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Sebastian (a lady)

Annual Search for AP Exam Site Commiseration Thread

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So it's time to put hat in hand and start cold calling high schools looking for exam locations for AP tests again.

 

At least this year it's going to be local calls.  Last year we were moving around the same time as the exam registration.  So I was calling from one side of the country to the other side, with no idea where we would be living, trying to find hospitable exam locations.

 

This year we are newly arrived in another new state.  One course (Computer Science) is only offered in one high school on the island.  But at least the aren't doing Comparative Government this year.  That is only offered at one public high school in the state, and it's not on this island.

 

Not one public school in the state offere AP German or AP Latin.  Guess we'll be looking towards private schools for those.

 

I was actually mentally drafting an essay about this on the treadmill last week.  I was dwelling on the gap between equal access rhetoric with respect to these door opening exams and the reality that a student from many high schools may not have access to the exams that actually get them college credit.  There is a disproportionate impact against students who self-study, get outside tutors or who want to create small study groups independent of their high school's official structure.  When I was in high school, my district only offered one AP course (US History) and it was only offered at limited high schools with a cross town agreement from other district schools.  But I was allowed a release to travel to the other school to take the exam, based only on my work done in a non-AP honors course.  I did well enough to validate 2 semesters of US history in college.  But I don't feel like this would be encouraged or necessarily even allowed in most schools today.

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AP Course Ledger as an aid for those who are looking for schools that might be offering courses.  The course ledger can be misleading.  Sometimes schools will have courses listed as active, even if they don't have a class in a give year.  And it doesn't show schools that might order an exam for a course they aren't offering.  (These schools are gems.)

 

https://apcourseaudit.epiconline.org/ledger/

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I forgot that you were no longer on the mainland. I was going to tell you to head up my way and take advantage of the fact that our local high school offers most of the AP tests. I believe you can request a test be sent to the administrators even if it's not from a class that the school offers. For example, they don't do World History, but you could take the test.

 

 

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Ok, so in our part of the state, AP Human Geography is listed as being given at one charter school (another district), one public school (another district), one boys' private school (ds's alma mater btw), and one girls' private school. I know that the boys' and girls' schools cross-list some AP classes so it's probably only given at one of the two schools.

 

Deep breath.

 

Dnephew is studying APHG w dd. My sister was told by his public high school that he'd be able to take the exam at the public school that offers APHG. I'll have to check with her if his guidance counselor will arrange it or if she will have to do so.

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I forgot that you were no longer on the mainland. I was going to tell you to head up my way and take advantage of the fact that our local high school offers most of the AP tests. I believe you can request a test be sent to the administrators even if it's not from a class that the school offers. For example, they don't do World History, but you could take the test.

 

That would have been fun.  I found one public high school that offers both courses I need.  And Iolani (super exclusive private school) offers those two and also Latin, which I'll need next year.

 

The public schools are on break for a few more days. 

 

On the other hand, the local community college has been a dream to work with and Rutabaga is registered for his next math class. 

 

And it's a dreamy 70 degrees with a breezy tradewind blowing through my open windows.  (Trying to keep my glass half full.)

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One approach I've tried when all else failed--I've asked private schools if they would be willing to order and proctor the specific AP exam my kid plans to take.  I have usually ended up paying a proctoring fee on top of the CB imposed exam fee.  The proctoring/administration fee has not been insignificant but in our situation it is also the only option.  (and the fee is significantly less than the flying and hotel fees we'd incur for traveling to the exam)

 

I won't rant about equitable access or even suggest that this is a financially responsible option for all those desirous of a particular AP exam but it is an option.  It does require being proactive and starting early.

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Yes, I went through this last year with AP Latin.  I seriously called probably three dozen schools when it was all over because even after I got one to agree, I kept calling until I got the confirmation letter from them because I was so wrung out by then and didn't want to lose out.  We had invested so much to get there.

 

Part of it was that the handful who do offer it every year sent in their packets in December, and I was calling in January.  None of high schools in my county or the immediate surrounding ones would order it for an outside student.  All of the private schools in those counties turned me down.

 

I ended up with a distant Catholic school that was going to charge a proctor fee plus an interview with me and a background check and written references for my student.  Sigh.  And a distant public school (an hour away). We went to the distant public school.

