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Most Rigorous Homeschool Curricula?

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#1 BBG580

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 05:36 PM

As a spin-off from the Parent's General Board about public schools and their academic rigor, I am curious about what you feel are the most academically rigorous homeschool curricula on the market currently for the following subjects. This is not the curriculum you personally love to work with or that your child particularly responds well to, just that it requires hard work from an average student for the grade level it is intended.

Math

Science

L/A

History

Geography

Foreign Language

#2 mommymilkies

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 05:50 PM

:lurk5:

#3 Renee in NC

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 06:19 PM

I don't think you can really qualify many curricula as being more rigorous than the others. Teaching and expectations are what define excellence, not the program. In addition, different average students are going to have different experiences with various programs. You have to find the program that makes *your* student work hard, KWIM?

Having said that, what I tend to do is look at high-performing private schools and see what *they* are using. Many times it is similar to what homeschool families use. See if you can find a classical school in your state that lists their book choices on their website.

#4 MIch elle

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 06:32 PM

CLE math, LA, & reading - all grade levels

R&S English all grade levels

Saxon math 54 & up

CPO science for middle school (Earth, Life, & Physical)

Biblioplan for history

Foreign Language - Classical Academic Press Latin & Spanish

IEW writing and most IEW products

#5 BBG580

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 06:33 PM

I can see how this post could step on toes, as everyone will feel defensive about the particular curricula that they chose and why they chose it for their child(ren).

I thought of this question when I read this in the other thread and I think it is worth addressing, which is why I posted this question here in the first place.

I am anything but an expert on homeschool curricula, but occasionally when looking through catalogs I have wondered how the writers set grade levels. From one angle, there's an incentive to set the grade levels lower rather than higher, because presumably parents are less likely to purchase a curriculum that would have their children 'behind' rather than at grade level or above (i.e, if you're shopping for a third grader, you're going to be more drawn to a program for which you could buy Grade 3 instead of Grade 2). But OTOH, if the grade levels are too out of whack then the program becomes far less desirable.



#6 Laura Corin

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 06:33 PM

It's not designed for home school, but I think Latin Prep is pretty rigorous. It's used in private primary/middle schools that prepare children to go to elite schools such as Eton.

Laura

Edited by Laura Corin, 25 February 2011 - 06:36 PM.


#7 Dolphin

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 07:00 PM

I think it comes down to the individual parent and child. The main strength of homeschool is the ability to customize your curriculum. I think of my son's handwriting. I don't know what is more rigourous, but he was learning Manuscript in his private school, and it was horrible. Tears, anger, couldn't read it etc... So, I read an article that said that italic and manuscript use different pathways, and that manuscript works with more children which is why it is used. We switched to italics and it has been a dream. We are using Getty Dubay now. I don't know if it is more rigorous, but for my child it is getting fantastic results.

It keeps going this way, is your child a natural speller, or do they have problems. What are those problems? The best most rigorous program is going to be the one that you are able to use to teach your child best.

I hope that I won't insult anyone on this board of all places, I do believe that the Classical Theory of Home School is one of the most rigorous of the methods that I have seen.
Nicole

#8 momchiroto2

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 07:17 PM

:lurk5:

#9 Renee in NC

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 07:24 PM

I hope that I won't insult anyone on this board of all places, I do believe that the Classical Theory of Home School is one of the most rigorous of the methods that I have seen.
Nicole


I agree.;)

#10 tracymirko

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 07:43 PM

I think that academic rigor is difficult to define. My dd really struggled with math last year and said she hated it. It was a lot of work. Our new program introduces higher level concepts much earlier but requires a lot less writing from the students. It feels like less work, but she is learning at a higher level.

#11 jewel7123

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 07:48 PM

I hope that I won't insult anyone on this board of all places, I do believe that the Classical Theory of Home School is one of the most rigorous of the methods that I have seen.
Nicole


Do you just mean classical homeschooling in general, or is this a curriculum I'm unaware of? :001_smile:

#12 elegantlion

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 07:54 PM

I think it comes down to the individual parent and child. The main strength of homeschool is the ability to customize your curriculum.


:iagree: I believe it is Hunter who has an awesome line in her signature. The superior curriculum is the one that gets used. :D

I do believe there are many providers where their material would qualify as rigorous, many of those names you will see over and over in posts.

