Jump to content

Menu

This is why I believe in school choice!!


Recommended Posts

I cannot believe this case:( This poor woman is going to jail for trying to send her kids to a better school. I believe in radical school choice that would allow parents to choose any school even if it is out of their district. It is sad that many kids only have access to deplorable schools IMHO. I also believe in the choice to homeschool and in vouchers for all to help remedy our unequal schooling system.

 

 

http://news.yahoo.com/video/us-15749625/mom-jailed-for-sending-kids-to-better-school-23973624

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 110
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

She had the opportunity to pull her kids out of the school. The school district investigated several other families; a few decided to pay tuition, and the rest left the school. She continued to fight, even though she was lying.

 

She had other options. Her Dad lived in the district. She could've moved in with her Dad, or had her daughters move in with her Dad. Homeschooling might've been an option. Instead she chose to lie and to have her Dad file false paperwork.

 

Do I think she deserved a felony conviction or jailtime? Probably not, but I don't know what other charges she could've faced. However, I don't think she's the victim here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

She had the opportunity to pull her kids out of the school. The school district investigated several other families; a few decided to pay tuition, and the rest left the school. She continued to fight, even though she was lying.

 

She had other options. Her Dad lived in the district. She could've moved in with her Dad, or had her daughters move in with her Dad. Homeschooling might've been an option. Instead she chose to lie and to have her Dad file false paperwork.

 

Do I think she deserved a felony conviction or jailtime? Probably not, but I don't know what other charges she could've faced. However, I don't think she's the victim here.

 

She broke the law. Period. She's not a victim; she's a liar and she committed fraud.

 

People pay taxes in their district so their kids can attend good schools. It is unfair and unethical for someone who doesn't live in that district to lie so her kids can attend better schools without paying out-of-area tuition.

 

My property taxes are very high, and I would be very annoyed if some deadbeat was cheating the system so her kids could attend the schools in my district without being a resident or paying tuition. It's wrong and it's illegal, and the parents who do that sort of thing are well-aware that they are breaking the law -- and the parents tell the kids to lie about where they live, which is not exactly a benchmark for good parenting.

 

Do I think the mom should have been sentenced to jail? Probably not, unless there's more to this story than we're hearing (and that is often the case,) but I do think she should be forced to pay restitution to the school district. Fortunately, the sentence is only 10 days.

 

Cat

Edited by Catwoman
Link to comment
Share on other sites

School choice would be the best solution for parents like this, but the schools and unions fight it. It's maddening that it would be such a low-cost way to help disadvantaged children but instead they want to keep throwing more money at bad schools!!

 

How is her home school district not totally embarrassed that so many people will go to such lengths to get their kids into a nearby school?? You would think they would want to cover this up, not pour money into an investigation and cover up. Sheesh. And heaven forbid they actually fix the school and make it safe and effective at educating the children.

 

I also don't understand why the woman didn't just move herself and her children in with her father to be able to do this legally.

 

on a lighter note, anyone else immediately think of Aundrea Zuckerman camping out on her Grandma's couch to attend a better school? :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My parents did this for years with my sisters. They were zoned for a poor school district and lied about their address to get my sisters into a better one. Honestly (and yes I'm going there) they were never exposed because they were taking their white kids out of a predominately AA school system and putting them into another white one. I've seen this game played by many, many people and no one has ever been caught for it. Is it right? No, but I think maybe in this case the authorities went a little too far.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

She had the opportunity to pull her kids out of the school. The school district investigated several other families; a few decided to pay tuition, and the rest left the school. She continued to fight, even though she was lying.

 

She had other options. Her Dad lived in the district. She could've moved in with her Dad, or had her daughters move in with her Dad. Homeschooling might've been an option. Instead she chose to lie and to have her Dad file false paperwork.

 

Do I think she deserved a felony conviction or jailtime? Probably not, but I don't know what other charges she could've faced. However, I don't think she's the victim here.

 

These are very good points.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also wonder what the situation was with the school. We have a few schools that have really, really good specialty programs which are considered "optional" (students must apply and qualify), but also are neighborhood schools.

 

There have been real problems with parents who lie about their address to get their kids through the door if their child doesn't qualify for optional. The problem is, though, since the school has finite space, every child in the local attendance area reduces the number of kids who can be accepted into the optional program. In some cases, where enterprising developers have built high-density housing in the area and advertised based on the quality of the school, it's gotten to the point that there's literally NO room for the optional program that makes the school desirable. And even if the school doesn't have special programs, large numbers of parents playing games to get their child into a desirable school can lead to a school that is overcrowded, has large class sizes, and is in every way less than ideal for the kids who legitimately should attend.

