take care of seasonal produce from those. We buy maple syrup once a year on a trip up into northern Michigan.

 

We still have a long way to go as far as adding new things to our diet. It took us a while to consistently get the bad stuff out, and now we will be trying more new vegetables, beans, etc. in the future. :)

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It's not a list, but years ago I read that if you shop around the outside edges of the store you'll be buying healthier foods.

 

This is basically the way I do it, too. I go down the aisles for spices, salad dressing and condiments. Mostly dairy, meat, cheese and fresh fruits and veggies. I do buy a lot of frozen veggies, though, since I only shop once every week or two.

 

That's about it.

 

We don't "do" cereal -- not since I read the report many, many years ago about the experiments they did with lab rats. The rats that ate the cardboard boxes were just as healthy as the rats that ate the cereal. And that stuff ain't cheap the way my kid would go through it.

 

It's hard to know what "healthy" eating is anymore. It seems that every expert has their story and they're stickin' to it -- whether it's based on actual fact or not.

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Organics: Milk, cheese, yogert, reasonably priced vegetables usually brocoli, red peppers, salad mix etc., raisens,chips, bead dip or salsa, agave, eggs, bread, sp sauce, p.butter, jelly, frozen berries for smoothies, salad dressings

Kashi or organic cereal,

almonds, sunflower seeds

Variety of fruits (we wash in organic citrus wash)

Wild caught salmon, grain fed/ non hormone chicken, beef

whole grain crackers

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I wanted to eat healthy but I didn't have the skills or experience to do so. Then I read about the menu mailer on a board somewhere.

this has been a great hit in our house. It not only helps me serve healthy food my picky eaters enjoy but it breaks down and does the organization work for me!

 

When I first heard about the site I wasn't convinced but she has a free sample week posted. It's based on Nourishing Traditions/Weston Price info which I did not have a lot of previous knowledge about. I printed it and those 7 pages and it changed the way we eat forever. I am a FORMER processed food junky now. :)

 

here is info from her site and the link to the free sample...

 

 

 

The menu mailer covers 6 dinners (including side dishes) and one dessert every week. It contains a full menu, shopping list, a preparation plan, and serving suggestions for each meal. Tips and information are included in every mailer as well.

 

What makes the Cooking Traditional Foods menu mailer unique? A preparation schedule is included with every menu mailer. It reminds you when to thaw the meat, prep the crock-pot, make the stock or soak the grains. Because lack of planning is a major hurdle in getting healthy meals on the table, this schedule helps you make sure everything is done. It also contains blanks so you can write in your own reminders for breakfast, snacks and lunches.

 

 

 

Are you new to whole and traditional foods?

Have you just gone gluten/dairy-free and don’t know what to eat?

Want to fix meals that your kids will actually like and want to eat?

Learning how to cook or plan menus and not sure what to do?

Need a consolidated plan to save time?

Need help with menu planning?

Have trouble remembering the advanced preparation required for healthy meals?

Want to try something new?

Want to be able to chat with other Mailer users and ask the menu author questions?

 

Cooking Traditional Foods can help!

 

See a complete sample mailer here:

http://www.tfrecipes.com/forum/index.php?referrerid=117

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For the most part, it's oftn what is not in my basket- namely no transfats, no high fructose corn syrup, hardly ever any breaded products, no sodas.

 

We eat lots of fruits and vegetables, prefer lean meats, olive oil, butter not margarine, youghurts and kefir, some organics, Breyer's natural ice cream, milk, juices, etc, etc.

 

We don't have particualr issues with organic but sometimes I buy that. We are not on any special diets but I do know that I couldn't do those very cheap diets because they use all sorts of things I don't touch. I like real products for the most part and not imitations.

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I see my menu mailer has already been plugged. LOL

 

I've got a page on my website dedicated to helping you make healthier choices at the grocery store when buying ingredients. it's located at http://www.cookingtf.com/convert.html. Please forgive the sloppy cut and paste job, it's not a page that transfers well.Ingredient Changes - Sugar- rapadura, sucanat, light muscovado, dark muscovado, raw honey, Grade-B maple syrup, stevia, piloncillo, or coconut palm sugar. Piloncillo is available at some mega-marts in the refrigerated produce cases by the jimaca or in the ethnic food aisle with the spices. You could also check Mexican or Latin American grocers. It runs about one dollar for a half-pound at the mega-mart. I buy coconut palm sugar from the local Asian Market. I have heard that a product similar to piloncillo is available in Indian Markets pressed into a flat disc instead of a cone.

