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Can i see your advanced 2nd grade/3rd grade reading list?


Halcyon
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Here's what I have so far:

 

A Lion To Guard Us

Stone Fox

Henry Huggins

Shoeshine Girl

The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe

The Courage of Sarah Noble

Benjamin Franklin by D'Aulaire

Cleopatra by Stanley

Misty of Chincoteague

Black Ships before Troy

Alexander the Great by Langley

I, Houdini by Banks

Edited by Halcyon
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I don't have the list with me, but this summer my son (going into second grade) has read: Dr. Dolittle, Voyages of Dr. Dolittle, Where the Red Fern Grows. The next on the list is Mary Poppins and Harry Potter 3. I am planning on using Rivka's list but modified somewhat for a boy. I will post it in the evening.

 

Editing to add he read Pinnocchio and also plans to read Jungle Book.

Edited by Roadrunner
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Right now my daughter is reading simultaneously The Hobbit, Bridge to Terabithia, and Harry Potter Book 5. She just finished Abel's Island and told me all about it last night.

 

I don't have a scheduled list prepared for this year, we are just winging it, as she has been doing awesome at just picking up books and reading them on her own.

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My son has recently read some Beverly Cleary books, Clyde Robert Bulla books, and random others off of Veritas Press and Sonlight's reading lists. Pinocchio is a great one for this reading level with its short chapters and advanced language. The only thing I would caution is that Black Ships Before Troy has pretty advanced language. I read it to my boys this year, but I don't think I would assigned it for him to read by himself.

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We are using TOG, here are some from the reading list that we will be doing:

 

A World of Knowing

Pinocchio

DK Photobiography Thomas Edison

Stepping Stones Les Miserables

Usborne Napoleon

Shipwrecked!

A Visit to William Blake's Inn

Charlotte in Giverny

Seabird

A Christmas Carol

Frederic Chopin, Son of Poland, Early Years

Usborne Florence Nightingale

DK Photobiography Marie Curie

Sarah Plain and Tall

Seneca Chief, Army General

Rudyard Kipling's Just so Stories

Classic Starts The Swiss Family Robinson

Little Women

Bound for Oregon

Time for Kids Clara Barton

A Little Princess

Diary of An Early American Boy, Noah Black, 1805

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I'm never really sure how to participate in these threads since ds is dyslexic and "reads" everything by audio or read-aloud.

 

My SOTW related history reading list for him this year is:

 

Odin's Family

Castle Diary

Canterbury Tales (McCaughrean version)

Tales of Robin Hood (Tony Allan version)

Favorite Medieval Tales (Mary Pope Osbourne)

Three Swords for Granada

The Foolish Men of Agra

She Was Nice to Mice

 

My lit. booklist for him this year is:

 

Owls in the Family

Ben and Me

Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of Nimh

The Cricket in Times Square

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

The Wheel on the School

From the Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweller

The Best Christmas Pageant Ever

Frindle

The Sign of the Beaver

Treasure Island

The Twenty-One Balloons

Poppy

The Happy Hollisters

The Plant that Ate Dirty Socks

 

(so far we are flying through this list, so I may have to add some more here)

 

In his book basket for quiet-time listening each day are:

 

The Red Pyramid (current selection, he's about halfway through)

Over Sea, Under Stone

A Wrinkle in Time

Where the Mountain Meets the Moon

How to Train Your Dragon

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Benjamin West and His Cat Grimalkin

The rest of the Little House series

A Lion to Guard Us

Trumpet of the Swan

Ginger Pye

All of a Kind Family

Grandma's Attic

Steward Little

Emily's Runaway Imagination

Little Princess

5 Little Peppers

The Yearling

Freddy Goes Camping

Runaway Ralph

 

any FIAR books we row

Any other books from any other study we may begin in 3rd grade (dd is in 2nd now)

 

I will add these books if I find them at a very good deal:

 

Footprints in the Barn

Baby Island

Understood Betsy (I may print this one it is at google books)

Phillis Wheatley: Young Revolutionary Poet

Ordinary Princess

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We are starting in McGuffey's Eclectic reader two, it is supposed to be 3rd and 4th grade level. I want to be sure his comprehension skills are on par with his decoding skills. He will read aloud to me daily, we will move to the third reader around January. He is currently reading Harry Potter 1. He is a young second grader (would be first in any school). I try to remember that. He has very little Interest in just reading. He.loves HP and Star Wars so we are reading those for his silent reading. Read alouds are more classic children's lit, I usually have him read a page to me of each chapter.

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Read this past year:

Tornado

Sarah, Plain and Tall

The Invisible Dog

Toys Go Out

Farmer Boy

Hachiko Waits

Charlotte's Web

The Littles

MTH Research Guide: Ancient Greece & the Olympics, The Amazon, Leonardo da Vinci

Igraine the Brave

The Milly-Molly-Mandy Story Book

One Small Square: Backyard and others

The Chocolate Touch

 

 

Partially planned for next year:

Bambi

Misty of Chincoteague

Justin Morgan Had a Horse

Brighty of the Grand Canyon

Prince Siddhartha

Michael Hague's Favourite Hans Christian Andersen Fairy Tales

Stuart Little

Poppy

The Family Under the Bridge

Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes

Charlotte in Giverny

Holes

Edited by Aurelia
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Kolbe lit -

 

Misty of Chincoteague

Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIHM

The Children's Homer

The Black Cauldron

The Great Brain

The Boxcar Children 1

 

Eleanor Estes study -

 

The Moffats

The Middle Moffat

Rufus M.

The Moffat Museum

Ginger Pye

Pinky Pye

The Witch Family

The Hundred Dresses

The Alley

 

 

History and Science reading are still TBD.

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Here is what my 3rd grader will be reading next year. The ones with the asterisk are going to be studied more in depth via Progeny Press guides:

 

Toliver's Secret

Sarah, Plain and Tall

The Moffats

Ginger Pye

Henry and Ribsy

The Big Wave*

The Whipping Boy*

Charlotte's Web*

Mr. Popper's Penguins*

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I know DS had more assigned reading in second grade, but right now, I can't find my list.

