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Cake and Pi

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  1. What do you recommend for teaching literary analysis? What I want is a curriculum that uses upper-elementary level interest books to teach middle or high school level analysis. I might be in need of a book or resource that is aimed at the instructor and from which I could learn how to teach these concepts to my students with books of our choosing. I am looking for something to use with my 8yo (12th grade reading level but little interest in fiction unless it is math-related, e.g. The Man Who Counted) and 10yo (typically does well 6th-7th grade level books but is dyslexic with 12th grade level reading comprehension and 1st grade level fluency). My DS 12 did the Online G3 Lightning Lit 7&8 classes last year, and I still have all the materials from them. I liked the LL7&8 curriculum and the G3 classes were excellent, but I worry about 1) DS 10 having difficulty with some of the reading selections and 2) DS 8 probably not being particularly interested in most of the books. The selections for LL5 look good for both of them -- closer to interesting for DS 8, readable for DS 10 -- but the curriculum sample I got from the publisher didn't seem to contain much in the way of actual literary analysis, instead emphasizing recall-level reading comprehension and grammar/mechanics. I appreciate your thoughts on the matter!
  2. Have you considered the self-paced AoPS Prealgebra course? We did the demo at some point and it seemed pretty engaging. It's interactive, at least. You can sign him up and drop for a full refund within two weeks if it isn't a good fit. Prealgebra is probably the one AoPS book I think a very math-intuitive student could learn without ever cracking the book open, especially with an online class (self-paced or live), the AoPS videos, and Alcumus. The other thing I'm considering for DS 10 to do for pre-a after he finishes BA 5 is Thinkwell. I think he could get some degree of independence (as long as I'm nearby, in the same room, and have some degree of attention focused on him, lol) with the videos and online practice. I'd probably follow up with Alcumus, possibly buddy-solving. There's also Elements of Mathematics: Foundations (EMF). That could totally be an independent program, and it approaches math in an extremely interesting way. My DS 10 actually really liked it, except there was too much in the way of large blocks of text, and he needed me to read it all aloud to him.
  3. My DS 8 read and liked The Golden Goblet recently as an older-7 yo. He also got a kick out of the Horrible Histories books that were required for his Online G3 Horrible Romans and Egyptians class. Admittedly, he's not an emotionally sensitive kind of child, and though he can be convinced to read these kinds of things, he's not a particularly avid reader unless it's about math, coding, or Minecraft (bonus points for coding Minecraft, lol). As for fiction unrelated to Rome/Greece, his top picks over the last couple of years have been The Narnia Chronicles Blue Balliett's Chasing Vermeer series The Hobbit The Secret Garden Alice in Wonderland Peter Pan* A Wrinkle in Time* (first two books in the series only) Hawking's George's Secret Key series Diary of a Minecraft Zombie series MCT's Mud Trilogy* The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind (just finished reading) The titles marked with a * are absolute favorites and read many times each. There's probably a pretty wide range of reading levels in that list since neither of us takes reading level into consideration when we're choosing books. Several of them were started as audiobooks or read-alouds; however, I always pick up a hard copy for him to read along, and he takes off and finishes on his own when a book captures his attention, which is how I know some of these were favorites 😉 One of my older boys had an obsession with the Beast Quest series at that age. The other only really read graphic novels.
  4. I'm sorry your old district didn't meet your DD's needs, but it sounds excellent that KS has a system in place that will do more for your DS. Gifted services in CO seem to depend on where in CO you live and how well you know the system. CO has mandated GT programming, but since there's no legal provision for funding for said programming, it can take some work to get what's most appropriate in practice. Did your school district in CO do ALPs? They're better than nothing, but pretty weak compared to a gIEP. We are in a higher-resource area in a major city. Our district has highly-gifted magnet programs starting in 1st grade and non-magnet GT services (via ALP) for identified kindergarteners. In fact, my youngest was just given the CogAT with his kindergarten class at school last month. They decided to universally screen in K this year in addition to the usual 2nd grade universal screening done district-wide. They don't IQ test unless they can be convinced it's absolutely necessary, which sadly often comes down to parents knowing the system. Our school district gave my DS#3 the DAS-II in preschool to confirm a level of giftedness requiring non-standard gifted programming, and my DS#4 was given the WPPSI-IV last year in (his first time through) kindergarten for other reasons.
