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Book a Week in 2011 - Week Twelve


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Happy Sunday! Today is the start of week twelve in our quest to read 52 books in 52 weeks. Welcome to everyone who is just joining in, welcome back to our regulars and to all who are following our progress. Mr. Linky is all set up on the 52 books blog to link to your reviews. The link is in my signature.

52 Books blog - K is for Kane. Ben Kane wrote an interesting historical fiction series that follows four distinct characters: Romulus, Fabiola, Tarquinius and Brennus in ancient Rome. Check them out on the blog. Also the winner of Judge a book by its cover is "The Pint Man" by Steve Rushin. I actually quite happy about that because once I found out what all the books were about, only a couple really interested me. Links are on the blog to find out about the other books.

 

 

Happy Spring! Katrina of Callapidder Day's is hosting her Spring Reading Thing again this year. It is a low pressure, very casual, set your own goals for the spring challenge. I'm working on my list right now. She'll be posting Mr. Linky around 3:00 today if you want to join in.

 

What are you all reading this week?

 

 

 

 

 

Link to week 11

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What am I reading this week. Still working on The Artist's Way and in the middle of week 6 out of 12. Funny thing happened as a result of reading deprivation week. I'm reading more non fiction and have yet to read any fiction books. It's like my brain is in learn and absorb mode, rather than veg mode. Don't know if that's a good thing or bad.

 

Plus I seem to have gone from reading one book to a few at a time. Didn't know my brain could keep up. Guess college classes have been beneficial in that aspect. So Spring Reading Thing goals will include 6 non fiction books I've been meaning to read but haven't gotten around to. I started the U.S. Presidents project last year and just couldn't get into Joseph Ellis's bio of George Washington. Picked up "The Real George Washington" which looks much more interesting and will be reading it.

 

James and I are almost done with our read aloud of "Harry Potter and Order of the Phoenix."

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I finally finished dh's recommendation, all 800 pages of

 

11. John Barth, The Sot-Weed Factor

 

Historical fiction for adults with a high tolerance for ... somewhat Rabelaisian humor. The center of the wildly veering plot is a secret diary of Captain John Smith and its accidental involvement in political intrigues of colonial Maryland. An excerpt, from the diary:

 

"This same water, the wch my men had taken against my warning, prov'd to be foule indeed, for that upon slaking therewith there thirst, all the companie did growe wondrous grip'd of there bowells, and loose of there bladders, & took a weakness of there reins, so that they still had need of making water, & of voiding their severall bummes. Little my men did all the day long, & the night, while that we rode thus at anchor, but besmirch them selves. At length, the wether being warm, if squallie, I did order one & all to divest them selves of there breeches, the wch were besh*tt past rescue, and cast them to the fishes.... We made straightwaye for shoar ,but cd by no means land, seeing a great bodie of Salvages appear from the woods, making everie signe of hostilitie.... Long they shot, we still ryding at Anchor without there reatch making all the signes of friendship we cd. But this was a hard matter, inasmuch as for everie cheerie wave of the hand I signall'd them, some souldier or Gentlemen in my companie must needs let goe a fart, wch the Salvages did take as an affront, and threwe more arrowes."

 

A novel not for the faint-hearted.

 

ETA: Words I had to look up: poetaster, Boeotian, feculent, debouch, brummagem, puccoon, pucelage, wittol. Whew!

Edited by Sharon in Austin
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Well, I finally gave up on Beloved, I got 258 pages in (out of 325) and I STILL didn't like the book or any of the characters.

 

I did read Scarlet Nights by Jude Deveraux which I really liked and Her Mother's Hope by Francine Rivers, which I LOVED. I finished it this morning and am hoping the library has the next book this afternoon.

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I finished Left Neglected by Lisa Genova this week and enjoyed it. It's about a fast-paced-career wife/mom who suffers a brain injury in a car accident. Her injured brain does not process information from the left: she doesn't see things on the left, doesn't know where her left arm or leg is, cannot move them properly, etc. Her life necessarily slows down and she rediscovers what is really important.

 

Up this week: I'm reading Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls which I will assign to dd in the next few weeks.

