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I saw the Disney movie "earth" today...warning!


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I would not have taken my kids had a known what it would be like. There is amazing scenery and beautiful footage of exotic animals. But, as James Earl Jones said in the movie, "The urban eye is not accustomed to seeing the natural cycle of life." In other words, you will see animals under attack. You will see animals die. My kids were very sad. I, too, was sad. And, we didn't learn as much as we had hoped.

 

On a positive note...Discovery Channel Store is offering a GREAT package. The entire Planet Earth and Blue Planet DVD series 70% off today only! It is an Earth Day deal. Enter promo code EARTHEML. Mine will be here in 5-7 days!

 

Happy Earth Day!

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I would not have taken my kids had a known what it would be like. There is amazing scenery and beautiful footage of exotic animals. But, as James Earl Jones said in the movie, "The urban eye is not accustomed to seeing the natural cycle of life." In other words, you will see animals under attack. You will see animals die. My kids were very sad. I, too, was sad. And, we didn't learn as much as we had hoped.

 

On a positive note...Discovery Channel Store is offering a GREAT package. The entire Planet Earth and Blue Planet DVD series 70% off today only! It is an Earth Day deal. Enter promo code EARTHEML. Mine will be here in 5-7 days!

 

Happy Earth Day!

 

Oh wow! I'm glad you said that because I was looking forward to that coming out and seeing it with my dd. The killing would really affect her. Thank you so much for the heads up. :)

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Ugg, thanks for the warning. I can't take watching it myself!!! I am glad that I didn't take the kiddos.

 

I can watch all that on Discovery for free.

 

70% off now that's a good deal! Thanks!!

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A footnote...there is no blood or guts. There are just sad endings. For example...the polar bear dad starves to death. A baby caribou gets separated from it's mom and is chased by a wolf. All the kids in the theater were cheering for the caribou to run away. He ran, then he tripped. The wolf won.

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On a positive note...Discovery Channel Store is offering a GREAT package. The entire Planet Earth and Blue Planet DVD series 70% off today only! It is an Earth Day deal. Enter promo code EARTHEML. Mine will be here in 5-7 days!

 

 

Amazon.com has a Gold Box deal today on the same package (BBC version,) but it also includes the Life of Mammals series and the Life of Birds series, all for 69.99. If you want the Mammals and Birds DVDs, I think the Amazon deal is better. Otherwise, the Discovery Store deal is excellent!

 

Cat

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Amazon.com has a Gold Box deal today on the same package (BBC version,) but it also includes the Life of Mammals series and the Life of Birds series, all for 69.99. If you want the Mammals and Birds DVDs, I think the Amazon deal is better. Otherwise, the Discovery Store deal is excellent!

 

Cat

 

Ack I saw this AFTER I placed my order!:tongue_smilie:

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Ack I saw this AFTER I placed my order!:tongue_smilie:

 

You can probably still call and cancel your first order if you call Discovery Store. If your first order was from Amazon, you can go to your account and cancel online.

 

It looks like both Amazon and Discovery Store still have the DVDs in stock. If you're going to order from Amazon, get the item in your cart now, because even if it sells out, they've often allowed a bunch to accommodate those who already have it in their carts.

 

Let us know which set you get!

 

Cat

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Truly, I don't mean to be an argumentative stinker, but at what age do you think children SHOULD start learning about the true cycle of life? Farm kids have witnessed this forever. My parents never batted an eye while I watched Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom when I was a youngster (early 70's -- I'm 40 now -- you can do the math. I was pretty little). There were some pretty graphic scenes on that show.

 

I don't know that it is necessarily a bad thing for them to see this. Of course, every parent knows what is best for their own children, but I do think many parents in 2009 shelter our children from some things that they should see, and allow them to see things that they shouldn't.

 

Just my two cents... :) Please no hard feelings!!!

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Truly, I don't mean to be an argumentative stinker, but at what age do you think children SHOULD start learning about the true cycle of life?

 

No hard feelings at all -- actually, I agree with you!

 

I only asked because I have seen a few nature-type documentaries on TV that have seemed to dwell on almost nothing but the mating and killing, and it seemed almost voyeuristic, which I found kind of creepy.