#13 Snickerdoodle

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 07:58 PM

I believe it is Hunter who has an awesome line in her signature. The superior curriculum is the one that gets used.

This is exactly what I was thinking.

#14 BBG580

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 08:12 PM

I think that academic rigor is difficult to define. My dd really struggled with math last year and said she hated it. It was a lot of work. Our new program introduces higher level concepts much earlier but requires a lot less writing from the students. It feels like less work, but she is learning at a higher level.


And I suppose this is where I would step in and refute my own original question by stating emphatically that a curriculum is only as good as the instructor utilizing it. I was a CSMP failure, I was instructed via CSMP in a gifted program from 2nd-6th grade and higher math was a complete failure for me. My transition to higher math was horrible. I've looked at the program as an adult and I can see how valuable and interesting it is, but in my specific case it was nothing of the sort.

#15 tracymirko

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 08:22 PM

And I suppose this is where I would step in and refute my own original question by stating emphatically that a curriculum is only as good as the instructor utilizing it. I was a CSMP failure, I was instructed via CSMP in a gifted program from 2nd-6th grade and higher math was a complete failure for me. My transition to higher math was horrible. I've looked at the program as an adult and I can see how valuable and interesting it is, but in my specific case it was nothing of the sort.



Are you saying that you did not do well in math because you did not have a rigorous program? Or are you saying that you had a rigorous program but not good teachers? When you think of academic rigor, what is it that you look for?

#16 LizzyBee

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 08:24 PM

As a spin-off from the Parent's General Board about public schools and their academic rigor, I am curious about what you feel are the most academically rigorous homeschool curricula on the market currently for the following subjects. This is not the curriculum you personally love to work with or that your child particularly responds well to, just that it requires hard work from an average student for the grade level it is intended.

Math

Science

L/A

History

Geography

Foreign Language


Math - Singapore
English - Rod & Staff, Classical Writing

#17 BBG580

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 08:34 PM

Are you saying that you did not do well in math because you did not have a rigorous program? Or are you saying that you had a rigorous program but not good teachers? When you think of academic rigor, what is it that you look for?


Frankly, I am not sure what I think about CSMP because I have such strong and dramatic emotional reactions to my experience with that math program, and almost none of it positive.

No, I do not think I had teachers who were committed to teaching a program that was so different from what was largely being taught in the mid to late 80s. You have the benefit of *choosing* to use that program and being excited about it, a teacher who is not comfortable with the material would have a much harder time using it effectively.

When I think of homeschoolers I generally think of parents who are committed to providing academic rigor in their homes, especially parents who are frequenting the WTM forums. Then again there are a multitude of styles and reasons to homeschool so that is a really naive view on my part. With that said, I believe if a curriculum is rigorous it will require some work on the part of the teacher and student.

Then again, I'm new to homeschooling which is why I'm asking for advice!

Edited by BBG580, 26 February 2011 - 11:03 AM.


#18 tracymirko

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 08:40 PM

Frankly, I am not sure what I think about CSMP because I have such strong and dramatic emotional reactions to my experience with that math program, and almost none of it positive.

No, I do not think I had teachers who were committed to teaching a program that was so different from what was largely being taught in the mid to late 80s. You have the benefit of *choosing* to use that program and being excited about it, a teacher who is not comfortable with the material would have a much harder time using it effectively.


I did not mean this at all to be a conversation about CSMP, which is why I didn't name it. I only meant it to be an example of how one might define academic rigor in different ways.

If we put that particular program aside, what are you looking for in terms of rigor for any of the subjects that you listed. If we understand how you define rigor, it will be easier to come up with programs that fit your definition.

#19 Dolphin

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 08:47 PM

:iagree: I believe it is Hunter who has an awesome line in her signature. The superior curriculum is the one that gets used. :D

I do believe there are many providers where their material would qualify as rigorous, many of those names you will see over and over in posts.

:iagree:

Yes I am talking about Classical Theory in General. WTM, LCC, The Core, also, a lot of CM overlaps. The idea of teaching your children how to learn by giving them a good foundation in the basics.

As to Math, that was the area that I was the most scared of. I really struggled with Math as a child. I love Singapore Math. I don't know if it is the most rigorous, but I love the HIG. I didn't want a script, as if there was a question I might not know the answer. The Singapore HIG is teaching me math. There are 2-4 pages at the beginning of each unit that I can read through, it is helping to make me a better teacher, so it works really well for us. The few times my dh has taught a lesson, he doesn't bother with it as he is really good at math, but he is not our main teacher, I need the help.

