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Art: Help me want to do it with the kids


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Currently we use Artistic Pursuits when we do art.... Honestly, by the time I get through grammar, spelling, writing, reading/lit studies, science, history, math, social studies, geography, PE, music, Latin, etc.... I just don't feel like doing it. I let art slide most of the time. I know I shouldn't because the kids like it and it is good for them to experience it. I just don't like doing it.... It takes so long because it is open ended compared to other subjects... and it makes a bigger mess than anything else we do.... and it just seems like a waste of time when I feel pressed to for time as it is. I know I'm a bad, bad homeschooler.

 

How can I get a better attitude and make time for art?

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Consider different options:

 

Devoting a certain time for art each week. If you know you won't follow through with Friday afternoon art time, schedule it for Monday afternoon (or whatever might work).

 

Plan to begin when the weather is a bit better and you can do it outside. When my kids use/d AP, we'd do it on the porch. We looked forward to getting outside, even if we were continuing school.

 

Are you using AP with both your 5 and 10 year old? At the same time? We didn't use AP when my kids were that little, but it sounds like work (for Mom). Consider switching to something easier to implement--Discovering Great Artists, for example, which uses cheap materials for projects. While the samples of the artists' work is lacking in the book, it's easy to find works online. It would also work with kids that far apart in age, with each of them working to their own ability. (DGA and Art in Story were by far my faves when my kids were little. )

 

I am not an art person, not a crafty person, not a messy person. But basing our art program on something simple made it fun for all of us. Oh, how I miss those days!

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I sold Artistic Pursuits after looking it over and instead was happy to buy and use http://www.artsattack.com/visual-art-curriculum since it was a DVD teacher showing my kids what to do, etc. and all I had to do was have the art supplies on hand. I used Friday afternoons for art - just once a week, and we did it last - open ended so the kids who wished to could spend a LOT of time on it. I can't recommend this program enough!

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I sold Artistic Pursuits after looking it over and instead was happy to buy and use http://www.artsattack.com/visual-art-curriculum since it was a DVD teacher showing my kids what to do, etc. and all I had to do was have the art supplies on hand. I used Friday afternoons for art - just once a week, and we did it last - open ended so the kids who wished to could spend a LOT of time on it. I can't recommend this program enough!

 

ITA!!!

 

I caved and purchased Atelier and my kiddos LOVE it! I love it because they can do it without me and they really like the projects. They also really enjoy seeing what the rest of the kids on the video are doing. It gives them some perspective as to what other kids their age are doing.

 

I highly recommend this program. The only downside is that there are only 18 lessons per level so we get through them pretty quick.

 

Another option is Phonics of Drawing. It is also really well done and there are instructional CDs. I would say your 10yo could do this but not your younger one as it is fairly difficult/detailed.

 

HTH

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I like art lessons. :)

 

The biggest help has been teaching the kids to set up and clean up. It takes quite a bit of time and effort initially, but by now the boys set up their own work space and clean up after themselves with minimal reminders from me. I also try to get materials ready on a baking tray ahead of time so that I can just ask one of the boys to set it in the middle of the table.

 

Setting aside a block of time for art is a good idea. We do art most consistently when I schedule it after lunch on a day when it's the only afternoon subject. That way I've had a break from lessons and I don't feel rushed to finish.

 

I decided not to worry about output. They are free to make whatever they like. I don't worry about what they do as long as they've followed most of the directions. Sometimes they come up with amazing stuff; sometimes they rush or don't quite get it or use weird colors. I just put it all up on the bulletin board.

 

We will often do a music listening lesson at the same time. Usually we listen to a Classics for Kids series or a longer piece by a composer we're studying. The boys stay engaged longer, it's nice to have background music, and I feel better when I can check off two things in that large chunk of time.

 

If mess is a challenge for you, you might try starting with sketching lessons, or comics. Once you're in the habit of setting aside time for art you can branch out into painting or clay. One of our most fun art units was drawing comics. I printed comic templates I found online to give a variety of layouts. Sometimes I'd give them a specific assignment from a library books (like drawing funny noses), or I'd ask them to plan, draw and color a six-panel story. The only materials we needed were library books on drawing comics, paper, pencils, fine-tip black Sharpies and colored pencils or markers.

 

And sturdy rectangular baking sheets are my best art (and science) friend. They can contain clay or paint projects, they can hold lots of materials, they're easy to clean, and you can just lift them off the table and take them into the kitchen until you're ready to clean them up.

 

Sorry this got so long! :) Hope something here helps a little.

 

Cat

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I like the idea of having a specific day/time. However, I refuse to give up time set aside for core subjects. Where would you put it?