 

2011 Reading List

 

17. Left Neglected-Lisa Genova

16. Classics in the Classroom-Michael Clay Thompson

15. True You-Janet Jackson

14. The Samurai’s Garden-Gail Tsukiyama

13. Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet-Jamie Ford

12. God’s Middle Finger-Richard Grant

11. Kristin Lavransdatter-I: The Wreath-Sigrid Undset

10. The Housekeeper and the Professor-Yoko Ogawa

9. A Lucky Child-Thomas Buergenthal

8. Three Cups of Tea-Greg Mortenson

7. Run-Ann Patchett

6. The Red Queen-Philippa Gregory

5. Agnes Grey-Anne Bronte

4. The Daughter of Time-Josephine Tey

3. Mythology-Edith Hamilton

2. Phantom Toll Booth-Norton Juster

1. Her Fearful Symmetry-Audrey Niffenegger

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Well, I'm still reading Island of the World, and it is a wonderful book. This puts me behind though, and while I'd like to blame the length of the book (800+ pages), in truth I've slowed up because my internet is finally working properly. Now I'm going to have to set myself some web surfing limits if I want to keep up with this challenge... which I do.

 

 

Books Finished in 2011:

1. Glamorous Powers - Susan Howatch (4/5 stars) 1/7

2. City of Man: Religion and Politics in a New Era - Michael Gerson and Peter Wehner (5/5 stars) 1/15

3. That Distant Land: The Collected Stories - Wendell Berry (4/5 stars) 1/27

4. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl Written by Herself - Harriet Ann Jacobs 1/28

5. The Scarlet Pimpernel - Baroness Emmuska Orczy RA (4/5 stars) 2/2

6. The Warden – Anthony Trollope (4/5 stars) 2/5

7. Death of a Red Heroine – Qiu Xiaolong (3.5/5 stars) 2/9

8. Listen – Rene Gutteridge (3/5 stars) 2/21

9. Trusting God - Jerry Bridges (5/5 stars) 2/27

10. Remembering – Wendell Berry (4/5 stars) 3/2

Currently Reading:

11. Island of the World – Michael O’Brien

12. God is the Gospel – John Piper

13. Gone With the Wind – Margaret Mitchell RA

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Eh, another week here of not much reading. I finished Survival of the Prettiest and read most of Radical Homemakers, which is very thought-provoking and inspiring. Also read Murder at Teatime, a collection of classic cozy mystery short stories.

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This week I finished:

 

#19 - The Winter of Our Disconnect, by Susan Maushart. The subtitle is: "How Three Totally Wired Teenagers (and a Mother Who Slept with Her iPhone) Pulled the Plug on Their Technology and Lived to Tell the Tale". I enjoyed this. After reading a review that appeared in our local paper, I was under the impression that it was written journal-style. It is not. While there are a smattering of entries reproduced, it is mostly typical research writing - but with a flavorful twist, that twist being the authors' humor, sarcasm, cynicism, tongue-in-cheek turn-of-phrase, flat-out honesty. The studies she cites in no way detract from the book and in fact add to the story of these four people discovering real life in the challenge that the absence of wired-up technology delivers. It is reflective, educational, entertaining, and highly readable.

 

Haven't a clue what I will read next . . .

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I just finished reading Servant: The Awakening by L.L. Foster as well as the second book in the series, Servant: The Acceptance. Somehow I had earlier read the third book and had to backtrack to fill in the gaps.

 

From Amazon: "Product Description

 

Urban paranormal fantasy featuring Gabrielle Cody:Servant. Slayer. Seducer.

 

Gabrielle Cody has the ability to see the demons among us as they really are-and the responsibility to destroy them. She can't allow anyone to get in her way, even the magnetic Detective Luther Cross. Sensing a malevolent presence watching and stalking her, Gaby is drawn again and again to an abandoned hospital surrounded by an aura of sickness and suffering-and unimaginable evil."

 

L.L. Foster is a pseudonym of Lori Foster who is known for her romances. One of the curious things about the style that the author has taken for this pseudonym is the use of some very erudite vocabulary. I tend to consider myself to have a good vocabulary; however, I needed to head to the dictionary several times while reading these books.