When I am trying to pick a curriculum, I read what people are using on the board, look at the websites etc... Then I think about my ds, what are his strengths and weaknesses. Is this going to be easy enough to not make him hate a subject, while still teaching him and moving him forward. Then I look at my strengths and weakness. Is this a subject that I am comfortable with (writing, grammar etc) or one I need a lot of help with (Math, Science...?)

Finally, with a few things when I can not decide and I have it down to 2 choices, I let my ds look and make the final choice. It is always a better experience when he sees that his opinion matters.

#20 BBG580

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 08:53 PM

I did not mean this at all to be a conversation about CSMP, which is why I didn't name it. I only meant it to be an example of how one might define academic rigor in different ways.

If we put that particular program aside, what are you looking for in terms of rigor for any of the subjects that you listed. If we understand how you define rigor, it will be easier to come up with programs that fit your definition.


I see, sorry I dragged us off track.

I suppose I would think a program with decent academic rigor would challenge the student both conceptually and in core content. If you were thinking of a math program it would allow the student to master basic algorithms while also helping the child meet and understand concepts that are advanced. I've only used Miquon for a very short while but I think that program fits the bill of a rigorous program but at the same time I'm not sure if I would have the confidence to use it independently!

A good L/A program would require a child to write, read comprehensively, understand and successfully utilize standard grammar and learn new vocabulary.

A good history program would introduce historical data factually but also relate it to larger human themes, how we as human beings relate to the world around us and why the choices that have effected human history were made (whether for greed, the good of a people, etc.).

A rigorous science program would not only introduce children to the facts of the laws of science but also make them excited to explore the world around them. I've found that most science programs I've looked at disassociate the scientific theory from the excitement of our human lives and how it effects us. Biology seems to get it the most "right" but the areas of physics and chemistry can be too abstract and... boring... to create interest and long term learning connections.

Am I making sense here?

I also think the quote I posted from the other thread, upthread here, makes a good point. Are homeschool curricula companies marketing material at "down-level" simply to snag more customers? I understand that not all children will be on level 3 at 3rd grade but some universal standard benchmark of the average is helpful no matter what style and pace of learning a particular child takes.

Thanks for replying!

#21 Crimson Wife

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 09:07 PM

I can't speak to what is "the most" rigorous curricula, but programs I've seen that have impressed me as being "meaty" include:


  • Singapore Primary Math with the Intensive Practice and Challenging Word Problems books, and Singapore NEM
  • MEP
  • Russian Math
  • CSMP (I really wish I could figure out how to teach this one because I'm positive my DS would absolutely :001_wub: it)
  • Michael Clay Thompson's LA materials
  • CLE LA (wouldn't personally use them because of the Protestant POV but they do strike me as rigorous)
  • Don Killgallon's applied grammar/sentence-writing books
  • Ellen McHenry's science programs
  • Kolbe's literature programs :drool5:


#22 BBG580

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 09:14 PM

I can't speak to what is "the most" rigorous curricula, but programs I've seen that have impressed me as being "meaty" include:


  • Singapore Primary Math with the Intensive Practice and Challenging Word Problems books, and Singapore NEM
  • MEP
  • Russian Math
  • CSMP (I really wish I could figure out how to teach this one because I'm positive my DS would absolutely :001_wub: it)
  • Michael Clay Thompson's LA materials
  • CLE LA (wouldn't personally use them because of the Protestant POV but they do strike me as rigorous)
  • Don Killgallon's applied grammar/sentence-writing books
  • Ellen McHenry's science programs
  • Kolbe's literature programs :drool5:


Thank you!

#23 GretaLynne

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 09:17 PM

For the earliest grades, I think RightStart is a very rigorous and highly effective math curriculum. (Levels A and B)

For teaching reading and spelling fundamentals, I would vote for Spell to Write and Read.

I've only been using CLE Language Arts for a short time, but I am very impressed with it and think it is far more rigorous than anything else I have used at this general grade level (we are using 500).

I found Building Foundations of Scientific Understanding to truly accomplish what the title claims.

Latin Prep from Galore Park is also impressive.

#24 Staceyshoe

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 09:19 PM

Math - Singapore with CWP & IP. I think you can really stretch the mental challenge in this program if you use it to its full potential. (We're now doing CWP, IP, and many enrichment activities in the HIG.) It also has less review than many other programs.