 

Monday and Friday: DH teaches in the a.m. while I'm at work. I come home around 1:30 and finish up whatever he hasn't gotten to (typically DD is done with her core but DS generally has only done math and reading so he still has everything else to do).

Tuesday and Thursday: I am home all day but have to wrap up by 3:30 to get DD to dance. I generally do all of the core subjects as well as Latin, science, history on those days.

Wednesday: I work 8-6. DH schools the kids but they take a break from 11:00-2:30 to go to a role playing gamers group. Generally they only get through the core subjects that day (grammar, reading, writing, math, spelling)

 

I'd like to blame my schedule, but even before DH and I were tag team teaching, I generally skipped art. By the time I got around to it, I was sick of doing school and didn't want to deal with a directed mess.

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Rainy afternoons. Get good supplies and set them out. Put on some nice music. Let them have at it. I have found it helps us if I give him an assignment: please make a collage for my friend, we need a portrait to go right here on your door, how about drawing the beach on this card you sending to auntie.

 

For your older you might have some "draw this" time. My son isn't artistically inclined, but it is handy being able to sketch something or draw a decent map freehand. My son likes to draw leaves and seed pods. (and drawing is not messy!)

 

The other day I got a huge flat cardboard box. I drew the rough outline of windows and a fireplace. He elaborated. Now we have a "scene" he can move about and play in front of.

 

Hey, I've offered to lend you Atelier. We are done with the first disc, and kiddo really liked watching the other kids try things. I put out supplies, had him watch, and he did it on his own. Offer is still good.

Edited by kalanamak
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We have art schedule for Monday afternoons. That is our afternoon (last) subject block. On Tues/Thurs. it is History, on Wed. is it science. It doesn't take the place of anything else getting done. Core subjects, reading, and piano all take place before the afternoon subject each day.

 

I will admit, that if something is going to get skipped, it is art. But my kids love art. So they really want to get their other stuff done on Mondays so that we have time to do it. I will say we do a formal lesson probably twice a month. The other weeks I am happy enough if they got a crafty thing in somewhere else, and with their art co-op class they have once a week on another day.

 

Looking at your schedule, I would schedule it for either the mon. or fri. late afternoon time slot. If your ds is not done with his work, then he has to miss it. Do something fun with your Ker. He may see the fun, and be a little more motivated to get his work done. Or make him do it later in the evening as homework, so that he can participate. Either way, if you all are enjoying it, and he doesn't want to spend the rest of the evening at his desk, he should begin to speed up while you are gone.

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I sold Artistic Pursuits after looking it over and instead was happy to buy and use http://www.artsattack.com/visual-art-curriculum since it was a DVD teacher showing my kids what to do, etc. and all I had to do was have the art supplies on hand. I used Friday afternoons for art - just once a week, and we did it last - open ended so the kids who wished to could spend a LOT of time on it. I can't recommend this program enough!

 

I looked at the website but couldn't figure out the cost of the program. What types of supplies do you need? Other than clean up, would it be pretty hands off for you, even with a 6yo?

 

ITA!!!

 

I caved and purchased Atelier and my kiddos LOVE it! I love it because they can do it without me and they really like the projects. They also really enjoy seeing what the rest of the kids on the video are doing. It gives them some perspective as to what other kids their age are doing.

 

I highly recommend this program. The only downside is that there are only 18 lessons per level so we get through them pretty quick.

 

Another option is Phonics of Drawing. It is also really well done and there are instructional CDs. I would say your 10yo could do this but not your younger one as it is fairly difficult/detailed.

 

HTH

 

Would the Atalier be appropriate for both the (almost) 6 and 10 yo? I can't, can't, can't do 2 art programs.

 

I like art lessons. :)

 

The biggest help has been teaching the kids to set up and clean up. It takes quite a bit of time and effort initially, but by now the boys set up their own work space and clean up after themselves with minimal reminders from me. I also try to get materials ready on a baking tray ahead of time so that I can just ask one of the boys to set it in the middle of the table.

 

Setting aside a block of time for art is a good idea. We do art most consistently when I schedule it after lunch on a day when it's the only afternoon subject. That way I've had a break from lessons and I don't feel rushed to finish.

 

I decided not to worry about output. They are free to make whatever they like. I don't worry about what they do as long as they've followed most of the directions. Sometimes they come up with amazing stuff; sometimes they rush or don't quite get it or use weird colors. I just put it all up on the bulletin board.

 

We will often do a music listening lesson at the same time. Usually we listen to a Classics for Kids series or a longer piece by a composer we're studying. The boys stay engaged longer, it's nice to have background music, and I feel better when I can check off two things in that large chunk of time.