 

Regards,

Kareni

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I read "The Serotonin Diet" and wasn't hugely impressed. But I wasn't the target audience so I don't suppose it matters. :p Since then, I've been reading about children and music lessons. I want to take clavichord lessons but the cheapest ones are three grand and lessons are about $65 per hour so it's gone onto my list as a retirement project...

 

Rosie

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I'm now reading High Rising by Angela Thirkell, which I like better than Excellent Women (although I didn't dislike the latter. I think I just wasn't in the right frame of mind for the humour last week, so I did finish it and wonder if there is a sequel to it.) The little boy in this book reminds me a great deal of ds when he gets to talking;).

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I read "The Serotonin Diet" and wasn't hugely impressed. But I wasn't the target audience so I don't suppose it matters. :p Since then, I've been reading about children and music lessons. I want to take clavichord lessons but the cheapest ones are three grand and lessons are about $65 per hour so it's gone onto my list as a retirement project...

 

Rosie

 

How cool! The family I lived with during college had a clavichord and harpsichord that they had built -- boy, did I enjoy playing them. (The clavichord was MUCH kinder sounding during the middle of the night! :D )

 

I didn't finish any books this past week. I'm still working on Robinson Crusoe as a read-aloud, and Nurse! Nurse! and True Desert Adventures.

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I finished Left Neglected by Lisa Genova this week and enjoyed it. It's about a fast-paced-career wife/mom who suffers a brain injury in a car accident. Her injured brain does not process information from the left: she doesn't see things on the left, doesn't know where her left arm or leg is, cannot move them properly, etc. Her life necessarily slows down and she rediscovers what is really important.

 

That book has been on my list. I read her other book Still Alice and was deeply impacted by that book.

 

I'm still reading Jane Eyre (I wonder if I'll still be reading it when week #52 rolls around...I feel like such a dork that I'm still reading it). I'm also reading (sort of...I just can't get into it) A Tale of Two Cities and Speaking of Faith. I've also got a whole slew of vegetarian cookbooks lying around that I'm studying. I know those don't really count, but I did make a really good black bean burger tonight. :tongue_smilie:

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Ok, I ditched that other book I had started reading. I just didn't care for it at all.

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRtvSVFt9cYw88eH2rciJq6tdBkDE3GLBOjDgOuFNgCk0SYermruw

 

I've since started Fatu-Hiva by Thor Heyerdahl. Wow; I'm loving it. It seems to be out of print & that's a shame because it's lovely, wonderful, & fascinating. I've never read Heyerdahl's books, but I'm definitely interested in reading more of his work.

 

 

From the inside cover:

 

"A twentieth-century Robinson Crusoe, the youthful Thor Heyerdahl spent the year 1936 with his bride, Liv, on Fatu-Hiva in the primitive Marquesas Islands. Undecided about their future, the Heyerdahls wanted to escape civilization and live strictly according to nature. With no medical supplies, they came within inches of losing their lives, but they also found the natural serenity they were seeking.

 

 

 

They built a bamboo cabin; dressed in loincloths; ate breadfruit, coconuts, and prawns; made fire by rubbing sticks together; and struggled agains insects, rain, and fatal diseases. Almost miraculously, they lived to tell about it -- about their hazardous inter-island voyages, their idyllic month-long stay with the last surviving Polynesian cannibal, their mixed relations with the islanders, their failures and successes in an entirely natural world.

 

 

 

Fatu-Hiva was a turning point in Heyerdahl's life, for it was there that he began to pick up a trail that would lead to the Kon-Tiki expedition. Ancient stone figures, the presence of such flora as the pineapple, and local legends all pointed to an early migration from South America. At the time, this theory was considered outrageous. Heyerdahl would later prove it not only possible, but likely."

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQt8glK8S1DU2IwQRoVymodYLw5vY4670IITG3pmRSTLhPoTB6iUQ

 

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Happy Sunday! Today is the start of week twelve in our quest to read 52 books in 52 weeks. Welcome to everyone who is just joining in, welcome back to our regulars and to all who are following our progress. Mr. Linky is all set up on the 52 books blog to link to your reviews. The link is in my signature.