Science - I keep hearing that BJU is pretty rigorous, esp in the middle and high school years.

L/A - I also hear R&S mentioned a lot in terms of rigor, but then I also hear that there is a lot of repetition. I guess it depends on how you define "rigor."



#25 Ray

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 09:33 PM

Err do you mean something like http://www.coreknowl...3&record_id=109

Top notch head stuffing; topics in their sequence far more rigorous or complete for standard school subjects than we pull off at our house... well not, everything math for example;)

Anyway think Core knowledge had already been mentioned but throwing in a link incase anyone wanted to check out the free sequence download.

#26 EKS

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 09:34 PM

I think that rigor comes less from curricula and more from the expectations of the teacher and if I, as a teacher, start relying too much on the curriculum to do the teaching, I know that my child is having a mediocre experience.

That said, I've found the following resources for the K-8 crowd to encourage what I would consider rigorous standards (I am only including materials that have output expectations associated with them):

Singapore math
Jacobs Algebra
CPO science
K12 literature
MCT language arts materials
Latin Prep

Other materials that I have really liked:

K12's Human Odyssey series
Getting Started with Latin
Cambridge Latin



Singapore math

#27 Halcyon

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 09:36 PM

I concur with EKS--rigor comes from implementation. I have a friend whose 6 year old is "whizzing" through SM, and has begun 3B, but she admits he doesn't do the CWP or IP and often makes errors. To me, this is not a rigorous application of Singapore. And I have friends who use one of those packaged Brain Quest books (the big, 'complete curriculum' ones) but she uses it as a guide and supplements with reading, narration, lots of library books, and quizzes and I think it's great--and cheap! She's applying a rigorous approach to a "curriculum" that many here would consider fluff. And she's saving hundreds of bucks to boot LOL.

That said, here are my top picks for rigor.

Math: Singapore with all the additions (CWP, IP) and Zaccaro's Primary Math added in for more perspective.

Latin: We are starting Latin Prep, which I've heard is meaty.

Grammar: this, I don't know. We use GWG and it's good, but we supplement with tests that I make up, lots of oral quizzing, and memory work. So in our house, it's meaty. I want to try CLE just to compare. We're secular, but I think I just want to see it, given the praise here on the boards.

Science: I have yet to find a program I love. I know there are religious programs that are considered rigorous, but we are secular. We tried BFSU, but I couldn't implement it consistently. We use ES, but I wouldn't call it rigorous, and my son wanted more diversity. So I've ended up creating my own curriculum based on Core Knowledge and so far it's working very well. I like the diversity; it keeps me and my kids interested and we linger on particular topics when they interest us (we're studying vertebrates now and for some reason my elder is fascinated by eagles. It's the first time he has become literally obsessed with learning about something. Nice feeling :))

Writing: Don Kilgallon's books are meaty. Combined with WWE3, we're happy on this front.

Now you've got me curious about Kolbe...link?

Edited by Halcyon, 25 February 2011 - 09:40 PM.


#28 BBG580

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 09:45 PM

Science: I have yet to find a program I love. I know there are religious programs that are considered rigorous, but we are secular.


I'm a very ardent and adherent Catholic Christian but I choose mostly secular homeschooling materials because: 1) I do not want to deal with tweaking and, 2) I think faith in Christianity is better modeled than instructed constantly.

With that said, I am also finding a serious lack in the science homeschool materials available. Most are religious and seem to have that as the focus which is particularly not what I am looking for especially if it is Young Earth based curriculum.

I do have BFSU and it looks good for my little kids but I really wonder about grades 3+ because I would not use Apologia and that is what seems to be largely recommended here at WTM forums.
  • SuzySparkle likes this

#29 Crimson Wife

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 09:54 PM

Kolbe's elementary lit, jr. high lit, and sr. high lit. I sure wish we had the budget for them!

#30 BBG580

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 10:00 PM

Kolbe's elementary lit, jr. high lit, and sr. high lit. I sure wish we had the budget for them!


I heard the choirs of heaven's angels when I looked at this! Wow!

#31 Cindyz

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 10:28 PM

We're only in level 1, but Phonics Road 1 seems rigorous for the intended age group. It requires logical thinking for marking the spelling words, weekly sentence formation using spelling words, reading and demonstrating comprehension through illustrations, grammar including capitalization, commas, abbreviations, and this week we are focusing on rules related to suffixes and prefixes (very intense week). I know it steps it up with literature studies in level 2 and I can't wait!!