 

Second Grade (1st section for school, 2nd section for fun)

Ben and Me, Robert Lawson

Mr. Revere and I, Robert Lawson

Jean Fritz's books on the American Revolution

The Sign of the Beaver, Elizabeth George Speare

My Side of the Mountain, Jean Craighead George

Hatchet, Gary Paulsen

From the Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, E. L. Konigsburg

 

The Eragon series, Christopher Paolini

The Chronicles of Prydain series, Lloyd Alexander

The Castle in the Attic series, Elizabeth Winthrop

Harriett the Spy, Louise Fitzhugh

Tripods Trilogy, John Christopher

The Dark is Rising series, Susan Cooper

The Narnia Series, C.S. Lewis

Holes, Louis Sachar

The Indian in the Cupboard series, Lynn Reid Banks

A Wrinkle in Time, Madeliene L'Engle

Frindle, Andrew Clements

The Percy Jackson series, Rick Riordan

 

Third Grade (1st section for school, 2nd section for fun)

A Lion to Guard Us, Clyde Robert Bulla

The Broken Blade, William Durkin

The Samuari's Tale, Erik C. Haugaard

Homer Price, Robert McCloskey

Fever 1793, Laurie Halse Anderson

The Black Stallion, Walter Farley

Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH, Robert C. O'Brien

The Witch of Blackbird Pond, Elizabeth George Speare

Tuck Everlasting, Natalie Babitt

The Cricket in Times Square, George Selden

My Brother Sam is Dead, James Lincoln Collier

Year of the Hangman, Gary Blackwood

Carry on Mr. Bowditch, Jean Lee Latham (* he really liked this one)

The Whipping Boy, Sid Fleischman

The Bridge to Terabithia, Katherine Paterson

Maniac Magee, Jerry Spinelli

The Phantom Tollbooth, Norton Juster

Victory, Susan Cooper (* another favorite)

The Boy in the Alamo, Margaret Cousins

Call It Courage, Armstrong Sperry

Where the Red Fern Grows, Wilson Rawls

By The Great Horn Spoon, Sid Fleischman

 

Inkheart series, Cornelia Funke

The Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins (first book only)

The Underland Chronicles, Suzanne Collins

Book of Time, Guillarme Prevost

Books of Ember series, Jeanne DuPrau

The Redwall series, Brian Jacques

The Great Brain, John D. Fitzgerald

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2nd Grade Reading List

 

So far, he has already read the first 3 on this list and Farmer Boy, which wasn't on the list.

 

1. The Treasure

2. The Giving Tree

3. The Chalk Box Kid

4. The Boxcar Children

5. Stone Fox

6. Prairie School

7. The Legend of the Bluebonnet

8. Tornado

9. The Raft

10. In the Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson

11. Stuart Little

12. Encyclopedia Brown: Boy Detective

13. Because of Winn-Dixie

14. The Whipping Boy

15. The Mouse and the Motorcycle

16. Little House in the Big Woods

17. Sarah, Plain and Tall

18. Flat Stanley

19. The Great Kapok Tree

20. My Father’s Dragon

21. Mr. Popper’s Penguins

22. Charlotte’s Web

23. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

24. James and the Giant Peach

After this we will start MCT Lit and we will read those together.

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Thanks everyone who has responded so far! There were a few on there that I had forgotten about, so I appreciate it. I am going to stick with Black Ships, as older loved it and I think younger will too. I am going to add in

 

The Invisible Dog

 

The Whipping Boy

 

Tornado by Betsy Byars

 

The Cricket in Times Square

Call it Courage

Sign of the Beaver

 

based on suggestions here and my own memory of how much my older liked them.

Edited by Halcyon
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I have absolutely no reading list. Part of the problem is that I need to look for large text editions or Kindle versions. So I take it week by week.

 

No one put down My Side of the Mountain by Jean Craighead George. DD finished that quickly and really loved it. It's too bad the sequels are not available as large texts from my library and the publisher hasn't made them available on Kindle.

 

What she has started recently are the following:

 

Fellowship of the Ring

His Dark Materials

Julie of the Wolves

Various books by Roger Lancelyn Green

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I have no clue how many he will make it through, He reads for at least and hour a day but has been known to finish a book in a day. LOL I hope he can get through all the Newbery's in the next 4 years or so. I think he will do it. He is a young for 2nd grader this year.

 

Sonlight Grade 4-5 Readers, finishing up

Along Came a Dog

B is for Betsy

Betsy and Tracy Go Over the Big Hill

Children of Noisy Village

Encyclopedia Brown

Lumber Camp Library

Marco Polo

Misty of Chincoteague

Mustang Wild Spirit of the West

Socks

The Toothpaste Millionaire

 

And we are collecting Newbery titles, adding more bi-weekly to our collection.

Voyages of Dr Dolittle

The Dark Frigate

Smoky the Cowhorse

The Trumpeter of Krakow

Hitty, Her First Hundred Years

The Cat Who Went to Heaven

Young Fu of the Upper Yangtze

Invincible Louisa

Caddie Woodlawn

Roller Skates

Daniel Boone

Call it Courage

Johnny Tremain

Strawberry Girl

The Twenty-One Balloons

The Door in the Wall

Ginger Pye

The Wheel on the School House

A Wrinkle in Time

From the Mixed up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

Bridge to Terabithia

The Westing Game

Walk Two Moons

Holes

Buddy Not Buddy

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Subscribing- I see many titles here I need to add to DS's reading list this coming year. Thank you everyone for sharing.

 

I've seen a few mentions for Tuck Everlasting, and wanted to mention that if you haven't yet, Natalie Babbit's "The Search For Delicious" was a wonderful read- it was a surprise hit with DS, and I thought it was charming.

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I feel like I've already posted this list on one of your threads, so sorry if this is duplicative.