  5. Our state's department of education officially recognizes 2e. https://www.cde.state.co.us/gt/twice-exceptional
  6. No, but I'm interested! Do you have a link?
  7. We have a different diagnosis but similar result over here. My DS#3 is autistic and has accelerated radically in math because he gets singularly focused on it. It's his main area of special interest, as they say in the ASD world. His ASD also causes him to pay very close attention to details (when he pays attention at all), so his writing is meticulously free of errors, he usually checks his work, and he remembers obscure facts. Honestly, being autistic has only positively impacted his ability to learn at home. He's still 2e, though. His ability to verbally communicate, play and interact with peers, perform self-care, and be aware of typical dangerous situations is severely impaired, to the point that he qualifies as developmentally disabled with our county (I'm talking eight standard deviations difference between intellectual strengths and adaptive functioning weakness). If he'd been in school full-time since kindergarten, he'd absolutely need an IEP, and probably a one-on-one para for behaviors. Unless they tailored most of his reading and writing assignments to reflect his special interests, they wouldn't be able to get him to work at all. He'd probably spend a big chunk of every day in the "sensory room," screaming under a desk, in the principal's office, or crying out in the hall.
  8. I mostly stick with our school district's definition of 2e. So, I consider 2e to be a child who is gifted and also has a disability (learning, physical, emotional, etc.) that impacts learning or behavior to the extent that an IEP or 504 would be necessary in order for the child to succeed in school. At home we automatically accommodate for these needs, but that doesn't make the accommodations/needs any less significant or the child any less 2e when they're being homeschooled. So, yes, I'd consider your son 2e, both for the physical disabilities and the PTSD. Both would need official accommodations in place if he were in PS because they both would significantly impact his ability to learn and perform in the classroom without accommodations.
  9. My 10yo will be in 6th grade this fall. If he doesn't decide to return to PS, these are my plans for him. Math: Pre-algebra, but I can't decide what curriculum to use. He needs something like AoPS for problem novelty and puzzle-y-ness, but with traditional instruction and way less dense text, or even no reading at all. I might have to get creative. Science: Leaning toward an interest-led documentary year, but I may try align the topics with whatever his brothers are covering in their science class Social Studies: Not sure. Considering getting a subscription to Junior Scholastic and listening to a variety of historical fiction and diversity focused audiobooks Language Arts: Brave Writer with Arrows, Sequential Spelling 2, handwriting practice, Killgallons story grammar, and Vocabulary Cartoons Other: full-day aerospace program once a week (??), running with dad
  10. My oldest will be a 7th grader next year. He's in a phase where he doesn't want to be taught by me but still needs the support of an instructor and a weekly schedule, so we're incorporating many online classes. Math: AoPS Geometry, possibly through RFWP Online or WTM Academy Science: Public online GT 8th grade science class Social Studies: Public online GT 8th grade Early American History class Language Arts: MCT Literature Level, writing across the curriculum (via The Writing Revolution), Sequential Spelling 5, considering the Athena's lit to film class set Other: SK Philosophy level G, TBD classes through the homeschool charter, pottery, swimming
  11. Alright! I got motivated and worked out tentative plans. Of course, this will all probably change 27 times between now and August, but at least the thread's back on topic now 😄 Well, see? I should have just waited. It's been 2ish weeks and I'm already changing things. DS#1, will-be-12yo Getting very independent. He's in a phase where he often doesn't want to be taught by me but still needs the support of an instructor and a weekly schedule, so we're incorporating many online classes. I think he'd love to go to a B&M school next year if only there weren't other kids there, lol. Math: AoPS Geometry, possibly through RFWP Online or WTM Academy Science: Public online GT 8th grade science class Social Studies: Public online GT 8th grade Early American History class Language