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Secular Science Curriculum for Grammar Stage


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#1 ErikaElle

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 02:55 PM

Heya! I'm new here and wanted to pop in.
I'm Erika; a third year (technically fourth, if preschool counts) homeschooling mom to two little dragons. Currently I just have one student, my oldest son, age 7. My other son just turned 2 and is still in the creative play stage so I don't do any formal lessons with him.
 
I came to realize the beauty of an eclectic & free yet classical education and am digging my way out of the pit of traditional homeschooling & busywork I somehow fallen into. Our homeschooling methods have changed so much within the past year and, while I'm over the moon about the direction we're headed, I still struggle with wondering if I'm teaching my son enough when it comes to science.
 
And, let me tell you, I'm having a heck of a time finding a good science curriculum for my oldest son.
 
It seems like the bulk of things out there are either for young earth creationists or mainly science experiments for the secular schoolers. Science is my kiddo's favorite subject so I want it to be rich and continue fostering a love of it in him - but I don't want to do just experiments. We're Christians but not young earthers and, while we believe in creation, we're evolutionary creationists that would rather keep our religious beliefs completely separate from our education. So, you can see why this is all very difficult.
 
My oldest little is in grade 2 this year. I finally gave up trying to find something that would be a good fit for us and decided to make my own curriculum for science. The program is made up of living books, episodes of TV shows (Magic School Bus, Bill Nye, etc), Horrible Science books, and Kingfisher Encyclopedias (Science, Nature, Animals, Human Body). I'm also using Evan-Moor's Daily science for second grade.
 
I guess my question is, is this sufficient?
 
And what about next year for third grade?
(I know, I know, I'm already planning ahead. I can't help it.)
 
I realize science is basically a big repeat of itself during the grammar stage, but I feel like it should also be different somehow, if that makes sense.
 
What science programs you use or recommend?
 
For those of you who have used ScienceSaurus & the corresponding Daybooks, do you think the 4th grade level would be fine for a third grader or a bit too advanced?
 
Any tips/advice/recommendations is greatly appreciated. 
 
Have a beautiful day! :)

Edited by ErikaElle, 13 September 2017 - 04:46 PM.


#2 Amoret

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 03:12 PM

We like Building Foundations of Scientific Understanding. It takes some time to sort through the book and pull things together, but the lessons are really solid and the content is fully secular. Plus, the book is only about $35 and it is designed for k-2. We started with Book 1 last year (kids were 6&8) and while there was a little review, the content was very different and they learned plenty.


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#3 Kiara.I

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 03:15 PM

Check out Science in the Beginning. It is Christian, but doesn't discuss creation timeframe (even though it's based around the seven "days" of creation.) You might find it works for you.

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#4 HomeAgain

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 03:32 PM

We are using BFSU as well.  There are 2 other volumes if we decide to continue.  Our options for good, secular science are limited, really, but here is a list that may help you narrow your choices down: http://www.secularho...ence_curriculum

 

Mystery Science isn't on there and it should be - it's a good program that just came out about two years ago that is parent-friendly and easy to implement. 

 

I think what you have planned for this year is good.  But if you ever feel like it's not enough, the link above should help you pick for your family.



#5 NormaElle

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 04:03 PM

We are finishing up REAL Science Odyssey's Chemistry course. We really enjoyed it and learned a lot.
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#6 knitgrl

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 04:39 PM

BFSU can be intimidating to start, but it is soooooo worth it! We need to finish up Vol. 1 (only a few more lessons to go) and then we will get to have fun using a microscope. Dd was a better understanding of how some really basic things work than do many adults because of this curriculum. Two years ago, when we started, our ds was in public high school. We asked him at dinner what they were doing in physics class. He said they were talking about atoms and states of matter. That was exactly what his little sister in 1st grade was learning in homeschool! :lol: I am confident she will have a stellar science base with this curriculum.


Edited by knitgrl, 13 September 2017 - 04:39 PM.


