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What's the minimum shoe I could get by with for a hike on Mount Rainier?


StaceyinLA
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Gonna do a camping trip with one of my dear friends in Mount Rainier in a few weeks when I move my dd to Seattle. She said the hiking isn't bad and if I don't want to spend money on hiking boots, I could get by with good tennis shoes. I do not own good tennis shoes, so I am wondering what I should purchase. Should I do a better tennis shoe, or a low-end hiking boot? I guess the bonus to the good tennis shoe is I could wear it at Disney later this year where the hiking boot might be overkill for that. ;-p

Edited by StaceyinLA
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Yeah shoes that fit well, the more traction the better. And my two cents is take a change of socks instead of getting waterproof shoes. If you're going through water, it gets in at the top anyway.

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um, which trail at Ranier?  I just did a trail last week that still had snow on it.  I was in hiking boots with poles and still couldn't finish the trail b/c of the snow/slippery conditions and wished I had my micro spikes with me.  This was a hike that started in paradise parking lot and i saw a lot of people struggling with tennis shoes.  I think the loop trail at Narada is still snow covered in spots.  I would suggest asking more details about this hike at Ranier.  If it's the trail of trees by the camping spot on the SE side it has no snow on it right now and it's easy, tennis shoe type stuff.  But hiking Ranier can be easy, all the way to expert/need a guide type stuff.  Ask more details before shoe shopping

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um, which trail at Ranier? I just did a trail last week that still had snow on it. I was in hiking boots with poles and still couldn't finish the trail b/c of the snow/slippery conditions and wished I had my micro spikes with me. This was a hike that started in paradise parking lot and i saw a lot of people struggling with tennis shoes. I think the loop trail at Narada is still snow covered in spots. I would suggest asking more details about this hike at Ranier. If it's the trail of trees by the camping spot on the SE side it has no snow on it right now and it's easy, tennis shoe type stuff. But hiking Ranier can be easy, all the way to expert/need a guide type stuff. Ask more details before shoe shopping

Not positive, but my friend works at Rainier as a guide (not positive if that's her exact title), and told me good tennis shoes would be fine. I'll check with her for sure about the snow, but I don't think we will be in those areas on our hikes. They were there a couple weeks ago, so I feel like if we were gonna do an area that still had snow, she'd let me know. At least she better! ;-p

Edited by StaceyinLA
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I wear tennis shoes to hike in.  It is hard for me to find a good hiking boot in my size/foot shape, whereas trainers come down small enough with the right support.  It means I stay off more difficult terrain and on the regular paths.  Though I did just discover a store that may fit my needs so hopefully I can get a pair of summer boots next year.

 

If you are doing challenging trails, I would highly suggest a good boot with waterproofing, though. 

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Oboz are great hiking shoes and the low cut ones work well too. They are a little heavy but I would really consider wearing them to disney too. They are a really good fit.

They look good! Do they run pretty true to size? I'm pretty sure I'm gonna get some of these.

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I usually just wear a general athletic shoe (mine have excellent arch support as well as metatarsal support)  - even for panorama point - without issue. with GOOD SOCKS!!!!!  with padding and moisture wicking. 

 

there are a lot of trails above paradise.  many are paved (until you get high enough).  be sure to bring water and sunscreen.  hmm, we're going down in august (dh is convinced this is the best time for wildflower meadows), I'll borrow 2ds water backpack - whatever it's called.

 

if you do camp muir (serious hike with elevation gain.  there will be snow) - splurge on *good* hiking boots.

http://skimountaineer.com/MtnWebCams/Rainier-MtnWebCams.html?size=med - links to rainier webcams. you can see the view from camp muir.  it's at 10,000' +. 

 

do myrtle falls - east of paradise lodge - easy, paved, not long - but I have a thing for waterfalls.  and dd painted tiles of the view that I have as risers on my stairs.

narada falls.. . .

 

if you can get to ohanapakosh (SE corner of the park) . . . do big tree grove.  it's an easy hike.  there's an island in the middle of the ohanapakosh river with trees that are 1000+ years old.

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I usually just wear a general athletic shoe (mine have excellent arch support as well as metatarsal support) - even for panorama point - without issue. with GOOD SOCKS!!!!! with padding and moisture wicking.

 

there are a lot of trails above paradise. many are paved (until you get high enough). be sure to bring water and sunscreen. hmm, we're going down in august (dh is convinced this is the best time for wildflower meadows), I'll borrow 2ds water backpack - whatever it's called.