 

It's a mess, especially in districts like mine where we have a large number of "low performing" schools, where the kids have the right to transfer to a higher performing school, but there simply aren't enough spaces in the higher performing schools to take them all-and changing the demographics too much usually leads in a formerly "in good standing" school starting to slip.

 

One of the major reasons I homeschool is that, honestly, I think the best thing I can do to help our local schools is to NOT give them my highly asynchronous, quirky kid to try to educate!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

She had the opportunity to pull her kids out of the school. The school district investigated several other families; a few decided to pay tuition, and the rest left the school. She continued to fight, even though she was lying.

 

She had other options. Her Dad lived in the district. She could've moved in with her Dad, or had her daughters move in with her Dad. Homeschooling might've been an option. Instead she chose to lie and to have her Dad file false paperwork.

 

Do I think she deserved a felony conviction or jailtime? Probably not, but I don't know what other charges she could've faced. However, I don't think she's the victim here.

 

:iagree:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If that's the case, she broke the law. Period. She's not a victim; she's a liar.

 

People pay taxes in their district so their kids can attend good schools. It is unfair and unethical for someone who doesn't live in that district to lie so her kids can attend better schools without paying out-of-area tuition.

 

My property taxes are very high, and I would be very annoyed if some deadbeat was cheating the system so her kids could attend the schools in my district without being a resident or paying tuition. It's wrong and it's illegal, and the parents who do that sort of thing are well-aware that they are breaking the law -- and the parents tell the kids to lie about where they live, which is not exactly a benchmark for good parenting.

 

Do I think the mom should have been sentenced to jail? Probably not, unless there's more to this story than we're hearing (and that is often the case,) but I do think she should be forced to pay restitution to the school district. Fortunately, the sentence is only 10 days.

 

Cat

 

Good Morning America did a piece on it this morning (you can see video at the link, though I can't link directly).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is it right? No, but I think maybe in this case the authorities went a little too far.

 

Well, they investigated over 100 families, and this particular mom was the only one who kept fighting the district, even though they had evidence that she was defrauding them. Apparently, they gave her a chance to pay restitution, and to remove her kids from the school. The other families were willing to work with the district and arrive at a prosecution-free solution, but this woman would not cooperate.

 

I think maybe that mom was the one who went way more than a little too far.

 

Cat

Link to comment
Share on other sites

She had the opportunity to pull her kids out of the school. The school district investigated several other families; a few decided to pay tuition, and the rest left the school. She continued to fight, even though she was lying.

 

She had other options. Her Dad lived in the district. She could've moved in with her Dad, or had her daughters move in with her Dad. Homeschooling might've been an option. Instead she chose to lie and to have her Dad file false paperwork.

 

Do I think she deserved a felony conviction or jailtime? Probably not, but I don't know what other charges she could've faced. However, I don't think she's the victim here.

 

I agree but I can also see that some parents may be desperate:(. She may be in one of the districts that are not just bad but a nightmare. I have read of many in the big cities:(.

 

As for living with her Dad I thought the same thing. OTOH maybe her Dad will not allow that. As for homeschooling, I got the impression she might be a single mom, so it may not be possible for her. Or perhaps due to extreme predjudice against homeschooling, it may not have seemed an option to her. I was once totally against homeschooling since "how will the kids ever be socialized?";)

 

As for other charges, how about a misdemeanor? As for jail, our jails are already overcrowded and to me this type of offense does not warrant the expense of jail time. I agree that what she did was against the law and I believe in following the law but I also believe that desperation does play a role sometimes especially when it comes to our kids.

 

I think the real answer is radical school choice which will probably help these schools shape up and more equal funding:D Although, I don't think throwing more money at schools is going to help at all. Instead, choice, choices, and more choices such as charters, vouchers, cyber charters, and homeschooling is what I dream of:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What she did was wrong, but... a felony? Jail time? Oh, come ON. Misdemeanor - fines (a few thousand dollars) and community service. Enough to make an impression, but not excessive.