- Powdered sugar - sucanat or rapadura pulsed through a coffee grinder.

- White flour- soaked whole wheat flour, soaked spelt flour, sprouted flour. Gluten-free flours are usable if gluten isn't needed for the recipe. Gluten-free flour blends plus xantham gum can substitute for white or wheat flour in any recipe. Coconut flour can also be substituted for about 10% of the amount of flour called for in many recipes. I typically use 1 tbs coconut flour plus enough flour to make one cup for each cup of flour called for in a recipe.

- Shortening- Coconut oil, Spectrum brand shortening or palm oil. If being used for a pie crust, lard does wonderfully. - Margarine- butter or coconut oil. Kerry Gold, Natural by Nature or Smjor are good brands of grass-fed butter.

- Olive Oil in cooking- since Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO) is not heat stable for cooking, any recipe calling for heat can be changed to coconut oil, ghee, lard or butter.

- Vegetable oil, canola oil- coconut oil, ghee or butter if heated, EVOO if not heated

- Canned fruit in syrup- fresh fruit with a little honey and enough added fluid for the recipe or fruit canned in water or its own juice.

- Evaporated milk- cream or coconut cream.

- Skim or 2% milk- whole milk, coconut milk if heated.

- Half and half- cream or coconut cream

- Soy milk- whole cow's milk, coconut milk, Blue Diamond Unsweetened Almond Breeze or Pacific Rice Milk if casein intolerant

- Nuts- crispy nuts of the same variety.

- Peanut butter- crispy nut butter, sunflower seed butter, or tahini.

- Water and bouillon cubes or canned stock- home-made chicken or beef stock.

- Tofu- when being used as a binding agent, substitute eggs (1/4 cup tofu = 1 egg), sour cream, applesauce, cream cheese, mashed banana or squash puree. When cubed, marinated and used as a meat substitute, use queso fresco (an unmelting, bland cheese) or squares of polenta in equal amounts.

- Flavored yogurt- plain yogurt with 1/2 tbs all-fruit preserves.

- Vanilla yogurt- plain yogurt with vanilla extract added.

- Cornstarch- arrowroot powder, non-GMO cornstarch or sprouted wheat flour. If thickening soups, you can use arrowroot or leftover mashed potatoes instead

- Alcohol- white wine can be replaced with apple or white grape juice with a splash of vinegar. Red wine can be replaced with red grape juice with a splash of vinegar.

- Cream cheese- yogurt or kefir cheese, NT cream cheese.

- Canned beans- soak dry beans overnight, bring to a boil, and boil 20-60 minutes or cook on low in a crockpot 2-10 hours. Drain.

- Iodized salt or "table salt"- Real salt or Celtic sea salt

- Cocoa powder- Cacao nibs or ground cacao nibs. Use organic, dutch-process cocoa if cacao isn't available

- Soft drinks- fresh-squeezed juice with naturally carbonated water (such as Appolinaris), water kefir, NT ginger ale, kvass, or other fermented drink.

- Cheese- raw milk cheese, if not heated. If heated, check the temperature of the final dish- if under 130, use raw. If over 130, I use organic but not raw cheese. If casein free, Road's End Organics makes a cheese sauce substitute using nutritional yeast.

- Mayo- homemade mayo from NT's recipe. Duke's does make a sugar-free mayo, but it's still soybean oil. NT recommends Del Louis Fils mayo.

- Bottled juice- fresh squeezed juice.

- Pasta - brown rice pasta, spaghetti squash. If you're looking for something to replace noodles to go under sauce, you can also use polenta or French-cut green beans

- Egg noodles- soaked flour pasta.

- Salad dressing- make your own with EVOO.

- Sausage- homemade turkey or pork sausage. See replacement listings below for recipes.