 

The high school I went to offered AP exams in English, Calculus, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, German, French, Spanish, and History (don't remember which one). Now I know how unusual that was!

 

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Couldn't get through to the private school. I decided to start with them in hopes of building a bridge for next year when I need the AP Latin exam.

 

I need to add fruity drink mix, rum and paper umbrellas to my grocery list.

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One approach I've tried when all else failed--I've asked private schools if they would be willing to order and proctor the specific AP exam my kid plans to take.  I have usually ended up paying a proctoring fee on top of the CB imposed exam fee.  The proctoring/administration fee has not been insignificant but in our situation it is also the only option.  (and the fee is significantly less than the flying and hotel fees we'd incur for traveling to the exam)

 

I won't rant about equitable access or even suggest that this is a financially responsible option for all those desirous of a particular AP exam but it is an option.  It does require being proactive and starting early.

 

This is the only way I've been able to find a test site. I already have a private school committed for this years exam, although this thread reminded me it was time to touch base again.

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And it's a dreamy 70 degrees with a breezy tradewind blowing through my open windows.  (Trying to keep my glass half full.)

 

Ok, I'm officially jealous... (of the quoted part)  

 

Good luck finding an AP testing site.

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AP Course Ledger as an aid for those who are looking for schools that might be offering courses.  The course ledger can be misleading.  Sometimes schools will have courses listed as active, even if they don't have a class in a give year.  And it doesn't show schools that might order an exam for a course they aren't offering.  (These schools are gems.)

 

https://apcourseaudit.epiconline.org/ledger/

thanks for the link

What does a -- versus a 1 mean?

A school I was looking at has -- for the APUSH this school year 2014-15 but has a 1 for all the previous years listed.

Did schools have to get re-approved for the redesigned test? Did they know that?

 

Can a school offer an AP test without the associated approved course?

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thanks for the link

What does a -- versus a 1 mean?

A school I was looking at has -- for the APUSH this school year 2014-15 but has a 1 for all the previous years listed.

Did schools have to get re-approved for the redesigned test? Did they know that?

Schools had to re-approved and would have received many, many emails about the process. (I know because I was approved for the old Physics B and received all the emails about the changeover to the new Physics 1 and 2.)

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thanks for the link

What does a -- versus a 1 mean?

A school I was looking at has -- for the APUSH this school year 2014-15 but has a 1 for all the previous years listed.

Did schools have to get re-approved for the redesigned test? Did they know that?

 

Can a school offer an AP test without the associated approved course?

If I remember correctly the number indicates how many approved syllabi the school has for that course. Usually it's just 1, but a large school might have more than one class of an AP course (for example two different AP English Lit courses) or multiple teachers who have approved syllabi and the school decides each year who teaches the actual course.

 

A dash means there isn't an approved syllabus for the year. They might not be offering the course. Or they might not have submitted their syllabus yet. The deadline is the end of Jan.

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The key to taking an AP exam here for a subject not taught at the high school is to contact guidance in early January and pay the fees by the deadline which for us is late Jan. The school will offer a proctored seat for anyone, even if only 1 person is taking a particular exam and they self studied. Unless there is a wave of homeschooled students, the auditorium is not going to be filled with test takers.

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Couldn't get through to the private school. I decided to start with them in hopes of building a bridge for next year when I need the AP Latin exam.

 

I need to add fruity drink mix, rum and paper umbrellas to my grocery list.

 

You are a hard, cruel woman. It's sunny and below 40 degrees here.

 

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You are a hard, cruel woman. It's sunny and below 40 degrees here.

 

 

We moved the week of Christmas, have only loaner furniture, have no idea when our shipments will arrive, cannot fit everything into this house anyway, and will (maybe? hopefully?) be moving into more permanent (and larger) quarters in eight months (yea, three moves in 18 months).  

 

I'm feeling very global nomadish and I am trying to fasten on to what joy I can.  Were I back on the east coast, I'd be buying sleds for the whole gang.  Here I'm counting the hours until the pool opens.

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We moved the week of Christmas, have only loaner furniture, have no idea when our shipments will arrive, cannot fit everything into this house anyway, and will (maybe? hopefully?) be moving into more permanent (and larger) quarters in eight months (yea, three moves in 18 months).  