 

if you do camp muir (serious hike with elevation gain. there will be snow) - splurge on *good* hiking boots.

http://skimountaineer.com/MtnWebCams/Rainier-MtnWebCams.html?size=med - links to rainier webcams. you can see the view from camp muir. it's at 10,000' +.

 

do myrtle falls - east of paradise lodge - easy, paved, not long - but I have a thing for waterfalls. and dd painted tiles of the view that I have as risers on my stairs.

narada falls.. . .

 

if you can get to ohanapakosh (SE corner of the park) . . . do big tree grove. it's an easy hike. there's an island in the middle of the ohanapakosh river with trees that are 1000+ years old.

Great info! I'm gonna screen shot this and show my friend. When in August will you be going down? Wonder if we could run into one another?

 

Also, can you recommend socks?

Edited by StaceyinLA
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If the trails are rocky, it could be more comfortable in low-cut hiking shoes with a firmer sole and uppers than running shoes. I find that runners/tennis shoes have such a soft sole that rocks tend to become uncomfortable on the bottom of my feet.  Also, my hiking shoes don't seem to get as wet as quickly as runners when walking on a little snow or in rain. They are a little heavier than my runners, but lighter than boots.

 

Enjoy your hike!! Hope you have great weather.

Edited by wintermom
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Great info! I'm gonna screen shot this and show my friend. When in August will you be going down? Wonder if we could run into one another?

 

Also, can you recommend socks?

 

we'll be there the 11th & 12th.   we're taking some friends for their first time camping.  I have no idea about any specific schedule at this time.  but it would be fun to "run into each other."  :D

 

there's an overlook on the south side (right off the main road up to paradise) which is a great spot for star/meteor watching.  the mt. blocks the light pollution from seattle.  not sure when the persieds are this year.

 

I love rainier - it's a massive mt.  it feeds me.. . .

 

get to paradise EARLY. the parking lot will fill up - especially on a nice weekend day.  it's about two hours from seattle.  (we go through orting, atomic and electron. passes northwest trek.  bypasses more heavily traveled roads and is just a more pleasant drive.  still enter through the nisqually entrance at the SW corner.)

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When you say "hike on Mt Rainier", are you talking about hiking on the lower parts of the slopes, or acutally getting on the summit?

I would not wear tennis shoes on a glacier. No way.

On the trails in the Mt Rainier area, until you get to snow, tennis shoes or lightweight hiking shoes are fine. But for the top, nope. Not enoguh traction on rock or snow.

Edited by regentrude
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When you say "hike on Mt Rainier", are you talking about hiking on the lower parts of the slopes, or acutally getting on the summit?

I would not wear tennis shoes on a glacier. No way.

On the trails in the Mt Rainier area, until you get to snow, tennis shoes or lightweight hiking shoes are fine. But for the top, nope. Not enoguh traction on rock or snow.

 

first time I've ever heard summitting rainier referred to as a "hike".  (a cousin of dsil is a climber, and did refer to the last few thousand feet of Everest as a "hike" (as opposed to the earlier technical climbing) - but he summitted it. so he can say whatever he wants.)  

 

camp muir is a day hike (and base station for those summitting) for serious hikers.

 

there are places on the upper trails that may still have snow - poles are useful.  I've crossed them (carefully) in athletic shoes.  dig in with heels when going down.

 

  it's been extremely dry and average around 80+ for the last month.  trails should mostly be good.

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After breaking my ankle, I am skittish about minimalism with shoes. If you are going to be buying in any case, I think get a good pair of hiking shoes, and break them in before you go. Also, if you have a lifestyle where you don't even have/need a good pair of tennis shoes, I think you should consult with your friend about your fitness level and what she, as a person who does it all the time, sees as a "not bad" hike. Going uphill can be a good deal harder than people who aren't used to it may anticipate.

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I live in the PNW, and this is my hiking shoe of choice:

 

http://www.keenfootwear.com/p/W-TARGHEE-II-WP.html?dwvar_W-TARGHEE-II-WP_color=1012244&cgid=activity_hiking_womens

 

I have owned pair after pair of these over the years and never had the slightest issue with any easy to moderate trail in the Cascades, including some around Mt. Rainier.  

 

Obviously, if you are planning to attempt a summit or are jonesing for a difficult trail with serious elevation gain, you need actual hiking boots.  