- Lunch meat- home-cooked meats, thinly sliced or HFS nitrate-free varieties such as Wellshire Farms or Applegate Farms

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Things that we keep stocked:

 

boneless skinless chicken breast

top sirloin steak

Buffalo Burger or laura's lean hamburger

Fish that dh catches

 

Cereal

Skim milk

low-fat cheese

low-fat sour cream

low-fat cottage cheese

non-fat cheese slices

string cheese

broccoli slaw

carrots

celery

bananas

apples

avacados

healthy bread

whole wheat tortillas

salsa

Pasta sauce

lavash bread made with whole grains

long cook rice

whole wheat pasta or spaghetti squash

and other things like that.:001_smile:

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Here's my pantry staples list for dinners. You can download a copy at http://www.tfrecipes.com/forum/showthread.php?t=41

 

Note: Every Menu Mailer assumes you have the following items on hand continually: onion, garlic, carrots, celery, lemons/bottled lemon juice, salt, pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, cinnamon, vanilla extract, coconut oil, olive oil, rice, honey, soy sauce/tamari, eggs, baking soda, baking powder and rapadura/sucanat. Optional staples are butter/ghee, lard, tallow, red palm oil, and cow’s milk.

 

Protein

·chicken- whole, breasts with bone and skin, drumsticks or thighs; necks, backs and feet for stock making. Chicken sausage (rarely used)- Italian, apple, sun-dried tomato. Most chicken recipes offer the choice of more than one type of cut.

·beef- ground, steaks, roasts, ribs; bones for stock-making

·pork- chops, tenderloin and bacon. Non-pork alternatives are always provided.

·turkey- ground. We will cook a whole turkey twice a year- Thanksgiving and Christmas.

·seafood- canned salmon; frozen salmon, mahimahi, and assorted white fish. We do not use shellfish.

·game- ground venison and buffalo, optional

·lamb- ground and stew meat

·organs- chicken and beef liver, chicken hearts and gizzards, always optional

·eggs

·almond butter, cashew butter, peanut butter, tahini, sunbutter, used rarely

·almonds, cashews, walnuts, hazelnuts, pecans, pistachios

 

Veggies

·cultured – kimchi, sauerkraut, carrots, garlic, assorted in-season veggie blends

·frozen - green beans, asparagus, spinach, bell peppers, tomatoes, broccoli, mushrooms, cauliflower, shredded zucchini, pureed pumpkin, artichoke hearts, variety of beans and peas

·juice - tomato juice

·canned- artichoke hearts, tomatoes in a variety of forms- crushed, paste, diced, sauce, salsa

 

Fruits

·frozen - blueberries, raspberries, peaches, strawberries, mixed berries

·dried – dates, apricots, pineapple, raisins, strawberries, apples, prunes

·canned- chunk pineapple, unsweetened applesauce

·juice- lemon and lime, or use fresh squeezed

 

Pantry

·dried - red & green lentils, brown and wild rice, red & white quinoa, variety amaranth, quinoa, millet, teff. Grains are mostly used in side dishes, except rice.

·canned or dry beans

·fats- coconut oil, olive oil, unrefined palm oil, red palm oil, sesame oil; butter and ghee in fridge if you can have dairy; lard and tallow in freezer.

·flour- store all flours in freezer

oIf you are able to consume gluten, whole wheat flour (and optional sprouted flour) is all you need.

oIf you are gluten-free, a variety is needed depending on the function and desired results. I keep on hand: brown rice, sweet rice, white rice, tapioca, potato and potato starch, xanthan gum, and sorghum. Teff, quinoa and amaranth flours are good to have, but I normally don’t use them for dinners.

·cornstarch or arrowroot powder for thickening

·coconut flour

·liquid sweeteners - raw honey, maple syrup, used sparingly

·solid sweetener- rapadura or succanat; stevia if desired. Used sparingly.

·Tortillas of your choice- corn or flour, GF or not.

·sliced black olives

·green chilies

·frozen stock- homemade beef and chicken, or commercial.

·milk and cream or rice milk, almond milk, or hazelnut milk.