#7 nixpix5

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 04:44 PM

Yep, BFSU is a great way to go! :)

#8 Syllieann

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 05:23 PM

I really love volumes 1 and 2 of bfsu. My older two have both done all of volume 1. They are working on the life Science and physics thread of volume 2 currently. Oldest has done all the earth science and chemistry in volume 2 and the first half of volume 3. Volume 1 is very easily integrated into real life. Many of the "demonstrations" are things that are readily observed without needing to stage anything. It does take some prep to read ahead and plan books or materials, but it sounds like you are no stranger to that, and you don't seem intimidated by the organizational aspect since you are diy currently. I'm not as crazy about volume 3 because there is more lecture, which isn't the greatest fit for our homeschool. I would rather that my child had a good living book than listen to me talk. Also, there are more secular options for middle school. You may want to look at Novare science and math for middle school when you get there. They are mainstream science and Christian. I plan to use them after bfsu.


BFSU has a forum hosted by the author here. http://www.bfsucommunity.com

Outskirts press sells the PDF of BFSU for $5 each volume. https://outskirtspre...om/nebel#author
Note that you cannot print from these. I have used these exclusively, but many people purchase the PDF to see if they like it and then buy the hard copy after they decide. For you older, you would probably want to breeze through volume 1 to make sure he knew everything already, then dive into volume 2. Fwiw, my views fall into what would be called theistic evolution and I've never found anything to huff and puff about in bfsu.

#9 fourisenough

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 05:46 PM

Mystery Science!

#10 SusanC

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 05:52 PM

I was going to recommend BFSU also, because your science planning sounds like it is already headed down that path. Take a look at the book, see which lessons cover the material you already have planned out (which sounds great, by the way) and then peruse the prerequisites for anything your ds may not already know, then head forward from there I whatever order pleased you.

I finished volume 3 with my olders last year. Although we often revisit and add on to older lessons we NEVER repeated a lesson, that would have driven me bonkers. Mine finished the books in 6 years and have moved on to a high school physical science class. My third grader is into volume 2.

It is not user friendly, so I don't often suggest it any more, but you already sound line you are on the ball with science, you could make it work for you.

Along the way i folded an extra in-depth chemistry study and some of Ellen Mchenry's books.

#11 Vintage81

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 06:09 PM

We ❤️ Mystery Science!

https://mysteryscience.com

Edited by Vintage81, 13 September 2017 - 06:10 PM.


#12 MeaganS

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 06:41 PM

We're BFSU dropouts. It's good but too much work for me. Mystery Science has been great for us. I feel like it has a lot of the pros of BFSU without any of the cons. All the extra activities were things I could throw together in under 5 minutes and retention has been great. Dd6 cried last week because she wanted to do MS but there wasn't time.

Plus they have a generous free trial and have sales occasionally that make a year subscription very reasonable.

Edited by MeaganS, 13 September 2017 - 06:44 PM.


#13 Janeway

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 07:20 PM

I liked Mystery Science.

#14 2_girls_mommy

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 09:16 PM

I think what you are doing sounds good already and that it doesn't sound like you need anything different. 


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#15 CPSTAnne

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 09:20 PM

We like REAL Science Odyssey from pandia press. 

 



#16 ExcitedMama

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 09:32 AM

I have BFSU gathering dust on a shelf. Science in the Beginning is great. The text is very easy to read and makes sense. The experiments/demonstrations are well done and really help to illustrate the concept. It's been a big hit here.

#17 Jame

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 09:38 AM

Another vote for Mystery Science! We love it here!



#18 Jackie

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 11:10 AM

BFSU is basically what you're already doing, with the planning done for you - topics in a logical sequence, lists of living books to gather from the library, a hands-on component, teaches the parents the concepts so you can delve into the topics further. For my science-obsessed kid, I found that I really needed to have all three volumes of BFSU on hand to do interest-based studies using it as a guide. When she asks questions, I can find where it is addressed in the guides and work my way backwards through the prerequisite concepts to forge a path.

All that said, I only loosely use BFSU. We've leaned more and more interest-based for science, using whatever makes sense for DD's chosen topic. For example, she wanted to learn about electricity, so we're using a curriculum from Snap Circuits to do a heavily hands-on portion right now and I'll follow it up by going through BFSU for any particulars that the Snap Circuits don't cover. Next up is an online Marine Mammals class. Not sure what will come after that yet, but we'll figure it out as we go!