 

If you have weak ankles, I suggest boots all the way.  

Edited by LucyStoner
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I live in the PNW, and this is my hiking shoe of choice:

 

http://www.keenfootwear.com/p/W-TARGHEE-II-WP.html?dwvar_W-TARGHEE-II-WP_color=1012244&cgid=activity_hiking_womens

 

I have owned pair after pair of these over the years and never had the slightest issue with any easy to moderate trail in the Cascades, including some around Mt. Rainier.  

 

Obviously, if you are planning to a summit or to a difficult hike with serious elevation gain, you need actual hiking boots.  

 

These Keens are awesome! I am on my second pair.  I LOVE those for trail hikes and desert! (Not in snow though, because the sides are mesh)

 

In boulders and scree, I prefer a bit more ankle support and, most importantly, a stiffer sole. Also, with lose scree, you constantly have little stones in low cut shoes. I currently have, and love, this one:

https://obozfootwear.com/products/womens-bridger-mid-waterproof

Edited by regentrude
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After breaking my ankle, I am skittish about minimalism with shoes. If you are going to be buying in any case, I think get a good pair of hiking shoes, and break them in before you go. Also, if you have a lifestyle where you don't even have/need a good pair of tennis shoes, I think you should consult with your friend about your fitness level and what she, as a person who does it all the time, sees as a "not bad" hike. Going uphill can be a good deal harder than people who aren't used to it may anticipate.

This is a really good point!

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These Keens are awesome! I am on my second pair.  I LOVE those for trail hikes and desert!

 

In boulders and scree, I prefer a bit more ankle support and, most importantly, a stiffer sole. Also, with lose scree, you constantly have little stoenes in low cut shoes. I currently have, and love, this one:

https://obozfootwear.com/products/womens-bridger-mid-waterproof

 

How are the oboz for wider/larger feet (if you happen to know)?  I am in the market for new hiking boots (can't repair my Asolos any more).   The Keen boots for women don't work for my feet at all.  

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How are the oboz for wider/larger feet (if you happen to know)?  I am in the market for new hiking boots (can't repair my Asolos any more).   The Keen boots for women don't work for my feet at all.  

 

I have slender feet, but I have a toe condition that requires me to wear shoes with a wide toe box - that's why I love the Keens, and surprisingly, the Oboz offer a lot of room in the toes, too, even though they look slender. Also, I have to wear custom orthotics that take up extra space, and they fit well in the Oboz. So I would suspect that they should be fine for wider/larger feet.

 

One thing I love is the cushioning below the heel; I had trouble with other shoes, and asked the sales rep to help me find boots with the best cushioning on the bottom. 

They are insanely comfortable. I arrived in Portland last summer without boots, because I had realized while packing that my boots had a hole. Went from the airport straight to REI, bought the Oboz, and then hiked South Sister first thing, without breaking in the boots. 

 

ETA: I tried on the new Keen womens boots, and found them awful. Very narrow, not like the sandals or the Targhees at all.

Edited by regentrude
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I have slender feet, but I have a toe condition that requires me to wear shoes with a wide toe box - that's why I love the Keens, and surprisingly, the Oboz offer a lot of room in the toes, too, even though they look slender. Also, I have to wear custom orthotics that take up extra space, and they fit well in the Oboz. So I would suspect that they should be fine for wider/larger feet.

 

One thing I love is the cushioning below the heel; I had trouble with other shoes, and asked the sales rep to help me find boots with the best cushioning on the bottom. 

They are insanely comfortable. I arrived in Portland last summer without boots, because I had realized while packing that my boots had a hole. Went from the airport straight to REI, bought the Oboz, and then hiked South Sister first thing, without breaking in the boots. 

 

ETA: I tried on the new Keen womens boots, and found them awful. Very narrow, not like the sandals or the Targhees at all.

 

Thanks.  

 

yeah, I couldn't even get the new Keen women's ON my feet.  And size 11 so no room to size up.  I do have wide feet with a high arch but the boots are, as you say, NOTHING like the Targhees at all.  

Edited by LucyStoner
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I live in the PNW, and this is my hiking shoe of choice:

 

http://www.keenfootwear.com/p/W-TARGHEE-II-WP.html?dwvar_W-TARGHEE-II-WP_color=1012244&cgid=activity_hiking_womens

 

I have owned pair after pair of these over the years and never had the slightest issue with any easy to moderate trail in the Cascades, including some around Mt. Rainier.  