·coconut milk

·tamari or soy sauce

 

Spices, Seasonings and Condiments

·unrefined sea salt or Redmond Real Salt

·vinegar- rice wine, white, apple cider, white wine

·mustard- yellow, Dijon

·ketchup

·mayo – store-bought or homemade

·vanilla beans and vanilla extract

·spices - chili, garlic, onion, paprika, black and white pepper, cumin, cilantro, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, ginger, mustard, basil, oregano, fennel seed, cardamom, coriander seed, Italian seasoning, curry powder, turmeric, thyme, saffron threads

·cocoa powder

·frozen whole peeled ginger

·baking powder and baking soda, rarely used for dinners

·crystallized ginger, rarely used

Worcestershire sauce

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brown rice bread (for ds)

sprouted multi-grain bread (for everybody else)

~6 red onions

roma tomatoes

crimini mushrooms

avocados

small potatoes, varied (not every week though)

fruit (varies with the season, but usually at least 4-5 different kinds)

veggies (again, varies with the season, but at least 6-8 different kinds)

(Produce takes up the *vast* majority of the space in our cart.)

leafy greens (whole heads of leaf lettuce, usually 4-6; spinach, kale)

frozen fruit (mixed berries, mango)

frozen veggies (spinach, broccoli florets)

1 gal hormone free milk

1 pint plain yogurt

1/2lb cheese

sometimes 1/2 lb sliced "natural" turkey for sandwiches

 

pantry:

(buy when we're low)

cans of diced tomatoes and tomato paste

brown basmati rice

brown jasmine rice

wild rice

quinoa

whole grain cornmeal

brown rice pasta (if ds weren't allergic, I would have other whole grain pastas instead)

extra virgin olive oil

balsamic vinegar

brown rice vinegar

sesame oil

dried beans (French lentils, red lentils, black beans, white beans, garbanzo beans, petite red kidney beans, black eyed peas, pintos, etc)

a few cans of beans (garbanzo, black, pinto, kidney)

sunflower butter

organic all-fruit jam

organic free-trade coffee (dh is the only one who drinks it)

tea (green, herbal)

salsa

spices

baked blue corn chips

sometimes cereal (usually Kashi brand, except for ds)

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Lots of veg and fruit

Whole grains

Dried pulses

Chicken and fish

A small amount of beef, pork and lamb

Olive oil

Low sugar/high fibre cereals

Unsweetened bread

Low fat milk

Small amount of juice

Very few processed foods, including only the biscuits (cookies) with ingredients that I recognise as food.

Fizzy drinks as a twice a week event.

 

Laura

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lots of fruit that's on sale (right now watermelon, cantaloupe and berries)

bananas, apples (always have on hand)

romaine lettuce

carrots

purple cabbage

baby carrots

cucumbers

tomatoes

onions

potatoes

broccoli

celery

 

Nature's Own Sugar Free Whole Wheat Bread

Whole Wheat Buns

 

chicken breasts (usually antiobiotic-free -- growth hormone is never used in chickens, so I'm not paying more for chicken if it only says this and not antiobiotic-free)

low-fat ground beef --for chili

lunchmeat = Oscar Mayer Natural Turkey (no nitrates)

tilapia

 

honey mustard

 

Newman's Own Balsamic Viniagrette salad spritzer (dressing)

long-grain brown rice

beans

barley

lentils

petite diced tomatoes

Kroger's Private Selection Black Bean and Corn Salsa

Kroger's Private Selection Pineapple Salsa (I eat this on baked potatoes instead of butter and sour cream)

Organic Chicken Broth in cases (6 cartons to a case) from BJ's

 

pasta

spaghetti sauce

 

eggs

half and half

skim milk

1 % milk

 

low-fat sour cream

plain non-fat or low-fat yogurt

low-fat cottage cheese

mozarella cheese sticks

low-fat sliced cheese

low-fat shredded cheese

 

Smart Balance

butter

 

hummus

 

Morning Star veggie burgers

Chicken patties (my family eats these when I eat veggie burgers -- it's our only prepared dinner food aside from an occasional frozen pizza -- I get Kashi then)

 

frozen veggies -- especially mixed which I use for all sorts of soups I make

 

white pepper

salt

parsley

jarred diced garlic

garlic powder

other herbs

 

olive oil

canola oil

grapeseed oil

(all are cold, epeller-pressed)

 

all-fruit jelly

peanut butter

plain rice cakes

pretzels

almonds

pecans

flaxseed

raisins

dates

unsweetened chocolate almond beverage (for my "ice cream" shakes)

Kashi cereal bars

 

Kashi 3-pack cereal (I mix together)

oats

maple syrup

coffee:D

 

I buy Prairie Gold wheat and have a grinder

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. . . here's a list of the stuff I usually keep stocked in my kitchen:

 

unbleached flour

whole-wheat flour

rice--both regular long grain and basmati

organic sugar

baking powder

baking soda

canola oil

non-stick spray

pasta of various kinds

canned tomatoes--crushed, diced and paste

peanuts, cashews and walnuts

raisins

fat-free refried beans

vegetarian baked beans

flavored and plain couscous

Clif Z bars

dry beans--lentils, yellow split peas, black, garbanzos

black olives

natural peanut butter

pita chips

assorted crackers

unsweetened applesauce

salsa

tortilla chips

maple syrup

hummus

wheat germ

oatmeal

soy milk--store brand of chocolate and vanilla, plus a different brand of chocolate for my picky daughter

calcium-fortified orange juice

calcium-fortified apple juice

tortillas--flour and corn

fruit spread

margarine

salad dressings

frozen corn niblets

frozen strawberries

protein powder for breakfast smoothies

fruits and veggies--always celery, carrots, apples, bananas, potatoes, onions, garlic, plus whatever looks good and is a reasonable price

grated parmesan (for my husband the lacto-vegetarian)

sharp cheddar (ditto)

sour cream (ditto again)

 

And, okay, in the name of full disclosure, the following things are usually in my cart, even though they're not necessarily what one would call "healthy."

 

french fries

frozen hash brown patties

soy "ice cream"

dairy-free chocolate chips

potato chips

pizza rolls and/or cheese-filled jalepeno poppers (for my husband when he's on his own for dinner)

frozen vegetable samosas

diet soda (my indulgence)

Vanilla Coke (again, for my husband)

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  • 3 weeks later...
Here's my pantry staples list for dinners. You can download a copy at http://www.tfrecipes.com/forum/showthread.php?t=41

 

Note: Every Menu Mailer assumes you have the following items on hand continually: onion, garlic, carrots, celery, lemons/bottled lemon juice, salt, pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, cinnamon, vanilla extract, coconut oil, olive oil, rice, honey, soy sauce/tamari, eggs, baking soda, baking powder and rapadura/sucanat. Optional staples are butter/ghee, lard, tallow, red palm oil, and cow’s milk.

 

Protein

·chicken- whole, breasts with bone and skin, drumsticks or thighs; necks, backs and feet for stock making. Chicken sausage (rarely used)- Italian, apple, sun-dried tomato. Most chicken recipes offer the choice of more than one type of cut.

·beef- ground, steaks, roasts, ribs; bones for stock-making

·pork- chops, tenderloin and bacon. Non-pork alternatives are always provided.

·turkey- ground. We will cook a whole turkey twice a year- Thanksgiving and Christmas.

·seafood- canned salmon; frozen salmon, mahimahi, and assorted white fish. We do not use shellfish.

·game- ground venison and buffalo, optional

·lamb- ground and stew meat

·organs- chicken and beef liver, chicken hearts and gizzards, always optional

·eggs

·almond butter, cashew butter, peanut butter, tahini, sunbutter, used rarely

·almonds, cashews, walnuts, hazelnuts, pecans, pistachios

 

Veggies

·cultured – kimchi, sauerkraut, carrots, garlic, assorted in-season veggie blends

·frozen - green beans, asparagus, spinach, bell peppers, tomatoes, broccoli, mushrooms, cauliflower, shredded zucchini, pureed pumpkin, artichoke hearts, variety of beans and peas

·juice - tomato juice

·canned- artichoke hearts, tomatoes in a variety of forms- crushed, paste, diced, sauce, salsa

 

Fruits

·frozen - blueberries, raspberries, peaches, strawberries, mixed berries

·dried – dates, apricots, pineapple, raisins, strawberries, apples, prunes

·canned- chunk pineapple, unsweetened applesauce

·juice- lemon and lime, or use fresh squeezed

 

Pantry

·dried - red & green lentils, brown and wild rice, red & white quinoa, variety amaranth, quinoa, millet, teff. Grains are mostly used in side dishes, except rice.

·canned or dry beans

·fats- coconut oil, olive oil, unrefined palm oil, red palm oil, sesame oil; butter and ghee in fridge if you can have dairy; lard and tallow in freezer.

·flour- store all flours in freezer

oIf you are able to consume gluten, whole wheat flour (and optional sprouted flour) is all you need.

oIf you are gluten-free, a variety is needed depending on the function and desired results. I keep on hand: brown rice, sweet rice, white rice, tapioca, potato and potato starch, xanthan gum, and sorghum. Teff, quinoa and amaranth flours are good to have, but I normally don’t use them for dinners.