 

I'm feeling very global nomadish and I am trying to fasten on to what joy I can.  Were I back on the east coast, I'd be buying sleds for the whole gang.  Here I'm counting the hours until the pool opens.

 

I was thinking about you the other day when I was wrapping up an AP syllabus.

 

It seems like you didn't even have a chance to really get settled from the last move.

 

:grouphug: Enjoy the pool and I hope it all settles down for your family soon. Unless of course, you LIKE living on the edge?!

 

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One approach I've tried when all else failed--I've asked private schools if they would be willing to order and proctor the specific AP exam my kid plans to take.  I have usually ended up paying a proctoring fee on top of the CB imposed exam fee.  The proctoring/administration fee has not been insignificant but in our situation it is also the only option.  (and the fee is significantly less than the flying and hotel fees we'd incur for traveling to the exam)

 

I won't rant about equitable access or even suggest that this is a financially responsible option for all those desirous of a particular AP exam but it is an option.  It does require being proactive and starting early.

 

Our local public school seems to be willing to do this.  We've not gotten there yet but in my meeting with the principal and vice-principal, they stated that they would be willing to order any AP exam that dd wanted to take.  They didn't mention any fees but I offered to pay a proctoring/administrative fee.

 

Starting next year, we'll see if they stay true to their promises.  (Crossing fingers...)

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If I remember correctly the number indicates how many approved syllabi the school has for that course. Usually it's just 1, but a large school might have more than one class of an AP course (for example two different AP English Lit courses) or multiple teachers who have approved syllabi and the school decides each year who teaches the actual course.

 

A dash means there isn't an approved syllabus for the year. They might not be offering the course. Or they might not have submitted their syllabus yet. The deadline is the end of Jan.

thanks I submitted a similar question to the AP folks and got this canned response instead which may be helpful to others since I am not looking this year for AP exams.

===========  from the AP Collegeboard ===================

Homeschooled students or students who attend a school that does not offer AP, can still take the exams by arranging to take the exam at a participating school. 

 

Please be advised that it is too early to know which schools will be administering AP Exams in 2015. In January 2015, you can:

• Call AP Services 1 (866) 444 - 5460 to get the names and phone numbers of local AP Coordinators. Prepare a list of the exams you plan to take before you make the call so that we can locate the appropriate coordinators for you.

 

Once you receive the AP coordinators identified by AP Services, you will need to contact them no later than March 16th.

When calling AP coordinators to arrange testing, make sure to tell them:

• You are trying to locate a school willing to administer exams to homeschooled students or students from schools that do not offer AP.

• You will use a different school code so your exam score(s) will be reported separately from the school at which you test. (Homeschooled students will use the state homeschool code provided by the Coordinator on the day of the exam; students attending schools will use their school code.)

• The exams you plan to take.

 

Once you locate a school willing to administer the exams, that school's AP Coordinator is responsible for ordering your exam materials, telling you when and where to appear for the exams and collecting your fees. (Please note that the school may elect to charge a higher exam fee in order to offset additional proctoring or administration costs.) That school must administer the exams for you; they cannot forward the exam material to you or your school for handling.

We apologize for any inconvenience that this may cause.

For further information or assistance, please feel free to call us at 1 (888) 225-5427 (Domestic), 001 (212) 632 - 1780 (International), Monday through Friday, from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) or visit us at http://apstudent.collegeboard.org/exploreap.

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So it's time to put hat in hand and start cold calling high schools looking for exam locations for AP tests again.

 

At least this year it's going to be local calls.  Last year we were moving around the same time as the exam registration.  So I was calling from one side of the country to the other side, with no idea where we would be living, trying to find hospitable exam locations.

 

This year we are newly arrived in another new state.  One course (Computer Science) is only offered in one high school on the island.  But at least the aren't doing Comparative Government this year.  That is only offered at one public high school in the state, and it's not on this island.

 

Not one public school in the state offere AP German or AP Latin.  Guess we'll be looking towards private schools for those.

 

I was actually mentally drafting an essay about this on the treadmill last week.  I was dwelling on the gap between equal access rhetoric with respect to these door opening exams and the reality that a student from many high schools may not have access to the exams that actually get them college credit.  There is a disproportionate impact against students who self-study, get outside tutors or who want to create small study groups independent of their high school's official structure.  When I was in high school, my district only offered one AP course (US History) and it was only offered at limited high schools with a cross town agreement from other district schools.  But I was allowed a release to travel to the other school to take the exam, based only on my work done in a non-AP honors course.  I did well enough to validate 2 semesters of US history in college.  But I don't feel like this would be encouraged or necessarily even allowed in most schools today.