 

Obviously, if you are planning to attempt a summit or are jonesing for a difficult trail with serious elevation gain, you need actual hiking boots.  

 

If you have weak ankles, I suggest boots all the way.

 

  

These Keens are awesome! I am on my second pair.  I LOVE those for trail hikes and desert! (Not in snow though, because the sides are mesh)

 

In boulders and scree, I prefer a bit more ankle support and, most importantly, a stiffer sole. Also, with lose scree, you constantly have little stones in low cut shoes. I currently have, and love, this one:

https://obozfootwear.com/products/womens-bridger-mid-waterproof

Oh dear, this is probably just me, but that particular Keen model was a disaster for me. I liked them in the store, comfortable toe box felt spacious. But there was very little arch support (not usually an issue for me btw) and that really exacerbated an incipient case of plantar fasciitis. But I do know lots of people who love those boots.

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I usually just wear a general athletic shoe (mine have excellent arch support as well as metatarsal support) - even for panorama point - without issue. with GOOD SOCKS!!!!! with padding and moisture wicking.

 

there are a lot of trails above paradise. many are paved (until you get high enough). be sure to bring water and sunscreen. hmm, we're going down in august (dh is convinced this is the best time for wildflower meadows), I'll borrow 2ds water backpack - whatever it's called.

 

if you do camp muir (serious hike with elevation gain. there will be snow) - splurge on *good* hiking boots.

http://skimountaineer.com/MtnWebCams/Rainier-MtnWebCams.html?size=med - links to rainier webcams. you can see the view from camp muir. it's at 10,000' +.

 

do myrtle falls - east of paradise lodge - easy, paved, not long - but I have a thing for waterfalls. and dd painted tiles of the view that I have as risers on my stairs.

narada falls.. . .

 

if you can get to ohanapakosh (SE corner of the park) . . . do big tree grove. it's an easy hike. there's an island in the middle of the ohanapakosh river with trees that are 1000+ years old.

Yes, good socks. And sock liners (thin socks worn as a base layer) will help prevent blisters. Also -- no cotton socks. Another help is an off the shelf shoe liner, not the $$ kind you see in REI, but the Dr Scholls type you find in a local drugstore. Simple foam ones cost only a few dollars.

 

If you need new sneakers anyway, you might try buying some in a camping store. They will help you choose a tread that has good traction, and you can choose a look that you like for everyday use. I was just doing this over the weekend with ds -- his everyday sneakers were just too thin for a trip to Maine. He liked the camping store sneakers so much for fashion and comfort that we bought two pairs -- my idea, as they were far less expensive than his usual Adidas.

 

And before you set out, check the lacing of the sneakers. You can gain/lose comfort by having shoes tight/loose in the right places. This is just one of many articles you can find. And lacing your shoes is free!

 

https://www.backpacker.com/gear/common-hiking-boot-lacing-techniques

 

I've never been to Mount Rainier, but anytime I think of steep grades, up or down, I think hiking poles are a good idea. Don't buy any, but if someone offers to lend, say yes, lol. As well as helping you keep your balance, poles help you engage your core muscles, which means less strain on knees and feet.

Edited by Alessandra
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Yes, good socks. And sock liners (thin socks worn as a base layer) will help prevent blisters. Also -- no cotton socks. Another help is an off the shelf shoe liner, not the $$ kind you see in REI, but the Dr Scholls type you find in a local drugstore. Simple foam ones cost only a few dollars.

 

If you need new sneakers anyway, you might try buying some in a camping store. They will help you choose a tread that has good traction, and you can choose a look that you like for everyday use. I was just doing this over the weekend with ds -- his everyday sneakers were just too thin for a trip to Maine. He liked the camping store sneakers so much for fashion and comfort that we bought two pairs -- my idea, as they were far less expensive than his usual Adidas.

 

And before you set out, check the lacing of the sneakers. You can gain/lose comfort by having shoes tight/loose in the right places. This is just one of many articles you can find. And lacing your shoes is free!

 

https://www.backpacker.com/gear/common-hiking-boot-lacing-techniques

 

I've never been to Mount Rainier, but anytime I think of steep grades, up or down, I think hiking poles are a good idea. Don't buy any, but if someone offers to lend, say yes, lol. As well as helping you keep your balance, poles help you engage your core muscles, which means less strain on knees and feet.