 

I don't mind seeing some of the mating stuff; I just don't like it when the actual mating process* is shown for so long that I feel like I've accidentally clicked on the Lion Porn Channel. I really don't need to know if the lions are going to have a cigarette afterwards.

 

Cat

 

*"actual mating process" -- how's that for Politically Correct? ;)

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Did it show mating too??? :blushing: THAT would lead to a conversation that I don't think the girls are quite ready for! (We have had to touch on death of animals, though....my 5yo DD wants a pet SOOO badly, but we just aren't in a position right now to have a pet. So she took a Gladware outside, found a moth, caught it, named it (I can't remember the name but it was something super duper sweet), and then witnessed it die. She was surprisingly sad, but now she has an understanding that she didn't have before, and I was able to share our worldview on animals versus humans. (Not that animals are devalued whatsover, but that they are different than us...)

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I saw it with my 3 year old and (super-super-super-sensitive) 8 year old. Both really enjoyed it. There were more funny and heartwarming moments than sad, IMO.

 

My 8 year old is very sensitive. He hasn't been able to make it through 99.98% of what most kids the same age as his 3 year old sister have sat through and watched ad nauseum. He's sensitive to the sounds, the music, the storylines - EVERYTHING. He is finally to the point where he "gets" the 'circle of life' and can sit through the chase (but it still bothers him and he often averts his eyes). This child is scared by Polar Express, Mulan, Cars, and Shrek (to name a few) and hasn't made it fifteen minutes into any of them.

 

But he said he wanted to see this movie, so as usual I indulged his request and figured we'd leave our usual ten minutes in to the film. I invited their dad to join us, so that if one kid needed to leave ... the other could finish the film. My daughter isn't sensitive, but she is young and I wondered if the movie might be too graphic for her.

 

My son loved it. He was saddened at some of the storylines (mentioned in a PP), but it was ungraphic enough that my 3 year old didn't realize what was about to be the end result. She thought they were racing around and that there was a clear winner and loser; the polar bear dad, she thought he went to sleep (and FINALLY a Disney movie where it's not the mom that gets offed!). An older kid could read between the lines, but IMO every scene was totally appropriate for a G-rated movie. And I say this as someone who tends to find movie ratings overly liberal, especially some of the G-ratings and especially Disney films.

 

Both kids were captivated. If some of you have reservations, I'd definitely try to see it for yourself and judge accordingly for your own family. I found the movie to be quite tastefully done, and beautifully balanced - a gentle yet realistic introduction perfectly suited to the aforementioned urban family.

Edited by eternalknot
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Truly, I don't mean to be an argumentative stinker, but at what age do you think children SHOULD start learning about the true cycle of life? Farm kids have witnessed this forever. My parents never batted an eye while I watched Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom when I was a youngster (early 70's -- I'm 40 now -- you can do the math. I was pretty little). There were some pretty graphic scenes on that show.

 

I don't know that it is necessarily a bad thing for them to see this. Of course, every parent knows what is best for their own children, but I do think many parents in 2009 shelter our children from some things that they should see, and allow them to see things that they shouldn't.

 

Just my two cents... :) Please no hard feelings!!!

 

"Where's Papa going with that ax?" Fern said to her mother...

 

Charlotte's Web, 1952

 

I have a sensitive one, though so I appreciate the heads up.

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No hard feelings at all -- actually, I agree with you!

 

I only asked because I have seen a few nature-type documentaries on TV that have seemed to dwell on almost nothing but the mating and killing, and it seemed almost voyeuristic, which I found kind of creepy.

 

I don't mind seeing some of the mating stuff; I just don't like it when the actual mating process* is shown for so long that I feel like I've accidentally clicked on the Lion Porn Channel. I really don't need to know if the lions are going to have a cigarette afterwards.

 

Cat

 

*"actual mating process" -- how's that for Politically Correct? ;)

 

Catwoman writing about Lion Porn!!! That is funny! Get it? CATwoman/Lion.