 

If mess is a challenge for you, you might try starting with sketching lessons, or comics. Once you're in the habit of setting aside time for art you can branch out into painting or clay. One of our most fun art units was drawing comics. I printed comic templates I found online to give a variety of layouts. Sometimes I'd give them a specific assignment from a library books (like drawing funny noses), or I'd ask them to plan, draw and color a six-panel story. The only materials we needed were library books on drawing comics, paper, pencils, fine-tip black Sharpies and colored pencils or markers.

 

And sturdy rectangular baking sheets are my best art (and science) friend. They can contain clay or paint projects, they can hold lots of materials, they're easy to clean, and you can just lift them off the table and take them into the kitchen until you're ready to clean them up.

 

Sorry this got so long! :) Hope something here helps a little.

 

Cat

 

Thanks for those suggestions!

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I like the idea of having a specific day/time. However, I refuse to give up time set aside for core subjects. Where would you put it?

 

Monday and Friday: DH teaches in the a.m. while I'm at work. I come home around 1:30 and finish up whatever he hasn't gotten to (typically DD is done with her core but DS generally has only done math and reading so he still has everything else to do).

Tuesday and Thursday: I am home all day but have to wrap up by 3:30 to get DD to dance. I generally do all of the core subjects as well as Latin, science, history on those days.

Wednesday: I work 8-6. DH schools the kids but they take a break from 11:00-2:30 to go to a role playing gamers group. Generally they only get through the core subjects that day (grammar, reading, writing, math, spelling)

 

Is ds10 not finishing because it just takes him that long to do math and reading, or because he's dawdling?

 

If it's because he's dawdling, I think I'd just do the lesson Friday afternoons, and he can finish the rest of his work after art or on Saturday morning. Or let art lesson be the incentive to get more done (meaning if he's done with his grammar and spelling as well, he can do art with you).

 

Or, you set up an art lesson--materials and activity instructions, and let dh do it with the kids on Wednesday afternoons after the gamers group.

 

What about Art Evening? All of you could sit down and paint or draw after dinner one night. :) I enjoy art more since the boys got old enough that I can learn some drawing or painting myself instead of hovering over the table making sure no one flings paint or spills the water. :D

 

Cat

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Rainy afternoons. Get good supplies and set them out. Put on some nice music. Let them have at it. I have found it helps us if I give him an assignment: please make a collage for my friend, we need a portrait to go right here on your door, how about drawing the beach on this card you sending to auntie.

 

For your older you might have some "draw this" time. My son isn't artistically inclined, but it is handy being able to sketch something or draw a decent map freehand. My son likes to draw leaves and seed pods.

 

The other day I got a huge flat cardboard box. I drew the rough outline of windows and a fireplace. He elaborated. Now we have a "scene" he can move about and play in front of.

 

Hey, I've offered to lend you Atelier. We are done with the first disc, and kiddo really liked watching the other kids try things. I put out supplies, had him watch, and he did it on his own. Offer is still good.

 

I like those suggestions! And I may have to take you up on the offer for the disc.

 

We have art schedule for Monday afternoons. That is our afternoon (last) subject block. On Tues/Thurs. it is History, on Wed. is it science. It doesn't take the place of anything else getting done. Core subjects, reading, and piano all take place before the afternoon subject each day.

 

I will admit, that if something is going to get skipped, it is art. But my kids love art. So they really want to get their other stuff done on Mondays so that we have time to do it. I will say we do a formal lesson probably twice a month. The other weeks I am happy enough if they got a crafty thing in somewhere else, and with their art co-op class they have once a week on another day.

 

Looking at your schedule, I would schedule it for either the mon. or fri. late afternoon time slot. If your ds is not done with his work, then he has to miss it. Do something fun with your Ker. He may see the fun, and be a little more motivated to get his work done. Or make him do it later in the evening as homework, so that he can participate. Either way, if you all are enjoying it, and he doesn't want to spend the rest of the evening at his desk, he should begin to speed up while you are gone.

 

Yeah, DH and DS have yet to find a comfortable "zone" for getting things done. DH can't seem to multitask and teach both kids at once so he sends DS off to do reading or math while he does math, reading, writing, spelling and phonics with DD. I come home to one child completely finished with her core and other who has barely gotten going. I believe they are both "at fault" as DH can't multitask but DS daydreams if left to his own devices. Perhaps missing the fun would be some incentive for him.

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Outsource. ;)

 

We have a small art studio near us that offers wonderful homeschool classes at a discount. (Early afternoon would be their "dead" time, between when moms want classes for preschoolers but before public school kids are available.) DS has taken their homeschool classes, but last year I decided to switch to their summer classes and art camps where we could get art done w/o it interfering with our 'at home' school schedule.

 

Have you looked into art museums in your area?