 

ski poles from a thrift store can often work just as well.

 

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I got these. http://www.vasque.com/USD/product/womens-footwear/monolith-gargoyle-silvr-udry-07347

 

They are super light and give good ankle support without going high on your leg and being annoying.

 

Big toe box.

 

And I would totally wear these to Disneyland. So much support.

 

I liked other boots I saw on this thread. These worked for me. I got them last year after being very uncomfortable in tennis shoes at Sedona.

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I got these. http://www.vasque.com/USD/product/womens-footwear/monolith-gargoyle-silvr-udry-07347

 

They are super light and give good ankle support without going high on your leg and being annoying.

 

Big toe box.

 

And I would totally wear these to Disneyland. So much support.

 

I liked other boots I saw on this thread. These worked for me. I got them last year after being very uncomfortable in tennis shoes at Sedona.

Those look nice.

 

I got Vasque Talus boots, heavier, after plantar fasciitis got worse with Keen Targhee. The I felt guilty, because dd does more hiking than I do, so I got her Vasque Talus, which she prefers over Keens. I shall definitely look at the ones you suggested for lighter hikes. Thx.

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we'll be there the 11th & 12th. we're taking some friends for their first time camping. I have no idea about any specific schedule at this time. but it would be fun to "run into each other." :D

 

there's an overlook on the south side (right off the main road up to paradise) which is a great spot for star/meteor watching. the mt. blocks the light pollution from seattle. not sure when the persieds are this year.

 

I love rainier - it's a massive mt. it feeds me.. . .

 

get to paradise EARLY. the parking lot will fill up - especially on a nice weekend day. it's about two hours from seattle. (we go through orting, atomic and electron. passes northwest trek. bypasses more heavily traveled roads and is just a more pleasant drive. still enter through the nisqually entrance at the SW corner.)

We will be going a little later in the month, and during the week, so I guess we won't accidentally run into one another. My friend goes often from Seattle since she works there, so I'm just going along for the ride...

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After breaking my ankle, I am skittish about minimalism with shoes. If you are going to be buying in any case, I think get a good pair of hiking shoes, and break them in before you go. Also, if you have a lifestyle where you don't even have/need a good pair of tennis shoes, I think you should consult with your friend about your fitness level and what she, as a person who does it all the time, sees as a "not bad" hike. Going uphill can be a good deal harder than people who aren't used to it may anticipate.

Well, my reasoning for not having good tennis shoes isn't because I don't need them; I just wear the wrong shoes for activities (something that displeases my chiropractor). My friend isn't from the PNW, so she hasn't been doing this for too long. She says I'm in better physical shape than she is and should have no trouble doing the type of hikes we will be doing. We shall see...

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Okay so a couple of things she mentioned we might do:

 

Panorama Point along the skyline trail. She said it's snow free most of the way, with patchy snow from Glacier Vista to Pan Point where it gets snowy and we will turn around at that point if needed.

 

Myrtle Falls to Golden Gate?

 

Narada Falls, which is only about a 1/2 mile hike she said

Edited by StaceyinLA
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DH and I were just there a week ago for 3 days and hiked one snow covered trail out of Paradise, the Frozen Lake trail cutting back onto the Wonderland trail. There was quite a few sketchy spots on the Wonderland section but I'd imagine most would already have melted there. We just have tennis shoes and were fine, wish we have had trekking poles though to help on the slipping snow. We just took it slow and steady. Honestly the issues I had with lack of ankle support was when we "hiked" the Ape Cave upper trail the last day of our trip but that is in Mt St Helens area.

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Well, my reasoning for not having good tennis shoes isn't because I don't need them; I just wear the wrong shoes for activities (something that displeases my chiropractor). My friend isn't from the PNW, so she hasn't been doing this for too long. She says I'm in better physical shape than she is and should have no trouble doing the type of hikes we will be doing. We shall see...

 

the thing to remember if your hiking at paradise - you're also at elevation. you're starting at 5400'. and it does become noticeable especially as you go higher. - most of the trails are steep, but it's always nice.   I recall being in colorado springs (6400') - and walking around the USAFA - with signs all over with the symptoms of altitude sickness.

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Okay so a couple of things she mentioned we might do:

 

Panorama Point along the skyline trail. She said it's snow free most of the way, with patchy snow from Glacier Vista to Pan Point where it gets snowy and we will turn around at that point if needed.