I'm on the hunt as well...thanks for reminding me. 

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I feel so blessed that our local public school will order and proctor any test my ds has wanted to take.  They do offer some of the AP classes my son has tahen (AP Chen, AP Physics B, and AP Calc), but they do not offer others that my son has taken (AP Comp Sci, AP Latin, and AP Physics C [this year]).  The only fee we have to pay is the fee for the test.  I have always asked about it in August....way before the school would need to know to order the test to make certain they would proctor the exam.   I kjust sent an e-mail to the VP at our local high school to remind him that he will need to order the tests for ds.  I hope everyone that needs to find a seat will find one easily!!!!

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I also feel lucky that our local high school has already told me they frequently get homeschoolers taking AP tests there...we just have to come in, pay the test fee, and register.  Sounded like no big deal at all for them.

 

 

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I don't understand why only high schools administer AP Exams. You would think some of the for-profit testing centers could administer them. Sure they would charge you, but you would be a customer, and they would make it hassle free. I took the GRE at a Prometric center, they were a well oiled testing machine...

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I don't understand why only high schools administer AP Exams. You would think some of the for-profit testing centers could administer them. Sure they would charge you, but you would be a customer, and they would make it hassle free. I took the GRE at a Prometric center, they were a well oiled testing machine...

College Board is very restrictive about test conditions.

 

There are some areas where schools are handing exam registration and proctoring over to a contractor. We saw this in Southern California where a couple small districts and several expensive private school used the same company.

 

But the schools have to be sure test conditions meet CB requirements. There was a school a couple years ago that had a set of scores voided because the students sat on opposite sides of round tables (where they migh have signaled each other) instead of in rows at a proscribed min distance apart.

 

I personally wish that testing and registration was handled more like the SAT.

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College Board is very restrictive about test conditions.

 

There are some areas where schools are handing exam registration and proctoring over to a contractor. We saw this in Southern California where a couple small districts and several expensive private school used the same company.

 

But the schools have to be sure test conditions meet CB requirements. There was a school a couple years ago that had a set of scores voided because the students sat on opposite sides of round tables (where they migh have signaled each other) instead of in rows at a proscribed min distance apart.

 

I personally wish that testing and registration was handled more like the SAT.

 

And we just got word at school that the testing rules are even stricter this year than last in terms of seating arrangements. I don't know exactly what the changes are, but I know our AP Coordinator was not happy. 

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I thought this was going to be relatively easy as we live in an area with a huge PS that offers every AP.  They said they won't accept any homeschoolers.  :confused1:

So, if we are fortunate, we will be going 2 or 3 different places.

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And we just got word at school that the testing rules are even stricter this year than last in terms of seating arrangements. I don't know exactly what the changes are, but I know our AP Coordinator was not happy.

Ah that may explain the one school I talked to wanting to wait to see if they had room. I'd still like to use them because they offer Latin and I'd like to establish a relationship.

 

Good thing we aren't up to AP level in a living language. They said they don't accept anyone from outside for language exams that require a computer for listening or recording.

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College Board is very restrictive about test conditions.

 

There are some areas where schools are handing exam registration and proctoring over to a contractor. We saw this in Southern California where a couple small districts and several expensive private school used the same company.

 

But the schools have to be sure test conditions meet CB requirements. There was a school a couple years ago that had a set of scores voided because the students sat on opposite sides of round tables (where they migh have signaled each other) instead of in rows at a proscribed min distance apart.

 

I personally wish that testing and registration was handled more like the SAT.

personally I wouldn't want to sit across from someone - too distracting so that is good rule

allowing testing centers which meet the conditions should be an alternative  - the days when everyone goes to the local public high school are gone with home-school, charter schools, virtual schools, etc 

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I thought this was going to be relatively easy as we live in an area with a huge PS that offers every AP.  They said they won't accept any homeschoolers.  :confused1:

So, if we are fortunate, we will be going 2 or 3 different places.

 

Oh, no!  I hope you can find the place(s) you need without too much trouble. 

 

It is crazy how much the degree of AP testing-friendliness-to-homeschoolers varies. 