·cornstarch or arrowroot powder for thickening

·coconut flour

·liquid sweeteners - raw honey, maple syrup, used sparingly

·solid sweetener- rapadura or succanat; stevia if desired. Used sparingly.

·Tortillas of your choice- corn or flour, GF or not.

·sliced black olives

·green chilies

·frozen stock- homemade beef and chicken, or commercial.

·milk and cream or rice milk, almond milk, or hazelnut milk.

·coconut milk

·tamari or soy sauce

 

Spices, Seasonings and Condiments

·unrefined sea salt or Redmond Real Salt

·vinegar- rice wine, white, apple cider, white wine

·mustard- yellow, Dijon

·ketchup

·mayo – store-bought or homemade

·vanilla beans and vanilla extract

·spices - chili, garlic, onion, paprika, black and white pepper, cumin, cilantro, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, ginger, mustard, basil, oregano, fennel seed, cardamom, coriander seed, Italian seasoning, curry powder, turmeric, thyme, saffron threads

·cocoa powder

·frozen whole peeled ginger

·baking powder and baking soda, rarely used for dinners

·crystallized ginger, rarely used

Worcestershire sauce

 

 

Somehow I missed this post at some point. This is great! Both your posts were so very helpful.

 

If anyone else has anything to share, please do. All the posts have been great to read and come back to reread again. THANK YOU EVERYONE!

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what a fun thread!

 

Sam's Club

Butter - 4 1lb boxes

huge bag of Craisins

5lb cheddar

5 lb mozzerella

big pkg of provolone cheese

5 lb bag mini carrots

pecan halves

shelled walnuts

almonds

(I don't buy the nuts every time - a bag usually lasts 2 or 3 months, so I'm usually only buying one bag each time)

5 lb sour cream

big thing of Salsa

frozen chicken tenders

sometimes they have natural peanut butter and big bags of raisins

bag of tropical dried fruit to chop up and use in trail mix

frozen veggies

sometimes lunchmeat - We usually get the Hormel nitrate-free lunchmeat at the store, but the lunchmeat at Sam's is so cheap and with so many ppl eating sandwiches, sometimes I just get it here.

 

 

Save-a-lot

canned fruit

tortilla chips

pop for dh and I (shhh)

canned beans

 

regular grocery store

green leaf lettuce

red leaf lettuce

fresh spinach

romaine lettuce

flat leaf parsley

(I tear all of this up and wash it in a huge vinegar bath and give it a clean rinse, and then store it in plastic containers with paper towels in the fridge - it lasts all week for salads/sandwiches)

potatoes

onions

tomatoes

bread

real peanut butter

frozen juice

lunch meat

yogurt

frozen fruit

avacado

salad dressings - Paul Newman's is about the only brand I've found that doesn't have HFCS

brown rice

dry beans

wild rice

jasmine rice

(sometimes I'll go to the health food store and get brown jasmine rice or brown basmati rice)

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We don't qualify for many people (on this board's) definition of healthy; but we do believe in our approach for our bodies.

 

Our "staple" grocery list looks like this. We combine low carb with budget friendly as much as we can.

 

seasonal fruit, on sale

celery

romaine

cherry tomatoes

baby carrots

tri - peppers when reasonable

cucumbers

fresh broc

fresh cauliflower

spinace

 

meat, on sale - usually on clearance

eggs

shredded cheese

 

frozen: chopped spinach, broc, cauliflower, seasoning blend (onions, peppers), asparagus (on sale only), veggie mixes - usually without sauce/seasoning

 

Yogurt:

for the kids - kid centered yogurt, on sale

for the adults - Dannon plain full fat which we strain and mix with sugar free syrup or spenda, and mashed strawberries and sprinkle with nuts

 

almonds

walnuts

 

coffee

 

heavy whipping cream

 

coconut oil

olive oil

Pam type spray

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The healthy foods that I buy include

 

lots of fresh veggies and fruits

milk from cows that haven't had hormones or antibiotics

Eggs with omega 3

Activia yogurt

Breyers ice cream (natural type)

Newman's organic cookies

Kashi cereals among others (none with food colorings, HFCS, or transfats)

fresh bread from the bakery or bread that I bake

Boar's Head Deli meats

AMy's Organic PiZZA with Spinach

 

Mainly I avoid HFCS and trans-fats. I tend to buy simpler items and then make it by myself. Like I buy plain frozen vegetables and then add any sauce or seasonings by myself which reduces the amount of fat and junk. I make homemade pancakes, and all types of baked goods.