 

What makes it a felony vs. a misdemeanor is the amount of money they say that she "defrauded" the school district out of. I thought it was 30K? That amount is what makes it a felony - not a whim on the part of the judge. They did offer her other options (as they did the other parents). I think she gambled that at the end they wouldn't go through with it - and lost.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My only thought in this case is when the district asked for $30,500 in restitution for tuition was "seriously"? That much money spent to educate kids and the public schools usually do an abysmal job? Give me that money - I'll show you something! ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My only thought in this case is when the district asked for $30,500 in restitution for tuition was "seriously"? That much money spent to educate kids and the public schools usually do an abysmal job? Give me that money - I'll show you something! ;)

If it is really this much a year for public schools, then there is NO excuse for the poor education coming out of some of them. :glare:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it is really this much a year for public schools, then there is NO excuse for the poor education coming out of some of them. :glare:

 

 

I think it was for both her girls and I thought it was for four years but that isn't it right? So maybe 1-2 years?

Edited by AnitaMcC
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the US, public schools are funded by real estate taxes. In a few square miles one can find schools with books, walls that are not spewing asbestos, grassy areas for safe play, and Latin classes. In the next quadrant one can find syringes on the playground, no books whatsoever in the classrooms, and roaches crawling over walls.

 

THIS is America.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the US, public schools are funded by real estate taxes. In a few square miles one can find schools with books, walls that are not spewing asbestos, grassy areas for safe play, and Latin classes. In the next quadrant one can find syringes on the playground, no books whatsoever in the classrooms, and roaches crawling over walls.

 

THIS is America.

:(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the US, public schools are funded by real estate taxes. In a few square miles one can find schools with books, walls that are not spewing asbestos, grassy areas for safe play, and Latin classes. In the next quadrant one can find syringes on the playground, no books whatsoever in the classrooms, and roaches crawling over walls.

 

THIS is America.

 

:(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Dulcimeramy
In the US, public schools are funded by real estate taxes. In a few square miles one can find schools with books, walls that are not spewing asbestos, grassy areas for safe play, and Latin classes. In the next quadrant one can find syringes on the playground, no books whatsoever in the classrooms, and roaches crawling over walls.

 

THIS is America.

 

Very, very true. I can pull out of my driveway and drive 20 minutes northwest to the land of soccer leagues and Shakespeare, or I can drive 20 minutes due east to the land of homelessness and ignorance. My particular corner of the city contains glimpses of each environment, and it is hard to homeschool here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the US, public schools are funded by real estate taxes. In a few square miles one can find schools with books, walls that are not spewing asbestos, grassy areas for safe play, and Latin classes. In the next quadrant one can find syringes on the playground, no books whatsoever in the classrooms, and roaches crawling over walls.

 

THIS is America.

 

:iagree: I wish something could be done since IMHO it is very unfair. It is why I believe in school choice and changing how schools are funded so that it does not matter where you live.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the US, public schools are funded by real estate taxes. In a few square miles one can find schools with books, walls that are not spewing asbestos, grassy areas for safe play, and Latin classes. In the next quadrant one can find syringes on the playground, no books whatsoever in the classrooms, and roaches crawling over walls.

 

THIS is America.

 

We used to live in DC. Schools there get gobs of money but are in horrible condition and failed to teach kids (including our local school and we paid very high property taxes). This info is from 2007, but still useful.

 

"New York was the biggest spender on education, at $14,119 per student, with New Jersey second at $13,800 and Washington, D.C., third at $12,979, the Census Bureau said. Seven of the top 10 education spenders were Northeastern states.

The states with the lowest spending were Utah, at $5,257 per pupil, Arizona $6,261, Idaho $6,283, Mississippi $6,575 and Oklahoma $6,613. The 10 states with the lowest education spending were in the West or South.

Overall the United States spent an average of $8,701 per student on elementary and secondary education in 2005, up 5 percent from $8,287 the previous year, the bureau said."

 

 

There are a ton of problems with schools. However, I don't think that the problems are funding related - but that is for another thread. :)

 

OP - I agree with you, too. Give families school choice!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We used to live in DC. Schools there get gobs of money but are in horrible condition and failed to teach kids (including our local school and we paid very high property taxes). This info is from 2007, but still useful.

 

"New York was the biggest spender on education, at $14,119 per student, with New Jersey second at $13,800 and Washington, D.C., third at $12,979, the Census Bureau said. Seven of the top 10 education spenders were Northeastern states.

The states with the lowest spending were Utah, at $5,257 per pupil, Arizona $6,261, Idaho $6,283, Mississippi $6,575 and Oklahoma $6,613. The 10 states with the lowest education spending were in the West or South.

Overall the United States spent an average of $8,701 per student on elementary and secondary education in 2005, up 5 percent from $8,287 the previous year, the bureau said."