 

And reading this thread makes me determined to register my daughter for her test sooner, rather than later.  She'll be taking AP English language, which I think is a popular test.  I never even thought about the possibility that they might run out of seats. 

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I thought this was going to be relatively easy as we live in an area with a huge PS that offers every AP. They said they won't accept any homeschoolers. :confused1:

 

 

Oh, no!!  I am so sorry.  It really irks me that we all pay taxes, yet they deny a seat in a test.  I can understand if they don't offer the course and would need to get a special proctor (although as I mentioned before our local high school has been more than willing to proctor all tests).  I wonder if this is something that should be addressed with the school board (if you have one). 

 

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But the schools have to be sure test conditions meet CB requirements. There was a school a couple years ago that had a set of scores voided because the students sat on opposite sides of round tables (where they migh have signaled each other) instead of in rows at a proscribed min distance apart.

 

 

 

I remember this incident.  The CB ended up punishing the students by voiding their scores when it's pretty clear they were not at fault.  Why didn't the CB punish the school?  

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I thought this was going to be relatively easy as we live in an area with a huge PS that offers every AP.  They said they won't accept any homeschoolers.  :confused1:

So, if we are fortunate, we will be going 2 or 3 different places.

 

Perhaps you need to re-assess who at the school you have been speaking with?  Sometimes you get an automatic "no" from someone lower down but the person who has the power to change things is a totally different.  You could work your way up to the administration or even whoever in your district has interaction with homeschoolers.  I've had friendly AP coordinators, needed to talk to the actual person though-not the secretary, I've also worked with district superintendents and in one district a special department for homeschooling at the administrative level.  Someone there might be able to help.

 

Best of luck-it can be frustrating.  Our current go to is with a private school and we are probably set for this year and next year since they have already accepted us.  But we reinvent the wheel every time since they have a new AP coordinator every year-fortunately they tend to follow what was done the year before.  My freshman will end up having to take APs in 3 locations before graduating.  I'm confident of the current situation, fairly confident of the second location as we've used it before, and the 3rd (his senior year) is a total unknown.

 

I do wish CB gave high schools a requirement to offer AP exams to students (from their district or local area at the least) who are unable to sit the exam at their own school.  I think any justification of why the status quo exists should be failing due to the use of so many CB approved online courses, state virtual academies, etc.

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The issue of testing access is a major issue with online classes. Even if they are an official state DOE contracted virtual school, there is no guarantee than the student will be able to sit for the exam.

 

So far my kids have only taken AP exams for courses I wrote. But I wonder if online and virtual schools prompt students to arrange exams in a timely way.

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Oh, no!  I hope you can find the place(s) you need without too much trouble. 

 

It is crazy how much the degree of AP testing-friendliness-to-homeschoolers varies. 

 

And reading this thread makes me determined to register my daughter for her test sooner, rather than later.  She'll be taking AP English language, which I think is a popular test.  I never even thought about the possibility that they might run out of seats. 

 

I agree about registering sooner than later.  I started making calls this past fall which is how I found out about our local school's policy.

 

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Perhaps you need to re-assess who at the school you have been speaking with?  Sometimes you get an automatic "no" from someone lower down but the person who has the power to change things is a totally different.  You could work your way up to the administration or even whoever in your district has interaction with homeschoolers.  I've had friendly AP coordinators, needed to talk to the actual person though-not the secretary, I've also worked with district superintendents and in one district a special department for homeschooling at the administrative level.  Someone there might be able to help.

 

Best of luck-it can be frustrating.  Our current go to is with a private school and we are probably set for this year and next year since they have already accepted us.  But we reinvent the wheel every time since they have a new AP coordinator every year-fortunately they tend to follow what was done the year before.  My freshman will end up having to take APs in 3 locations before graduating.  I'm confident of the current situation, fairly confident of the second location as we've used it before, and the 3rd (his senior year) is a total unknown.

 

I do wish CB gave high schools a requirement to offer AP exams to students (from their district or local area at the least) who are unable to sit the exam at their own school.  I think any justification of why the status quo exists should be failing due to the use of so many CB approved online courses, state virtual academies, etc.