 

Myrtle Falls to Golden Gate?

 

Narada Falls, which is only about a 1/2 mile hike she said

 

When I was there you hit solid snow at Glacier Vista and were not permitted past Panarama Point, same with going up from Myrtle Falls via Golden Gate about 1/2 mile up you would hit snow. Normally that is one entire loop. We had planned to hike all 6 miles of it but scrapped it and did Myrtle Falls, Narada Falls and then drove to Olympic to hike Staircase. I think knowing what I did if you are comfortable in tennis shoes then I wouldn't worry about getting new shoes just for the trip if they have a decent tread on them. Narada Falls is super easy. 2/10 straight down steps and 2/10 straigh back up.

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I forgot to put the specific shoe I have is the Asics Gel-Kahana if you want to look it up. It is a trail runner shoe so the comfort of a running shoe with the tread of a hiking shoe. I don't like boots they irritate my ankle. I actually had to buy another pair about a week before we left on our trip (we spent 10 days road tripping and hiking OR and WA 1500 miles and hiking 75) and I had no break in period, no blisters from my shoes. I did have trouble with one toe where is folds under my other toes but this is an ongoing thing and even happens when I wear hiking sandals.

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Thanks! I'll look those up also!

 

My friend said altitude won't be an issue and we won't be going on steep trails. She'll be working so we'll be staying to popular trails.

 

Now, to figure out how to be two days with no cell service and no way for my family to contact me in an emergency. This is so out of my "box."

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I forgot to put the specific shoe I have is the Asics Gel-Kahana if you want to look it up. It is a trail runner shoe so the comfort of a running shoe with the tread of a hiking shoe. I don't like boots they irritate my ankle. I actually had to buy another pair about a week before we left on our trip (we spent 10 days road tripping and hiking OR and WA 1500 miles and hiking 75) and I had no break in period, no blisters from my shoes. I did have trouble with one toe where is folds under my other toes but this is an ongoing thing and even happens when I wear hiking sandals.

They also have an Asics gel venture-5. Do you have any experience with that one? It's a little less expensive, but still says it has the grips.

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When I was there you hit solid snow at Glacier Vista and were not permitted past Panarama Point, same with going up from Myrtle Falls via Golden Gate about 1/2 mile up you would hit snow. Normally that is one entire loop. We had planned to hike all 6 miles of it but scrapped it and did Myrtle Falls, Narada Falls and then drove to Olympic to hike Staircase. I think knowing what I did if you are comfortable in tennis shoes then I wouldn't worry about getting new shoes just for the trip if they have a decent tread on them. Narada Falls is super easy. 2/10 straight down steps and 2/10 straigh back up.

when were you there?  may? I would definitely expect snow to close trails.  june?  august things should be pretty much open - especially if she's going the end of august.  (and the summer we're having.)

 

Thanks! I'll look those up also!

 

My friend said altitude won't be an issue and we won't be going on steep trails. She'll be working so we'll be staying to popular trails.

 

Now, to figure out how to be two days with no cell service and no way for my family to contact me in an emergency. This is so out of my "box."

 

if you get up high enough on the trails - you have cell service  ;)  . . . . . I remember hiking panorama point  (I was still below it) - and getting a cell phone call from my then tweens/teens wanting me to mediate something . . . .

https://www.nps.gov/mora/planyourvisit/trails-of-mount-rainier.htm is a link to SOME trails.  it is certainly not complete.

here's the trail snow report.   https://www.nps.gov/mora/planyourvisit/trails-and-backcountry-camp-conditions.htm includes date of the last snow report.  most of those were mid july or earlier.

at ohanapecosh - grove of the patriarchs and silver falls are both easy trails - and very worth it.  (short, gentle grades, with little elevation)  zero snow.

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Thanks! I'll look those up also!

 

My friend said altitude won't be an issue and we won't be going on steep trails. She'll be working so we'll be staying to popular trails.

 

Now, to figure out how to be two days with no cell service and no way for my family to contact me in an emergency. This is so out of my "box."

Altitude may be an issue depending on what you body is used to. I had a lot of trouble hiking Sunrise to Frozen Lake which started at 6400'. I started getting a migraine maybe not even 2/10 a mile into the trip but it was too pretty to turn around so I suffered through it. Paradise area starts at 5420' and goes to 6336' at Glacier Vista and 6800' at Panorama Pt. I'm not sure what would make that not steep lol you are walking constantly uphill for several miles. Although our most difficult hike in terms of going uphill was Snow Lake (eaten alive by mosquitoes). It was hiking up stairs carved into the hills over and over and over. Just when you think you must finally be at the top, yet another set of stairs.