Arts: MCT Literature Level, writing across the curriculum, Sequential Spelling 5, considering the Athena's lit to film class set Other: SK Philosophy level G, TBD classes through the homeschool charter, pottery, swimming DS#2, 10yo May return to PS for the social life. If he stays home I'll need to continue to learning how to teach him, which has been quite the adventure so far (four weeks in). He's an out-of-the-box, non-linear, headstrong, and not-externally-motivated kind of learner. This curriculum-loving mama is having to step way out of her comfort zone to reach and teach this kid. Math: Pre-algebra, but I can't decide what curriculum to use. He needs something like AoPS for problem novelty and puzzle-y-ness, but with traditional instruction and way less dense text, or even no reading at all. If I don't find the magic curriculum, I'm thinking about riding this bike with no handlebars and just teaching him without a book, which I really don't want to do but at least feels possible now that it'll be my 3rd pass through teaching pre-a. Science: Leaning toward an interest-led documentary year, or I may try align his topics with whatever his brothers are covering in their science class Social Studies: Not sure. Considering getting a subscription to Junior Scholastic and listening to a variety of historical fiction and diversity focused audiobooks Language Arts: Brave Writer with Arrows, Sequential Spelling 2, handwriting practice, Killgallons story grammar, and Vocabulary Cartoons Other: full-day aerospace program once a week (??), running with dad DS#3, 8yo Math: AoPS Online Intermediate Algebra and Precalculus. It feels scary writing that out. Maybe he'll just do Intermediate Algebra. Science: Public online GT 8th grade science class Davidson: Explore Contemporary Science Social Studies: I'll probably lump him in with whatever I decide to do with DS#2 Language Arts: MCT Voyage Level, writing across the curriculum, handwriting practice, reading whatever he wants Other: SK Philosophy level D, python, java script, HTML, TBD classes from the homeschool enrichment program, might take a B&M high school class and/or go to the GT elementary magnet for a class period, swimming if we can squeeze it in around all that and his 15ish hours a week of ABA DS#4, 6yo Not an AL, but I'll include him anyway! Main academics: Public school 1st grade Main services: sped and speech therapy at school Supplemental academics: guided playing with home-made DragonBox Nooms rods, as much read-aloud time as he'll tolerate, phonetic awareness games Supplemental services: mix of private and mom-facilitated OT and PT, may attempt private pelvic floor rehab therapy again
  12. Sorry, I'm not very good at reading between the lines. What, exactly, is the main view towards education that dominates the AL forums, and how does it clash with your personal educational philosophy? As for textbooks and curriculum, I would and do use them with any and all of my kids, accelerated or not. I'm just not educationally well rounded or creative enough to come up with what and how to teach on my own. Without curricula, I'd be very unsure of myself as a home educator. If my delayed dude comes home from public special education, I'll be buying Barton and ST Math for him, things I learned about on the Learning Challenges forum, which I view very similarly to the AL forum. They're both places for parents of kids who don't fit "typical" in one or more ways that affect learning. Nothing wrong with pooling resources and sharing ideas, right?
  13. I think the major benefit of this particular forum is not having to justify where your kid is at. I can ask here for recommendations on a high school physics book for my elementary kid or share that my 8yo will start AoPS Precalculus next year and no one is going to accuse me of pushing him, not letting him be a kid, or ruining his childhood, like has happened on some of the other WTM forums. It's also helpful for those of us who use curriculum to get ideas for appropriate resources to use with kiddos who don't necessarily learn best with traditionally scoped, sequenced, and paced curriculum.
  14. No one should have to apologize for where their kid is at developmentally or academically, including you 😉. I only meant that sometimes the posts about PG and/or radically accelerated learners seem very prominent on this board and that the parents of more subtly/spiky/non-traditional ALs shouldn't let that keep them from joining in.
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