My son has taken classes (both homeschool and "Saturday school") at two different local art museums. The classes range in price from free to $12/student for two hours of instruction and guided gallery tour.

Both museums give the parents tons of "goodies" - things that didn't sell at the gift store, I assume. Coffee table quality art books, posters, post cards, etc.

The nice thing about classes at an art museum is that they generally have classes for a range of ages at once, so both of your children can get age-appropriate lessons at the same time.

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Is ds10 not finishing because it just takes him that long to do math and reading, or because he's dawdling?

 

If it's because he's dawdling, I think I'd just do the lesson Friday afternoons, and he can finish the rest of his work after art or on Saturday morning. Or let art lesson be the incentive to get more done (meaning if he's done with his grammar and spelling as well, he can do art with you).

 

Or, you set up an art lesson--materials and activity instructions, and let dh do it with the kids on Wednesday afternoons after the gamers group.

 

What about Art Evening? All of you could sit down and paint or draw after dinner one night. :) I enjoy art more since the boys got old enough that I can learn some drawing or painting myself instead of hovering over the table making sure no one flings paint or spills the water. :D

 

Cat

 

He's a dawdler. Very much so. To an infuriating level. He still has a math lesson, 2 grammar lessons, a book report, and a book to read that he has to finish from last week.... He has until Monday morning to get those done.

 

Weds afternoon might work if DH manages to get through the core in the morning.

 

Art evening sounds fun but honestly we have commitments from 6:30-8:00 every night of the week except Thursday (and 2 nights a month we have some then) and those 2 Thursday nights DH and I save for us. Our commitments don't run through the summer though so maybe we could spend a few summer evenings on art.

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Outsource. ;)

 

We have a small art studio near us that offers wonderful homeschool classes at a discount. (Early afternoon would be their "dead" time, between when moms want classes for preschoolers but before public school kids are available.) DS has taken their homeschool classes, but last year I decided to switch to their summer classes and art camps where we could get art done w/o it interfering with our 'at home' school schedule.

 

Have you looked into art museums in your area?

My son has taken classes (both homeschool and "Saturday school") at two different local art museums. The classes range in price from free to $12/student for two hours of instruction and guided gallery tour.

Both museums give the parents tons of "goodies" - things that didn't sell at the gift store, I assume. Coffee table quality art books, posters, post cards, etc.

The nice thing about classes at an art museum is that they generally have classes for a range of ages at once, so both of your children can get age-appropriate lessons at the same time.

 

That's a good idea. I have sent them to some homeschooler workshops and art camps at our childrens museum. I believe the closest art museum is about 40 miles away, but the childrens' museum is convenient. I'll have to check into any upcoming camps.

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He's a dawdler. Very much so. To an infuriating level. He still has a math lesson, 2 grammar lessons, a book report, and a book to read that he has to finish from last week.... He has until Monday morning to get those done.

 

Weds afternoon might work if DH manages to get through the core in the morning.

 

Art evening sounds fun but honestly we have commitments from 6:30-8:00 every night of the week except Thursday (and 2 nights a month we have some then) and those 2 Thursday nights DH and I save for us. Our commitments don't run through the summer though so maybe we could spend a few summer evenings on art.

 

:grouphug::grouphug::grouphug:

I completely understand your frustration. I have a Dawdling Dreamer too. A written checklist has helped him some, as has growing up a little more but....yeah. I get it.

 

Gosh, I love your last idea. What if you do a summer art unit? Skip art altogether right now, and do 2-3 days a week of art during the summer. Sign the kids up for art class or art camp. Depending on their learning styles, doing it all at once without focus on academics and activities might make it a meaningful learning experience too.

 

Cat

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I sold Artistic Pursuits after looking it over and instead was happy to buy and use http://www.artsattack.com/visual-art-curriculum since it was a DVD teacher showing my kids what to do, etc. and all I had to do was have the art supplies on hand.

 

Gulp! Can you tell us more about this program? I followed the link and can't find any information about cost. It looks like it is targeted to school systems though and the following makes it sound like it costs thousands:

 

If you are a typical school with only 50 students per grade (2 classrooms) and you use the program for only 3 years, your actual cost per student will be on the order of $4.00 per year. For larger schools or for those who use the program much longer than 3 years (the great majority of our customers), the annual cost is even less.

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My kids don't like "Mom on Art". I don't know what happens to me when an art project is on the table - type AAAAAA-perfectionist-raving-lunatic Mom personality comes out. It's best that I don't do art with my kids. ;) Fortunately they get it once a week at our co-op and are actually OK that we don't do art at home. I'm not sure what it is about art - I'm not like that with with other subjects!