 

SECOND GRADE

 

 

  1. The Water Horse. Dick King-Smith. 1990. RL 5.2, GL 3-5
  2. Understood Betsy. Dorothy Canfield Fisher. 1916. RL 6.3, GL 3-5
  3. All-of-a-Kind Family. Sidney Taylor. 1951. RL 4.9, GL 3-5
  4. Charlotte's Web. E.B. White. 1952. RL 4.9, GL 3-5
  5. The Daydreamer. Ian McEwan. 1994. RL 5.8, GL 3-5
  6. [/url]Nim's Island. Wendy Orr. 2000. RL 4.8, GL 3-5
  7. The Door in the Wall. Marguerite di Angeli. 1949. RL 3.1, GL 3-5
  8. Where the Mountain Meets the Moon. Grace Lin. 2010. RL 5.4, GL 3-5
  9. A Lion to Guard Us. Clyde Robert Bulla. 1981. RL 3.9, GL 3-5
  10. Ramona Quimby, Age 8. Beverly Cleary. 1981. GL 3.5, RL 3-5
  11. Sarah, Plain and Tall. Patricia MacLachlan. 1985. RL 4.2, GL 3-5
  12. On the Banks of Plum Creek. Laura Ingalls Wilder. 1937. RL 5.2, GL 3-5
  13. In the Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson. Bette Bao Lord. 1984. RL 3.8, GL 3-5
  14. Paddle-to-the-Sea. Holling C. Holling. 1941. RL 4.5, GL 3-5
  15. Follow My Leader. James B. Garfield. 1957. RL 5.2, GL 3-5
  16. The Story of Doctor Doolittle. Hugh Lofting. 1920. RL 5.5, GL 3-5

 

 

THIRD GRADE

 

 

  1. Ella Enchanted. Gail Carson Levine. 1997. RL 5.1, GL 3-5
  2. The Tale of Despereaux. Kate DiCamillo. 2004. RL 4.8, GL 3-5
  3. The Penderwicks. Jeanne Birdsall. 2007. RL 4.8, GL 3-5
  4. Five Children and It. E. Nesbit. 1902. RL 5.6, GL 3-5
  5. Haroun and the Sea of Stories. Salman Rushdie. 1990. GL 4-7
  6. Shiloh. Phyllis Reynolds Naylor. 1991. RL 5.7, GL 3-5
  7. The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. C.S. Lewis. 1950. RL 6.1, GL 3-5
  8. My Side of the Mountain. Jean Craighead George. 1959. RL 6.7, GL 4-7
  9. From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler. E.L. Konigsburg. 1967. RL 6.9, GL 3-7
  10. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. J.K. Rowling. RL 5.3, GL 3-5
  11. The Reluctant Dragon. Kenneth Grahame. 1898. RL 4.4, GL 3-5
  12. The Phantom Tollbooth. Norton Juster. 1961. RL 5.3, GL 3-5
  13. Swallows and Amazons. Arthur Ransome. 1930.
  14. The Wolves of Willoughby Chase. Joan Aiken. 1963. RL 5.6, GL 4-7
  15. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Lewis Carroll. 1865.
  16. Homer Price. Robert McCloskey. 1943. RL 7.3, GL 4-6

 

This was my original planned reading list, anyway. Alex is currently reading Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, so Sorcerer's Stone doesn't really belong on the 3rd grade list anymore. I'm obviously going to have to do some updating as we go along.

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I know DS had more assigned reading in second grade, but right now, I can't find my list.

 

Third Grade

The Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins (first book only)

 

 

Really? Oh my goodness. I would be very interested to hear your decision process on this.

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My fiction list for my 2nd grader this fall. He just finished A Series of Unfortunate Events and The Borrowers, and has decided that he's done with series for a while. A few of these will be read alouds, but he'll read most on his own.

 

Because of Winn-Dixie

The Indian in the Cupboard

In the Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson

Peter Pan

Sarah, Plain and Tall

The Whipping Boy

Half Magic

Pippi Longstocking

Homer Price

The Invention of Hugo Cabret

James and the Giant Peach

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Twits

The BFG

The Chocolate Touch

Hotel For Dogs

How to Steal a Dog

Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing

The Cheshire Cheese Cat

The Railway Children

Bridge to Terabithia

Bud, Not Buddy

Shiloh

Old Yeller

Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer

Holes

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Well, here is my list of possibilities in no particular order. My ds LOVES to read, and when he is in a good book he will read for 4 hours a day. We will be studying Early Modern history this year so I have quite a few of those available. Just to be clear, ds will NOT read all of these, but he likes choice, so this is the list he will pick from. He has finished the first 3, and we just got out the next 2 Lewis books from the library. I have a separate set of books that my dh will read to him.

Ruth in NZ

Swallows and Amazons (plus sequels)

Caddie woodlawn

Out of the Silent Planet, CS Lewis

That Hideous Strength, CS Lewis

Perelandra, CS Lewis

Many Waters (4th book in L'Engle series)

Holes

King of the Wind

20,000 Leagues under the Sea

Ender's Game

Chitty Chitty Bang Bang - Ian Fleming

Hans Brinker or the Silver Skates - Mary Dodge

Lassie Come Home - Eric Knight

Watership down - Richard Adams

Happy Prince and other stories - Oscar Wilde

The Incredible Journey

Old Yeller

Invention of Hugo Cabret

Mrs Frisby and the Rats of Nim

Anne of Green Gables

Railway children

Island of the Blue Dolphins

The Reluctant Dragon, Grahame

The Neverending Story, Ende

Wolves of Willoughby Chase

Where the Red Fern Grows

The Second Mrs. Giaconda, E.L. Konigsburg

Bridge to Terabithia

Swiss Family Robinson

Peter Pan

Alice and Wonderland

Through the Looking Glass

 

 

Historical Fiction:

Moccasin trail

Om-kas-toe

Naya Nuki

Justin Morgan had a horse

Behind Rebel Lines

The Broken Blade

Red Sails to Capri

By the Great Horned Spoon

Edited by lewelma
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Well, none. Button, who's scheduled for a combined 2/3 grade this year, doesn't esp. love to read and I'm not planning on assigning him stuff until next year. He will be reading aloud to me at least once a week or so, the current plan is to have him do our poetry reading once a week.

 

He's getting Billy and Blaze for his birthday. Does that count???? :D (in case you have not seen this book: it has, like, 4 sentences per page)

 

Button reads perfectly well; he's actually shot ahead in reading this year. Just doesn't love it. Maybe I can use all these marvelous lists with Bot-bot when he hits 2nd. He's super bright but in a much more normal way!!!

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Is this for read aloud or independent?

 

My oldest was also a huge fan of Black Ships Before Troy. Have you checked out Sutcliff's versions of The Odyssey and The Aeneid?