52 Books blog - K is for Kane. Ben Kane wrote an interesting historical fiction series that follows four distinct characters: Romulus, Fabiola, Tarquinius and Brennus in ancient Rome. Check them out on the blog. Also the winner of Judge a book by its cover is "The Pint Man" by Steve Rushin. I actually quite happy about that because once I found out what all the books were about, only a couple really interested me. Links are on the blog to find out about the other books.

 

Happy Spring! Katrina of Callapidder Day's is hosting her Spring Reading Thing again this year. It is a low pressure, very casual, set your own goals for the spring challenge. I'm working on my list right now. She'll be posting Mr. Linky around 3:00 today if you want to join in.

 

What are you all reading this week?

 

Link to week 11

 

I have recently put Ben Kane's books in my "to read" pile! Thanks for the review. Perhaps I will hit those when I finish A Song of Ice and Fire.

My review for this week is here, I am on Book Two, A Clash of Kings.

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I read "The Serotonin Diet" and wasn't hugely impressed. But I wasn't the target audience so I don't suppose it matters. :p Since then, I've been reading about children and music lessons. I want to take clavichord lessons but the cheapest ones are three grand and lessons are about $65 per hour so it's gone onto my list as a retirement project...

 

Rosie

 

Wow, those are expensive lessons!!! I personally prefer the clavihcord as an ensemble instrument, but it would be cool to learn how to play one. And the harpsichord. Now if I could get $65 per hour for teaching piano, I wouldn't mind a bit;). My area would never suppor that, though, even for someone with the world's best credentials--they'd have to go to a different place in my state.

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I finished Shadow of the Bull. As you can see, After reading a book for my pleasure, I've had to play catch up with my kids reading list. Shadow of the Bull was a very quick read. I actually read it straight through. I couldn't put it down. All the discussion of bull fighting was unpleasant, but the boy coming of age and finding himself was worth it.

 

1: Graceling

2: Voyage of the Dawn Treader

3. A Single Shard

4: The Fiery Cross

5: A Season of Gifts

6: Otto of the Silver Hand

7: A Proud Taste for Scarlet and Miniver

8: Harry Potter

9: Watership Down

10: Master Cornhill

11. A Breath of Snow and Ashes

12. Catherine Called Birdy

13. Shadow of the Bull

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Wow, those are expensive lessons!!! I personally prefer the clavichord as an ensemble instrument, but it would be cool to learn how to play one. And the harpsichord. Now if I could get $65 per hour for teaching piano, I wouldn't mind a bit;). My area would never support that, though, even for someone with the world's best credentials--they'd have to go to a different place in my state.

 

Hee hee. Last week I was in love with harpsichords, but this week I discovered clavichords existed and are portable. I'd love to be able to play for the SCA dancers :)

 

The only place to learn is at one of the universities. That's why it is so expensive, I guess. Local piano lessons are $35-$45 per hour, with a half an hour lesson a standard $25.

 

Rosie

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Here's where 10 y/o dd and I are at (we're doing the challenge together).

 

Week 1, The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster

 

Week 2, Skellig by David Almond

 

Week 3, Ida B and Her Plans to Maximize Fun, Avoid Disaster and (Possibly) Save the World by Katherine Hannigan

 

Week 4, The Gawgon and The Boy by Lloyd Alexander

 

Week 5, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by JK Rowling

 

Week 6, The Girl With The Silver Eyes by Willo Davis Roberts

 

Week 7, Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt

 

Week 8, Sounder by William H. Armstrong

 

Week 9, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl

 

Week 10, Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

 

Week 11, All-Of-A-Kind Family by Sydney Taylor

 

Week 12, The Midwife's Apprentice by Karen Cushman

 

--

 

We've also each been reading books independently. Most recently Alexa finished a "Dear America" book and I (finally) finished "Patience, Princess Catherine" by Carolyn Meyer (Young Royals series). Going to start Nights in Rodanthe by Nicholas Sparks this week, I think.

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Last week was book 16. I read Red Riding Hood. Not so great. I think the movie will be entertaining, but not a quality novel by any means. This week I am reading Seeds of Vengeance by Sylvia Nobel. Again, not a classic....just fun, light reading. Maybe I'll look for something "deeper" next week:)

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The only place to learn is at one of the universities. That's why it is so expensive, I guess.