 

Maybe if you tried doing it once a week IN LIEU of another subject it could be worked in?

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Gulp! Can you tell us more about this program? I followed the link and can't find any information about cost. It looks like it is targeted to school systems though and the following makes it sound like it costs thousands:

 

If you are a typical school with only 50 students per grade (2 classrooms) and you use the program for only 3 years, your actual cost per student will be on the order of $4.00 per year. For larger schools or for those who use the program much longer than 3 years (the great majority of our customers), the annual cost is even less.

 

I'm interested, as well! I loved art in school and just haven't ever been able to do it regularly with my kids. I'm thinking something like this will help.

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Gulp! Can you tell us more about this program? I followed the link and can't find any information about cost. It looks like it is targeted to school systems though and the following makes it sound like it costs thousands:

 

If you are a typical school with only 50 students per grade (2 classrooms) and you use the program for only 3 years, your actual cost per student will be on the order of $4.00 per year. For larger schools or for those who use the program much longer than 3 years (the great majority of our customers), the annual cost is even less.

 

Ouch! I can do the math there! That's more than I spend total for 2! Maybe they have a scaled-down homeschoolers' option!

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Summer might be the answer... Either camps or at home. I'm hoping to be out of the clinic by the summer which would mean more free time for such things.

 

Kiddo loves clay camp. He looks forward to it every year.

 

Oh, and our library has one after school day a month where they provide the materials. Our local Y has homeschool gym and one option is "arts and crafts".

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ITA!!!

 

I caved and purchased Atelier and my kiddos LOVE it! I love it because they can do it without me and they really like the projects. They also really enjoy seeing what the rest of the kids on the video are doing. It gives them some perspective as to what other kids their age are doing.

 

I highly recommend this program. The only downside is that there are only 18 lessons per level so we get through them pretty quick.

 

Another option is Phonics of Drawing. It is also really well done and there are instructional CDs. I would say your 10yo could do this but not your younger one as it is fairly difficult/detailed.

 

HTH

 

Yes, I think Atelier is really helpful for getting that art time in. I actually look at it as a plus that there are only 18 lessons because that means if I do art 2X/month, I will complete a level a year. Plus, many times a project takes us more than one week to complete, so it gives us the wiggle room to really take time with our projects.

 

Lisa

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I was never great at this myself.

 

I learned to take one idea and go with it, and I tried to do this twice a month.

 

I tended to buy really good materials and make them available for use as kids wanted, rather than provide a lot of instruction. I tried to set things up outside as much as possible. I had a couple of those plastic picnic tables for young children that I picked up at garage sales--one in the kitchen and one outside in the back yard. These could be hosed off if necessary, so I didn't have to worry about stains. If I set up in the back yard, I put a dish bucket of warm soapy water on the deck for handwashing before coming back inside. Once when things got really really messy I remember telling DD to take her clothes off on the deck and then wrapping her in a huge towel to carry her through the house to the bathroom to wash up--containment was crucial!

 

Every so often we would go to a museum or to look at some sculptures installed publicly. Whenever we did, we would just look at a few and talk about them, rather than trying to see tons of them and forgetting them all.

 

Some techniques:

Tearing or cutting tissue paper into designs and painting them onto paper with a mixture of glue and water.

Making stained glass designs out of layered tissue paper in a ring of cardboard.

Ukrainian eggs

White crayon on white paper resisting paint

Drawing one feature (eyes, or a mouth) 5 ways

Making human figures out of ovals

Ditto cats

Weaving with paper

Collage with found objects

Blending water colors

Decorating clear plastic ornaments

 

Oil pastels are very satisfying to work with, and I wish that I had found them sooner.

 

The occasional art camp is a really good idea for catch up purposes.

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Kiddo loves clay camp. He looks forward to it every year.

 

Oh, and our library has one after school day a month where they provide the materials. Our local Y has homeschool gym and one option is "arts and crafts".

 

Camps are definitely a good way to go. Both kids did an art camp last summer and they loved them. Unfortunately our Y's homeschool PE is purely that.... swimming and a fitness program. Our library has a "kids club" once/wk but it's described as "an afternoon of stories, activities, songs, games, and more!" That might be an option if it weren't on Tuesday (DD's dance class).

 

 

If the kids enjoy doing it for fun how about picking one or two Saturdays or Sundays a month and doing projects then. It wouldn't have to be the whole day or anything, just something fun for them todo.

 

There would probably be wailing and gnashing of teach if I pulled out schoolwork on the weekends! DD would think it was fine but DS would HATE it, even if it was art. He grumbles at any structured activities on weekends.

 

I was never great at this myself.

 

I learned to take one idea and go with it, and I tried to do this twice a month.