 

We do a lot of read aloud from Lang's Fairy Books as well. The language can be archaic, but I have found it to be great in training their ears.

 

Anything by Roald Dahl is hilarious. Especially The B.F.G.

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Really? Oh my goodness. I would be very interested to hear your decision process on this.

 

Ds read the Harry Potter books when he was six (almost seven) and re-reads them every year. He's also read other "children in peril" books so I felt he could handle the first book.

 

I read The Hunger Games and I found it an interesting book, particularly the themes and characterization. I wouldn't call it great literature, but it was engaging. To me, Katniss is a an example of a flawed main character, struggling with her conscience and feeling conflict when helping others. Ds and I had a great discussion about it.

 

We briefly talked about the main city's culture; he mentioned how silly the Capital people were. I agreed; in summary, I said people sometimes do crazy things to look cool, but it doesn't make their actions any more right. I held off on delving deeper. Right now, I like to hand him a good book, send him off to read, and then have a brief discussion about it. Since ds is the type to read books again, I'm sure we'll discuss it more in the future.

 

I opted to hold off on the last two books. The violence is more graphic and the moral conflicts more mature. He'll probably read them sometime within the next year, but we'll see. I've yet to forbid a book, but i do advocate waiting. We often discuss my reasons for placing a hold on certain books. My parents let me read Stephen King when I was eight and as an adult, I think I was much too young. Ask me how I feel about clowns...

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Okay, so some of these choices have me :confused: My younger (he just turned 7 two weeks ago) has read some of these, like Charlotte's Web, all the Roald Dahl books, Pinnochio....but others on the list seem to be more appropriate for my rising 5th grader (and again, DS7 is a great reader, but just in terms of content.....)

 

Tuck Everlasting-I am assigning this for my rising 5th grader. I just finished it myself, and don't think my 7 year old would grasp the underlying themes of immortality, death and consequences.

 

Swallows and Amazons: I am assigning this one as well to my 5th grader, who is a strong, albeit slow, reader. Appropriate?

 

Bridge to Terabithia; I read this aloud to my boys this past year, and younger was devastated. Talked about the book for days, how upset he was, please "never ever read such a sad book again" etc. So for my younger, I think this book was the wrong choice at a young age. Older, OTOH, loved it.

 

Holes: older read this in 4th....seems really hard-core for a 2nd grader, the themes of punishment and the scenes of the children digging....Maybe I just have sensitive kids LOL.

 

I am absolutely not criticizing these choices! Just trying to understand why I see them as more appropriate for 4th or 5th, and others have chosen them for 2nd graders. Again, I am not talking about reading level. My 2nd grader is a great reader and it's not the actual story line he would have trouble with, but the themes.

 

Or maybe I am assigning "too easy" books for my 5th grader? (FWIW, his list is:

The Magician's Nephew

 

The Hero of Gilgamesh

 

Tuck Everlasting

 

Bronze Bow

 

Pushcart War

 

The Children's Homer

 

Swallows and Amazons

 

The Golden Golden by McGraw

 

Japanese Tales and Legends

 

India's Tales and Legends

 

Island of the Blue Dolphins

 

Eagle of the Ninth

 

Gentle Ben

 

House of Sixty Fathers

 

Wrinkle in Time by L'Engle

 

The Hobbit

Edited by Halcyon
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Okay, so some of these choices have me :confused: My younger (he just turned 7 two weeks ago) has read some of these, like Charlotte's Web, all the Roald Dahl books, Pinnochio....but others on the list seem to be more appropriate for my rising 5th grader (and again, DS7 is a great reader, but just in terms of content.....)

 

:iagree: with your assessment, but parents know their children best.

 

However, I, like you, am holding off on some of these deeper themed books until my dd is older. Does she have the ability to read them? Yes, but I want her to read them when she has a better understanding of the world and can really dig into the nuances and life lessons that appear in some of the children's lit you listed in your post.

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My son is really into deeper issues. He doesn't care at all for fluff. I agree he isn't the average, but a few of mine weren't. We read together as in I read the book immediately before giving it to him so we can discuss the issues or anything else he wishes. I do not believe my little sensitive daughter will be remotely ready for the same list at the same age. Each child is an individual so I teach them individually.

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Okay, so some of these choices have me :confused: My younger (he just turned 7 two weeks ago) has read some of these, like Charlotte's Web, all the Roald Dahl books, Pinnochio....but others on the list seem to be more appropriate for my rising 5th grader (and again, DS7 is a great reader, but just in terms of content.....)

 

Tuck Everlasting-I am assigning this for my rising 5th grader. I just finished it myself, and don't think my 7 year old would grasp the underlying themes of immortality, death and consequences.

 

Swallows and Amazons: I am assigning this one as well to my 5th grader, who is a strong, albeit slow, reader. Appropriate?

 

Bridge to Terabithia; I read this allowed to my boys this past year, and younger was devastated. Talked about the book for days, how upset he was, please "never ever read such a sad book again" etc. So for my younger, I think this book was the wrong choice at a young age. Older, OTOH, loved it.

 

Holes: older read this in 4th....seems really hard-core for a 2nd grader, the themes of punishment and the scenes of the children digging....Maybe I just have sensitive kids LOL.

 

I am absolutely not criticizing these choices! Just trying to understand why I see them as more appropriate for 4th or 5th, and others have chosen them for 2nd graders. Again, I am not talking about reading level. My 2nd grader is a great reader and it's not the actual story line he would have trouble with, but the themes.

 

I agree with you. There are a lot of books on various people's lists that are not technically difficult to read, but that I would hesitate to assign to a younger child. Bridge to Terabithia is a good example - not just because of the death at the end (I'm not spoiling it for anyone, am I?), and not because it has anything graphic or shocking that would be obviously inappropriate, but because of the themes throughout the book. I read that book when I was pretty young, and the class/culture issues went straight over my head even though I loved the parts about the imaginary world. There's so much tension in that book that I didn't get - I could tell that it was there, but not why, because I didn't have the cultural or emotional context. For that reason, it's on my list for fifth grade even though my child could certainly read it now and understand the plot.

 

Wind in the Willows is another one. There's so much going on there beyond the "dressed-up animals have adventures" aspect. Younger children can enjoy the animal story (although I think it does often drag for them, unless they skip the non-action parts), but for an actual literature study, I'd lean later.