#19 Dust

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 11:35 AM

I <3 BFSU, but haven't really tried anything else other than just putting my own stuff together. 

 

It does require planning, at least for some of the lessons. I started it when my DS was in 2nd grade(jan 2017.) We are breezing through it. I'm trying to get done with this volume by Feb, which is doable. He already knows a lot of the stuff, so I check for understanding and we move on. We spend a bit more time on things that he's not so familiar with.

 

I like that it's a multi-year book, so you get into more depth in each topic than the PS science books that basically repeat the same stuff every year with a couple of additions. 

 

I have my book spiral bound in 4 volumes, and when I get a bit of planning time, I take it out and read through and highlight one(or more) of the lessons. I highlight what I plan to say so that I don't have to waste time reading stuff that I'm not planning to actually say to DS. For instance, sometimes the author writes a bit to explain the concept to the teacher, but doesn't intend for you to teach that thing to the student yet.

 

We don't usually do the experiments or end of lesson activities, unless I know that they will be of value for my son - either because they are entertaining or give a better grasp of the concept.

 

I've found I'm usually able to do a lesson without prior planning, it's just a lot more efficient and interesting for DS when I plan ahead. I've run into issues where I was "planning" to do the next lesson without reading or skimming it ahead of time, and then we needed supplies for an experiment and we didn't have them ready. So we either skipped science that day, watched bill nye or magic school bus or something else, or did a lesson from a different section. No biggie.



#20 SilverMoon

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 12:31 PM

If what you're doing is working, which it sounds like it is, why fix it? It sounds interesting and engaging. :001_smile: 

I put my oldest kids through formal elementary science curricula. The next ones up have had something more similar to what you're describing. Loads of supplementary books, videos, hands on projects if that's what they like, and so on. The middle kids didn't get a formal science textbook until high school level, which they're thriving in this year. :001_smile:

 

There are some options out there that schedule all those extras in for you, which are convenient. Guesthollow and Quark Chronicles off the top of my head. They both have some Christian books in the schedule but they clearly mark them.


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#21 AdventuresinHomeschooling

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 12:33 PM

We seek a more neutral program ourselves. To answer your first question, what you are doing is enough for second grade. Maybe add some hands on elements through a Magic School Bus experiment kit, and you are fine. Science is also my boys favorite too. At our classical private school in first grade, science was only once a week, and it was hands-on, so doing your own thing is enough. Pinterest has some great ideas if you want to keep doing your own thing.

Science often isn't tested formally until fifth grade in most states if you do testing. Fifth grade is when I feel they need more structure to get ready for jr. high science and have some outputs like a science notebook.

I did my own thing for a while, and I haven't found a silver bullet for science yet. So far, we have liked Elemental Science and RS4K. Both require gathering supplies for experiments. RS4K is a little more manageable for me because it's only ten experiments, and it has a well written textbook with good explanations that are scientific with correct terms and not too chatty. ES is a full 36 week course and utilizes the encyclopedias. No text. My only drawback is there is a little too much writing for my taste, but it's easy to modify.

I looked at Mystery Science, and it looks great, but you also have to gather supplies. This is my biggest Hangup with science programs in general. I really like MSB kits for that reason alone.

I supplement with some science and engineering classes sometimes bc my kids love this stuff. I plan to fully outsource when they are in jr. high.

#22 Eagle

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 12:41 PM

We completed the first volume of BFSU but got bogged down in the second book. We did a year of REAL Science Odyssey and really enjoyed it. Mystery Science did not work for us, although we do watch their weekly question/answer videos. We continue to do some lessons from RSO, but our new find this year is Picture Perfect Science and Picture Perfect STEM.

So far we are loving the PPS books and I wish we had known about them from the beginning. They pair a fun picture book on a topic with a nonfiction book for a scientific explanation. Some of the topics are different than the usual elementary science fare. You make bracelets using UV beads that show when your sunscreen needs reapplying. You grow rice to learn about experiment design. You make ice cream to learn about states of matter. You pop popcorn in test tubes held over a flame to observe the changes. You learn how lightbulbs work and compare incandescent, fluorescent, and LED bulbs by design and for efficiency. It's a lot of fun! The downside to the program is that it is expensive, and some of the topics require equipment you may not already have (test tubes, a laser thermometer, etc.). But for us, it has been a really good fit.