 

:D

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That is an awesome deal on the dvds, we have a set we borrowed from my dad and they are awesome. The kids have been hooked on all the bbc dvds like those(blue planet, earth the biography, planet earth, voyage to the planets etc). I didn't even realize that disney put one out, I think mine would enjoy it, but they have seen images of animals being attacked and dieing both IRL and on other programs.

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No hard feelings at all -- actually, I agree with you!

 

I only asked because I have seen a few nature-type documentaries on TV that have seemed to dwell on almost nothing but the mating and killing, and it seemed almost voyeuristic, which I found kind of creepy.

 

I don't mind seeing some of the mating stuff; I just don't like it when the actual mating process* is shown for so long that I feel like I've accidentally clicked on the Lion Porn Channel. I really don't need to know if the lions are going to have a cigarette afterwards.

 

Cat

 

*"actual mating process" -- how's that for Politically Correct? ;)

 

Oh, my! :lol: We've witnessed some interesting scenes at the zoo lately! First, ds and I saw two huge tortoises who "needed some privacy" (as I tried delicately to put it), then some babboons were putting on quite a racy show. :blink: Ds and I were at the zoo last week, and while observing the porcupines (so cute!), he wondered how THEY... :001_huh:

 

Wendi

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After your post I was very concerned, went and read online reviews, called my dh, and talked to my boys (ages 5 and 7). I said, "It may have sad parts, when hunting animals eat other animals, are you OK with that?" They wanted to go.

 

Well, I'm sure glad we did! I thought it was wonderful. After your review I was expecting a "nature red in tooth and claw" sort of thing... not like that at all! The amount of time spent on hunting was less than you might think, considering that all animals spend their waking hours in search of food.

 

SPOILERS::: It was 30 minutes at least before there was any hunting--a wolf who catches a caribou, he chases, grabs it's tail, and it sits down. They cut the camera. No blood, no gore. The most 'disturbing' sort of shot was the lions who were catching an elephant, again no blood (and it's shot with a night scope) but they do climb up on it's back, which I guess could be kind of scary for some children. In the two hours there are about five or six hunting scenes (unless you count krill and birds eating insects or fishing), plus a young elephant that wanders out the wrong way (assumedly to die later in the desert) and a male polar bear who doesn't find enough prey because of receding ice and fruitlessly tries to catch a walrus before laying down on the beach, to die later off screen from hunger.

 

Anyhow, my boys thought it was great, didn't make them sad at all, they want to get it on DVD.

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I'm really surprised and confused by your plug for Planet Earth over "earth"? Quite a bit of the footage from "earth" was taken from the Planet Earth series, including much of the hunting footage, although they cut before the more gruesome parts in "earth" -- parts which are included (and more explicit) in Planet Earth.

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My oldest kid loves insects. The sort of fascination that makes a college intro text to insects a cherished birthday gift. So one day I was under the weather and we were watching Life in the Undergrowth (a Blue Planet type series about insects and other crawlies).

 

I hadn't realized that this particular disk was almost entirely about insect, snail and arthropod reproduction. Oh my, the snails. Worthy of Cirque de Soleil. So my kid looks over at me with a mix of curiosity and horror and asks if dh and I use a similar technique.

 

Uh, no. I'm still not totally sure if he was yanking my chain or worried. Got to love those almost teenagers.

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Truly, I don't mean to be an argumentative stinker, but at what age do you think children SHOULD start learning about the true cycle of life? Farm kids have witnessed this forever. My parents never batted an eye while I watched Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom when I was a youngster (early 70's -- I'm 40 now -- you can do the math. I was pretty little). There were some pretty graphic scenes on that show.

 

I don't know that it is necessarily a bad thing for them to see this. Of course, every parent knows what is best for their own children, but I do think many parents in 2009 shelter our children from some things that they should see, and allow them to see things that they shouldn't.

 

Just my two cents... :) Please no hard feelings!!!

 

Well, I'm not one to hide things from my children but I do try to consider how they will react. And I'm only willing to spend big bucks at a theatre for something my kids will enjoy. I won't be taking them to see this, however I will read more about it and may buy it when it comes out on DVD. Something watched at home, in the familiar comfort, with the lights on, and shown on a small screen comes across very differently than watching something in a large dark room, with the images bigger than life and the volume blaring out of the wall at you. I think the movies at the theatres get a little intense sometimes and that's why I'm thankful for the warning. I saw the preview and didn't think it would be that bad, but now I'll wait.