 

I tended to buy really good materials and make them available for use as kids wanted, rather than provide a lot of instruction. I tried to set things up outside as much as possible. I had a couple of those plastic picnic tables for young children that I picked up at garage sales--one in the kitchen and one outside in the back yard. These could be hosed off if necessary, so I didn't have to worry about stains. If I set up in the back yard, I put a dish bucket of warm soapy water on the deck for handwashing before coming back inside. Once when things got really really messy I remember telling DD to take her clothes off on the deck and then wrapping her in a huge towel to carry her through the house to the bathroom to wash up--containment was crucial!

 

Every so often we would go to a museum or to look at some sculptures installed publicly. Whenever we did, we would just look at a few and talk about them, rather than trying to see tons of them and forgetting them all.

 

Some techniques:

Tearing or cutting tissue paper into designs and painting them onto paper with a mixture of glue and water.

Making stained glass designs out of layered tissue paper in a ring of cardboard.

Ukrainian eggs

White crayon on white paper resisting paint

Drawing one feature (eyes, or a mouth) 5 ways

Making human figures out of ovals

Ditto cats

Weaving with paper

Collage with found objects

Blending water colors

Decorating clear plastic ornaments

 

Oil pastels are very satisfying to work with, and I wish that I had found them sooner.

 

The occasional art camp is a really good idea for catch up purposes.

 

Thank you for the suggestions! What are "ditto cats"? Oh, and the tissue paper/glue/paint think gave me a visceral reaction, just thinking of the mess. LOL.

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Ditto cats means making cat figures out of ovals.

And re. the tissue paper--that was definitely an outside activity!

 

Another one that was pretty successful, although much more of a craft than an art ( but that's OK in my book) was taking little paper plate type bowls and putting some thick paint like biocolor on the bottom, about 1/2 inch thick or a little less. Then you dip a cookie cutter into the paint and stamp it onto a card. This is particularly successful for making valentines--using several heart-shaped cookie cutters in red on pink or white paper is really striking.

 

One year I found some very pretty knitting ribbon in a sale basket at a yarn store. It was soft and knotable, not stiff like normal ribbon. It had oranges and pinks in it, and some silver glitz. We blew out some brown eggs, various shades, and rinsed them with a mixture of vinegar and water. Then we drew very simple, abstract designs on them with Sharpie blunt markers--stars, spirals, that kind of thing--in orange and red. The colors looked great against the brown eggshells.

 

Then we threaded the knitting ribbon through the eggshells, and put knots in the ribbon on either side of each egg. I planned to hang these up, but ended up twining them in a set of Easter candles. It was easy and something that everyone could work on and that we could mix the results together and have them look pretty good.

 

I'm not very crafty, so these kinds of things have to WORK.

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Check garage sales and library sales for art history books as well. Sometimes the most gloomy, oversized, dull colored textbooks hide gorgeous color photos of great works of art. Those are great to look at and talk about from time to time.

 

One year I bought a beautiful coffee table book at a museum sale of Renaissance art. I planned to use this mostly for my own devotional meditations during Lent, but it turned out to be a great book for studying art with children as well. YMMV if you are offended by nude paintings--personally the Renaissance nudes don't bother me as they are not typically purient.

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Check garage sales and library sales for art history books as well. Sometimes the most gloomy, oversized, dull colored textbooks hide gorgeous color photos of great works of art. Those are great to look at and talk about from time to time.

 

One year I bought a beautiful coffee table book at a museum sale of Renaissance art. I planned to use this mostly for my own devotional meditations during Lent, but it turned out to be a great book for studying art with children as well. YMMV if you are offended by nude paintings--personally the Renaissance nudes don't bother me as they are not typically purient.

:iagree:

 

Garage sales, library used book sales, used book stores, etc., are all wonderful places to look for coffee table quality art books.

 

We do quite a bit of art history, as my son and I are both interested in this. I follow an eclectic mix of WTM/LCC/AO and do art very "Charlotte Mason" like, with picture study.

I always keep an art book open in a metal book stand on our end table. It is just a casual way to look at and appreciate art. Every week or two, I pull the book down and we sit and look through the book, find another picture to display for the following week.

 

Along the lines of CM - there are other ways to study/appreciate art w/o actually "doing" a formal art program. AO has a handy list of "handicrafts" for children - felting, working with clay, knitting, etc.

 

Craft stores have art kits and/or classes. Maybe take your children and see if they are interested in anything in particular. (If interested enough, they may do on their own, thus lightening your load. ;))

 

Look beyond traditional "art" - photography qualifies as art and may be something your family has more interest in.

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Gulp! Can you tell us more about this program? I followed the link and can't find any information about cost.