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We make sure to buy plenty of fruits and vegetables- carrots, celery, tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, brocolli, bananas, strawberries, peaches, blueberries, etc.

For meat we buy mostly chicken, turkey and fish. We have cut out pork and beef products.

We also buy whole wheat bread, milk, cheese, boxed cereal (low sugar like Cheerios or Rice Krispies), juice, nuts, tortillas, some seasonings, eggs, yogurt, and that's about it.

 

Very basic, but we are getting used to it. We just decided to make a drastic change about a month ago. So far, dh and I have both noticed we have much more energy. Dh has also had a huge decrease in his acid reflux symptoms. We both lost weight too!

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We converted to this lifestyle just a few months ago and are feeling great, losing weight and staying healthier than ever. Just recently we made a commitment to continue eating this way permanently and to buy as much food as possible locally. We shop at our local farmer's market first and for whatever else we need we go to our Costco warehouse or a couple of local groceries stores that sell bulk foods.

 

Here is mostly what we buy:

 

  • A variety of fresh fruits and vegetables (bought weekly). We'll buy canned and frozen during the winter when we can't buy fresh.

 

  • All natural chicken, pork, fresh seafood, occasionally lean beef and/or buffalo

 

  • Whole grains such as quinoa, barley and brown rice, as well as dried beans

 

  • Whole grain pastas, whole grain flour, whole grain breads

 

  • Olive oil, nuts, avocados, olives, peanut butter, canned albacore tuna (in water)

 

  • Eggs, plain yogurt, 1% milk, low fat cheeses such as mozzarella, goat, feta, etc., along with some cheddar and/or jack.

 

  • Wine (consumed at dinner only), tea and coffee

 

  • 100% fruit juice for my daughter along with occasional ice cream or frozen fudge bars for the family

I think that just about covers it.

 

Blessings,

Lucinda

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what a fun thread!

 

Sam's Club

Butter - 4 1lb boxes

huge bag of Craisins

5lb cheddar

5 lb mozzerella

big pkg of provolone cheese

5 lb bag mini carrots

pecan halves

shelled walnuts

almonds

(I don't buy the nuts every time - a bag usually lasts 2 or 3 months, so I'm usually only buying one bag each time)

5 lb sour cream

big thing of Salsa

frozen chicken tenders

sometimes they have natural peanut butter and big bags of raisins

bag of tropical dried fruit to chop up and use in trail mix

frozen veggies

sometimes lunchmeat - We usually get the Hormel nitrate-free lunchmeat at the store, but the lunchmeat at Sam's is so cheap and with so many ppl eating sandwiches, sometimes I just get it here.

 

 

Save-a-lot

canned fruit

tortilla chips

pop for dh and I (shhh)

canned beans

 

regular grocery store

green leaf lettuce

red leaf lettuce

fresh spinach

romaine lettuce

flat leaf parsley

(I tear all of this up and wash it in a huge vinegar bath and give it a clean rinse, and then store it in plastic containers with paper towels in the fridge - it lasts all week for salads/sandwiches)

potatoes

onions

tomatoes

bread

real peanut butter

frozen juice

lunch meat

yogurt

frozen fruit

avacado

salad dressings - Paul Newman's is about the only brand I've found that doesn't have HFCS

brown rice

dry beans

wild rice

jasmine rice

(sometimes I'll go to the health food store and get brown jasmine rice or brown basmati rice)

 

That's good to know about the Paul Newman brand salad dressing. I was going to replace ours with a healthier version but wasn't sure what was healthy. I'll pick some up tomorrow. TY!

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On my list :

 

raw milk

fresh farm eggs

organic produce

almond butter

wheat berries

honey

oats

grassfed beef/buffalo and chickens allowed to live naturally

(all from my local coop or farmers)

 

From the store I tend to buy

yogurt

fill in items

 

Its been fun to see other lists!!

I am lucky because we have an amazing local coop of other moms who work hard to get stuff together.