 

My kids have all seen the Harry Potter movies, but I'll only take my oldest (12) to see the new one at the movies. My other two (8 and 5) will have to wait for it to come out on DVD. At the theatre they would have nightmares, at home they won't.

Hope this helps you understand, at least my opinion.

Melissa

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After your post I was very concerned, went and read online reviews, called my dh, and talked to my boys (ages 5 and 7). I said, "It may have sad parts, when hunting animals eat other animals, are you OK with that?" They wanted to go.

 

Well, I'm sure glad we did! I thought it was wonderful. After your review I was expecting a "nature red in tooth and claw" sort of thing... not like that at all! The amount of time spent on hunting was less than you might think, considering that all animals spend their waking hours in search of food.

 

SPOILERS::: It was 30 minutes at least before there was any hunting--a wolf who catches a caribou, he chases, grabs it's tail, and it sits down. They cut the camera. No blood, no gore. The most 'disturbing' sort of shot was the lions who were catching an elephant, again no blood (and it's shot with a night scope) but they do climb up on it's back, which I guess could be kind of scary for some children. In the two hours there are about five or six hunting scenes (unless you count krill and birds eating insects or fishing), plus a young elephant that wanders out the wrong way (assumedly to die later in the desert) and a male polar bear who doesn't find enough prey because of receding ice and fruitlessly tries to catch a walrus before laying down on the beach, to die later off screen from hunger.

 

Anyhow, my boys thought it was great, didn't make them sad at all, they want to get it on DVD.

 

I do think some kids will love it. I had posted a footnote earlier that there is no blood and guts, just some sad moments. Some children may be sensitive to this. I was in a theater full of small children cheering for the baby caribou to outrun the fox. When he tripped and death was certain, they were sad. When the daddy polar bear is certain to starve to death...it was sad. Yes, it is part of nature. Yes, it is a fact of life. As concerned parents (as we all are) we make the decision as to what is appropriate for our children. I just thought the information would be helpful to others. Those with young children and sensitive children especially.

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I'm really surprised and confused by your plug for Planet Earth over "earth"? Quite a bit of the footage from "earth" was taken from the Planet Earth series, including much of the hunting footage, although they cut before the more gruesome parts in "earth" -- parts which are included (and more explicit) in Planet Earth.

 

I purchased this to keep in my DVD collection and view it as my kids get older. I think it will be a nice addition to science when the time is right. I wasn't "plugging" it as much as just letting people know of a good deal if they were interested.

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I do think some kids will love it. I had posted a footnote earlier that there is no blood and guts, just some sad moments. Some children may be sensitive to this. I was in a theater full of small children cheering for the baby caribou to outrun the fox. When he tripped and death was certain, they were sad. When the daddy polar bear is certain to starve to death...it was sad. Yes, it is part of nature. Yes, it is a fact of life. As concerned parents (as we all are) we make the decision as to what is appropriate for our children. I just thought the information would be helpful to others. Those with young children and sensitive children especially.

 

I'm glad you posted it. I am planning to wait because of your mentioning it.

 

Wish I had been similarly warned about how mis-rated Marley and Me was. My 12 yodd said, "PG? More like PG-13! Sooooo inappropriate!" And then did a mock-up of Jennifer Aniston saying, "We're not Old!" as she leapt naked into the pool. :glare:

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Did it show mating too??? :blushing: THAT would lead to a conversation that I don't think the girls are quite ready for! )

 

This is related to the farm life post. We used to live in the city -- and then the suburbs. We now live on a farm. One "perk" of living on a farm that I was just NOT ready for was the mating questions coming from my 5 year old. (We have female AND male varieties of several types of fowl. We have female goats that need to be bred in order to make milk. That kinda thing.) It just can't be avoided (along with the death and predator/prey topics) when you live on a farm. Sigh.