 

I am struggling right now with whether I should let my 7yo continue the Harry Potter series past #4. It is very much not about her technical competence in reading. I am sure she could decode through book 7 and understand the story line. It is more thinking about the appropriateness of the themes for a very young child.

 

I'm currently leaning towards letting her finish if she wants to, because friends have convinced me that she will take away from the books what she is ready to take away, and that she'll probably skim past the parts that are emotionally too much for her. That's totally fine - she'll probably revisit the series several times as she gets older. But it's a big part of why I wouldn't assign the later books to her at this age.

 

But we each draw the line different places, right? The last time I posted my full list, a couple of people had issues with books I'd listed for 5th or 6th grade for the same "mature themes" reason.

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Honestly, my DD can't handle the content in most of these books. It is a real struggle to have an extremely sensitive child with a very advanced reading ability.

 

Most of her assigned readings are non-fiction. She handles it so much better, and I've decided it just isn't worth it to push it. We'll just find a way to read more original sources. :001_smile:

 

She is both extremely empathetic and self-aware. She truly feels the pain of the characters, and she knows that it will cause her heart to hurt too much. She loves biographies, but she often scans to figure out how the person dies before she reads the rest--she read the entire "Who Was.." series that way!

 

I'm not looking for advice to get over this because I know her, and things just happen for her when she is ready. I just wanted to share in case there were others like us!

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I am new. We started homeschooling in January. I just need to say thank you for bringing up that some of these choices are not quite mainstream for 3rd grade. I was beginning to worry. My ds is not an avid reader, we are just getting into chapter books so I am thinking more along the lines of Magic Tree House, Charlotte's Web, How to Eat Fried Worms with some other classics thrown in as well.( I found Treasure Island, The Jungle Book, Dr. Doolittle,The Wind in the Willows, Huck Finn and several other classics at Target written for a 3rd grade level, for $1 BTW) I love literature, and would like to pass along my love for it to my child, who is not so much entralled,lol. But we are working on it.

Many of those listed will be his independent reading. Together we will read Beowulf and some other titles listed in TWTM that go along with the history. He really loved our read-alouds last year, especially The Odysssey, so that gives me hope :001_smile:

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Honestly, my DD can't handle the content in most of these books. It is a real struggle to have an extremely sensitive child with a very advanced reading ability.

 

Most of her assigned readings are non-fiction. She handles it so much better, and I've decided it just isn't worth it to push it. We'll just find a way to read more original sources. :001_smile:

 

She is both extremely empathetic and self-aware. She truly feels the pain of the characters, and she knows that it will cause her heart to hurt too much. She loves biographies, but she often scans to figure out how the person dies before she reads the rest--she read the entire "Who Was.." series that way!

 

I'm not looking for advice to get over this because I know her, and things just happen for her when she is ready. I just wanted to share in case there were others like us!

 

:iagree::iagree: This is my younger. And you're right, it IS a struggle finding appropriate material. Charlotte's Web just about broke his heart. Bridge to Terabithia was absolutely not appropriate for him. (Oh, the tears!) He likes humorous books, and enjoys historical books and biographies. I would love to hear your suggestions on that front. Thanks.

 

Rivka-I have your list and use it a lot :) I agree with your assessment, particularly about Wind in the Willows. I am thinking of having my older read it this year (5th). Wrinkle in Time is another--heavy themes there, and I think 5th grade is right for my kids.

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:001_huh:

I agree with you. There are a lot of books on various people's lists that are not technically difficult to read, but that I would hesitate to assign to a younger child. Bridge to Terabithia is a good example - not just because of the death at the end (I'm not spoiling it for anyone, am I?), and not because it has anything graphic or shocking that would be obviously inappropriate, but because of the themes throughout the book. I read that book when I was pretty young, and the class/culture issues went straight over my head even though I loved the parts about the imaginary world. There's so much tension in that book that I didn't get - I could tell that it was there, but not why, because I didn't have the cultural or emotional context. For that reason, it's on my list for fifth grade even though my child could certainly read it now and understand the plot.

 

Wind in the Willows is another one. There's so much going on there beyond the "dressed-up animals have adventures" aspect. Younger children can enjoy the animal story (although I think it does often drag for them, unless they skip the non-action parts), but for an actual literature study, I'd lean later.

 

I am struggling right now with whether I should let my 7yo continue the Harry Potter series past #4. It is very much not about her technical competence in reading. I am sure she could decode through book 7 and understand the story line. It is more thinking about the appropriateness of the themes for a very young child.

 

I'm currently leaning towards letting her finish if she wants to, because friends have convinced me that she will take away from the books what she is ready to take away, and that she'll probably skim past the parts that are emotionally too much for her. That's totally fine - she'll probably revisit the series several times as she gets older. But it's a big part of why I wouldn't assign the later books to her at this age.

 

But we each draw the line different places, right? The last time I posted my full list, a couple of people had issues with books I'd listed for 5th or 6th grade for the same "mature themes" reason.

 

 

:iagree:With the exception of A Wrinkle in Time (because I have a kid very interested in the space/time continuum), all of those will wait at our house too. We've also struggled with the Harry Potter issue. I've let ds read the first 2, but then I made him stop because personally that's where I felt it started to get darker. It does get tough though when they have read most of what's available for the younger crowd and want more, so I think the temptation is there to just keep moving on, even though some of the topics are more mature.

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I think it just depends on the child. It's hard to find appropriate books for a nine-year old whose tester said he can read, understand, and summarize college freshmen text. When I questioned the results, the tester emphasized that normally she wouldn't say such a thing, but he really can read at that level. Does that mean I make him read books at his tested level? No. I know he isn't mature enough to handle daily reading at that level. But he's already read many of the advanced books listed for his grade. Chances are, he read them years ago.

 

Right now, on top of his 1-2 weekly book assignments, he easily reads a stack of other books, even with daily outside playtime lasting hours. He can't go to sleep at night without reading a book. He selects books based on thickness, because "they last longer." Without prompting, he read almost the entire catalog of Oxford Children's Classics and asked for more. I scour the internet searching for books trying to feed the monster.