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Health food store:

butter stock peanuts

maple syrup

Sucanat

popcorn kernels

sea salt

pepper corns

various herbs and spices

organic ketchup (no hfcs)

olive oil

fresh fruit

veggies when CSA is not in season

whole wheat pasta

 

Grocery store:

Butter

olive oil

yogurt

cleaning supplies

deodorant/contact lens solution

fresh fruit/veggies when CSA isn't in season

paper goods

pretzels

cocoa

occasional box of whole grain cereal

Locatelli Romano for pasta

whole wheat pasta

 

 

Co-op:

eggs

cheese

cream

free range chicken

pastured pork

grassfed beef

raw honey

 

local "PA Dutch" market:

pork

grassfed beef

yogurt

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1% organic milk, nonfat plain youghurt, neufchatel cream cheese, cheddar

 

onions, taters, zucc, lettuce, green beans, cabbage, lemons, apples oranges bananas, other veggies (all fresh). Frozen peas, corn, and shelled soybeans.

 

Wheat chex, oat bran cereal, wheetena-type stuff, Bob's red mill oats. 100% WW bread, brown rice, barley, kidney beans, Newman's peach salsa, marinara sauce, WW pasta, Ak Mak crackers and TLC crackers, All Fruit Apricot Jam, fresh pack pickles, seltzer, low sodium V8 (I add tons of lemon juice), skinny cow fudgecicles, juice for making freezer pops (Portland Punch concentrate...it is a local berry syrup you dilute), frozen blueberries by the bag (Costco), strawberries, plums, dried apples, coffee, unbleached and WW flour, sugar, molasses, honey and the occ. "fresh" tortilini (cheese filled) and package of spinach tortillas.

I also get EVOO, peanut oil and all kinds of fancy vinegars, although I prefer verjus but it isn't sold locally :(

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I try and buy fresh items when possible - or frozen (rarely canned - except for tomatoes) simply put

 

veggies, fruits, lean meats, sustainable fishes ( http://www.mbayaq.org/cr/cr_seafoodwatch/download.asp ), whole grains

 

But sadly, DH and the kids bring in their other foods. If they (he) were not in the house, there would be no junk food either. No I'm not a saint, but I would buy a single serving so as not to have it around. :lol:

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apples

oranges

kiwis

bananas

avocado

tomatoes

red and orange peppers

collards

spinach

yams

blueberries

broccoli

mangoes

melon or pineapple

carrots

peas

eggplants

ackees

cilantro

whatever other fruit they happen to have

linseed

nuts

peanut butter

rice milk

soy milk

juice

oat crackers

 

ground coconut and flaked coconut

pounded yam flour

gram flour

oats

till

pawa

jaggery

honey

ginger tea

dry sorrel

odeiga

 

I also found two west African products- jansa and eguti, which I will try in recipes. I always like to try things from Africa or India or the Caribbean.

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This is my list....

spinach and red leaf lettuce

onions (sweet)

mushrooms

carrots

sunflower seeds

beets

black beans

ginger

garlic

turkey or chicken

frozen peas

wheat bread

cheddar cheese

milk

Kashi stone ground 7 grain party crackers (so good)

berries

apples

bananas

peanut butter

Stoneyfield Farms yogurt

cereal (usually Bob's Red Mill)

All this stuff is organic/natural if available. I have a yogurt or hot cereal for breakfast, apple and peanut butter sandwich for lunch, and a salad with the chicken or turkey for dinner. I have lost about 15 lbs so far...so it is working and I feel satisfied. :)

 

 

 

 

You mention you have lost weight.. do you drink fat free or use whole milk. I just switched to whole milk because I heard it's better for me. But, I'm afraid I might gain. Just wondering what you use.

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i just went today and picked up:

 

produce (blueberries, cantaloupe, cherry tomatoes, bananas, grapefruit, leeks, green onions, lemons)

various cheeses (lowfat cheddar, feta, etc)

multi-grain bread

frosted shredded wheat

whole oats

couscous

milk

pasta

 

other things we buy regularly:

 

smart balance peanut butter

canola/olive oil

whole grain tortillas/pita pockets

tuna

canned and dry beans

jasmine rice

honey

maple syrup

sunflower seeds, flax seeds

golden raisins

cashews, walnuts, pecans

red/green leaf lettuce

lots of fruits and veggies

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