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Truly, I don't mean to be an argumentative stinker, but at what age do you think children SHOULD start learning about the true cycle of life? Farm kids have witnessed this forever. My parents never batted an eye while I watched Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom when I was a youngster (early 70's -- I'm 40 now -- you can do the math. I was pretty little). There were some pretty graphic scenes on that show.

 

I don't know that it is necessarily a bad thing for them to see this. Of course, every parent knows what is best for their own children, but I do think many parents in 2009 shelter our children from some things that they should see, and allow them to see things that they shouldn't.

 

Just my two cents... :) Please no hard feelings!!!

 

:iagree: I do believe that for a child's first intro to a the "unromantic" side of nature should be in bite-size pieces and should emphisis th cycle of life; an animal dies and feeds others, allowing them to live.

 

But I don't believe that they should be able to hide their heads in the sand about it, and yes, that means the sensitive do need to see it on occasion. Sorry, but words just don't do justice to learning something like this. However they may not need so much and in such concentrated amounts as this movie apparently supplies.

 

But I do want my 15 yo ds to see it, and I probably would have him seen it when he was 8, maybe younger. But he was much less upset by this sort of thing. The one reason I may not have him watch it this week is because he just watched and discussed Hotel Rowanda and that hit him hard. I think he needs a breather from grim, graphic realities

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Oh, my! :lol: We've witnessed some interesting scenes at the zoo lately! First, ds and I saw two huge tortoises who "needed some privacy" (as I tried delicately to put it), then some babboons were putting on quite a racy show. :blink: Ds and I were at the zoo last week, and while observing the porcupines (so cute!), he wondered how THEY... :001_huh:

 

Wendi

 

:lol:

 

Several years ago, I went to the zoo with my college level animal behavoir class to study waterfowl courtship behavior. We were discussing all the signs of courtship as they occured when I noticed a mother with to young children trying to observe the action yet ignoring our discussion of it.

 

The piece de resistance came when a drake mounted a hen in the pond, grabbed her neck with his beak and the combined weight submerged the hen. I overheard the mother discribe the behavior as "being like when you fight with your brother" :lol::lol::lol: Come on, they weren't that young.

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Well, on a farm, you get to see the baby animal left, or the other animals and you see that life goes on, you know? I grew up on a farm and yes, there is death, but you don't dwell on it with pathos, the way that a movie dwells on the death. Yes the animal dies, but soon you have to deal with practicalities, like burying a 12 year old donkey. It is really sad that he died, but watching him leave with his feet in the air via the backhoe is a firm reminnder that life goes on, there are animals to be fed.

 

I think the problem with showing animal death in a movie is that the movie makes too much of the death... ascribes human feelings to animals. Yes, I had animals that moped around, but really, they were still happy and content when they got their feed. The movie makers rip your heart out with the death that they *could* have prevented. On a farm, if you have the power to stop an animal from suffering, you do it. You don't just watch and see what happens if you have the power to stop it by either saving the animal or putting it out of its misery.

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A footnote...there is no blood or guts. There are just sad endings. For example...the polar bear dad starves to death. A baby caribou gets separated from it's mom and is chased by a wolf. All the kids in the theater were cheering for the caribou to run away. He ran, then he tripped. The wolf won.

 

Yes, and with the caribou, they didn't even show the wolf do more than catch up with him. They did show a cheetah catch an antelope in slow motion. The two parts that bothered my kids were a really cool scene at night at a watering hole with a pride of hungry lions and a herd of elephants. The roaring of the lions was what bothered the girls. The other thing that bothered them was the polar bear dad. My youngest is convinced that the polar bear dad might have survived, since they just left him lying down.

 

They were pretty amazed to learn that a baby caribou can run as fast as a wolf and has even odds of getting away. They did agree that the baby wolves have to eat too. Then there was a quick scene change to something else beautiful and amazing.

 

My girls are very sensitive, but they loved the movie. We just about drove my husband crazy by saying "Oh Wow" throughout the whole thing.

 

The birds of paradise were amazing.

 

As a whole, they loved it, but could have done without the surround sound roaring lions in the dark.