 

 

There are a ton of problems with schools. However, I don't think that the problems are funding related - but that is for another thread. :)

 

OP - I agree with you, too. Give families school choice!

 

I agree that throwing more money at the situation will not always help since in many cases we spend oodles of money that is probably mismanaged. OTOH I think a more equitable system of funding schools may solve some of those problems. I remember when Oprah did an expose on DC schools that showed some of them were in deplorable condition to say the least.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What makes it a felony vs. a misdemeanor is the amount of money they say that she "defrauded" the school district out of. I thought it was 30K? That amount is what makes it a felony - not a whim on the part of the judge. They did offer her other options (as they did the other parents). I think she gambled that at the end they wouldn't go through with it - and lost.

 

I wish she'd had a better defense attorney.

 

The school benefited from the girls' enrollment, in terms of the federal tax dollars they received and there is NO way the school was out $30,000 as a result of the girls' attendance.

 

And, the school's entire argument that she "didn't pay property taxes" and so didn't help fund the school is bogus. What about all the children whose parents rent their homes? Do they have to pay tuition? Of course not.

 

Lying on the enrollment forms was not okay. But the charges against her are way overblown.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wish she'd had a better defense attorney.

 

The school benefited from the girls' enrollment, in terms of the federal tax dollars they received and there is NO way the school was out $30,000 as a result of the girls' attendance.

 

And, the school's entire argument that she "didn't pay property taxes" and so didn't help fund the school is bogus. What about all the children whose parents rent their homes? Do they have to pay tuition? Of course not.

 

Lying on the enrollment forms was not okay. But the charges against her are way overblown.

 

The thing is, they were using her father's address, who presumably pays property taxes. If they had been sleeping on her father's floor, they would have been eligible to go to school there. So, why does it matter? Oh, wait - then they probably would have been breaking occupancy laws.:glare:

 

i understand that she broke the law. Me? I'd live in a tent if it meant in a better area with better schools. If what it took was us sleeping on the living room floor, then I would sleep there. I would give my father guardianship. I would live in his garage. I would not ask my dc to lie, though, so I'd have to come up with something good.

 

It's is just incredibly sad that we have a mom who chose to break the law so her kids could get a better education. Socioeconomic level should not determine education, which is exactly what happened here. She couldn't afford to live in the good district, so she broke the law and went to jail to get them the education she wanted them to have. It should *not* be that way!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree that throwing more money at the situation will not always help since in many cases we spend oodles of money that is probably mismanaged. OTOH I think a more equitable system of funding schools may solve some of those problems. I remember when Oprah did an expose on DC schools that showed some of them were in deplorable condition to say the least.

 

Oprah's right. They are in awful condition. But like I said, they get a ton of money. I wish that the problem was just funding. That would be an easy solution. We've tried it for decades and it doesn't work. As a nation, we've more than tripled our spending since 1960 and the quality of our public education has tanked.

 

While searching on this topic I came upon a Wash. Post article that states that DC total spending per pupil is $25,000. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/04/04/AR2008040402921.html

 

But, that is all beside the point. PP is right. It's ridiculous that someone is lying to get her child into a good school. Parents should be able to choose the school. And funding should follow the child, not the school.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The thing is, they were using her father's address, who presumably pays property taxes. If they had been sleeping on her father's floor, they would have been eligible to go to school there. So, why does it matter? Oh, wait - then they probably would have been breaking occupancy laws.:glare:

 

i understand that she broke the law. Me? I'd live in a tent if it meant in a better area with better schools. If what it took was us sleeping on the living room floor, then I would sleep there. I would give my father guardianship. I would live in his garage. I would not ask my dc to lie, though, so I'd have to come up with something good.

 

It's is just incredibly sad that we have a mom who chose to break the law so her kids could get a better education. Socioeconomic level should not determine education, which is exactly what happened here. She couldn't afford to live in the good district, so she broke the law and went to jail to get them the education she wanted them to have. It should *not* be that way!

Super good point!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So many are focused on what she did wrong, and what her options were if she wanted to avoid jail. What were her options if she wanted a better education for her kids? Maybe move in with her father--though we don't know if there was room or if that was okay with him.

 

I don't condone lying; however, the OP has a point about school choice. $$ gives such a huge advantage in terms of choices. Should it be that way for education?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wish she'd had a better defense attorney.

 

The school benefited from the girls' enrollment, in terms of the federal tax dollars they received and there is NO way the school was out $30,000 as a result of the girls' attendance.