 

All I have left is to find the books that are more mature, but still not too mature. My ds is an old soul. When he was younger, I hesitated to let him read the last few books of Harry Potter, but he really wanted to finish, even after I warned about the darker elements. However, once he finished, we had an amazing conversation about inner strength, friendship, and love. He used simplistic language, but I could see he had a good grasp of the deeper themes. This is something we do for all his assigned reading.

 

I know ds is outside the norm. Dh and I have always get disbelief on our son's grasp of language until people talk to him. We get it from family, parents, and teachers; I can understand seeing it here. But the OP requested an advanced reading list and this is what works for my son. I know I struggle to find books, so I hoped my list could help someone in a similar situation.

 

I don't know if my younger child will be able to handle emotionally many of the tougher books at an equivalent age, let alone understand the themes. As she increases her reading ability, I plan on tailoring her reading program to her level.

 

That's what's great about homeschooling.

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Okay, so some of these choices have me :confused: My younger (he just turned 7 two weeks ago) has read some of these, like Charlotte's Web, all the Roald Dahl books, Pinnochio....but others on the list seem to be more appropriate for my rising 5th grader (and again, DS7 is a great reader, but just in terms of content.....)

 

:iagree: Another voice in agreement.

 

Some of them are on the line - I think someone questioned Holes, for example, my rising 3rd graders just listened to it as an audiobook last week and really liked it. One of them especially adored all the plot connections between the stories - he's really good at picking up on threads like those and this book just delighted him in that sense. It has such a tidy plot so I knew they would like it. But the punishment themes are tough - and some of the racial issues might be difficult to talk about.

 

For me, there's a difference between giving a child a book and allowing them to read a book. For me, I suggest and assign my children books I think they'll enjoy for fun and books I think are right for their reading and emotional level. I save books I think will speak to emotions and things later on so they can appreciate them more fully, even if they could read them. But I wouldn't stop them from reading them if they saw it in the library or were given it by a friend. And that goes for fun reads (I haven't given them Origami Yoda, for example, which is very easy, but I think they'll enjoy even more in a couple of years) and literary reading.

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I actually trust them to self select to some extent. I grew up with a huge library at home and I basically pulled books off the bookshelves and read what I found interesting. The reason I can't completely let go is I don't have that type of library here so I have to order books in batches. Now that the collection is growing, I am starting to see my son (7 year old) pick and put down books. He went nuts on Dr. Dolittle and Harry Potter books, but read about a chapter on Narnia and put it back down. So the goal is to take all those lists you all put together and buy them all to staff the shelves and let him roam. I think books that are at his maturity level he will find interesting, others he will simply put away for later. I do staff the shelves with good reading and I require 30 minutes minimum a day (he usually ends up reading much more though).

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These are my lists for my 8yo 3rd grader. He can read at an advanced level, but also enjoys "lighter fare", so I try to vary the difficulty of his options as much as possible. Read-alouds are done together; he reads a few pages, then I read a few, and so on.

 

Read-alouds (audiobooks with an *):

 

A Wrinkle in Time

A Wind in the Door

A Swiftly Tilting Planet

Many Waters

The Railway Children

The Mouse and the Motorcycle

The Princess and the Goblin

The Borrowers

The Dark is Rising sequence

The Cricket in Times Square

Redwall

The Narnia series (some *)

Peter Pan*

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland*

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz*

A Little Princess*

The Secret Garden*

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow*

 

School-related reading:

Sarah Plain and Tall

Jean Fritz books

Cornerstones of Freedom books (vintage)

Ben and Me

In Their Own Words: Benjamin Franklin

Annie Henry and the Redcoats

My Brother Sam is Dead

The Courage of Sarah Noble

The Cabin Faced West

Little House in the Big Woods

Farmer Boy

 

Independent Reading:

Frindle

The School Story

Clementine

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

The Witches

James and the Giant Peach

Ralph S. Mouse

Wayside School is Falling Down

Wayside School Gets a Little Stranger

Misty of Chincoteague

King of the Wind

The Indian in the Cupboard

Harry Potter and the Sorceror's Stone

misc. other books from our shelves

 

The only books on these lists that are "required" in any way are the school-related reading, and I won't force him to read them. If he can give me a good reason why he doesn't want to finish one, I'm fine with that. I occassionally refuse to finish a book myself, so I can't very well deny him the same choice without being a hypocrite.

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Books help my ds deal with his own emotions. He is an empath and "sees" so much more that he really should at this age. There is just so much around him that he feels/senses but then cannot process (I'm talking news, adult discussions he overhears, even advertising). I have found that books with mature content (like Bridge to Teribithia) are an excellent, safe way to process the hurts of this world for a boy who is already aware of them.

 

As for books like Wind in the Willows, yes, he would see the literary value better as an older child. But here is a book whose content is perfectly appropriate for my 3rd grader and will help him develop his reading skills. I NEED books like this for him. There are so many many literary books out there that he can read when he is older, but so very few for a 3rd grader. When he is older, he can either read Wind in the Willows again from a literary analysis point of view, or we can just analyze other Great Books.

 

As for mainstream 3rd grade, no, my child is not. And I am very sorry to have upset anyone. I just saw the word "advanced" in the title, and thought it applied to my little boy. Perhaps he needs a different label. He is just the cutest thing, and loves to read, and I try to help him in any way I can.

 

Ruth in NZ

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Okay, so some of these choices have me :confused: My younger (he just turned 7 two weeks ago) has read some of these, like Charlotte's Web, all the Roald Dahl books, Pinnochio....but others on the list seem to be more appropriate for my rising 5th grader (and again, DS7 is a great reader, but just in terms of content.....)

 

...

 

Bridge to Terabithia; I read this aloud to my boys this past year, and younger was devastated. Talked about the book for days, how upset he was, please "never ever read such a sad book again" etc. So for my younger, I think this book was the wrong choice at a young age. Older, OTOH, loved it.

 

Holes: older read this in 4th....seems really hard-core for a 2nd grader, the themes of punishment and the scenes of the children digging....Maybe I just have sensitive kids LOL.

These two are both on my 2nd grader's list, and I've read both of them. They're actually recommendations from my stepchildren, who read them around 3rd grade. I can definitely see how they would be too much for some 7 year olds, but Nathan isn't too sensitive about what he reads. He likes to talk about books he's reading to make sure he's understanding everything, so I'm sure I'll know if there's something upsetting or confusing to him.