 

 

Answering my own earlier post because I found the information on a different website:

 

https://www.homeschoolart.com/store/art-curriculum-levels

 

It looks like it is $155 per level. I don't know yet if it can be found for less elsewhere. It looks great but 18 art lessons for $155 plus cost of supplies might make it more than we want to pay. I'll have to think about it. I also requested the free trial DVD so maybe that will blow me away. ;)

 

Pegasus

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I like the idea of having a specific day/time. However, I refuse to give up time set aside for core subjects. Where would you put it?

 

Monday and Friday: DH teaches in the a.m. while I'm at work. I come home around 1:30 and finish up whatever he hasn't gotten to (typically DD is done with her core but DS generally has only done math and reading so he still has everything else to do).

Tuesday and Thursday: I am home all day but have to wrap up by 3:30 to get DD to dance. I generally do all of the core subjects as well as Latin, science, history on those days.

Wednesday: I work 8-6. DH schools the kids but they take a break from 11:00-2:30 to go to a role playing gamers group. Generally they only get through the core subjects that day (grammar, reading, writing, math, spelling)

 

I'd like to blame my schedule, but even before DH and I were tag team teaching, I generally skipped art. By the time I got around to it, I was sick of doing school and didn't want to deal with a directed mess.

 

How about Saturday or Sunday? :001_smile:

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Answering my own earlier post because I found the information on a different website:

 

https://www.homeschoolart.com/store/art-curriculum-levels

 

It looks like it is $155 per level. I don't know yet if it can be found for less elsewhere. It looks great but 18 art lessons for $155 plus cost of supplies might make it more than we want to pay. I'll have to think about it. I also requested the free trial DVD so maybe that will blow me away. ;)

 

Pegasus

 

Thanks, Pegasus! I'm thinking if I can get a couple friends to want to do this with me, maybe we could split the cost and do a co-op kind of art class to make it less expensive.

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Currently we use Artistic Pursuits when we do art.... Honestly, by the time I get through grammar, spelling, writing, reading/lit studies, science, history, math, social studies, geography, PE, music, Latin, etc.... I just don't feel like doing it. I let art slide most of the time. I know I shouldn't because the kids like it and it is good for them to experience it. I just don't like doing it.... It takes so long because it is open ended compared to other subjects... and it makes a bigger mess than anything else we do.... and it just seems like a waste of time when I feel pressed to for time as it is. I know I'm a bad, bad homeschooler.

 

How can I get a better attitude and make time for art?

 

Send them to my house? My son would love to have yours over.

 

I love art, but I don't use a curricula and I do discuss art appreciation type stuff. I just pick fun projects (mostly from artprojects4kids.com or pinterest) and do them. I try to do one project a week.

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How about Saturday or Sunday? :001_smile:

School on weekend would not be well-received. In any form. By anyone.

 

Send them to my house? My son would love to have yours over.

 

I love art, but I don't use a curricula and I do discuss art appreciation type stuff. I just pick fun projects (mostly from artprojects4kids.com or pinterest) and do them. I try to do one project a week.

 

I'll have to look at the art site. Pinterest gives me a headache, lol. Or just ship them off to your house! :tongue_smilie:

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I like those suggestions! And I may have to take you up on the offer for the disc.

 

 

 

Yeah, DH and DS have yet to find a comfortable "zone" for getting things done. DH can't seem to multitask and teach both kids at once so he sends DS off to do reading or math while he does math, reading, writing, spelling and phonics with DD. I come home to one child completely finished with her core and other who has barely gotten going. I believe they are both "at fault" as DH can't multitask but DS daydreams if left to his own devices. Perhaps missing the fun would be some incentive for him.

 

Haven't read replies past this one, but maybe he could switch and work with your ds first, since he probably has more to do than your 5yo. I can't imagine the 4 subjects of a 5yo's core taking more than 2 hours. That would leave him at least 2 to work with ds, and 2 hours of very focused work can accomplish a LOT with a 10yob who may still need someone right beside him.

 

Just a thought.

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Answering my own earlier post because I found the information on a different website:

 

https://www.homeschoolart.com/store/art-curriculum-levels

 

It looks like it is $155 per level. I don't know yet if it can be found for less elsewhere. It looks great but 18 art lessons for $155 plus cost of supplies might make it more than we want to pay. I'll have to think about it. I also requested the free trial DVD so maybe that will blow me away. ;)

 

Pegasus

 

Homeschool Buyers Co-op did a group buy on this in July. It's how I got my last level. I paid $93 and got the art prints for a total of $127 shipped.

 

Unfortunately, there's no talk of them doing it again soon (that I've seen).

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I like the idea of having a specific day/time. However, I refuse to give up time set aside for core subjects. Where would you put it?