 

DH offered to take it to the principal of the local high school.  It is so frustrating because many of the private schools either don't have seating available or they don't offer these AP classes.  I told DD that I need to figure this out before she enrolls in Physics C for Fall 2015 and expends that effort because it is near impossible to find schools that offer that around here.

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FYI~ I signed DD up for an AP exam last year only to have her turned away the day before the exam because another student at the school signed up late and took my DD's spot. DD did take the exam on the make-up day several weeks later, but it did cause her some anxiety. Finding a school that offers Computer Science A this year is going to be hard.  :glare:

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I'm commiserating with you. Even AP testing service seems unable to help me. Best wishes to us!

 

ETA: A little bit of good news. I was able to find a school for Calc BC.

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Woo hoo.  I got a yes for one course from the first public school I called.  Good thing too, because they are the only school in the county listed as having the course.

 

Alas, they aren't offering the other course this year.  So back to my list.

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When I first started this process, I discovered the closest public hs wouldn't take any outside testers, because they take their headcount in September-- Their students have to decide in September whether they are going to take the test in May. Then the count is closed. Those students who change their minds later in the year and want to take the test are out of luck at their school.

We found another public hs a few towns away that offers 30 tests -- is that all of them? -- and happily takes the other ps students who decided later in the year to take the test, or who forgot to sign up or whose school doesn't offer the tests. The test coordinator is a lovely woman, very easy to work with. She will take testing requests up until the last minute in March. During the tests, the parking lot at that school is packed. They turn a resource building over to the tests, and hundreds of kids are lined up to go in in the mornings and at noon. It's kind of chaotic, but they seem to get everyone sorted. They seem to group the kids by school.

I wonder if the schools get a cut of the fees.

Maria

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I wonder if the schools get a cut of the fees.

Maria

 

Locally they don't.

 

This is why the local head of the guidance department told me that they won't order tests that their own aren't taking. He has to find someone to proctor it, potentially taking a teacher or an aid out of the classroom. They can't take credit for the scores because they're not reported to that school (there's a different homeschool code). There's no benefit for them at all to test students that aren't their own.  The headmasters of both local prep schools told me the same thing.  There's zero benefit for them even if they're already offering it, so they don't do it.

 

The public school guidance head told me that the superintendent requires that they provide for external students for the exams they're already offering, but it is up to those students to figure out when and how to register. The state regulation is vague, just saying that public schools are supposed to provide for homeschooled students to take them.  

 

They don't make any effort to publicize this other than a sentence in the letters that come back in the summer when you register to homeschool.  All it says is that the high schools offer AP Exams and to contact them.

 

It really is a bum rap, but homeschooled students are a small fraction of the students who take AP exams every year.  I don't see the College Board making big changes to help a relatively small group. Of all my local homeschool friends, I only know of one other family who did one or more AP's last year.

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No, they do not. It goes to the College Board.

 

This is why the local head of the guidance department told me that they won't order tests that their own aren't taking. He has to find someone to proctor it, potentially taking a teacher or an aid out of the classroom. They can't take credit for the scores because they're not reported to that school (there's a different homeschool code). There's no benefit for them at all to test students that aren't their own. The headmasters of both local prep schools told me the same thing. There's zero benefit for them even if they're already offering it, so they don't do it.

 

The public school guidance head told me that the superintendent requires that they provide for external students for the exams they're already offering, but it is up to those students to figure out when and how to register. The state regulation is vague, just saying that public schools are supposed to provide for homeschooled students to take them.

 

They don't make any effort to publicize this other than a sentence in the letters that come back in the summer when you register to homeschool. All it says is that the high schools offer AP Exams and to contact them.

 

It really is a bum rap, but homeschooled students are a small fraction of the students who take AP exams every year. I don't see the College Board making big changes to help a relatively small group. Of all my local homeschool friends, I only know of one other family who did one or more AP's last year.

I think the changes will come as more students take courses online and then cannot find a way to take the exams. I agree that homeschoolers are a very small group of what is already a small segment of high schoolers.

 

I was pleasantly surprised to get a pretty good reception at the public schools I called. I already have one yes and the other school is checking into the process.

 

It does make me concerned for next year when Latin will be needed. Only one school offers Latin. I would be so disappointed if four years of prep and hard work were for naught.