#23 Josh Blade

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 01:57 PM

+1 to BFSU, Mystery Science, and Real Science Odyssey.

 

I think BFSU is definitely the place to start. It'll give your children an amazingly broad foundation. A common theme seems to be that people think BFSU is a lot of work, but I felt like it was pretty open and go with maybe 5 minutes of prep to read ahead to make sure I understood the goals of the section. We're doing RSO now and it feels like it requires a lot more planning than BFSU ever did (though I still like it too).  Mystery science is good at what it does, which is explaining a topic really well and providing neat experiments to reinforce the idea all in 20-30 minutes. Mystery Science doesn't really have enough breadth or organization to be used on it's own though (at least for us). 


Edited by Josh Blade, 14 September 2017 - 01:58 PM.


#24 blondeviolin

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 03:11 PM

We also love Mystery Science. My older kids do extra stuff but for K-3, it's perfect with it and generous readers/encyclopedias.

#25 hands-on-mama

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 05:01 PM

We like Real Science Odyssey.

 



#26 ErikaElle

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 02:36 AM

Thanks for the feedback, ladies! :)

 

I decided to pick up a copy of BFSU and another program I came across called Elemental Science. I also made an account at Mystery Science to see what their program is like. :)

 

BFSU does look a little daunting, I must admit, but if it is pretty much what I'm already doing I figure, why not? At least that way I'll have more of a "spine" to go off.


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#27 soror

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 05:58 AM

Thanks for the feedback, ladies! :)

 

I decided to pick up a copy of BFSU and another program I came across called Elemental Science. I also made an account at Mystery Science to see what their program is like. :)

 

BFSU does look a little daunting, I must admit, but if it is pretty much what I'm already doing I figure, why not? At least that way I'll have more of a "spine" to go off.

FYI Eleemntal Science is not secular. The elementary programs do not include evolution or the big bang at all and at the upper levels that info is part of optional lessons.


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#28 FarmingMomma

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 09:14 AM

Another vote for BFSU!  We did all 3 volumes and it gave my kids a great foundation in science.  We also did one year of Elemental Science (Biology for the Logic Stage).  I liked it, but not as well as BFSU.  I did pull ideas from Elemental Science, especially having them do science fair type projects.  

 



#29 knitgrl

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 01:34 PM

Thanks for the feedback, ladies! :)

 

I decided to pick up a copy of BFSU and another program I came across called Elemental Science. I also made an account at Mystery Science to see what their program is like. :)

 

BFSU does look a little daunting, I must admit, but if it is pretty much what I'm already doing I figure, why not? At least that way I'll have more of a "spine" to go off.

 

BFSU is great because each lesson builds on previous lessons. I think it truly lives up to its title. It is an excellent choice. We have used Mystery Science to supplement one of our lessons this year, and that was a fun enhancement that really underscored one of the main points of the lesson.
 



#30 Lace

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Posted 16 September 2017 - 02:30 PM

BFSU has been really hard for me to pull off, but I haven't found anything I felt did a better job.  What seems to be working this year is using BFSU as a spine, writing a script for the next lesson the night before, and supplementing with corresponding Mystery Science videos/activities, Bill Nye and Magic School Bus episodes, chapters from Real Science 4 Kids (world view "neutral"), living books (esp. from the Lets-Read-And-Find-Out series), E-M Daily science workbooks, and occasional activities from CTC's Developing Critical Thinking Through Science books.  It's probably overkill.

 

My favorite for ease of use and kid approval is Mystery Science.  My favorite for in-depth, solid science is BFSU.  My favorite for independent completion is E-M Daily Science.  My favorite for keeping kids occupied while I take a shower is Bill Nye.  So I guess they're all good for different reasons!


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#31 ErikaElle

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 02:12 PM

Thanks for all the feedback! :)
BFSU should be delivered tomorrow. I'm waiting to see what Elemental Science will bring to the table, too. I didn't realize ES isn't a secular program when I ordered it. If it is worldview neutral then that should be fine, as we cover both creationism & evolution in other ways.
 