#32 Testimony

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 10:45 PM

Math

Science

L/A

History

Geography

Foreign Language


Math: Singapore Math with Challenging word problems and Intensive Practice books (elementary level). Middle School level: Singapore Math's NEM.

Science: I think Apologia for younger ones. For me personally, I think that in the lower grades they should do more nature studies and just memorize science facts. In the upper grades, I think Apologia is strong.

L/A: I would say Classical Writing with Rod and Staff or Our Mother Tongue.

History: Tapestry of Grace

Geography: Bob Jones University Geography along with reading National Geographic Magazine. Those articles are so well written. I would copy them to improve my writing skills.

Foreign Language: I have done Latin with my sons. They do Latina Christiana and Henle. I think they are rigorous. I think that Wheelock Latin is the most rigorous program.

I forgot: most rigorous literature program: Ambleside Online!!


These are just my opinion.

Blessings,
Karen
www.homeschoolblogger.com/testimony

Edited by Testimony, 25 February 2011 - 10:47 PM.
forgot something


#33 Cindyz

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 10:46 PM

Kolbe's elementary lit, jr. high lit, and sr. high lit. I sure wish we had the budget for them!



What is the price range? The book store is down.

#34 guateangel

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 10:47 PM

For teaching reading and spelling fundamentals, I would vote for Spell to Write and Read.


:iagree:

DD's private school uses this. I can't wrap my brain around it but I do know other hs'n mom's who love it even though it took a couple of months of studying on their part in order to teach it.

#35 Crimson Wife

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 11:34 PM

What is the price range? The book store is down.


It's something like $150 for each of the study guides and they have a no-resale policy so you have to purchase it new. That's a lot for a single course.

#36 kristinannie

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 11:37 PM

I am going to use a lot of Kolbe Academy curricula because I have heard that they are rigorous and challenging (I also love that they are flexible because I could NEVER do anything 100%...hence my kids are not going to public school. I am obviously a control freak). :lol:

What is CSMP?

#37 GretaLynne

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 11:40 PM

I do have BFSU and it looks good for my little kids but I really wonder about grades 3+ because I would not use Apologia and that is what seems to be largely recommended here at WTM forums.


Just FYI, there is a second volume of BFSU out now for grades 3 - 5, and he is working on a third volume for grades 6 - 8.

Edited by GretaLynne, 25 February 2011 - 11:58 PM.


#38 GretaLynne

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 11:43 PM

:iagree:

DD's private school uses this. I can't wrap my brain around it but I do know other hs'n mom's who love it even though it took a couple of months of studying on their part in order to teach it.


I attended a seminar, and that really helped. Even so, I did not stick with it like I should have, because I got into a very relaxed homeschool group and decided it was too much. :rolleyes: One of my bigger homeschooling regrets.

#39 GretaLynne

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 11:45 PM

It's something like $150 for each of the study guides and they have a no-resale policy so you have to purchase it new. That's a lot for a single course.


:001_unsure:

Edited by GretaLynne, 25 February 2011 - 11:56 PM.


#40 blessedmom3

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 11:51 PM

Learning how to read/spell : Adventures in Phonics + their readers, + their spelling books ( Christian Liberty Press) , Phonics Pathways for children with difficulties or who need more practice
Math: Singapore + CWP + CLE (yes, all)
LA : R&S , BJU , Abeka or CLE LA
History: SOTW + tons of books
Science : Read and find out science for the younger, BJU for the older-gr. 5&up ( with DVD's)
Reading: Sonlight , Veritas Press, HOD lists

Overall for middle&High I really like BJU and consider it if I will homeschool again.

#41 G5052

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 12:11 AM

To be a rigorous homeschool parent you have to educate yourself and know how to expect a lot from your particular children. You don't have to have a fantastic education if you will make the effort to truly "get it."

I've taught homeschooled kids in local classes and at the local community college who have used many of the favorite curriculum choices on this board, and some remain poor writers and significantly behind in math for no other reason that I'm aware of other than a parent who didn't put the effort in. Of course curriculum helps, but it is often the teacher :001_smile:.

#42 Spy Car

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 03:30 AM

Math (actually used)

Miquon (especially when started in pre-K with a child having "fun" and a parent intent on educating him or herself on how to teach mathematics to a young child).