 

Monday and Friday: DH teaches in the a.m. while I'm at work. I come home around 1:30 and finish up whatever he hasn't gotten to (typically DD is done with her core but DS generally has only done math and reading so he still has everything else to do).

Tuesday and Thursday: I am home all day but have to wrap up by 3:30 to get DD to dance. I generally do all of the core subjects as well as Latin, science, history on those days.

Wednesday: I work 8-6. DH schools the kids but they take a break from 11:00-2:30 to go to a role playing gamers group. Generally they only get through the core subjects that day (grammar, reading, writing, math, spelling)

 

I'd like to blame my schedule, but even before DH and I were tag team teaching, I generally skipped art. By the time I got around to it, I was sick of doing school and didn't want to deal with a directed mess.

 

Fit it in on the weekend, then - and you do not HAVE to do it every week. It can be a fun reward for when everything else does get done (why I used Friday afternoons). If you use the dvd stuff I mentioned in my earlier post, it really can be FUN (for the kids) and rewarding and worth a few weekend hours. Or even evening ones (a crafty project for Dad? ;) )

 

I might add - you do NOT have to do art now. If it doesn't fit, it doesn't fit. As long as there are art supplies handy for the kids to use if they want when they have time, great. Maybe do an Arts Attack dvd unit over the summer. It is art - kid's won't see it as school. Don't sweat it for now if it just won't fit in!

Edited by JFSinIL
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Gulp! Can you tell us more about this program? I followed the link and can't find any information about cost. It looks like it is targeted to school systems though and the following makes it sound like it costs thousands:

 

If you are a typical school with only 50 students per grade (2 classrooms) and you use the program for only 3 years, your actual cost per student will be on the order of $4.00 per year. For larger schools or for those who use the program much longer than 3 years (the great majority of our customers), the annual cost is even less.

 

I'd email the company and ask what it runs for a homeschooling family. I spend about $50 per dvd/unit when I used is a few years ago. I am sure they still cater to the homeschool market, too - the website is just not set up that way anymore.

 

http://www.homeschoolart.com/

 

HERE IT IS - the homeschool version! Use this link!!!!! And I see it is more expensive -ok, may I used it 10 years ago, now that I think of it. I picked a level suitable for my oldest kids, and the younger kids did just fine with it, so do not be thinking you have to buy more than one level for your different age kids. And I got just one unit at a time, to see if we liked it and would use it.

Edited by JFSinIL
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Haven't read replies past this one, but maybe he could switch and work with your ds first, since he probably has more to do than your 5yo. I can't imagine the 4 subjects of a 5yo's core taking more than 2 hours. That would leave him at least 2 to work with ds, and 2 hours of very focused work can accomplish a LOT with a 10yob who may still need someone right beside him.

 

Just a thought.

 

He starts DD first because she is up and ready to go (morning person) while DS is groggy, foggy, and dazed for about an hour after he gets up. It takes me about an hour for her work (CLE LTR program, reading to DH, writing her spelling spelling words and practicing letters, and CLE Math) but for some reason it takes DH longer... I have my own thoughts there.

 

Fit it in on the weekend, then - and you do not HAVE to do it every week. It can be a fun reward for when everything else does get done (why I used Friday afternoons). If you use the dvd stuff I mentioned in my earlier post, it really can be FUN (for the kids) and rewarding and worth a few weekend hours. Or even evening ones (a crafty project for Dad? ;) )

 

I might add - you do NOT have to do art now. If it doesn't fit, it doesn't fit. As long as there are art supplies handy for the kids to use if they want when they have time, great. Maybe do an Arts Attack dvd unit over the summer. It is art - kid's won't see it as school. Don't sweat it for now if it just won't fit in!

 

Dad hates crafty stuff... All of our weekday evenings are booked (save 2/month that are Mom & Dad time)... And it would cause a rebellion if I did school (even art) on the weekends. They grumble when I drag them to the zoo or the history or art museum if it's on a weekend!

 

Thank you for reminding me that I don't HAVE to do it. We do use SOTW so they get some artistic stuff there from time to time.

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Currently we use Artistic Pursuits when we do art.... Honestly, by the time I get through grammar, spelling, writing, reading/lit studies, science, history, math, social studies, geography, PE, music, Latin, etc.... I just don't feel like doing it. I let art slide most of the time. I know I shouldn't because the kids like it and it is good for them to experience it. I just don't like doing it.... It takes so long because it is open ended compared to other subjects... and it makes a bigger mess than anything else we do.... and it just seems like a waste of time when I feel pressed to for time as it is. I know I'm a bad, bad homeschooler.

 

How can I get a better attitude and make time for art?

 

Make it a Saturday school class. :D

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