 

And, the school's entire argument that she "didn't pay property taxes" and so didn't help fund the school is bogus. What about all the children whose parents rent their homes? Do they have to pay tuition? Of course not.

 

Lying on the enrollment forms was not okay. But the charges against her are way overblown.

 

 

With all the media attention she will probly get a very good attorney, and win billions from the school district after she wins her appeal! ;)

 

After all, this is America ;).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And, the school's entire argument that she "didn't pay property taxes" and so didn't help fund the school is bogus. What about all the children whose parents rent their homes? Do they have to pay tuition? Of course not.

 

We rent our home. The landlord who owns the home uses part of our rent to pay the taxes on his property. We DO pay property taxes.

 

I don't know about this particular district, but many do offer the opportunity for children from outside the district to pay tuition. Over the years, I have known a few families who moved mid-way through an academic year and paid tuition to allow their children to finish the year in the old district. I would assume the "tuition" being charged here is not what it actually costs per student, per year, but whatever amount the district would charge annually for someone from outside.

 

I'm afraid I agree with many of the others and believe she broke the law and does deserve to pay the consequences. I do understand desperation to give your children a better life, but I don't think it excuses breaking the law when there are other, more reasonable options.

 

But, no, I also don't think she belongs in jail. It is only 10 days, though. And, as we already know, her father lives nearby, so the children won't be abandoned.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We rent our home. The landlord who owns the home uses part of our rent to pay the taxes on his property. We DO pay property taxes.

 

I don't know about this particular district, but many do offer the opportunity for children from outside the district to pay tuition. Over the years, I have known a few families who moved mid-way through an academic year and paid tuition to allow their children to finish the year in the old district. I would assume the "tuition" being charged here is not what it actually costs per student, per year, but whatever amount the district would charge annually for someone from outside.

 

I'm afraid I agree with many of the others and believe she broke the law and does deserve to pay the consequences. I do understand desperation to give your children a better life, but I don't think it excuses breaking the law when there are other, more reasonable options.

 

But, no, I also don't think she belongs in jail. It is only 10 days, though. And, as we already know, her father lives nearby, so the children won't be abandoned.

I plan on homeschooling through high school, but I am suddenly grateful for open enrollment in MN. It is also free.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the scandal here is that we allow this unequal funding of schools. If we valued all our children, we would insist that they all be offered a good education, the kind of education we would want for our kids if we were sending them to school. I think the way we are funding schools now is unfair and selfish.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the scandal here is that we allow this unequal funding of schools. If we valued all our children, we would insist that they all be offered a good education, the kind of education we would want for our kids if we were sending them to school. I think the way we are funding schools now is unfair and selfish.

 

*That* is a hot button issue! It seems most people think it is perfectly fair - if other people want to live in the better school districts, then they need to live there, right?

 

It isn't just a funding issue, though - some poorer schools get extra funding and still have low achievement. The real problem is the "achievement gap" which seems to fall along socioeconomic lines. Unfortunately, it will take much more than money to fix the problems that lead to this (which are more complicated than just, "the kids are poor.")

 

I understand the sentiment of this mother, though. Since we are no longer homeschooling and we are moving, picking a school district has become a major issue. Simply renting a house in the best school district really isn't an option for us due to the costs. However, we will *not* live in a low achieving district, so it is difficult to determine where exactly we *will* live.

 

ETA: There are charter schools in very poor areas that do very well. The difference is that the families who go after enrollment in these schools are highly motivated. Unfortunately, there aren't enough spots in the schools for all the motivated students/families. Also, some families that *would* go after enrollment, but other obstacles get in their way. What is needed is not necessarily more money, but more people who are willing to put in the time. Many of the best teachers go to better districts because they may pay more (this is true in NC - the local supplement in one poor district is $900 a year while in a wealthier district it is $10,000 a year.) And this just begins to describe some of the differences.

Edited by Renee in FL
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the US, public schools are funded by real estate taxes. In a few square miles one can find schools with books, walls that are not spewing asbestos, grassy areas for safe play, and Latin classes. In the next quadrant one can find syringes on the playground, no books whatsoever in the classrooms, and roaches crawling over walls.

 

THIS is America.

 

This is what is so sad about this case. Yes, she broke the law. But there is a larger issue here. In the land of the free, things are still not equal. The haves get more and the have nots lose what they have.