Rosie

 

Probably.

 

I finished Agnes Grey. Sweet story although very predictable.

.

 

Her second book, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall is the one that was so controversial and broke a mould for the times. It isn't shocking by today's standards, but if you read it in light of knowing what was permissible to do then it's interesting.

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I finished Little Bee today. What a powerful story! I really liked it even if it wasn't the ending I was expecting. However, I think that is part of what makes it so good.

 

Ds & I started The Canterbury Tales as retold by Geraldine McCaughrean today. That's going to take us a few weeks, since I need to chunk it out carefully so he's not overwhelmed with narrating the density of it.

 

I'll be starting the 5th Outlander book tonight: The Fiery Cross. I'm excited to return to the 1700's with Jamie & Claire! :001_smile:

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12. Chris Wright, Dr. Wright's Kitchen Table Math: Book 1

 

We've used AOPS for oldest dd, but I'd never seen this series of math books for elementary-aged children published by AOPS. It's not a curriculum, but is a guidebook to how to teach math concepts, including geometry, logic, and the beginning of equations with variables, to young elementary-aged children. There are many things here we used with oldest dd back when we started homeschooling (Sprouts, playing store and making change, etc.), but it seems that we've become so curriculum-dependent that I'd neglected a lot of these fun and fruitful (and free!) math activities with my younger dds.

 

I spend the last two evenings devouring it and taking lots of notes. Highly, highly recommended.

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Finally finished (the audiobook of) Gary Taubes' Why We Get Fat (and What To Do About It)....long review in my blog.

 

I'm looking forward to reading your review as soon as I have a few minutes :). I've been interested in Gary Taubes' books for some time.

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12. Chris Wright, Dr. Wright's Kitchen Table Math: Book 1

 

We've used AOPS for oldest dd, but I'd never seen this series of math books for elementary-aged children published by AOPS. It's not a curriculum, but is a guidebook to how to teach math concepts, including geometry, logic, and the beginning of equations with variables, to young elementary-aged children. There are many things here we used with oldest dd back when we started homeschooling (Sprouts, playing store and making change, etc.), but it seems that we've become so curriculum-dependent that I'd neglected a lot of these fun and fruitful (and free!) math activities with my younger dds.

 

I spend the last two evenings devouring it and taking lots of notes. Highly, highly recommended.

 

Thanks, I think I may read it.

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I read Daughter of China by Flinchbough this week.

A heart breaking account of the abuses against Christians as well as women in China. I actually had to put the book down a couple of times when they were recounting scenes from country orphanages.

The book was a beautiful testimony to the power and courage of the persecuted church.

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I am having a rough last two weeks!!! 3 of my holds at the library came in, they are all new (so no renewals!) and I didn't even make it through half of the first one!!! :glare:

 

Can't wait to hear what you think of this book; I've been eying it at B & N for months! It just looks daunting to me-lol

 

Daunting is how I would describe this book! I've spent 2 weeks and I'm only 250 pages in. It is a real challenge for me! So far, I've read about church history, his formation of his stance on Catholicism vs. Protestant theology, (I think if I read the word theology one more time my brain might pop) and his rise to be a pastor. I honestly think the second half is going to read faster, but I'm not looking forward to it, as it's going to be all about the pique of Hitler. And now it's about due back to my library. I think it's worth buying, if you are willing to put the time and mental energy into it. Hasn't been an easy read for me.

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I'm just starting Salting Roses, Lorelle Marinello.

 

I had to play catch up this week (spring break) to be on track...:D

12. Salting Roses, Lorelle Marinello

11. The Well Trained Mind, 2004 Edition

10. Night, Elie Wiesel

9. Last Light Over Carolina, Mary Alice Munroe

8. Homeschooling, A Family's Journey, Gregory and Martine Millman

7. Time is a River, Mary Alice Munroe

6. Commencement, Courtney Sullivan

5. The Redemption of Sarah Cain, Beverly Lewis

4. Thursdays at Eight, Debbie Macomber

3. The Three Weismann's of Westport, Cathleen Schine

2. Rebecca, Daphne du Maurier

1. The Search, Nora Roberts

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