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texasmama

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texasmama last won the day on May 7 2016

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About texasmama

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  1. Oops! That’s what I get for reading and responding before coffee. Hopefully some of what I suggested is still applicable because there is a fair amount of overlap between ADD and ASD. And maybe someone else will glean something, as well.
  2. Yes to the above. Physical activity prepares the brain for academic activity. My ASD kid was a serious high school athlete. I think that saved us all. It’s different with an artist but these kids need to move their bodies prior to schoolwork.
  3. If he is a good speller, drop spelling. My kids were not doing formal spelling at this stage. I continued to read aloud some to my boys through middle school. Consider this approach for some of the lit or history. Keep most of the writing in Language arts and concentrate on preparing him for High school writing expectations. Build his tolerance to school slowly. Add a bit to the daily schedule every week. Make it meaningful work. My ASD son (now away at college) had to be convinced that work “made sense” or he sat like a mule during the teen years. I have a se
  4. This can be an effective approach for most people, on the spectrum or NT. As a related aside, much of traditional talk therapy techniques have been discarded in favor of short-term, solution-focused approaches. There are some neuroplasticity approaches that don’t even require the client to speak much of the experience or feelings. The past, feelings, and causality take a back seat to change to meet a client’s goals going forward. Motivational interviewing techniques pretty effectively point out client resistance to change in such a way that the insight is client-achieved, not impart
  5. It creates calm and then helps build new neural pathways to lock this in. My ds’s anxiety was severe so comparable to someone with a trauma history. Different cause but similar brain mechanism.
  6. Kbutton, thank you for your kind words! Miss it here and glad to visit when I can. ❤️
  7. My ds’s primary disabling condition is anxiety. Second to that is the deficient theory of mind that only allows him to see things from his perspective. Take heart, though! My ds has begun having progress in the area of theory of mind, though. I credit my relentless work over years with him (ha!) and, more recently, friendships with two sweet neurotypical girls his age who have helped him to see and feel another person’s point of view because he cares about them and sees them in emotional distress so wants to understand and support. Fabulous! ❤️
  8. Also, if there is a laundry list of concerns, it’s good to start with one that is easier to achieve success with so the kid experiences that success (and so do the parents) which can propel everyone forward another mile.
  9. Agreed with your last paragraph. My ds does very little of what we would choose for him to do (we have mostly given up on most expectations in the face of the mental health challenges), but he wanted to decrease his anxiety so this is what he works on in therapy. It’s a good place to start, both because he chose it and because the rest of life is pretty irrelevant if he is incapacitated by his mood disorders, which has happened and still does at times.
  10. Ahhh, the magic of non directive sand therapy play! A hard sell week after week with parents, though. 😄
  11. I have a similar kid (breakfast example). I can restate a simple, logical fact 1,000 times but he may not accept it. He is better at 19 than he was at 15, though. I took to telling him I had explained this many times and asking him to repeat my explanation. Saved me some breath and mental energy that way. The need to brush his teeth was one of those issues. $1,000 of cavities filled a couple of years ago helped some because his argument had been “But I don’t get cavities”. He still doesn’t always brush his teeth twice a day, though.
  12. Yes! A select ball coach who has done one on one training with ds just “gets” him and how to get the best out of him b-ball wise. He is an intuitive type who genuinely cares about kids. No training or experience with ASD at all - he just likes my kid and appreciates how hard he works at his game even when he is clearly working under a heavy burden due to sensory or anxiety issues.
  13. You’re good. Lol No, counselors are not specifically trained to work with clients with language disorders. That would be specialized training in addition to the typical track Testing is an entirely different area, and this also requires a lot of skill and ability to follow rabbit trails. SLPs also own a corner of the ASD treatment market for good reason. They are an invaluable part of a treatment team. What I found, both professionally and personally, is that treatment is as much an art as a science. What works for one person does not work for another. What worked last ye
  14. I’ve done plenty of low talk therapies with kids and teens using play, games, art, movement, active play (ball games), etc. A good therapist will meet a client where he is. Not all therapists are trained in or practice play-based therapies, and this one may not be. Finding a good fit in a therapist can be difficult. As a therapist who also has the experience of raising a kid on the spectrum to adulthood, I will say that my parenting experience enriched my skills as a therapist with the ASD population (and their parents) a thousand times over. My personal experience trumps a
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