 

Fwiw schools are allowed to charge extra for non-registered students. I also make a point of saying that I realized we may have to pay. Some districts cover the cost of the exam. That could make them hesitate to let others test. Last year we paid $125 for one exam, with the contract registration company keeping the $36 overage. I don't know if they got room space at the schools as part of the contract or if they had to pay rental fees. Some exams were actually given at the fairgrounds with students from multiple districts and several private schools all at the same site. It's an interesting model.

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In case it helps anyone else. This is the company that helped us find a seat for Comparative Government last year. http://aptestservice.com/about-2/

 

I was intrigued to find out that the school the test was held at didn't offer Ap Comp Gov. But they were doing a lot of other tests and were willing to make a couple other rooms available. So every student taking the Comp Gov test was from somewhere else and at least a few others were testing based on self study.

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It does make me concerned for next year when Latin will be needed. Only one school offers Latin. I would be so disappointed if four years of prep and hard work were for naught.

 

Check the college that your kids might attend. They might use SAT 2 subject test scores for Latin credit. For example, UT Austin awards credit for Latin and Physics based on SAT subject tests and their intro composition class based on SAT or ACT writing scores. Even if a school doesn't use SAT subject tests, they'll often offer language testing for placement and allow you to place out of the language requirement if you score high enough.

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Check the college that your kids might attend. They might use SAT 2 subject test scores for Latin credit. For example, UT Austin awards credit for Latin and Physics based on SAT subject tests and their intro composition class based on SAT or ACT writing scores. Even if a school doesn't use SAT subject tests, they'll often offer language testing for placement and allow you to place out of the language requirement if you score high enough.

 

These are good suggestions.  And I was thinking of having my kids take the SAT Subject Test in Latin in any event.  And I actually tested out of a year of German based on the departmental assessment at my college.

 

But neither of those options replace the credential that AP represents.  We are doing AP courses and exams, not to rack up college credit, but as a means of quantifying for outside observers some of the level of difficulty of courses my kids are working through.  I am often the person designing what we do in English or history.  I think it is helpful to have a few markers of the quality of the work, so that other courses with no outside grade can be evaluated within the context of the other work completed.

 

 

And to be honest, it just bugs me that a credential that has become something of the mark of the most rigorous courses taken in high school, with rankings of high schools nationally based in large part on the AP courses offered, can be so difficult for students outside those schools to access.  For me that is a real equity issue.  

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How much work is it to be an AP coordinator?  Is this something that a well-organized co-op could do?  I know there are restrictions on the coordinator -- it can't be someone whose child is taking the test that year.  Could a co-op hire an existing public school AP coordinator to act at AP coordinator for the co-op?

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How much work is it to be an AP coordinator?  Is this something that a well-organized co-op could do?  I know there are restrictions on the coordinator -- it can't be someone whose child is taking the test that year.  Could a co-op hire an existing public school AP coordinator to act at AP coordinator for the co-op?

 

Unless something has changed, you have to be an accredited bricks-and-mortar school, and there is indeed a process for being approved. The other problem is that everyone takes a particular test at a particular time on a particular day, nation-wide.  So if a public school coordinator was giving the AP Latin exam on the expected Thursday afternoon at their school, they couldn't exactly dash out to give it two places at once.  I can't imagine why someone would take personal leave to give it elsewhere either.

 

The only way you can give it on an alternate day is if there is a natural disaster or some other major problem that prevents the school from giving it, and there are very strict rules for how that is handled.

 

The College Board is just as strict on the SAT I and SAT II.  Homeschool groups aren't able to give those either.  Maybe in time they'll change, but not yet.

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Even if a school doesn't use SAT subject tests, they'll often offer language testing for placement and allow you to place out of the language requirement if you score high enough.

 

This is a good point.  Many colleges often administer their own challenge exams.  These exams are used to allow students to place out of courses not covered by AP or CLEP exams.  Sometimes they give credit for the course, but sometimes they don't.

 

If your student wants to receive credit for an AP or other test, be aware that he/she may need to take an exam confirming placement, usually given just before the fall semester begins.  This happens a lot with math classes at engineering schools.  When ds went to engineering school, he had to pass math placement test to be able to take Calc II even though he received a 5 on the Calc AB exam.  Many students earn 4s & 5s on Calc exams but do not pass the placement tests.  Perhaps they forget over the summer?

 

Make sure you carefully check with the college, and carefully consider whether advanced placement or standing is a good fit for your student.

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