Singapore Math (including the Intensive Practice and Challenging Word problem books).

MEP Math.

Primary Grade Challenge Math

Math (prospective)

Russian Math 6

Art of Problem Solving

Language Arts (prospective)

Michael Clay Thompson (MCT)

Latin (prospective)

Latin Prep

Lingua Latina (with College Compendium)

Wheelock's (with Dale Grote's supplementary book)

Middle level American History (prospective)

The Drama of American History series by the Colliers brothers

Bill

#43 Hedgehogs4

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 09:12 AM

in answer to this question, I have to agree with everyone who said it is the teacher and not the curriculum who establishes "rigor." I had teachers in school who everyone hated because they were "hard" and there were other teachers down the hall teaching from the same books who were considered so cool because they were "easy"--translated, that meant that they let the kids goof off, gave easy tests, and didn't give a lot of homework. I hated those teachers because I was hungry to learn and felt that they wasted my time.

#44 Alessandra

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 09:48 AM

I agree with this, as we have used the same curriculum for years -- sometimes we are rigorous and sometimes relaxed, depending on outside events, etc.

I don't think you can really qualify many curricula as being more rigorous than the others. Teaching and expectations are what define excellence, not the program. In addition, different average students are going to have different experiences with various programs. You have to find the program that makes *your* student work hard, KWIM?


But I am also glad to see specific recommendations, like this, with a recommendation and a reason for the recommendation.

It's not designed for home school, but I think Latin Prep is pretty rigorous. It's used in private primary/middle schools that prepare children to go to elite schools such as Eton.

Laura



#45 lamamaloca

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 09:49 AM

It's something like $150 for each of the study guides and they have a no-resale policy so you have to purchase it new. That's a lot for a single course.


I think it is $150 for the course lesson plans which cover three years. They also have a set of study guide books, without pacing information, that is quite a bit less. I'd give them a call to check for sure.

#46 lamamaloca

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 09:55 AM

I know this is a tangent, sorry!

You can see Kolbe's catalog here, although it is the one from last year:
http://www.kolbe.org/catalog/

Here's a bit of info on the elementary literature program: http://www.kolbe.org...yLiterature.pdf
It is $150 for course plans that cover 3 years of elementary literature, from 4th - 6th grade.

but there is also a study guide set available (I found it under their fourth grade books section):

"Elementary Literature Study Guide Set
3 Book Set
NEW FOR 2009—Elementary Literature Study
Guide Set. Includes detailed chapter by chapter study
questions and vocabulary lists for each of the 41 books in a 2 book
set—a student book and a teacher book with answers—and a separate
glossary for looking up the vocabulary words. This set is good for all three
years of the elementary literature program!
3 Book Set T3930 $30.00"

This would be designed to be used alongside the course plans, but perhaps it could be used on its own?

#47 mommymilkies

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 10:02 AM

Just curious-does nobody consider FLL rigorous?

#48 texasmama

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 10:16 AM

Just curious-does nobody consider FLL rigorous?


I would, particularly at levels 3 and 4, given that they are intended for mid elementary-aged kids. That said, I have nothing to compare FLL to, as we found the program early and haven't used any others.

#49 lmrich

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 11:00 AM

Honestly I have to find a balance of rigor and ease of use and interest level. The kids and teacher/mom both have to love the curriculum to make it work. That being said I have found a few that fit bill for us -

Story of the World - completing a narration every week, adding a time line figure every week, doing an art project/cooking project every week, taking a test every week (starting in second grade), and adding in extra books makes this much more rigorous and relevant than just listening to the chapter on the way to dance class.

My eldest benefited greatly from Easy Grammar when I first brought home in fifth grade. He was able to quickly master grammar (he had very little in private school), and he was able to transition to Rod and Staff at his University Model School with excellence. Clearly Rod and Staff is considered to be more rigorous, but I think he would have been overwhelmed with it and needed the Easy Grammar approach to get started.

I think rigor starts with teacher expectations AND the tenacity a teacher has to get their students to the next level. We have to push and pull and prod. A good curriculum makes it easier, but really rigor is at the heart of the teacher.

#50 tracymirko

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 11:01 AM

Just curious-does nobody consider FLL rigorous?


I would consider any grammar before 3rd grade rigorous, since grammar is not traditionally taught earlier.



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