 

We're having the opposite issue in my town. A neighboring town WANTS to have their kids go to the neighborhood school which is now at least equal if not better than my districts schools and the taxes would be cheaper. Many, many years ago, they were districted to our school when the area was smaller. Now our district is over-crowded. Yet the district won't release these kids to go their neighborhood school which is just minutes away compared to 30+min away for my district. Why? B/c of the tax dollars these kids bring in.

 

It's all about money folks....not educating the kids.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I'm afraid I agree with many of the others and believe she broke the law and does deserve to pay the consequences. I do understand desperation to give your children a better life, but I don't think it excuses breaking the law when there are other, more reasonable options.

 

But, no, I also don't think she belongs in jail. It is only 10 days, though. And, as we already know, her father lives nearby, so the children won't be abandoned.

 

Yes, but being convicted of a felony, she has now spent 2yrs getting an education to be a teacher and she will no longer be able to get a job teaching, ever, from what I saw on the news. And her current job is a teacher's aid so I'm sure she has lost that job as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I found these quotes in one of the articles:

 

However, family and friends of Williams-Bolar call this an unfair case of selective prosecution.

 

"Who's looking at Copley and why they chose this particular young lady, this particular girl and not anyone else?" asked Bobbi Simpson, a friend of the family.

 

Williams-Bolar is a teacher's aide in the Akron school district and she's pursuing her teaching degree. However, the judge pointed out that Williams-Bolar will not be allowed to be a teacher now that she has a felony record.

 

Williams-Bolar's father, Edward Williams, also went on trial for grand theft. The jury also couldn't reach a decision on the charge and the judge declared a mistrial.

 

"They railroaded us. They couldn't get me, but they tried to get my daughter. They wanted to hurt her," Mr. Williams said after sentencing on Tuesday.

 

First, the woman is 40 years old, not a young lady and certainly not a girl. The family friend must be the Crypt Keeper if 40 years old is a girl!

 

Second, what did the dad think was going to happen when he kept breaking the law?

 

I think the daughter and the dad think that the rules shouldn't apply to them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very, very true. I can pull out of my driveway and drive 20 minutes northwest to the land of soccer leagues and Shakespeare, or I can drive 20 minutes due east to the land of homelessness and ignorance. My particular corner of the city contains glimpses of each environment, and it is hard to homeschool here.

 

I am in one of the oldest suburbs of our city. Three blocks (literally) from here, the city schools graduate 46%. The district I am in the rate is over 90%. This is a working class suburb, made up of mostly small 1940s starter houses. It's not big lot, McMansion suburbia.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wish she'd had a better defense attorney.

 

The school benefited from the girls' enrollment, in terms of the federal tax dollars they received and there is NO way the school was out $30,000 as a result of the girls' attendance.And, the school's entire argument that she "didn't pay property taxes" and so didn't help fund the school is bogus. What about all the children whose parents rent their homes? Do they have to pay tuition? Of course not.

 

Lying on the enrollment forms was not okay. But the charges against her are way overblown.

 

But it was 2 girls, over a number of years.

 

The property owner pays the school taxes on his property and if he is any kind of business man, he passes on the costs to his tenants.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm afraid I agree with many of the others and believe she broke the law and does deserve to pay the consequences. I do understand desperation to give your children a better life, but I don't think it excuses breaking the law when there are other, more reasonable options.

 

.

 

What are those other, more reasonable options?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wish she'd had a better defense attorney.

 

The school benefited from the girls' enrollment, in terms of the federal tax dollars they received and there is NO way the school was out $30,000 as a result of the girls' attendance.

 

And, the school's entire argument that she "didn't pay property taxes" and so didn't help fund the school is bogus. What about all the children whose parents rent their homes? Do they have to pay tuition? Of course not.

 

Lying on the enrollment forms was not okay. But the charges against her are way overblown.

 

If her father lives in the district, he is paying property taxes for those schools, right?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't read all the post, and what she did was wrong, but I understand her wanting to do the best for her daughters. It doesn't take it OK though.

 

I am very upset though that anytime I try to go to the US I spend about 3 hours in line behind thousands of kids attending school in the US illegally. They are in public school uniforms and and it really isn't right. even have neighbors that say they had their kids in the US so they can go to school there for free using a relatives address. Why is this women in jail? And these other families are even ushered though the border wait faster so they will not be late. Is t because she tried to get into a highly ranked school. Either way, the law is the law, and it should be enforced equally in all cases.

 

Just my two cents.

 

Danielle

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share


×
×
  • Create New...