 
My Mystery Science trial thingy started today. I just gave mystery #1 a looksie and I'm really liking what I see. It looks fun and engaging and I think my son would enjoy it. I'm going to have him give it a go in a few minutes to see how he feels about it.
 
 
For those who use Mystery Science, how do you do it? Like, do you do one mystery a day? A week? And is this the only science program you use? In your opinion, can it stand alone or should it be more of a supplement for something like BFSU?

Edited by ErikaElle, 17 September 2017 - 02:18 PM.


#32 MeaganS

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 02:52 PM

Science is very interest-led for my kids right now. My oldest has some delays so my kids are essentially 1st grade science-level. We do mystery science about once a week. I'd like it to be more, but that's about what we do in reality. I also get them books on the chosen topic from the library and we do quite a lot of informal discussions on various topics. In fact, I usually choose the mystery Science lesson based on what we're talking about. But I'd probably say it was complete for the k-3 crowd if you do the added activities and suggested reading or add your own extra library books.

#33 Syllieann

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 09:43 PM

Thanks for all the feedback! :)
BFSU should be delivered tomorrow. I'm waiting to see what Elemental Science will bring to the table, too. I didn't realize ES isn't a secular program when I ordered it. If it is worldview neutral then that should be fine, as we cover both creationism & evolution in other ways.


My Mystery Science trial thingy started today. I just gave mystery #1 a looksie and I'm really liking what I see. It looks fun and engaging and I think my son would enjoy it. I'm going to have him give it a go in a few minutes to see how he feels about it.


For those who use Mystery Science, how do you do it? Like, do you do one mystery a day? A week? And is this the only science program you use? In your opinion, can it stand alone or should it be more of a supplement for something like BFSU?

Somewhere on the mystery science site I read that it is meant to be a full curriculum using 1 mystery per week. There is a guide somewhere on there for a sequence to cover standard grade level material. We don't use it, but I do think it would be sufficient for k-2 as long as you are spreading the content out and not cramming the whole week into a day. You might find yourself out of lessons pretty quickly though. It sounds like you are science-minded and actively teach it, so you may find your older son exhausts the material quickly. You will probably want to use it on the lowest end of the age range. There are plans to continue adding content for higher levels, but I would personally not be satisfied with what is currently available for grades 3-5 as a standalone.

ETA: aha, here is the recommended path
https://mysteryscien...s&fallback=true

Edited by Syllieann, 17 September 2017 - 09:45 PM.


#34 soror

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Posted 18 September 2017 - 04:56 AM

Fwiw we use Mystery Science as a fun supplement, my girls do 1 mystery a week. I try to somewhat line it up with our unit studies. I prefer mysteries in the older age range but sometimes assign them younger ones too. My daughters are not the big science lovers that my son was so they haven't picked up as much.


Edited by soror, 18 September 2017 - 05:09 AM.


#35 Vintage81

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Posted 19 September 2017 - 08:38 AM

 

For those who use Mystery Science, how do you do it? Like, do you do one mystery a day? A week? And is this the only science program you use? In your opinion, can it stand alone or should it be more of a supplement for something like BFSU?

 

 

 

We're in our second year of using Mystery Science, and we currently do one mystery per week. We're usually able to do the mystery and activity in one day, and then we'll spend another day doing the "Extras" and read any accompanying library books we find. If it's a topic that really interests us, we'll spend more time on it and do our own extra activities.  

 

The great thing about Mystery Science is that it's really customizable. IMO, it can be used as a main science program. You can do as much or as little as you want with it. During busy weeks, doing the mystery/activity will suffice. During weeks where you have more time, you can go off on rabbit trails and really explore the topics. You can add in library books, field trips, nature walks, lapbooking, notebooking, and whatever else interests you.

 

Many families also use it as a supplement to other curriculums. Again, because it's so flexible, you can use it however works best for you.

 

Because you're in a free trial right now, you probably can't see all of the mysteries available, but I did a quick count, and I believe there are well over 80 of them available. They're also adding more mysteries during this school year. There are age ranges listed, but they're just suggestions. I've been able to show the mysteries for the oldest grade levels to my 2nd grader with no issues. 


Edited by Vintage81, 19 September 2017 - 08:45 AM.