 

 

They also have an Asics gel venture-5. Do you have any experience with that one? It's a little less expensive, but still says it has the grips.

Do you know what type of foot you have? Under, over, or neutral pronation? If you look it up on Asics website they have a chart which shows which type of shoe works for what foot. Other than that I think any trail runner will give you the tread you are looking for with the versatility of a tennis shoe. They are a bit heavier with the treads but I wear mine regularly to Disneyland and I find them comfortable and supportive for my foot. 

 

when were you there?  may? I would definitely expect snow to close trails.  june?  august things should be pretty much open - especially if she's going the end of august.  (and the summer we're having.)

 

 

if you get up high enough on the trails - you have cell service  ;)  . . . . . I remember hiking panorama point  (I was still below it) - and getting a cell phone call from my then tweens/teens wanting me to mediate something . . . .

https://www.nps.gov/mora/planyourvisit/trails-of-mount-rainier.htm is a link to SOME trails.  it is certainly not complete.

here's the trail snow report.   https://www.nps.gov/mora/planyourvisit/trails-and-backcountry-camp-conditions.htm includes date of the last snow report.  most of those were mid july or earlier.

at ohanapecosh - grove of the patriarchs and silver falls are both easy trails - and very worth it.  (short, gentle grades, with little elevation)  zero snow.

I was there July 16-18, a week ago. We stayed the 16th at Crystal Mountain resorts and the 17th at Paradise Hotel. Kind of a big pain because they were paving the whole Paradise parking lot and we had to move our cars by 7am. That whole area was a mess. I would expect Panorama Vista to be mostly clear by Aug but I think they are expecting beyond that to still be covered in snow.

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Thanks! I'll look those up also!

 

My friend said altitude won't be an issue and we won't be going on steep trails. She'll be working so we'll be staying to popular trails.

 

Now, to figure out how to be two days with no cell service and no way for my family to contact me in an emergency. This is so out of my "box."

I know I replied to this quote already but inside of Paradise Hotel there is a set of payphones you can use. I know they are going to start remodeling there so I don't know how that would affect the payphones but at least you could call out at some point if you didn't get signal anywhere else. We have Tmobile and the only other place we had a signal was at Crystal Mountain but that would be quite a drive if you didn't plan to go there.

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I know I replied to this quote already but inside of Paradise Hotel there is a set of payphones you can use. I know they are going to start remodeling there so I don't know how that would affect the payphones but at least you could call out at some point if you didn't get signal anywhere else. We have Tmobile and the only other place we had a signal was at Crystal Mountain but that would be quite a drive if you didn't plan to go there.

My friend says she calls out on the pay phones in the evenings. She said you could get some signal with Verizon, but I don't have Verizon, so I'm gonna be outta luck. I'm sure my family can go without talking to me for 36ish hours. I'll likely call them on the evening of our second day and check in.

 

It'll be strange to have no contact, but I'm thinking it's much needed and will be thoroughly enjoyable!l

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Another brand to consider:  I have a pair of Salomon trail runners that offer the kind of arch support I need. 

 

I loved those but the pull cable laces and me don't seem to last well together.  I'll never really forgive my last pair for crapping out on me while running the lakefront trail in Chicago.  The upside:  REI replaced them but I exchanged them for Keens instead of a third pair of Salomons.  It's really too bad because otherwise, I loved them.  

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So many different ones. Which style do you have? I could definitely use arch support, so that would be a plus.

 

This is the shoe I have:

 

https://www.rei.com/product/888922/salomon-x-ultra-low-2-gtx-hiking-shoes-womens

 

I pair these with Dirty Girl gaiters to help keep the grit out. My son is the serious hiker who recommended both brands.

 

I loved those but the pull cable laces and me don't seem to last well together.  I'll never really forgive my last pair for crapping out on me while running the lakefront trail in Chicago.  The upside:  REI replaced them but I exchanged them for Keens instead of a third pair of Salomons.  It's really too bad because otherwise, I loved them.  

Yeah, before we went hiking in Iceland I was worried about what might happen if the cable lacing failed.  I decided not to worry--all was well.  Not sure how this system works in the long run though as I have owned these shoes less than a year.

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