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I don't mind seeing some of the mating stuff; I just don't like it when the actual mating process* is shown for so long that I feel like I've accidentally clicked on the Lion Porn Channel. I really don't need to know if the lions are going to have a cigarette afterwards.

 

Cat

 

*"actual mating process" -- how's that for Politically Correct? ;)

 

:lol::lol::lol::lol: You crack me up, Cat. hehehe

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Truly, I don't mean to be an argumentative stinker, but at what age do you think children SHOULD start learning about the true cycle of life? Farm kids have witnessed this forever. My parents never batted an eye while I watched Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom when I was a youngster (early 70's -- I'm 40 now -- you can do the math. I was pretty little). There were some pretty graphic scenes on that show.

 

I don't know that it is necessarily a bad thing for them to see this. Of course, every parent knows what is best for their own children, but I do think many parents in 2009 shelter our children from some things that they should see, and allow them to see things that they shouldn't.

 

Just my two cents... :) Please no hard feelings!!!

 

I actually agree with this, I watched the same shows as a kid and I was the sort of kid who couldn't finish a Jack London novel because I fretted over the dogs.

 

I wonder if this trend towards protecting kids from movies like this but exposing them to video games is giving the right impression of the world. I wonder if children are getting a mixed message about they cycle of life vs gratuitous violence. Why is it acceptable to have "fake" violence but not see the reality of nature.

 

This is not directed at anyone in particular, just something I have noticed in discussions with other parents in the last year or two. The parent who can't stand to have their kids see animals being hunted and eaten in the wild but are happy to buy violent video games for their kids. It just makes me wonder what is happening to kids' perception of the world these days.

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I grew up in Africa......I totally agree.

 

Dawn

 

I actually agree with this, I watched the same shows as a kid and I was the sort of kid who couldn't finish a Jack London novel because I fretted over the dogs.

 

I wonder if this trend towards protecting kids from movies like this but exposing them to video games is giving the right impression of the world. I wonder if children are getting a mixed message about they cycle of life vs gratuitous violence. Why is it acceptable to have "fake" violence but not see the reality of nature.

 

This is not directed at anyone in particular, just something I have noticed in discussions with other parents in the last year or two. The parent who can't stand to have their kids see animals being hunted and eaten in the wild but are happy to buy violent video games for their kids. It just makes me wonder what is happening to kids' perception of the world these days.

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.....I wonder if this trend towards protecting kids from movies like this but exposing them to video games is giving the right impression of the world. I wonder if children are getting a mixed message about they cycle of life vs gratuitous violence. Why is it acceptable to have "fake" violence but not see the reality of nature.

 

This is not directed at anyone in particular, just something I have noticed in discussions with other parents in the last year or two. The parent who can't stand to have their kids see animals being hunted and eaten in the wild but are happy to buy violent video games for their kids. It just makes me wonder what is happening to kids' perception of the world these days.

 

I don't understand why "fake" is ok but real isn't. Is it because the adults know it's fake and assume their children also instinctively know that also? Or is it because the parents are repulsed by real violence and aren't by the fake? Is it because the parents underestimate the effect of fake violence?

 

I've enjoyed the fake violence of cartoons and other things at times. But I know that violence in real life has consequences, sometimes severe, uncorrectable consequences. That's why I feel it's vital that children should learn early that real violence has real consequences. Nature programs showing the real thing is a good way to introduce that concept at arms length. True, if the program is too sympathetic to the prey animal or someone can identify too easily with the underdog it's not so arm's length. But it's still more arms length when than when you catch your young child strangling a younger sibling because it's funny when Sarge does it to Beetle Baily.

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Did it show mating too??? )

 

No, it did not show any mating. But it did show an Awesome mating dance that birds of paradise in the amazon do and it showed it with little comment except that he was trying to impress his date. One of the birds even took leaves and cleaned the branches of the trees around where he was going to dance. The girls loved the bird dances.

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How much global warming discussion is threaded into the movie? Is it super-prevalent, or in the background?

 

The warming is actual framed in seasonal warming more than a "man is bad and killing everything" sense. I am pretty sure there is a reference to polar ice melting more quickly than in the past, but it is brief just like all the other commentary.

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