 

We're also into re-reading books, so I'm not too worried about missing some of the themes. Even if we never come back to them, there are so many good books to read later on that I'm not sure there's a need to "save" these books for later.

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Books help my ds deal with his own emotions. He is an empath and "sees" so more that he really should at this age. There is just so much around him that he feels/senses but then cannot process (I'm talking news, adult discussions he overhears, even advertising). I have found that books with mature content (like Bridge to Teribithia) are an excellent, safe way to process the hurts of this world for a boy who is already aware of them.

 

As for books like Wind in the Willows, yes, he would see the literary value better as an older child. But here is a book whose content is perfectly appropriate for my 3rd grader and will help him develop his reading skills. I NEED books like this for him. There are so many many literary books out there that he can read when he is older, but so very few for a 3rd grader. When he is older, he can either read Wind in the Willows again from a literary analysis point of view, or we can just analyze other Great Books.

 

As for mainstream 3rd grade, no, my child is not. And I am very sorry to have upset anyone. I just saw the word "advanced" in the title, and thought it applied to my little boy. Perhaps he needs a different label. He is just the cutest thing, and loves to read, and I try to help him in any way I can.

 

Ruth in NZ

 

I agree.

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Books help my ds deal with his own emotions. He is an empath and "sees" so much more that he really should at this age. There is just so much around him that he feels/senses but then cannot process (I'm talking news, adult discussions he overhears, even advertising). I have found that books with mature content (like Bridge to Teribithia) are an excellent, safe way to process the hurts of this world for a boy who is already aware of them.

 

As for books like Wind in the Willows, yes, he would see the literary value better as an older child. But here is a book whose content is perfectly appropriate for my 3rd grader and will help him develop his reading skills. I NEED books like this for him. There are so many many literary books out there that he can read when he is older, but so very few for a 3rd grader. When he is older, he can either read Wind in the Willows again from a literary analysis point of view, or we can just analyze other Great Books.

 

As for mainstream 3rd grade, no, my child is not. And I am very sorry to have upset anyone. I just saw the word "advanced" in the title, and thought it applied to my little boy. Perhaps he needs a different label. He is just the cutest thing, and loves to read, and I try to help him in any way I can.

 

Ruth in NZ

 

I'm almost glad I didn't put down the books that DD has already read and would like to read again or would like to read. I had a feeling that some choices would be questioned given that there is no context in which these books are listed. It's tedious to have to explain ourselves and our kids.

 

DD did read Wind in the Willows, which is perfect for her at this age (e.g. friendship, adventure, sentence structure), and I'm sure she will read it again in 8th grade or as an adult, and understand the adult themes at that point. For example, Where the Red Fern Grows is probably more appropriate for a slightly older child, but when DD read it at 6, she felt such an emotional connection to the characters that she read it 10 times during the month. DH believed it was the right time for her. It was difficult for her the first time, reading what the ending was, but we talked about it, and this book has made a huge impression on her.

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Lewelma, I don't think you upset anyone, certainly not me. I find it very interesting to see how very differently children progress, and how some children are emotionally ready for books others are not. I think it's wonderful that you are receptive to your child's needs, and build a book list accordingly. My child might not be able to read some of the books listed, from an emotional maturity perspective, but then again, he's SUPER sensitive and doesn't seem able to filter what he reads or what he sees around him. Nor does he seem to be able to "talk it out" with me--it's almost as though he takes in the book in every cell of his body and can't "shake" it. It reminds me of how I feel when I watch a really scary movie--I just can't get it out of my head, feel scared when alone in bed, etc....:tongue_smilie:

 

I absolutely appreciate your sharing. I am sorry if my post indicated otherwise--I am always curious and surprised at how very different children can be.

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These are from my lists on my blog...I'll put the ones my younger dd has read in blue...she's a rising 4th grader so these are books she read in 3rd grade...

ETA: As you can see...she's all over the place...lol

 

This is my 3rd grade list:

 

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow:

Paul Revere's Ride by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (illustrated by Ted Rand)

*The Song of Hiawatha by Henry W. Longfellow

*This is the long version if you're feeling ambitious or your student enjoys it. Otherwise the picture book version with illustrations by Susan Jeffers might suffice.

The Village Blacksmith by H.W. Longfellow

 

 

Poetry:

A Child's Garden of Verses by Robert Louis Stevenson

 

Tales:

American Tall Tales by Adrien Stoutenburg

Old Peter's Russian Tales by Arthur Ransome

 

Fairy Tales:

Fairy Tales by the Brothers Grimm Some

 

Mythology:

Book of Greek Myths by Ingri and Parin D'Aulaire Now

Favorite Norse Myths by Mary Pope Osborne

 

Shakespeare:

William Shakespeare's The Tempest by Bruce Coville

 

 

 

Literature:

 

Heidi by Joanna Spyri

The Hundred Dresses by Eleanor Estes

The Heroes by Charles Kingsley Next

The Moffats by Eleanor Estes

Ordinary Princess by Mary Margaret Kaye

Homer Price by Robert McCloskey

Farmer Boy by Laura Ingalls Wilder

 

On the Banks of Plum Creek by Laura I. Wilder

Prince Caspian by C.S.Lewis

Voyage of the Dawn Treader by C.S. Lewis

Sarah, Plain and Tall by Patricia Maclachlan

Skylark by Patricia Maclachlan

Ginger Pye by Eleanor Estes

Pinky Pye by Eleanor Estes

The Voyages of Doctor Dolittle by Hugh Loftin

The Doll People by Ann Martin and Laura Godwin

The Meanest Doll in the World by Ann Martin and Laura Godwin

The Family Under the Bridge by Natalie S. Carlson

The King of Ireland's Son by Padraic Colum Now

 

4th Grade List:

Poetry For Young People: Lewis Carroll edited by Edward Mendelson

A Visit to William Blake's Inn: Poems for Innocent and Experienced Travelers by Nancy Willard

Poetry For Young People: William Blake edited by John Maynard

Christina Rossetti selections

 

Author Study:

Pebble in a Pool: The Widening Circle of Dorothy Canfield Fisher's Life by Elizabeth Yates

 

Tales:

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving and illustrated by Will Moses

Rip Van Winkle by Washington Irving and illustrated by Will Moses

 

Mythology:

The Chinese Wonder Book: A Classic Collection of Chinese Tales by Norman Hinsdale Pitman

 

 

Shakespeare:

Twelfth Night by Bruce Coville

A Midsummer Nights Dream by Bruce Coville

 

 

 

 

The Little White Horse by Elizabeth Goudge (Book Notes) Now

The Little Lame Prince by Dinah Maria Mulock (Craik)

The Saturdays by Elizabeth Enright

Otto of the Silver Hand by Howard Pyle

The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll

Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH by Robert C. O'Brien

The Wheel on the School by Meindert Dejong

The Big Wave by Pearl S. Buck

Understood Betsy by Dorothy Canfield Fisher

 

Optional:

Amos Fortune, Free Man by Elizabeth Yates

The Treasure Seekers by Edith Nesbit

Jason and the Golden Fleece by Padraic Colum

The Wouldbegoods by Edith Nesbit

Linnets and Valerians by Elizabeth Goudge

Caddie Woodlawn by Carol Ryrie Brink

Ballet Shoes by Noel Streatfeild

Bambi by Felix Salten

Book of Pirates by Howard Pyle

The Wonder Clock by Howard Pyle

The Penderwicks by Jeanne Birdsall

The Penderwicks on Gardam Street by Jeanne Birdsall

The Penderwicks at Point Mouette by Jeanne Birdsall

The Whipping Boy by Sid Fleischman

The Princess and the Curdie by George MacDonald

Tree of Freedom by Rebecca Caudill

Gone-Away Lake by Elizabeth Enright

The Silver Chair by C.S. Lewis

The Magician's Nephew by C.S. Lewis

The Horse and His Boy by C.S. Lewis

The Last Battle by C.S. Lewis

By the Shores of Silver Lake by L.I. Wilder

Norse Stories: Retold From the Eddas by Hamilton Wright Mabie

The Cat Who Went to Heaven by Elizabeth Coatsworth

 

5th Grade:

 

Poetry for Young People: Walt Whitman edited by Jonathan Levin

Poetry for Young People: William Wordsworth edited by

Poetry for Young People: Rudyard Kipling edited by

Poetry for Young People: American Poetry edited by John Hollander

 

Tales:

The Arabian Nights Entertainment by Andrew Lang

The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood by Howard Pyle or Robin Hood by Roger L. Green

 

Mythology:

Nordic Gods and Heroes by Padraic Colum

or Northern Legends by Oliva Coolidge

 

Shakespeare:

Choose 2:

More books by Bruce Coville such as Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet and The Winter's Tale.

 

Author Study:

Charles Dickens: The Man Who Had Great Expectations by Diane Stanley

 

Literature:

Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome (Book Notes)

The Phantom Tollbooth by Norman Jester

The Good Master by Kate Seredy

Black Beauty by Anna Sewell

At the Back of the North Wind by George MacDonald

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

Kensuke's Kingdom by Michael Morpurgo

Call it Courage by Armstrong Sperry

The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald

The Complete Fairy Tales by George MacDonald Next

 

Choose at least one by Frances Hodgson Burnett:

The Secret Garden or Little Lord Fauntleroy or A Little Princess

 

Faerie Gold: Treasures From the Land of Enchantmentby Hunsicker and Lindskoog

*Includes stories by authors such as MacDonald, Nesbit, Alcott, Katherine Pyle, Lang, Rossetti and Hans Christian Anderson

Optional: Faerie Gold: A Guide for Teachers and Students by Hunsicker

*We have the guide and I like it a lot. I think it gives many great extension ideas. This would be one book that could be used to begin studying books more intently. The guide includes introducing such concepts as viewpoint, plot, personification, setting and more. There are vocabulary words and other great activity ideas.

 

Optional:

The Heroes of Asgard by A&E Keary

The Enchanted Castle by Edith Nesbit

From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E. L. Konisburg

The Second Mrs. Giaconda by E. L. Konisburg

Rebecca of Sunnyfield Farm by Kate Douglas Smith Wiggin

Pollyanna by Eleanor H. Porter

Just David by Eleanor H. Porter

Thimble Summer by Elizabeth Enright

Eight Cousins by Louisa May Alcott Family Read-Aloud

The Water Babies by Charles Kingsley

Penrod by Booth Tarkington

The King of the Golden River by John Ruskin

King of the Wind by Marguerite Henry

Lad: A Dog by Albert Payson Terhune

Sing Down the Moon by Scott O'Dell

Little Town on the Prairie by L.I. Wilder

The Long Winter by L.I. Wilder

These Happy Golden Years by L.I. Wilder

The First Four Years by L.I. Wilder

The Rat Catcher's Son and Other Stories by Carolyn London

Born in the Year of Courage by Emily Crofford

Su-Mei's Golden Year by Margueritte Harmon Bro

"Tree and Leaf" by J.R.R. Tolkien Next (She's read The Hobbit and LOTR)

Edited by Kfamily
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For me, there's a difference between giving a child a book and allowing them to read a book. For me, I suggest and assign my children books I think they'll enjoy for fun and books I think are right for their reading and emotional level. I save books I think will speak to emotions and things later on so they can appreciate them more fully, even if they could read them. But I wouldn't stop them from reading them if they saw it in the library or were given it by a friend.

 

I don't think the parents who posted on this thread approach their selection process any differently.

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Lewelma, I don't think you upset anyone, certainly not me. I find it very interesting to see how very differently children progress, and how some children are emotionally ready for books others are not. I think it's wonderful that you are receptive to your child's needs, and build a book list accordingly. My child might not be able to read some of the books listed, from an emotional maturity perspective, but then again, he's SUPER sensitive and doesn't seem able to filter what he reads or what he sees around him. Nor does he seem to be able to "talk it out" with me--it's almost as though he takes in the book in every cell of his body and can't "shake" it. It reminds me of how I feel when I watch a really scary movie--I just can't get it out of my head, feel scared when alone in bed, etc....:tongue_smilie:

 

I absolutely appreciate your sharing. I am sorry if my post indicated otherwise--I am always curious and surprised at how very different children can be.

 

Thanks for this.

 

Ruth

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